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Canadian Rail 383 1984

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Canadian Rail 383 1984

Canadian Rail B
No. 383
NOVEMBER
DECEMBER 1984

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–.
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–.
NAI)
Published bi-monthly by the Canadian Railroad
Historical Association P.O Box 148 St. Constant P.Q.
JOL IXO. Subscription rates $21.20
(US funds if outside Canada)
IL
ISSN 0008-4875
EDITOR: Fred F Angus
CO-EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A Germanluk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
FRONT COVER
A BIRKENHEAD-TYPE 4-4-0 of the Grand
Trunk Railway pushing a snow plough
during the winter of 1867 -68.
INSIDE FRONT COVER
TWO VIEWS OF A G.T.R. SNOW PLOUGH
pushed by no less than FOUR engines
in the Eastern Townships during the
winter of 1867 -68. These three
views appeared in the Illustrated
London News in 1868 and were engraved
on wood from photographs by Mr. A.
Henderson of Montreal. In the days
before photo-engraving such woodcuts
were made by highly talented artists
whose work was surprisingly detailed.
Here, the engraver has truly captured
the drama of keeping the line open
in the midst of a nineteenth century
Canadian winter.
NEW BRUNSWICK DIVISION
P.O. Box 1162
Saint John,
New Brunswick E2L 4G7
ST.
LAWRENCE VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 22 Station B
Montreal, Que. H3B 3J5
BYTOWN RAILWAY SOCIETY
P.O. Box 14i;StatlonA .
Ottawa,
Ontario K1 N 8V1
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
P.O. Box 5849, Terminal A,
Toronto, Ontario M5W 1P3
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
300 Cabana Road East,
Windsor, Ontario N9G 1A2
GRAND RIVER DIVISION
P.O. Box 603
Cambridge, Ontario N1 R 5W1
NIAGARA DIVISION
P.O.
Box 593
St. Catharines,
Ontario L2R 6W8
RIDEAU VALLEY DIVISION
P.O.
Box 962
Smiths Falls, Ontario K7 A 5A5
ROCKY MOUNTAIN DIVISION
P.O.
Box 6102, Station C,
Edmonton, Alberta T5B 2NO
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN DIVISION
60 -6100, 4th Ave. NE
Calgary,
Alberta T2A 5Z8
CROWSNEST & KETTLE-VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 400
Cranbrook, British Columbia V1C 4H9
PACIFIC COAST DIVISION
P.O.
Box 1006, Station A,
Vancouver, British Columbia V6C 2P1
KEYSTONE DIVISION
14 Reynolds Bay
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3K OM4
The
by Orner Lavallee
Contemporary graphics depiciting the earliest
Canadian rai Iways
and thei r operations in the pre­
photographic era are exceedingly rare. One of
them, time-honoured through repeated use, is a
line engraving
of a 2-2-2 locomotive and tender
drawing a train of four, four-wheeled cars. Shown
in Figure 1 in its conventional form, it carries the
inscription; The First Railway Train To Come
Into Montreal, Montreal & Lachine Railroad, Nov.
19,
1847. From an engraving by J. Walker, made
at the time. From the collection of the late Ald.
Dougal
MacDonald, Montreal.
We have no difficulty in identifying the engrav­
ing itself. Signed
J. Walker, Sc., it was done by
an engraver of that name who carried on his bus­
iness
in Montreal in the middle years of the last
century. A reference to J.H. Walker as a self-des­
cribed
engraver on copper and wood appears
· … ·J.WALKfR,Sc.
in the Canada Directory of 1851. In the same
publication for 1857 and for 1871, he advertises
his
ability to prepare drawings of Buildings, Mac­
hinery, etc … One of his drawings in the 1851 Dir­
ectory, showing a locomotive and passenger tr.ain
of that era, embellishes an advertisement for the
New York and Boston Express whose office
was at 183 St. Paul Street, Montreal, Thus, Wal ker
has been established as a real
flesh and blood
person whose activities extended at least over the
twenty-year period, 1851-1871. -1-
Historians have been less successful in identi­
fying
when and for what purpose the engraving of
the 2-2-2 locomotive and its train was intended.
When it discovered some time prior to 1942, it was
thought to be a contemporary illustration of the
opening of the Montreal & Lachine Railroad in
November 1847. The 2-2-2 locomotive illustrated
THE fiRST RAILWAVTRAIN To COME INTO MONTREA
FROM AN ENCRAYINC BY J.WALKER,MADE AT THE TIME. FROM TM
I
J
was identified as a illustration of one of two single­
drivered locomotives
built for the Montreal &
Lachine Rail-Road
by the firm of Kinmonds &
Company, Dundee, Scotland. However,
about
1946, research into newspapers of the period
revealed
that the inaugural train on the Montreal
& Lachine
was pulled by a Norris-built 4-4-0 loco-
-2-motive named
Lachine, the Kinmond locomo­
tives
not being delivered to the M&L until the
summer
of 1848. Obviously, the caption was wrong,
thus discrediting
it as a contemporary illustration
of the event that it purported to describe. In spite
of this flaw, it was still accepted by most historians
as an illustration of a Montreal & Lachine train
of 1848 or later. -3-
of the walker drawing by removing the 2-2-2 type
locomotive and substituting a similar engraving
of a Norris-built-4-4-0, drawn from a builders
advertisement
for the period. The resulting con­
cocted illustration was used in a brochure ent­
itled Yesterday and
Today, a century of railway
progress, 1847-1947. This version
is shown as
Figure 2.
Footnotes
Incidentally, this assumption
led to the crea­
tion of a variation which has unwittingly caused 2
subsequent confusion
to more recent historians.
Information about J.H. Walker and his career
kindly furnished by Mr. John Beswarick Thom­
pson.
Montreal Witness, 22 November 1847,
In 1947, when Canadian Ilational Railways marked 3
the centennial
of the Montreal & Lachine Rail­
Road, the late
A. L. Sauviat, then in charge of
CNs display department, made a revised version Robert
G. Bales, The Montreal & Lachine
Rail Road and its Successors, Canadian Rail
No. 177, May 1966.
FIGURE 1. THE WALKER DRAWING as it is usually shown.
It purports to depict the opening of the Montreal
and Lachine Railroad on November 19 1847.
L, MONTREAL & LACHINE RAtLROAD, Nov.19, 1847.
E COLLECTION OF THE LATE ALD. DOUGAL MAC DONALD, MONTREAL.
CANADIAN
190
R A I L
FIGURE 2. THE MODIFIED VERSION of the Walke r drawing.
This was concocted by A.L. Sauviat of the CoN.R. in
1947. He substituted a Norris locomotive of the 1840s
for the 2-2-2 originally shown.
FIGURE 3. THE WASH DRAWING OF LONGUEUIL WHARF STATION of
the St. Lawrence and Atlantic Railroad in 1855. The
2-2-2 locomotive is the BRITANNIA which came second­
hand from Scotland in 1848. This apears to have inspired
the locomotive in the Walker drawing.
As time went on, this identification became less
and less satisfactory. Research initiated by me
beginning in
1963 made it obvious that much
less-than-objective legend had been accepted
and enshrined into records as fact, no less by myself
than by my contemporaries.
As far as locomotives are concerned, too little
detailed scrutiny had been given to such useful
references as
the Reports of Samuel Keefer for
1858-60 which had come to light late in the 1940s.
With my withdrawal from railway club and mus­
eum activities beginning in 1967, I found myself
with more time to devote to research and writing,
and I began a systematic, critical re-exami nation
of all of the formerly-accepted truths .. about
Canadian railways and their equipment up to the
middle of the Nineteenth Century.
During this process, I discovered that comple­
tely different evidence about the Walker drawing
was in my
own possession, and had also been
available to the late John Loye (1880-1962), foun­
der and fi rst president of the C R HA. One of my
art pieces, inherited from Mr. Loye, is an unsigned
black-and-white
ink wash drawing, dated 1855,
captioned as depicting the Longueuil Station of the
St. Lawrence & Atlantic Rail Road. Shown in
Figure 3. this depicts a cab less 2-2-2 type steam
locomotive, tender and four-wheeled boxcar,
emerging from a trainshed on the waterfront at
Longueuil. In the immediate background is the
St L&As ferry, the steamer Transit, which
plied between Longueuil and the harbour front
of Montreal, which is shown in the left background
with the distinctive twin towers of Notre Dame
basilica against
the backdrop of Mount Royal.
unmistakable simi larities. They led me to an ob­
vious conclusion: that Walker had access to the
1855 drawing when he made his engraving. While
he
copied the details of the locomotive, tender
and freight car quite closely, he made several al­
terations.
One of these was the addition of a wood cab;
another was the provision of three, British-style,
four-wheeled
compartment passenger carriages.
Consultation with a number of historians, includ­
ing Dr.
John H. White of the Smithsonian Insti­
tution, leads us to believe that the long-wheel­
based passenger
cars were copied from a contem­
porary British engraving. Relatively few fourwheeled
cars were used in North America; those that were
dated from the earliest period. Moreover, known
references refer to short-wheelbased vehicles,
which
would have given a safe, if somewhat bou­
ncy, ride. Long-wheelbased four-wheeled cars,
such as
those depicted in the Walker engraving,
would simply
not have been practical on North
American track of that period. -4-
From this other source, whatever it was, Wal­
ker added details such as what appear to be spring
buffers to both coupling faces of all of the cars,
including
the tender. As the wash drawing illust­
rates
the locomotive, tender and boxcar from a
three-quarter angle, the intermediate coupling and
buffing apparatus is not seen, but the locomotive
carries leather-encased stuffing.. buffers at the
front. From another source, Walker added a rud­
imentary wooden cab, bolted with long rods to
the footplate railings. While Walker was a careful
engraver, his
understanding of railway technology
was less than perfect; it wi II be seen that the loco-
A
comparison of the locomotive, tender and
boxcar in this wash drawing, with those depicted 4
in
the Walker enqravinq, revealed a majority of
Inter alia, letter from Dr. John H. White, Jr.,
dated 29 October 1981.
FIGURE 4. THE UN -CAPTIONED VERSION OF THE WALKER DRAWING
formerly owned by alderman MacDonald. The damage to the
front passenger car was corrected by John Loye at the
same time as he added the caption (c. 1942).
motives main rod seems to float in mid-air, rather
than
be connected to the driving wheel as it should
be.
This discovery led, in turn, into detailed re­
search into the caption of the Walker engraving.
Clearly,
it was executed in a lettering style com­
pletely
different from, and in strong contrast to,
the fine I ines characteristic of the engraving. The
final phrase in the caption
was intriging: From
the collection of the late Ald. Dugald MacDonald,
Montreal. The question was obvious. How late
was Ald. Dougal MacDonald?
A letter addressed
to the archives of the City
of Montreal resolved this question promptly. Under
date
of 30 September 1981, the superintendent
of the Archives Section, M. Henri Gerin-Lajoie,
gave me a brief biography of Dugald (not Dougal)
MacDonald: Born at Dalhousie Mills, Que., in
1838, bourgeois et avocat. Alderman
for the
Notre-Dame-de-Gr:ke Ward
of the City of Mon-
treal
from 1912 ro 1918. Defeated in 1918, he
died in August of that year.
So! The caption
was post-1918. That information
sent me scouring my John Loye papers. There,
I discovered
several photostat copies of the Walk­
er engraving. One carried no caption at all, and
showed
some damage to the drawing–a tear–
on the rear half
of the first passenger car. The
others bore the caption and also showed the da­in Figures 4 and 1, respectively. An original copy
of the front page of the Montreal Gazette for 13
March 1942, carried
an article written by John
Loye
entitled First Bonaventure Station Here
Opened
for Service 95 Years Ago. At the head
unretouched Walker engraving. However, the type­
set caption reads as follows: The first train out
of Montreal, on the Montreal & Lachine Railroad,
1847. This
is a Walker wood-cut of the period,
showing in
quite accurate detail a Kinmond loco­
motive,
built in Scotland. It is reproduced from a
print in the possession of Miss Eileen Goodman,
5864 Cote
des Neiges Road.
The facts had become clear: Mr. Loye
had ob­
tained
his photocopy from Miss Goodman who
one presumes
was related or connected in some
way with Alderman MacDonald. The information
mage corrected cleanly. These drawings are shown ¢~~~
/A
~ .l2 0 -.l. 2 J . 4 :s 0 7 8 I=t:
~I =m-====cl ===C===~==C=~==~==~====
FIGURE 5. THE BRITANNIA LOOKED LIKE THIS WHEN IT WAS NEW.
This drawing was made in 1840 and appeared in Whishaws
Railways of Great Britain and Ireland in that year.
The VICTORIA depicted here was identical, and in the
same lot, as the BRITANNIA.
.:2 __ . __ ,,~—,-, —;—————-.-.—.–.—_ –.••…•
t
. ,PUDLISllED, l:5EMI-MONTHLY, fROM OFFICIAL TIME-TABLES. I
, ~;~-.-, .,~ ;.7=i:~-:~ -:=:=-~~I
,NO.;;I).:~.(,.,:,(.,:·; OCTOBER, 1870. Pn-(,-l ft Cts.
:~:r:n~t~:: ,i;.~·;,;;..::~~T-.-:~–~–.. ——–.–~~-~ -~ ~ –~::~ ~~~-~~ .. /
.-0::
.1fOilJlU~AL :
Pul)lisllcd by -C. ]_~ .. Chi,,11ohn … ~ CO.
GENE IAL NlWS AGENTS.
I ~()t.1l llY A[,L DO(JxSn,[.f:nR. NKWB J)RALII~. A~I) ;f:WB AUKNTS ON THR TRAINS ANIl STY.AHRR1 .
. _–,.–.-. –_.. …… .. __ .. —-.
FIGURE 6. JOHN H. WALKER WAS AN ACCOMPLISHED ENGRAVER as
can be seen by his magnificant cut for the cover of the
International Railway and Steam Navigation Guide in 1870.
CANADIAN
194
R A I L
that it depicted a Montreal & Lachine train was
either gleaned from Miss Goodman, or assumed
by Mr. Loye, who incorporated it into a caption
which he, himself, added to the engraving. I have
many examples
of Mr. Loyes art and and lettering
work–he was a
designer or ornamental metal
work by profession–and I am satisfied that the
captipn lettering is· his. I remember Mr. Loye tell­
ing me
that either MacDonald or his family came
from Dundee. Presumably he obtained this in­
formation also from Miss Goodman.
The question remains: what is the Walker en­
graving
intended to depict? While we cannot an­
swer
that question at this time, it can be argued
that it was prepared by Walker merely as an or­
nament to be ad:led to his stock-in-trade to em­
!Jellish railway
announcements in publications.
Possibly it was
prepared for Dugald MacDonald
personally,
and intended to illustrate, not the
opening of the Montreal & Lachine, but a scene
in his ancestral Scotland. Certainly the backgr­
ound with the frolicking horses and cows suggest
the hills of Angus-shire rather than the heights
of Notre-Dame-de-Grace above Turcot swamp!.
This hypothesis is strengthened by the fact that
we know the identy of the 2-2-2 locomotive de­
picted
in the Longueuil wash drawing and copied
in tbe Walker engraving. It is the locomotive Brit­
annia of the St. Lawrence & Atlantic Railroad
built in 1839 by Stirling & Company of Dundee.
Scotland, for the Arbroath & Forfar Railway,
J. H. WALKER,
ARTIS1 ANDtElYGRAVER ON WOOD,
13 Place dArmes, Montreal.
Illust.rations made for Books and Periodicals.
a 66-inch gauge line in the Dundee area. When the
A&FR was converted to standard-gauge in 1847,
several of its locomotives were not converted
but instead sold to a second-hand dealer. Two of
them came to Canada, purchased in 1848 by the
StL&A which was. coincidentally, being built to
the same 66-inch gauge as the Arbroath railway
had
just discarded. One was an 0-4-2 tender loco­
motive named Princess. The other was the 2-2-2
engine
Britannia whose 1855 appearance was
preserved
in the wash drawing. -5-The original
appearance of the Britannia is clearly· shown
by a steel engraving which appeared in the book
Railways of great britain and Ireland by Francis
Whishaw
published in London in 1840. (figure 5).
This engraving
depicts the locomotive Victoria
which was identical to Britannia in all respects,
both being from the same lot of three engines
built by the same builder for the same railway
only one year before the engraving was published.
Comparison between the engraving and the wash
drawing
shows that some alterations were made
before the locomotive came to Canada, but the
basic elements are unchanged.
One
of the consequences of all this is that the
CR HAs replica of John Molson, based largely
on
the assumption that the Walker engraving sho­
wed a
Kinmonds locomotive on the Montreal &
Lachine Railroad,
is a more accurate portrayal
of Britannia, albeit with a narrower gauge and
larger driving wheels than Britannias, which were
60 inches in diameter. Perhaps it is time that the
Canadian Railway Museum considered renaming
the 2-2-2, in order to conform more closely with
documented history.
Footnotes
5 For complete particulars, see: Omer Lavallee,
Dundee-Built Locomotives on Canadas First
Railways, Railroad History 149, Autumn
1983. (Westford, Mass.: The Rai Iway & Loco­
motive Historical
Society, 1983).
FIGURE 7. AN 1870 ADVERTISEMENT FOR J.B. WALKER showing,
appropriately, a man walkingo It is slightly reminiscent
of the advertisement for the well known whisky of the
same name~
CANADIAN
FIGURE 8. AN ADVERTISEMENT
FOR WALKER which appeared
in the Montreal directory
in 1885, showing that he was
still in business then.
The date of 1859 is when he went
into business on his
own, but he was doing his
art long before that date.
195
R A I L
J. H· WALKER,
ESTABLISHED IB~9.
Ucsigncr nnu Engralcro!lVooil)
FORESTRY CHAMBERS,
132 St. Jam~s StrecL
116 sr. FRANCOIS XAVIER STREET.
Cuu fur lilustralcfl C«tu·
ogll C3 Q1ld Price List:s.
Latel., Cuts for Circulars, Ne.,,­
;oP Pat,.ted Art!el .. , IGe
Fine Cuts for Poslers,
Electrotyping, &c_
w-OrdOr8 prompLly llUondod 10
autl eout. per OXP:CIJ3.
IN THE ARTICLE ON STATIONS OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND WHICH
APPEARED IN THE LAST ISSUE, THIS VIEW OF THE STATION AT
ROYALTY JUNCTION WAS OMITTED. TO COMPLETE THE SERIES OF
VIEWS WE ARE PRINTING IT HERE.
PORTNEUF QUEBEC
1er SEPTEMBRE 1938
Jacques Messier
Lhistoire du chemin de fer na pas que ses
bons moments, ses exploits, ses performances,
sans songer au zele de ses heros du rail. Apres la
pluie Ie beau temps dit-on, et il est de meme pour
Ie chemin de fer qui connu aussi des heures ternes.
Cest ainsi que tot Ie matin du premier septe­
mbre 1938, alors qu une serie de violents arages
touchaient la region de Quebec, un convoi de
passagers en provenance de Montreal a destina­
tion de Quebec ne pu franch ir un pont a Portneuf
et alia secraser environ cinquante pieds plus bas
au
fond dun ravin. Laccident fit deux morts et
de nombreux blesses -cinquante selon les temoins-,
sans compter les pertes dequipement.
Les journaux de Iepoque relatent avec une
certaine precision les evenements. Les jours pre­
cedents avaient ete orageux, a un point tel que
les eaux des rivieres sortirent de leur lit, dont la
riviere Portneuf. Les dommages furent consider­
abies
a St-Gregoire de Montmorency OU des in­
ondations minerent une falaise et emporta une
maison et ses occupants.
La nuit du trente et un aout au premier septem­
bre fut la plus devastatrice. II tomba dit-on 3,75
pouces de pluie durant cette nuit ce qui crea des
inondations presque partout dans la region de
Portneuf. Six membres dune meme famille y
trouverent la mort alors que leur maison fut em­
portee par Ie courant. Le train 358 compose de la
locomotive 2813 et onze wagons en provenance de
Montreal Que. filait alors vers Quebec. La visi­
bilite
dit-on, etait grandement reduite du a Iab­
ondance de pluie. Vers 5H.37, Ie convoi du C.P.
sengage
sur Ie pont de Portneuf long de 350 pi.
et dont la base etait sans doute affaiblie par I eau:
ce fut alors la chute. Dans Iempilade qui sen
suivi,
deux wagons a baggages et un coach reg­
ulier
croulMent avec la 2813 alors enlisee dans la
boue et ou sont restes emprisonnes Ie chauffeur
et Ie mecanicien. Les equipes de secours venues
de
Quebec, eurent la difficile tache de degager les
deux cadavres de Iamas de ferraille. Deux autres
personnes qui voyagaient a bord du train furent
blessees dont Ie Pere Jean Marie Reed O.p. ori­
inaire
dOttawa qui re<;u plus tard une mention
dhonneur du Canadien Pacifique pour son cou-
rage a Iegard des blesses. Au dire dun passager
transporte a Quebec Ie meme jour pour subir des
soins, un
choc terrible secoua Ie train et en peu
de temps, tous les passagers se retouverent pro­
jetes
contre les parois des wagons et subirent des
blessures. Certains
temoins ont confie aux jour­
naux de Iepoque que Ie pont deja mal en point
apres cet accident, fut finalement emporte par
Ie courant.
On du detourner pour un certain temps les
convois
353 et 354 et Ion constata des dommages
a la voie du C.N. a Pointe-Levis et a Deschambault.
On dO egalement refaire la voie de tramway re­
liant
St-Romuald a Levis a cause des dommages
causes par Ieau.

est remarquable que Ie chemin de fer soit
a toute fin utile, Ie dernier moyen de transport
affecte par les intemperis. Quand les routes sont
enneigees, la circulation est vite ralentie. Lorsque
Ie temps se fait menasant, les avions restent au
sol. Mais
Ie confort et la vitesse que Ion attribue
a grand coup de battage publicitaire nauront
jamais raison du chemi n de fer qui se detie des
elements de la nature. Si Iefficacite demeure Iem­
bleme
du chemin de fer dantan, encore reste t-il
des
imponderables dont les repercussions tragi­
ques ne font quajouter au deti du Rail au Canada.
Documentation
Carte et horaire, gracieusete Lucien Dauphinais,
Montreal.
Le Soleil. Vendredi 2 septembre 1938
La Presse Vendredi 2 septembre 1938
Le Solei I. Jeudi 1 er septembre 1938
Le Devoir. 1er septembre 1938.
La Patrie 1 er septembre 1938
Album du centenaire de Portneuf 1861-1961.
Quebec Chronicle –Telegraph Thursday, September
1, 1938
, .
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r-
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:~.<:~<~i£
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~UD DOWN
CANADIAN
Pool
Service,
198
R A L
&rvices
8n Commun I:AD UP MONTREAL-QUEBEC
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Dally Daily Daily Daily Ex.Sa. Qaily Sat. onlySun.only Daily Daily. Eastern Time Dally ~ ~ p_.l~I¥. Sun only Oaily Dally pally paily __
r:ii: ~ ~ -i.M: ~ P.M. -~ ~ ~ ~ Heure de Iest P.M. P.M P.M. .M. r.M A M. A…. .M. P.M •
…… …. , ……. 11.45 6.50 ….. , 1.20 .. , ….. 9.15 …… 00 lv ….. MoHT .. AL Wmd,orStn 1 .. 1< •••••• 6.00 ...... 1015 ........ 7 IS ..................... ..
…… …… …… 11,51 6.56…… 1.26 …….. 9.21, ….. 2.0 t, ……. W .. tmoun ……….. 1< ...... 5.52 ...... 10.~? ........ 7.07 ...................... .
…… …… …… 11.57 7.02 ……. 1.32…….. 9,27 ….. :,; 4,7 l …. .Mon …. 1 Wilt.. . .. I< ...... 5.4...... 10.0......... 7.00 ...................... ..
:::::: :::::: :::::: . iii!( j-:ii; ~:~~ Tss gj~ ide hs ii:s t:::::n~!::~I:.I:kA~~~:,.S~t~llu.t lug s:ii ng 9:40 18:f~ 6:36 :::::: :::::: :::::: ::::::
JJ2? ~ 12,00 …… = == m~– , …… I~ ….. ….. tV ….. Mon., .. 1 Cenhal SIn …. Ar …… : .. ::~:: :..:…:..;, … :…:..:..:..:. :..:..:.:.:.c.:..:.~ ~ 7.05 9.20 ……
…… …… …… ~ …… 5.0a 12.01 -rooI
1
.J< -r4l 1>.5 b ………. Bod .. u …………. f2:o5 5.12 9.05…… 9,571 O.LV ………… :-::-:-:-::-::-:-:-:
:::::: :::::: :::::: :::::: :::::: :::::: :::::::::::::::: : ::::: : ::::: IH ~::::::·~~;~:£if~::~::.:::::i; ~ii:~~ ::: ::;: ::::: ::::: :i~:~:~6:~~~:ib ::::::1: ::::: :::::: : :::::
:::::: ::::::~ :::::: :::::: ::~:i~ ::::::::mHr :::::: :::::: 18-:) b …… ,5 •. M.ln Juno ……. I< m.-5R ...... , ........... c 9.50 >0.10 …………………. ..
5
20 015 7 5) ~9):L·,·.· ….. 5·t. .. ·V .. InL:.nCt·Pd.· .. P· … u·I·.··.·.· .• . 111,5
457
…… 1,9
9
.4
47
1 ,5.5. …………………. ..
…………………… 15:26 :::::::: 1110:22 0:: 8;:;;: 285 : 8.50 , ………………… ..
…… .••••• …… i2~i c: 2 0 sOT 28.9 ………….
0•
5.1 …………… 1I1.~7 : 18.40 • 9.34 ………………………. ..
::::::::::::::::::g 103 f b~ :::::::: Ilo.~ ; f~ 32:7 ::::::::::::I;;::~~~~::::::::::::: IhS c U~ ~ ~n~ I~:~~ :::::::::::: :::::: ::::::
…… …… ………… /5.40 …….. /10.33 ~ 8.1 35,8 ……… ,C.b.n. Rond ……….. III ,22 f /8.27 ………………………………. .
……………… 1.19 5.49 ……. , 10041 • 8g 41.3 ……….. LEplph.nl ………… 11.11 … 8.17 9.13 5,21 …………………. ..
…………………… /5.56 …….. 8.47 8 45,3 ………… V.uclu ………….. 1I1.03 /8.0B …………. , ………………….. ..
………………………… 6,02· …. · •• 11 .55 …… /82748.9 …… , ….. La …. ,; …………. /10,55 …… /7,58 ……• 902/5.07 …………………. ..
…… …… …… .43 …… 6.15 …….. 11.05 10.45 8,38 54.2 …… ,. .u.no,.;. 35 ………. 10.45 4.23 7.50…… 8.55 4.54 …………………. ..
••.••• •••••• >.~.. +n:::q~~i;~ITJm J f:·,;~1~~.~~,.Jii;i 1;:~~~1~, ill; •••••••••••• :.. • ••.••
…… …… …… b 2J5 …… 6.53 …………………. 9.32 76J ……….. M .. klnon …………. 10,08 .. , … 6.53.::: ….••••••. /4.06 ….. , …………….. .
……………… 2.34 …… 7,02 3,15 …….. 11.14 9:~ 80.2 ………. ,Loul … IlI ………… 10.& 3.5 6.4418.07 …….. 1.57 ………………….. .
:::::::::::::::::: .. ~:~5:::::: IU~ :::::::::::::::: ::::;; 16:03 ~~.~ ::::::::.:p!tn;;~~·~~::::::::: ~.~O :::::: U~ ::::::::::::::: .. :46 :::::::::::: :::::: ::::::
:…:..:..:..:.:…:..:..:..:.:…:..:..:..:.~–L!?~ 3.50.-..!.:..:..:.: II.~ 10.15100.8 Ar …. TIIO Rv .. uU36 …. l. 9.30 3.2 6.15 7.4.o~ 3.15 ….. . …. —=. … ,., ……. , …………… , … .
………… , ….. ,.35 9.25 7.55~ …….. lT5 …… ………… …… · ….. /8.05 …………………. 1,3 101.4 …………. R.dmlll …………. 19.07 ….. ,15.52 ………………………. , ………… •.
…… …… …… 4.02 …… B,14 …………………. 10.44 113.S ………… Ch.mpl.ln ..•••• ,…. ~.58 …… 5.43 ………….. /2.21 …………………. ..
:::::: :::::::::::: t~:::::: U~ ?~:~::::::::: :::::: IU~ i~n :::::::::::.:~:~~~~:.:.::::::::::: d~ :::::: n~ :::::: ::::::::1 r~ :::::::::::: :::::: ::::::
:::::: :::::: :::::: .. 4:47 :::::: aJg:::: :::: :::::::: :::::: III J% m:~ :::::::::·:~.·:h·:~:~·~r .. :::::::::: 133~ : :::::, U~ :::::: :::::::: … :~~ :::::: :::::: :::::: : :::::
……………… 5.04 …… 9.03 14.51 …….. 112,37 11.47143.5 ………… Po.tn.ul …… , ….. 8.06 …… 4.51 …………. , 1.16 …………………. ..
………………. /5.14 …… 9,12 ………………….. 1.58148,1 …… , …… 5t. B .. II ………….. 7.58 … , •. 4.43 …………… 05 ………………….. . •
•• ,., …… …… 5.26…… 9.21 15.04 …….. 112.50 12.09 152.8 ……….. Pont Rou…………. 7.50 …… 4.35 ………….. 12.55 ………………….. .
m~…Y!~ I;!~ 0;-:·m.: ;:~ ~ I~! io:!!Ni~~1~j~~:,p:% !~; l~;.: y ,;.: .•• ~m, ••••.•
M~~: I
s:i6iii6 5:00= ,::::: :::::: :::::::: :::::::: :::::: :::::: :::::
Fan} Fut, ,., …•••..•••. …•.• . •••..••.•.•••••. _. • •• .•.•.. . … .
5.30 12.10 5,30 ………………………………………….. .
~ :-::-::-: ~ -nS TnO IDO –s:so ~ -r:35 –r:oo T78.J
t~~~~t~~~If~~f;;.~//~ :~:::~ .~:::: ~~::~: I·~::;:(::::;;rt :~t~~~!;~ ~~~i~ :::<
A.M. A.M. P.M. A.~. P.M. .ra. ….,.. .M. ·P.PIII •
Ji …… Qu … c hi.,. SIn . ….. (v 7.JO .~;}5 .3;.55 ,.s;.50I~ ~~,;.~5 …. ,j,: . ,:~: .. j.:;: ~
…. • ow. LANORAiE, JOLIETTE, ST. GABRIEL . 309 307 378 305 I 3041306 308 375 E:~~n. Mil.. TARLE 37 366
Ex. Ex. Sun. Ex. Mil TABLE 35 Ex. Ex. Ex. Sun. _____ ___ Ex.Sun. —
Sun. Sun. only ~ ~I Sun. Sun. Sun. only __ s.io 0.0 lv … Troll Rlvl&r ….. Ar r2~45
~ ,.:;:–~ . M. A.M. P,III. ,….. r…. 8.20 2.6 .Cap d. I .. Mad..ln…. 2.35
6.25 4.35 IL05 li.oo C.Ollv ….. u.no .. I.33 …… 1< 1035! 410 60 B 55 ..... B.40 9.3 ...... St. M.ud........ 2.10
1;.32/4.42/11.12/11.0/26 ….. Voll.ny ……. II028/401/557fS4B ….. 9.0013.8 …… 5 •. ……….. 11.54
640 4.50 1/.20 11.15 6 JI JolI.tt …….. ll 1020; 355 545 B 191…… 9.20 20.9 •••• L.o.:, Tou…. 1.27
, 6 57 …… II 37 III 32 II 51 …… LOUd ……….. flO 011 3 36 …… B 19 ….. 9.25 22.9 w …… C. .. u …… lv 1.20 7
IQ …… 1 50 II 45 Ib 7 ….. 5,. .IIx …….. 949 324 …… B 05 ….. 9.45 22.9 lv …… · »u …… W 1.00
n~ .:::: Ib r~ a n ~ ~II . si;.C~:o:.~:,o …. Lv, B~ H~ .:::: I n6 ….. II~f~ ~U )j.· .. :G;~::: .. ;~il· .. ;:: ·.i.v lUg
TROts flIVI£RES, SHAWINISAii FALLS, GRANDMERE TABLE 38 QUEBEC-MURRAY BAY-LA MALBAIE
387 385 383 38 I 13791 I 13803821384 366 3B8 j390 I 1,·1011 V:a Can. Nat, By. I P.M. I P.M,
[x. Sat. D.By Oa;ly Ex. Mil.. TAlILE 36 Ex, D.;I~D.ily Sat. Ex.Sa. .. …….. lt3·00lV.QUOb •• Q.R.L.&;p,Stn,ArhI2.05
r
I0120 ……
____ _________ 1————…….••. 6.45].PolntelluF-lo)-MuruyS.y. 8.20 6.35 ….. .
Sat. only Sun. I ISun. I only &;Sun. Sun. .. •….••. 3.53j … St •• Anne d~ Bo.up,.I1 … 11.129.27 ..•.•.
9~25 ~.OO ~·OO li~55 5~501 00 lv.T,ol. Rlvl …. 33.Arj 9~Cl3.M05 ~.Mio 1110 it2 li~s9 ………. 655Ar ……. L. M.lb.I ……. lvh 81516.30 …. ..
9.28 IB.05 14.0611 ,5<) ... I.? ........ Cook ......... ,!9 ·94:12, 59 n.14 11/13:112.1 !II.53 TABLE 39 QUEBEC-LAC EDOUARD-CHICOUTIMI
I? .39 lB. 19 14.20112.14 16.1 ~ 7.5 …. , .L .. Fo, •• ….. lIB ·59!2 .45;n ,00iI0/59;1I1 .59;1.4 I I .
19.44 .B.25 14.2&.112.20/(>.1, 9.81 …… M.ch.nd …… /8·~o:!2·3y6.54iI0152/11 52.111.35 :M.~ A.M·I v,. Can. Na Ry. .A,M. I PM~
19.50 IB.3) 14.341112.2810.2, 13.C …. , .. L.., G.b. ……. ,!B.3/1!2.321/&.47110/44!11 .. 441!11.29 …… 10.2 J S.45 lv.Quob.c Pal.1S Stn .. w 53O!1
T 3.30
…. ..
f9.55 18.38 14.40J/12.3?/6 33114.5J … ,,,.Loo G, ……… i/8.3JI!2.2B/6.4JI0/40·1I1.40!/11 25 , .. , .. 3.0 12.501<, .. La. Edou.d ....... 11.57 11.1 , .... .
10100 18.44 14.471112.39 16.4Q 16.71., … L>bJ •.• onl~ ….. :!B .~281!2.2) 16 .38
il 0/34:111.
34~!II .20 I …… 5?01 3.15 …… ChambOTd ……. 9.55 8. . …. .
10.15 8.56 5.01 12.5116.5 21.:Ir.Sh.wlnl •• n F.II •. lvI8.1 2.106,25;10.21111.21 11.09! …… 6.,S 5.15.Jonqul … (Konogaml) .. 8.33 7.05 …. ..
lU~ U~ U~ l,.~~l r~ ~U~Sh~;:~~I~:,:;.~:~tJ t IS U~ n~iln~. 1~~1 l~m :::::. U~J t~51Ai-::·:C:.::~dt~,.;; .. :·,::i.;. U~T U6::::::
EQUIPM£NT­
Monuelll and Qu.bea
(Coache., on all trolins)
N … 354, 31). 356. 362, 355
*Coiches *Diner *Parlorl
Nc, 358.357 Coaches and
SIe6ping Cua-
*12 Soc., D.Fl. * 8 Soc 4 D.B.A.
(Sleepen open 10.30 p.m. May be
occupied in MontrOll (W.S.) until 7.-5
a.m., and In Quabec until 8.CO a.m,j I
MATERIEL
Mon~r6al et Qu6beo
No •. 354, 353, 356. 362, 355
*Voiluf6S ordina;fes
*Wagor.s-restaufant *Wagons-salons
No •. 358. 357-VoiturfiS ordinaires et wagons-tits-­
*12 sec. p·t salon-lits.
*8 sec. at 4 chambrettes.
(WaQOns-lit5 ouverts ~ 10.30 p.m. Pouvent etre
cCGupe.s a Montreal (G.W.) jusqul~ 7.45 a.m.
et i Qu~bec jusqu:}. 8.00 a.m.)
EXPLANATION OF SIGNS-,HIS PAGE
B MeaI5:;;:;Jo. I Stops on signal. p Flag stop Suns. only
*Alr-ol> :Itlon.d. b Dailyex.Sun.andMon. to entrain.
• Oail:/. I r~oPJe~r~dar:v~;~~ ~ ~g;s rc;5getriJ~ rev ..
t Sun. only. psgrs. from Grand enue passen~~rs from
t Dlyex.Sun. Mer:e and Shawinigan Montreal and beyond.
l> Stopa to detrain from J ~~I~~: Thu .• Sat. tDt~~rtS ~:~e°n~; top~::
Montreal. mStops on signal Sun· senf)ers from north
, Stopa to d~tain. days and Thursdays. of Trois Rivleres.
R[NVOIS
Bu,1 II. gar ••
*Alr-oondltlont.
• Tous las jours.
t Dim, excopt6,
~ Dim S8UI.
b ArrM pour lai.her voya-gour.
de Montr6al.
c lailS& voyagours.
, ArrAt
sur signal.
h Dim. at lun. axe.
I Lalsse voyageurs pay~
ants do GrandMilro
et Shawinigan Fall$
Ie fundi soul.
J Mar., leu., 11m.
mArrel sur signal dim.
at jeu. seuloment.
1) Arret sur signal dim. seu!., pour
prendre
voyageurs.
r Lun., mer., ven.
t Laisse voyageurs pay­
ants de MontrtJal at
au·dol;}.
to Arrllt sam. saul. pour
~~t:e;uv~~~~8d:8fr~r;
Riviere •.
DS
by Lon Marsh
The Calgary and Edmonton Railway Co. was
incorporated in 1890 and operated by the C.P.R.
under a lease program. The Calgary and Edmonton
Railway had reached Strathcona in July 1891
and began to serve the surrounding town and
district. Later, the C.P.R. purchased the C & E
railway
and between 1905 and 1912, Strathcona
was the Northern terminus of the C.P.R. until
the completion of the High Level Bridge in 1913.
The first station was a small wooden structure
built in 1891. {Today this building is located at
10447-86th Ave., and is the home of the Junior
League of Edmonton}.
In 1906, Strathcona was made a Divisional
Point for which a more impressive structure was
required.
In April, 1907, the plans arrived for the
new C.P.R. station which was to be erected during
the summer and completed by September 1 st,
1907. The station was not only to be impressive,
but substantial and commodius in every way.
The main materials were to be of brick on a stone
and cement foundation. It was to be two stories
in height,
the second story being occupied by
divisional offices, steam heated and lighted with
electricity.
The contract included a concrete walk or plat­
form between the station and the tracks and was
to be six hundred feet long. The station itself,
was
to be 134 feet 6 long and 38 feet wide.
This new station was located south of the 1891
station, facing
Anderson Avenue. (81st ave. and
103rd St.) At the north end were the express
offices,
21 ft. by 38 ft. and adjoining was the
ladies waiting room 38 ft. by 15 ft, including a
lavatory.
Next came the hallway entrance to the
business offices with a stairway to the upper .
storey. To the south was the agents office 22 ft.
by
18 ft. with wickets into the general waiting
room which was 38 ft. by 24 ft. Toward the east
and opening on to the platform was the ticket
and telegraph offices, 14 ft,. by 24 ft. The con­
ductors room was between the general waiting
room and the ticket and telegraph offices. To the
south of the waiting r90m was a gentlemens smok­
ing
room and lavatory which was 15 ft. by 25 ft.
At
the extreme south end was the baggage room,
38 ft. by 29 ft.
The upstairs arrangements were made for the
superintendent, engineer, and dispatchers offices.
The station was built by Peter McDermid of Winni­
peg,
at a cost of $24,382 approx. The painting
contract was awarded to Messrs. Peterson and
Fallam.
FROM
THE EDMONTON BULLETIN -Jan-
uary 27th, 1908 ……… Much of the commotion
and congestion of traffic that formerly existed
on the arrival of the trains at the old Strathcona
Railway Station has been stopped by the removal
to the new building. The buses now stand at the
rear of the station and passengers reached them
by going around or through the building.
ANOTHER EXCERPT FROM THE EDMONTON
BULLETIN, Friday, February 28, 1908 …..
Improving C.P.R. Terminus -(From Mondays
Bulletin)
Since
the old C.P. R. railway station and baggage
sheds have
been removed from their old site, an
agitation has been begun to beautify the C.P. R.
right of way between the new station and Whyte
Avenue. The Strathcona Chronicle discussing the
question says, The old station having now been
removed the opportunity occurs of making arrange­
ments so that with the first advent of Spring Strath­
cona may have a railway terminus of which the
City and the C.P.R. may be proud. The artistic
new building which has erected is an attractive
feature which cannot fail to impress incomers.
There is, however, an opportunity of making the
C.P.R. station still more attractive by laying out
the site of the old station and planting a few trees
or shrubs. First impressions are invariably diffi­
cult to remove and nothing would be more fitting
than for the traveller on alighting from the train
at the University City to find well kept, well
laid
out and artistic surroundings. We understand
that the C.P.R. would be inclined to layout their
right of way frontage to Whyte Avenue, provided
the city undertook the upkeep. We could not
imagine a better investment for the city than the
few dollars that the upkeep would cost. Just con­
sider
the number of people that pass through
Strathcona and have little opportunity of forming
any opionion of the city except from the station
surroundings. They are rushed across to Edmonton
and Strathcona must inevitably be judged in their
mind by the little they could see from the station
THE
ORIGINAL
1891
C.P.R.
STATION
has
been
restored
and
is
used
by
the
Junior
League
of
Edmonton.
It
now
looks
much
as
it
did
back
in
1891.
Photo
by
Lon
Marsh
Sep
9
1984.
o ~ z ~ o ~ z
~ o o
::u ~ r
THE
C.P.R.
STATION
AT
STRATHCONA
(EDMONTON
SOUTH)
IN
1910.
The
grain
elevator
and wooden Dominion
Express
mail-express
cars
have
disappeared
but
the
station
is
stoll
active.
Provincial
Archives
of
Alberta
photo
B-7047.
A
RARE
VIEW
OF
NORTHERN
ALBERTA
RAILWAYS
ENGINE
207
at
the
C.P.R.
station
at
South
Edmonton on a
railfan
trip
on
April
8
1975.
See
back
cover
of
July-August
1984
Canadian
Rail
for
a
view
of
the
same
train
on
the
high
level
bridge.
Provincial
Archives
of
Alberta
photo
J-1815.
~I z ~ o ~ z
l.j o l.j
;0 ~ r
platform. That little might be artistic. We trust
the city council will approach the C.P. R. on the
subject at once .. II
A 1932 Newspaper article had this to say about
the stations name change: On the roof of the
Canadian Pacific Railway station on the south side,
the name South Edmonton has been painted
over the old name Strathcona which was in use
for decades. By force of habit, trainmen still called
Strathcona -Next Stop! It soon became on Iy
a memory.
The name Strathcona was used by the railway
until
the new time table which was effective June
28th listed the station as South Edmonton!
Thismet the request of the South Side Business
Mens
Association.
In 1966, the station underwent a modern ren­
ovation. The following is a story of a railway ter­
minal
which once stood where Prudhams Shop­
pers Park now stands on 104th Street.
The Canadian National tracks in Edmonton
South once held the potential to offer passenger
services
comparable to those of a main line ter­
minal. This goes back to Mackenzie and Manns
Canadian National Railway. The tracks paralleling
103rd and 104th Streets now serving a lumber
yard, formerly served a substantial passenger ter­
minal
known as Strathcona Station. Mackenzie
and Mann connected Strathcona
and Edmonton via the Low Level Bridge in 1902,
with their Edmonton Yukon and pacific Railway.
Plans were
made for the Strathcona terminal in
April,
1913. The new Canadian Northern depot
faced 80th Avenue between 103rd and 104th
Streets. This was in sight of the C.P. R. station.
There has been some confusion over the completion
date of the depot, but it was Monday, June 20th,
1915, when the station apparently entertained
its first scheduled passenger train. Strathcona
Station saw its last passenger train on Saturday,
January 5th, 1929.
The station had two storeys, was made of brick
and had a flat roof. The central portion housed a
ticket office and waiting room on the main floor,
and offices were on the second floor. Single storey
wings of equal size flanked the main portion of
building. They also were brick with a peaked roof.
The East wing housed a baggage room, mens
washroom and parcel checking facilities. The West
wing
included an express room and ladies waiting
room. A wooden platform extended across the
south side of the building and was extended at a
right angle
south from the building alongside a
stub end track. The portion of the platform ser­
ving
the trackside, was lighted by three substantial
lamp standards, each with five attractively design­
ed lamps.
THE 1907 C.P.R. STATION as it stands today. VIA Rail uses
this station for its twicw-a-day runs to and from Calgary.
Photo by Lon Marsh Sep 9 1984.
The station provided I ivi ng quarters for an agent
and boarding car inspector. After 1935, only the
agent lived there. In 1947, the station housed a
clerk until 1952. In 1953, was used a C.N.R. express
agency, but did not house a clerk. In 1955, the
building was vacant following abandonment of the
Edmonton, Yukon and Pacific trackage. In 1956,
the location was occupied by Prudham Building
Supplies Ltd., until 1963.
It is thought that the Canadian Northern Strath­
cona station was torn down in that year, almost
fifty years after completion.
It had only seven active passenger service for
just a little over thirteen years of its fifty year
history.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
1. The Alberta Pioneer Railway Assoc. publication
called The Marker February and June 1979
issues.
2.
Strathcona – A Walking Tour booklet.
3. The friendly staff of the City of Edmonton
Archives for use of their early Newspaper files.
A REAR VIEW OF THE C.Al~ADIAN
NORTHERN STATION. Notice that the
window design is totally different
from the front view.
Provincial Archives of Alberta
photo B-5016.
:!
~
, :
,
:!
.
,
1.
: <
I ,
~ .•
;
.,
.,
~ ~
i
,
.
..

,
I~
..
:
-;i;
THE
CANAD
I
AN
NORTHERN
EDMONTON
SOUTH
STATION
front
view
wi
th
an
unidentified
freight
train
soon
after
the
station
opened
in
1915.
Note
the
elegant
pl
atform
l
ights
and
the
unballasted
track
. The
1907
C.P.
R.
station
is
just
visab
le on
the
far
right
. Glenbow
Archives
photo
NC
-6-698.

CANADIAN
206
R A I L
THE OLD SITE OF THE CANADIAN NORTHERN STATION is now occupied
by Prudhams shopping center. The original station basement
are still in use today. The boilers are lettered Canadian
Northern and they heat the shopping center complex.
Photo by Lon Marsh Sep 9 1984.
ON THE SOUTH WALL OF PRUDHAMS LUMBER YARD BUILDING, below
the metal sheathing in this view, can just be seen a few of
the original roof supports which graced the express sheds
on either side of the main building of the old Canadian
Northern station.
Photo by Lon Marsh Sep 9 1984.
Edmonton Bridges-Follow-Up
As a follow-up to Lon Marshs article on the Edmonton
High Level bridge (Canadian Rail July-August 1984) we would
like to clear up three errors that inadvertantly crept in:
Page 112 line 1: Date should read 1891 (not 1901).
Page 112 line 12: Should read In 1902, the Low Level
Bridge was comple te d which (not was buil til) .
Page 116
caption A: Name should be Pollard Brothers
(not Ballard II) •
Mr. Marsh has also sent us five additional photos of
the two Edmonton bridges.
1. A two-car Dayliner train heads south over the High
Level br-idge bound for Calgary on October 7 1964.
The dayliner no longer uses the high-level after
the northside C.P.R. (1913) station was torn down
in the mid 1970s to be replaced by a parking lot~
2. Anothe r Ie sse r .known bridge as the Edmon ton Yukon and
Pacifics Low Level bridge built in 1900. Here
we see C.N.R. engine 7018 southbound in 1940. The
former Grand Trunk Pacifics Hotel Macdonald is in
the background.
3. A northbound street car has discharged passengers
after entering Edmonton over the Low Level bridge
in this 1909 scene. This was the only rail link
across the river at Edmonton until the High Level
bridge was completed in 1913. Note that the wagon
must yield the right-of-way to the street cars
which must, in turn, wait for any train traffic.
CANADIAN
209
R A I L
4 and 5. The Low Level bridge was twinned in 1949 to
ease traffic congestion. Its last rail traffic was on
June 11 1952. The Pullman trolley busses were
retired in 1966. The Hotel MacDonald is now being
greatly renovated in the interior. It was built in
1915 by the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway.
n
CANADIAN
210

SWEET MEMORIES
By John (Choo Choo) Mulkerns
Upon a
lonely hill I sat
just above the rai I road tracks
far far away I heard her sing
her lonesome whistle and bell
to ring.
Far in the
twilight of the eve
when autumn colors turned the leaves
I heard her blow at milepost nine
assuring
me that shes on time.
The engineer
he waved to me
and for a moment I had a dream
for as she passed, I heard her sing
and filled the air
with nostalgic ring.
The hobo I
saw in the box car door
was one of many Id seen before.
How many miles was he from home?
So cold, and tired, and alone.
The
box cars passed me one by one
65, 75, then
81.
from many railroads far and wide
R A I L
the train sounds filled the country side.
Then the caboose came slowly behind
and soon the train
was out of sight
for night had fallen, and the stars
were bright.
As I bade the train a silent goodnight
from on the hilltop I heard her sing
her whistle and her bell
to ring~and
as I slowly walked awaY,l I had
sweet memories for another day.

NEW MEMBERS
We are pleased to welcome the following new
members
into the C.R.H.A. It has been some time
since we last published a new members list. The
following list dates back
to January 1983 and
includes all new members up
to the present time.
Welcome and
we hope to have you with us for
many years to come.
NEW MEMBERS
FOR YEAR 1983
No.
NAME
No. NAME No.
2907 Robinson, Gordon 2939 Svoboda, Chuck 2971 2908 Benning, A.G. 2940 Miller, Robert 2972 2909 Prigge, John 2941 Carel, Maurice 2973 2910 Waton,
Ron 2942 Evanson, George 2974 2911 Forrest, Kenton 2943 Glenbow Museum Library 2975 2912 Jubb, Peter
F. 2944 Leeder, Byron 2976 2913 Croswell, Val 2945 Downey, Roy 2977 2914 Higgins, Thomas 2946 Payette, Bernard 2978 2915 Hanson, Ronald 2947 Farand, Raymond 2979 2916 Williams, David 2948 Young, Wally 2980 2917
East, James 2949 Gagne, Andre 2981 2918 DeAmond, Dr. Richard 2950 Kleinsteiber, K.L. 2982 2919 Desmarais,
Jacques 2951 McCuaig, John 2983 2920 Scott,
Rev. Robert 2952 McLean,
Hugh 2984
2921 Boselli, Louis 2953 Shetler,
James 2985 2922 Salkeld, Lloyd 2954 Durand,
Serge 2986 2923 Benedetti, Joseph 2955 Waldron, Stewart 2987 2924 Penkuinas, Michael 2956 Martin, Jean-Guy 2988 2925 Boles, Derek 2957 Broadway, Norman 2989 2926 Honeyford,
Dave
2958 Conway, Norman 2927 Siegel, Ori 2959 Dubie, D.A. 2990 2928 Carpenter,
George
2960 Perry, Vere H. Jr. 2991 2929 Bushell, William 2961 Henderson, Derek 2992 2930 Carscadden, Stuart 2962 Stewart, Fred 2993
2931 Laplante, Fernand 2963 Blundell, Norman 2994 2932 May, A.
R. 2964 Bradette, Claude 2995 2933 Campbell, Craig 2965 Chapman,
Paul
2996 2934 Hyde, Stanley 2966 Christofori, Adrian 2997 2935 Lackie,
Ron 2967 Gregory, Roy 2998 2936 Organ, Gerald 2968 Hambrook,
Dave
2999 2937 Carter,
Warlace
2969 Hermann, Frank
3000
2938 Moyer, James 2970 Lewis, Richard ·3001
NAME
Shreve, Bryce
Summers. Bob
Hazell, Gary
Kelly, John
Pichette,
Andre
Wright,
Peter Jackson, W.H.
Kennelly, Gregory
Mann, Patrick
Botting,
Gerald
Broadbear, Don
Post,
Dirk
Weir, John
Bowes, E.F.
Searson,
Sean
Carette, Marc Webb,
Ed.
Aboussafy, Ronald
Central B.
C. R/R Preser
vation & Museum Society
Buchan, Larry
Huddlestone, Ralph
Kohler,
F.M.
Pazzy,
Robert
Hamon, Robert
Novak,
A.
Pondrom,
J.P.
White, Allen
Salinger, Ruth
Lajeunesse, Jean-Pierre
Sunderland,
Philip
Mcintosh, Stewart
No.
3002
3003
3004
3005
3006
3007
3008
3009
3010
3011
3012
3013
3014
3015
3016
3017
3018
3019
3020
3021
3022
2023
3024
3025
3026
3027
3028
3029
3030
3031
3032
3033
3034
3035
3036
3037
3039
3040
3041
3042
3043
3044
3045
3046
3047
3048
3049
3050
3051
3052
3053
3054
3055
3056
3057
3058
3059
3060 NAME
Wiseman, Gordon
South
Peace Historical Asn ..
Waugh, Edward
Grant, Rory
Lafleur, Dr.
Jean
Schuff, Brian
Schuff,
Paul
Barham, Bernard
Chevalier, Yvon
Fourneaur, Raymond
Hoadley, David
Brown, Richard
Keefe, Warren
Dawson,
Arthur
Dawson, Wm. & Sons
Donlevy, R.G.
Ede, Norman
Morris, David
TrudeaJ. Normand
Wrigh~, Glenn
Hobson, Clive
Wright, Edward
Robinson, D.A.
Salzen, Christian
Stephenson,
J. R.
Lloyd, Eric
Simonet, Pierre
Krivel, Orin
Kozma,
Leslie
Seeley, Lorne
Mongrain, Pierre
Wilson, William
Ikeda, Vernon
Gough, Gerald
Heron, Donald
Sanford,
R.
Carter, Barry
Leblanc, Andre
Cousineau. Michel
McCaffrey, Dr.
D.C.
Brentlinger, H.
Mcinnis, R.
Mulkerns, J.
Borrow, V.
Osmond,
D.
Adams, John B.
Demartino, Thomas M.
Harper, Clark A.
Lightle, Howard
Rogers, James
Van Nortwick, Warren Sr.
Baxter, Roger
Shore, D.
Meriden, David J.
Nattress, Allan
Stoltz, Douglas
Benner, louis
H.
Borchuk, George
No.
3061
3062
3063
3064
3065
3066
3067
3068
3069
3070
3071
3072
3073
3074
3075
3076
3077
3078
3079
3080
3081
3082
3083
3084
3085
3086
3087
3088
3089
3090
3091
3092
3093
3094
3095
3096
3097
3098
3099
3100 3101
3102
3103
3104
3105
3106
3107
3108
3109
3110
3111
3112
3113
3114
3115
3116
3117
3118
NAME
Friend, Kerry N.
lVIackie, J. Douglas
Smallwood, John
H.
Boulet, J.M.
Brown, Georgia
Leach, L.O.
Halpin,
W. Eric
Carter,
W.P.
King, Robert S.
Hanstein, Ray F.
Moore, Charles
Shifley, Clyde
E.
Tasse, Wayne
Bowen, Peter
Clyde, R.A.
Cook, Rick
L.
Colquhoun, IVI.M.
Reesor, J.D.
Tompson, Robert
Kennedy,
Ed. T.
Handke, Stephen
D.
Kirkland, Ian
Lachance, Gilles
Ouellettee, Roger
Sinclair,
James A.
Smith, Donald
Thompson, David
Clarkson, Guy
C.
Parney, Christopher G.
Sharpe, William
Jerfensen, Dennis
I.
Sabuda, Frank
Watson, Thomas
Jacquiard, Max
Johnstone,
P.
Eakins, Norman
Klages, Roland R.
Kritzky, Scott
Lee, Ross
MacLeod, Donald R.
Sloan, George F.
Foster, C. Leonard
Brock
House Society
Lake, Harold
McKinnon, Alec
Heinl, Leroy A.
Klinger, Ronald
H.
Morcan, A.W.
Scott, Jym
Bunting,
Chas
Gibbons, R.A.
Hanman,
R.
McEvoy, G.H.
Elder,
C. Gerald
Barone,
F.IVI.
Memmer, William
Stephens,
Rev. E.S.
lVIoeller, Larry No.
NAIVIE
3119 Wilde, Robert G.
3020 Trudeau, Normand
3021 Wright, Glenn
3122 Higgins,
Russell
3123 Bisson, Andrew T.
3124 Gillian,
E. L.
3125 Lewis, James
3126 Parmiter, Murray
3127 Prentice,
Rev. Roger
3128 Schwalm, Addison
A.
3129Camp, Lance W.
3130 Keim, Roger C.
3131 Burger, Clifford G.
3132 Smith, Frank O.
3133 Wragg, Mike
3134 Walton, Mark
W.
3135 Mackay, John P.
3136 Cardwell, Norman J.
3137 Filion; Rev. Andre from
3138
3139
3140
3141
3142
3143
3144
3145
3146
3147
Gift Re: Rev. R. Scott 2920
Gibson, Dr. IVI. Allen
Livingstone, William I.
Percy, E.A.
Self, Morgan
G.
Clarke, Christopher L.
Smith, Gordon
Salzman,
Dale
Carscadden, Stuart
Canada National Museum
of Science
3148 Edgar, D. Walter
3149 Haines, A.J.
3150 Lacey, Peter
3151 Ville
de lVIontreal
3152 Smith, J.D.
3153 Sugden, Lloyd
3154 Laughlin, R.G.
3155 Hamon, D.G.
3156 Blumenthal, Echart
3157 Rudover, Allan
3158 Trites, D.c.
3159 Harvey, Edgar
D.
3160 Acheson, Bruce
3161 Clarke,
Hugh M.D.
3162 Rendall, John
3163 Kazemir,
James
3164 Ward, Robin
3165 Dwarika, Dhanyram
3166 Blackburn, Andrew
3167 Schriner, David
W.
3168 Weir, Richard S.
3169 Boettcher, A.D.
3170 Cohen, Edward
H.
3171 Marnell, Dan
3172 Hubbel, Dr. lVIorgan J.
3173 Lerpiniere, P. Robin
3174 McDonald,
W. Scott
No. NAME
3175 3176 3177 3178 3179 3180
3181
3182 3183 3184 3185 3186 3187 3188 3189 3190
3191
3192 3193 3194 3195 3196 3197 3198
3199 3200
3201
;3202
Paques, Joseph Jean
Snell, Tim
South, Michael Gerald
Cleveland,
Paul H.
Greenshields, Laird
Shoesmith, Peter
Reeve, John W.
Skucas, Algis
Taylor,
James W.
Wilson, E. L.
Culp, William L.
Evans, Hadrian L.
ODonnell,
James L.
lVIicrophor, Inc.
Weafer,
Mel
Greenwood, Don S.
Wright, Jolien
Binley, John
H.
Schulz, Tom
Welch, Phil
Mace, William
E.
Maxwell, Dr. D. Vance
Orr, I.A.
Fort Erie, Historical
Railroad Museum
Lemire, Denis
Rutherford,
B.W.
White, Mike R.
Araki, Takaharu
3203 3204 3178 3205
3206
3207 3208 3209 3210
3211
3212
3213
3214 3215 3216 3217 3218 3219 3220
3221
3222 3223 3224 3225 3226 3227 3228 3229
Totenhofer, P.R.L.
Loken, Richard
Cleveland,
Paul H.
Renaud, Pierre
Preddy, Andrew
MacDonald, Bryan
Swainson, Maurice
Jackson, Dr.
James
Duncan, John
Rowling, John
W.
Davis, William
Bracken, Harry
M.
Noble, Graham J.
Jones, Hodge L.
Morey, Charles
Falk, Lyall
Wheeler, Dr.
R.
Hoyle, John H.F.
MacVey, Don
Viberg, Richard
Howard-Gibbon, F.A.
Crysler, Vince
Kennedy,
D.
Chomik, Paul
G ranvi lie, Transportation
Price, Bruce
D.
Garey, Rev. James R.
St. Germain, Ernest
3230
3231
3232 3233 3234 3235 3236 3237 3238 3239 3240 3241 3242 3243 3244 3245 3246 3247 3248 3249 3250
3251
3252 3253 3254 3255 3255 ,3256
Worth, Arthur Willmott
Carpenter, Jacques
Farnam, Robert
Rossignol, Roger
Schingh,
Rene
Wearing, Dave
Ritchie, John
Walford, Lloyd A.
Smith, Douglas
II.W.
Flannelly, Samuel
Nantel, Robert
Dugmore, Donald
Miller, Gregory
Beswatherick, Earl
Guibbaud, Sylvain
Ryan,
Dan
Showalter, Timothy
Calvin, David R.
Elliot, George E.
Fraser, Fen
Shedd, Philip D.
Deslauriers, Jean
Faulks, Art
Chrome, Dr. John
Grose, Thomas
F.
Sherwood, Laird
Consultants Ltd.
Fields, Stuart
CRHA COMMUNICATIONS
IMPORTANT NOTICE
For those who have renewed their C R HA mem­
bership
for 1985 we will be sending out your
1985 membership card along with the JANUARY
1985 issue of CANADIAN RAI L. For those of
you who have not yet renewed please note that
we will be mailing the January issue ON L Y TO
THOSE WHO
HAVE RENEWED their membership.
Dont be disappointed, renew your CRHA mem­
bership today
if you have not already done so,
and keep an eye out for your January issue con,
taining
your new membership card.
On page 166 the words haule d back
from the track and used for storing
hay refer to the bottom photo
instead of to the top one.
ERRATA
Unfortunately there were errors on two
pages of the SEP -OCT issue.
On page 158 line 41 the words was
buil t and the old station were
omitted so creating the impression
that the boulder station was hauled
up the hilll
NEWS FROM THE DIVISIONS
The Toronto and York Division is pleased to
announce that the 10th annual Model Railway
Show
will be held March 9 and 10, 1985 from
11 AM to 6PM at the Queen Elizabeth Exhibi­
tion Hall, Exhibition Place, Toronto. For group
rates
or more information call 416-488-9446, or
write the Division at the address indicated on
page 3.
THE GREAT CRANBROOK CAPER #3
LABOUR DAY WEEKEND
by Norris Adams
This is the third successive year that our Cal­
gary
& South Western Division have offered this
novel adventure shared at Cranbrook
with our
Crowsnest & Kettle Valley Division. C. K. & V.
Division, under the expert architectural guidance
of member Garry Anderson are restoring and
refurnishing
C.P. R. coaches of the late twenties
to form a complete trainset equivalent to all the
lavish appointments
and appearance of The Trans
Canada Express. It is a fabulous experience to dine
in the
Argyle replete with all the silver service
and linen
and crystal and enjoy a five course meal.
Afternoon tea is also served. It is great to sleep
in one of the official bedrooms of Business car 19
or a fully appointed period sleeping car. The
week end included a conductedtour
to the C.P.
Cranbrook roundhouse, also an onboard visit to
3 fully equipped wrecking car auxiliaries. A visit
was made to Fort Steele nearby, where an English
aristocrat 0-4-4 coal burning beauty named
Dun­
robin and full length 8 wheel passenger coach,
makes regular
passenger trips of· about 2 miles.
There
is also a small ornate Saloon coach on
4 wheels in
the car shed and outside a Pacific
Coast Shay locomotive
familiar to heavy logging
operations
of yesteryear.
It might be well to mark you calendar for Labour
Dat Week End and the Great Cranbrook Caper
No.4. For
information: contact: Mike Westren,
632 Oakwood
PI, S.W. Calgary, Alberta T2V OK5
281-1985
or Norris Adams, 4036 West 36 Ave.,
Vancouver, B.C.
V6N 2S9 (604) 261-3415 Garry
,Anderson (604) 489-3918 or 426-7590
***************
A short history:
In 1976 The Cranbrook Archives, Museum
&
Landmark foundation was established by inter­
ested individuals. A mandate
was drawn up to
collect and exhibit the heritage of Cranbrook-­
in particular its strong lin k
with the heritage of the
Rai I road. Early in 1977 the foundation purchased
an old dilapidated C.P. R. work car Ilo. 411257
which was intended to be situated at the end of
Cranbrooks Main Street on a vacant lot beside
the railway tracks. The purpose
of this was to
promote the heritage of the railroad by displaying
the restored
exterior. The interior was to be ren­
ovated
to provide gallery space for the museum
end art shows. In May 1977 an amazing discovery
took place that changed the entire concept of the
museum! The old
work car was found to contain
exquisite inlaid black
walnut ,Panelling thioughout,
and although it was covered up with seven layers
of paint–it was determined that it could be res­
tored. Further research showed that the old car
was in fact, the Argyle on of 23 A class dining
cars built by C.P. R. specially for it Premier train–
the Trans Canada Limited of 1929. To-day the
Argyle is the only restored example of the A
class dining cars. After nearly 15 months of res­
toration work, it is as respendent as it was in 1929
when built for the Trans Canada Limited. In 1979
C.P. Rail donated to the foundation–a baggage
car
from sleeper. Now other pieces of equipment
are being assembled to complete the consist for
the museum to show the entire train much as it
would have appeared in 1929.
The following report indicates the major pro­
ject undertaken by our Rideau Valley Division,
this report first appeared in the Smith Falls Re­
cord Ilews. The photo shows the station when
new in 1914.
After more than three years of negotiations,
Canadian National Railway (CNR) has agreed to
sell the Canadian Northern Railway Station on
William Street to the Smiths Falls Railway Museum
Association.
The sale clears the tracks for the towns rail­
way museum project to go full steam ahead.
Bill LeSurf, president of the Smiths Falls Rail­
way Museum Association said the association
will
buy the 70-year-old station but lease the land
surrounding the historic site.
Under the terms of the agreement, the associa­
tion will buy the station for $1 and lease the land
for $2,000 a year, We have a 10-year lease with
two five-year extensions in the agreement.
Mr. LeSurf said the history behind the build­
ing
and the building itself make it an A-1 tourist
attraction.
The station is quite unique in design and is
only one of two such stations in Canada, Canadian
Northern Railway was trying to get government
money to help it compete with Canadian Pacific
Railway
and it built the station to show the govern­
ment it was serious, explained Mr. LeSurf.
Most railway stations were wood frame con­
struction in those days but the railway went all
out on Smiths Falls station using brick and stone
for the complete building.
But before the railway association can move
into its new home, the station must undergo some
expensive restoration.
Architects have estimated restoration costs
between $180,000 to $260,000, he said.
Mr. LeSurf said
the money will come in the
form of grants and through fund raising efforts
by the association.
But costs arent the only problems the associa­
tion has faced.
Mr. LeSurf had proposed running a steam engine
train from Smiths Falls to Chaffeys Locks with
a stop at Forfar but the station in Forfar was
bulldozed without Mr. LeSurfs knowledge.
Then in April 1984, vandals stole valuable ori­
ginal
mouldings, window frames and doorhandles
from the station, worth more than $10,000
e. uSlne
car
A JUDGE ENDED A SIX-MONTH DIVORCE
battle by granting visitation rights to both
the husband and the wife to more than $4,000
worth of toy trains.
In our better days we jokingly said we could
divide up the kids, but never the trains, Sondra
Kay Buckner, 43 said. The North Dallas couples
two children are grown.
State District Judge Josh Taylor awarded Mrs.
Buckner custody of the tinplated 1935 Comet aqua
and silver engine, three passenger cars, a three­
piece green bridge, a standard-gauge tunnel, two
street lights, toy baggage men and baggage worth
$500 to $1,000.
She wanted the little corpulent people, too,
but he got those, said Joseph Semon, lawyer for
Noel Buckner 48.
Buckner also
got the American Flyer train set
with the orange water tower, coal loader, log car,
red caboose, lionel billboards,
animated newsstand,
tunnel, plus 25 train catalogs, workbooks and plan­
ning books, as well as
25 sections of mighty casey
track.
When 12 containers of scenery material for track­
side,
one train place mat, the dispatchers phone
and the engine oil can are figured in, it comes to
nearly $4,000.
Although Buckner got most of the trains, his
wife
won custody of the couples house and rights
to visit her ex-husbands trains twice a year.
Taylor said the Buckner case is the first in which
he granted visitation rights
for a train.
It sometimes happens with dogs or something
like that, he told the Dallas Times Herald, but
Ive never heard about a toy train. But then, theyre
both pretty involved with them.
Mrs. Buckner said the first train set was a Christ­
mas gift
to her son, now 22, about 11 years ago.
She and her husband got hooked on them and they
later graduated to collecting more sophisticated
gauge and antique varieties.
S. Edmonton Journal
Mike Wragg writes in part
While in St. Johns on business last Wednesday, I
called
TerraTransport concerning the branch line
from Clarenville to Bonavista. The official date for
closure is JUN2084
They advised me that no trains have been run for
some time now since the tracks are considered
unsafe for regular working and JUN2084 is just a
date on paper.
They indicated demolition would not commence
unti I at least the end of this year and possibly not
until 1985. One reason he gave was that Terra­
Transport are willing to consider input from The
Provincial Government, the Municipalities through
which the Line runs, The Newfoundland Transport
Historical Society, and any other interested bodies
regarding a possible
future for the right of way.
CANADIAN
217
R A I L
Does this mean, we could see another Salem &
Hillsborough or a St. Thomas Port Stanley
preservation project in Nfld? One can only hope.
Certainly the Line has some seasonal tourist
potential.
Meanwhile, TT are attaching one or two passenger
cars
to the three times weekly freights from
St. Johns to Carbonear, via BrigusJunction and from
St. Johns to Argentia, via Placentia Junction but
these services are not advertised nor promoted in
any way.
LONG-SUFFERING TRAIN PASSENGERS WHO
ride VIA Rails
routes on cars built at least
30 years ago may get a taste of the future if
they travel between Edmonton and Winnipeg
before Nov. 12.
V I A has leased a double-decker, stainless steel
passenger
train from Amtrak, the United States
passenger giant, to learn more about modern,
long-distance passenger equipment.
While VIA has developed a Light, Rapid, Com­
fortable (LRC) train for use on short-haul commuter
work, its long-haul stock is aging rapidly.
We have
to re-equip sometime soon, VIA
sales representative
John Wondga told The Journal
during a recent tour of the Amtrak Superliner
parked at the CN station.
Wed like 10 of these right now.
These are sleek, sophisticated rail cars des­
igned
to hold roughly 50 per cent more passengers
than conventional equipment, in greater comfort
and with more modern facilities.
The Superliner operates two days a week in
each direction. It leaves Edmonton Mondays and
Fridays and leaves Winnipeg
Sundays and Thur­
sdays.
Other scheduled runs on the Panorama route
are made with regular VIA equipment.
The double-decker coaches put most seats and
sleeping
accomodation on the upper level, and
passageways between cars are all upstairs.
The latter feature is especially helpful in cold
climates,
notes Wondga, because passengers avoid
the cold and snow that accumulates between re­
gular rail cars during
winter runs.
The Superliner· cars, built by Pullman in the
late 1970s, include a number of special features to
help handicapped passengers ride in relative com­
fort.
A special swivel chair in the lower coach section
is easily accessible to a wheelchair. And one lower
bedroom is provided with its own separate, wheel­
chair-accessible
washroom.
Upstairs, coach seats are more like those of
an aircraft than an old train car. Pullman designers
have
managed to squeeze a wide variety of acc­
essories
such as showers, closets and toilets into
the various bedroom areas.
Wondga
is particularly pleased to see that rail
car designers have finally left the age of steam
in providing heat and air conditioning for the
cars.
VIA is seeking reaction to the Superliner from
passengers and railway experts, Wondga says,
before deciding whether it will embark on its own
program of double-decker rail car construction.
VIA claims bilevel equipment could result in a
$50-million annual saving, thanks to the higher
density rail cars that reduce the size of a train
and associated costs per mile.
Current V IA fares between Edmonton and
Winnipeg
for a single adult are $164 coach; l280
for an economy bedroom that sleeps two; $418
for a deluxe bedroom that sleeps two; and $518
for a family room that sleeps two adults and two
children.
FROM SEPTEMBER 20 TO NOVEMBER 12,
VI A Rail Canada operated Amtrak Super­
liner equipment two days a week in each direc­
tion on the Panorama route between Winnipeg
and Edmonton.
VIA leased the stainless steel bi-Ievel equipment
from Amtrak on an experimental basis to test its
suitability in Canadian operating conditions and
its acceptability to the travelling public. The ex­
periment took concurrently with a proto-type
development program; first announced in December,
1983, to evaluate options for equipping VIAs
transcontinental trains.
If bi-Ievel equipment proves to be the chosen
option, it could result in cost savings to VIA of
about $50 million a year. The bi-Ievel passenger
cars
carry more people, while reducing the size
of the train and car~mi Ie costs.
The Superliner operated out of Winnipeg every
Sunday and Thursday during the experimental
period, and out of Edmonton Mondays and Fri·
days. Conventional
VIA equipment will operated
on all other scheduled runs of the Panorama service.
The Superliner train set leased by VIA will
consisted
of a locomotive, a coach, a baggage­
coach. a
44-bed sleeper, and a dining car. One
coach
is equipped with a wheelchair loading ramp
and has a wheelchair accessible washroom, while
the sleeping car features one bedroom designed for
the disabled. The high capacity dining car, with
72 seats, will also provided lounge service to passen­
gers.
The Superliner train set arrived in Winnipeg in
time to permit advance mechanical inspection,
crew and employee orientation and training prior
to its first scheduled run to Edmonton which was
held
on September 20.
S. VIA Rail
Photo courtesy Brian Schuff
THE LONESOME WAIL OFA STEAM WHISTLE
will no longer be
heard at Pinafore Park.
The Portage Flyer is going home.
The two steam engines of the Pinafore Park
Steam Railway, one of Canadas smallest commer­
cially operated railways, were to be loaded on
trucks this afternoon for a trip back to Hunts­
vi lie, Ont., where they began their days of smoke
and steam decades ago.
Im getting older now, said train owner Don
Broadbear,
explaining that he sold the engines
because
of the increasing cost effort to keep them
in running order.
Mr. Broadbear added, however, that he is re­
taining
the Pinafore lines diesel engine and coach
for trips around the loop of park rails.
The two engines were purchased for $40,000
by a group of railway buffs from the Huntsville
area, where
what this city knows as Pinafore No. 1
began its
days as a passenger steamer chugging
along
the one and one-eight-mile track of the
Huntsville and Lake of Bays Railway.
It was
known as the Portage Flyer and ran be­
tween North and South Portage in the Lake of
Bays district in Northern Ontario.
Pinafore No. 2 was manufactured in 1926 by
the Montreal Locomotive Works for the Canadian
Gypsum Co, Windsor, N.S., where it was used
until
1937 when it passed into the hands of the
Huntsville line.
ONLY ONE WAY TO GO
The Portage Flyer was once the only way to
transport tourists and supplies between Hunts­
ville
and Lake of Bays and, in its hayday, the
Huntsvi lie line boasted four engines. By the late
1940s, however, it fell victum to improved roads.
One pair of engines ended up in a pioneer village
in
Minden; Neb., in 1948. The remaining two
were used until 1961 when they were sold to
Mr. Broadbear and his father, Percy.
Through an agreement with the city, the two
men founded the Pinafore Park Steam Railway,
which became a hit with tourists and residents
alike. Despite its
popularity, increasing mainten­
ance costs soon forced Mr. Broadbear to ask the
city in 1971 for a reduction in the $400 rent he paid
for use of the land.
In recognition
of the lines tourist attraction
for the city, the rent was reduced to a token $1
a year.
At the time, then mayor E.O. Fanjoy said the line
is an excellent addition to the park.
It gives it distinction and ties in with the his­
tory of the city, he said.
EXCITED
The citys loss is Huntsvilles gain, however,
and residents are excited about the return of the
engines this weekend. The community plans a
parade for the veteran machines down its main
street at 2 p.m. Saturday.
The society purchasing the engines hopes to
set up a theme park focusing on the history of the
railway where the machines can chug around about
five miles of track.
St. Thomas train buffs can therefore be rest
assured
that the locomotives will find new friends
waiting as the old steamers travel back home to
Huntsville.
S. ST. THOMAS
TIMES JOURNAL
THURSDAY, SEPT, 20, MARKED THE LAST
day a passenger would run in the province.
It
occurs in the fifth year of a five year reo
vitalization program for the Newfoundland Rail·
way by Terra Transport. Come spring, Transport
Canada will make recommendations to the fed·
eral
government on the future of Terra Trans­
port in the Newfoundland transportation enviro­
nment. Passenger trains in the province will play
no role in that future. .
Peter Clarke, president of Terra Transport, said
in the spring issue of the company newsletter,
their operations are now fully computerized, and
that administratively, the company is modern
and up-to-date as any competitors in the trans­
portation industry.
Passenger trains in Newfoundland do not fall
into that category.
The last passenger express train (The Newfie
Bullet) left St. Johns for Port aux Basques. June
30, 1969 after a decision was made in 1968 to
discontinue the service and begin a bus service
across the island.
Last June the line was closed to Bonavista, 17
years after the first application was made to the
Canadian Transport Commission.
In 1982, Terra Transport applied to the eTC
to discontinue passenger service Argentia and
Carbonear. They were granted permission Aug. 15.
Terra Transport reports losses
of more than
$225,000 in 1982. An average of 6.5 paying pass­
engers were habdled between St.
Johns and Ar­gentia; 12.9 passengers between St.
Johns and
Carbonear.
The train
went the 82.3 miles to Argentia, Mon­
day. Wednesday and Friday; and
the 80.1 miles
to Carbonear, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
All the communities served by these trains have
daily bus service.
It takes
$550 worth of fuel to make the return
trip
to Carbonear from St. Johns. At 514 return
fare,
it would take 40 passengers each trip to pay
for fuel alone. S. Evening Telegram St.
Johns Nfld.
-DOUBLE-TRACKING OF THE CANADIAN
Pacific mainline through the mountains is
being made possible by the abolition of the Crowsnest Pass freight rate, says the president
of
CP Rail.
BACK COVER
Russ Allison said the cash flow resulting from
the introduction of the Western Grain Transport­
ation Act last year has enabled CPR to undertake
the biggest
capital works project since the railway
was built
in the 19th century.
You have
to have cash to make things happen
and we were having problems maintaining the
railway line before
the Crow changes, said Al­
lison.
Now were planning to spend $2.8 billion
between
Thunder Bay and Vancouver in the next
few years expanding and improving our system.
Allison
and other top CP executives toured the
Rogers Pass project to check the progress of bridge and tunnel
construction.
CPR was losing
$200 million a year carrying
grain before the Crow rates were abolished, Al­
lison told The Journal.
Work
started this summer on the four-year
$600-million Rogers Pass project, which includes
10 m
iles of tunnels and 5,491 feet of bridges.
There is no more important project at Cana­
dian
Pacific now than the Rogers Pass project,
said Allison. You ca
nt afford to have a major bottleneck
li
ke this between Calgary and Vancouver.
The project is scheduled for completion
in
1988 and will enable CP Rail to boost its YVest·
bound capacity from about 15 trains a day to 20.
The
maximum grade will be reduced from the
present average of 2.2 per cent to one per cent.
That means a six-unit pusher train will no longer
have to be
added to help trains through the dif­
ficult
and winding pass.
Allison
said that would shorten the westbound
trip
by 45 minutes.
S.
Edmonton Journal
A more modern view than the front cover, but it shows that
Canadian innters are still cold. Here Vie see the front of
VIA Rail train The Northland hauled by O.N.R. 1508 at
Kapuskasing Ontario in December 1980. The temperature was
30 below Celsius which is equivalent to 22 be 1 0,,) farenheit~
Photo by Scott C. Anderson.

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