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Canadian Rail 375 1983

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Canadian Rail 375 1983

Canadian Rail
:-… . .
7

No. 375
JULY-AUGUST 1983

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4

NAil
Published bi-monthly by the Canadian Railroad
Historical Association P.O Box 148 St. Constant P.Q.
JOL IXO. Subscription rates $21.20
(US funds if outside Canada)
EDITOR: Fred F Angus
CO-EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
cover
The only known photo of car Saskatchewan before its
1901 modernization, and one of the few to show Van Horne
on the car. The date was May 17 1894 and the place was
the new steel bridge at Stoney Creek in the Selkirk Mountains.
Standing on the platform of the car are (left to right):
Samuel Nordenheimer, Mr. Erskine, Mr. Macdonald, Mr.
Jeffery and William C. Van Horne himself. Seated on
the coupler is Sir Casmir Gzowski, while standing are:
Harry Abbott,
R. Marpole, P.A. Petersen and Henry Irwin.
Looking out
the window is the porter, most likely Jimmy
French. The car in front of Saskatchewan is the
Earnscliffe which, coincidentally, was to bear the name
Saskatchewan from 1917 to 1928. One week after the
photo was taken Van Horne was knighted and became Sir
William.
Photo by R.R. Bruce.
Glenbow -Alberta (nstitute Photo NA-1459-54.
opposite
A clear view of car 38 (formerly Saskatchewan) as it
appeared when in service at Toronto in the early 1930s. It
was then still finished in varnished wood, but was soon to be
painted Tuscan Red.
Photo by James Adams, supplied by Harvey Elson.
A view of the interior of car Saskatchewan showing the
ornate woodwork typical of the elegance of the 1880s. This
woodwork is all original and has survived unchanged for a
century.
Canadian Pacific Photo 12176.
IL
ISSN 0008-4875
NEW BRUNSWICK DIVISION
P.O. Box 1162
Saint John,
New
Brunswick E2L 4G7
ST. LAWRENCE VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 22 Station B
Montreal, Que. H3B 3J5
BYTOWN RAILWAY SOCIETY
P.O. Box 141, Station A
Ottawa,
Ontario K1 N 8V1
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
P.O. Box 5849, Terminal
A,
Toronto Ontario M5W 1 P3
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
300 Cabana Road East,
Windsor
Ontario N9G 1A2
GRAND RIVER DIVISION
P.O. Box 603
Cambridge,
Ontario N1 R 5W1
NIAGARA DIVISION
P.O. Box 593
St. Catha rines,
Ontario L2R 6W8
ROCKY
MOUNTAIN DIVISION
P.O. Box 6102, Station C,
Edmonton Alberta T5B 2NO
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN DIVISION
60 -6100, 4th Ave. NE
Calgary, Alberta T2A 5Z8
CROWSNEST
& KETTLE-VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 400
Cranbrook, British Columbia
V1C 4H9
PACIFIC COAST DIVISION
P.O. Box 1006, Station A,
Vancouver British Columbia V6C 2P1
By: Fred Angus.
March 2 1983 marked the one-hundredth ann­
iversary
of the delivery of official car Saskatc­
hewan to the Canadian Pacific Railway. This car,
popularly known as Van Hornes Car, is now one
of the most historic and significant exhibits at the
Canadian Railway Museum. Over the years many
stories have been told about this car, some true,
some false, and a great deal of confusion ha,s arisen.
This
is partly due to the fact that C.P. had, at
different times, no less than four cars named Sask­
atchewan and it is sometimes difficult, in listening
to old stories, to tell which apply to the real
Saskatchewan. A few of the statements (all of
them false) applied to this car are: It was Van
Hornes private
property and was bought by the
C.P.R. after his death. It was only built in 1901
after the original car was scrapped ., It was never
used by Van Horne
at all., It was an 1886 slee­
ping car and
only became an official car in the
1920s., It was the first official car built for the
C.P.R., It was the C.P.R. official car ever used
by Van
Horne. An excellent way to commemorate
the centennial of this historic car would be to tell
the true story and to show once again that truth
is stranger than fiction.
One hundred years ago the construction of the
Canadian Pacific main line was in filii swing as the
builders put every effort into the project to span
the continent within five years. Since the railheads
were
constantly moving the headquarters of the
construction superintendants had to be mobile,
and so official cars were needed from the very
start. In order fully to understand the reason for the
construction of the Saskatchewan it is necessary
to consider briefly the other nine official cars, of
various designs, acquired by C.P. in 1881 and 1882.
They were a rather varied lot, largely second-hand,
but none really filled the requirements later sat­
isfied
by the Saskatchewan.
The first car specifically described as Official
by the C.P.R. was No.7, acquired from the Canada
Central Railway in
June 1881. This was most
likely used as a mobile office on construction in
the east and was not available for the use of the
directors. Remodelled into a revenue car in the late
1880s, it remained on C.P.s roster until 1907
The funeral train of Sir William Van Horne at Windsor Station in September 1915. Car Saskatchewan is on the rear
of the train. The coffin was carried in the 60-foot baggage car which had been fitted up as a Chapel, however the mourners
rode in the Saskatchewan~ The train travelled at a slow speed on its run to Joliet Illinois.
Canadian Railway and Marine World, October 1915.
CANADIAN
117 R A I L
MANUFACTURERS OF ROLLING STOCK FOR RAILROADS, FROGS, CAR WHEELS, tI
CD
.,
Capital Stock, $760,000.
Ground. Occupied, 18 Acre •.
And all kinds of Castings.
JO Pa..eDger and nalflfnl~ per Month.
EMPLOY 1,000 MEN. =:
o
c
Cftpaclty, 1& Freight CUI and 100 Car Wheeh per dllY. ESTA.BLISHED :1849. Six Million Fee oC Lumber I .. Store.
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J.D.PLATT,Secy. C!:
F. E. SMITII, 04 •• 1. s,.,,J. ..:::
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~he factory of Ba~ney and Smith at D~yton Ohio at about the time when the Saskatchewan was buHt. Despite the
ftrst-class constructIon the car was ready In only about four months from when it was ordered.
Poors Manual,
1879.
when it was destroyed in a disasterous wreck at
Caledon Ontario. Close on the heels of NO.7 came
official car No.1, purchased from the Grand Trunk
Railway in July of 1881. Car No.1 was assigned to
the Western Division Headquarters at Winnipeg
and, until the arrival of St. L. & 0., No.9 in the
spring of 1882, was the only CPR official car in
the West. It was rebuilt to a pay car in 1884 -still
bearing
the Number 1 -and was renumbered to
25 in 1886. Later re-numbered 42, this car was
converted
to a revenue car late 1890s and retired
in 1929. These two cars were the only official cars
acquired
by C.P. in the year 1881, and while it may
seem
stange that there were so few it is probably
explained by the fact that other types such as vans
were no
doubt used by officials during this time
and, in fact, in later times as well.
During
1882, seven official cars began operating
on C.P. rails including one that was not formally
added to the roster until 1885. These included two
from the St. Lawrence and Ottawa Railway, one
from the Quebec Montreal Ottawa and Occidental,
two pay cars built new, one business car built new
for the contractors Langdon and Shepard, and one
directors car built new. First to come were the two
from the St. L. & 0., formerly numbers 9 and 10
of that road. Both had very long careers and both
have been preserved. No. 9 came in April 1882,
was numbered CPR 77 in October of that year
and renumbered to 78 in 1886. Later it became 14,
then, in 1907, received Numer 1, and served until
1962. It was then retired and was preserved at the
Canadian Railway Museum. No. 10 underwent some
modifications so did not join the fleet until August
12 1882; still bearing the number 10, it was sent
to the Western lines and became the official car of
the General Manager, William C. Van Horne. In
1885 it later became No. 77 and in later years
had several re-namings and re-numberings before,
as No. 39, it was retired in 1956. The body was
used
for years as a hunting lodge but it has since
been restored and is now at the Portage La Prairie –
Fort La Reine Museum in Manitoba. The Q.M.O.
& O. car, official car 1 acquired in June 1882, was
CANADIAN 118
R A I L
almost new having been built about 1880. It retain­
ed its original number (No.1) for a few years and
was used mostly by Sir John A. MacDonald the
Prime Minister
of Canada. After a short period
when
it was named Hull, it became the Jamaica
about 1886 in honour of Lady MacDonalds birth­
place. It served the Prime Minister until February
3 1890 when
it was destroyed in a fire at Ottawa
station.
It was then replaced by former Q.M.O. &
O. parlour car, hastily converted to an official car
and renamed Earnscliffe, of which we will hear
more later. The
two pay cars, numbered 112 and
137, were
built in June and November 1882 respect­
ively and served
C.P. for a number of years. Pay
cars were numbered in the same series as conduct­
ors
vans which accounts for their widely spaced
numbers. The
other car sent to Western lines during
was built new for the use of the contractors Lan­
gdon and Shepard
who were building the line
across the prairies. Although not at that time a
C.P. car, it was used in building the C.P. line during
an important time. When Langdon and Shepards
contract ended on reaching Calgary in August
1883 the car
was used by James Ross and event­
ually, in 1885,
was bought by C.P. and given
number 76.
It was present at the driving of the last
spike in November 1885 and in later days
was nam­
ed II Rosemere. Sold to the Edmonton Dunvegan
and British Columbia (now Northern Alberta
Railways) in 1921,
it was in use until the early
1960s and
is now preserved at the Heritage Park
Calgary. The one remaining official car acquired in
1882
was the first one built for the directors and
was named Metapedia. This was the first C.P.
official car to be named, was the immediate pre­
decessor
of the Saskatchewan, and the histories
of both cars are quite closely related in the early
days.
Even before the end of 1881 it was realized that
there was no car for the President and Higher
officials. President George Stephen decided
that
such a car should be built and some discussion
was held on this matter. One piece of correspon­
dance which survived
is a letter written on Dec­
ember 6 1881
by R.B. Angus, one of the C.P.R.
syndicate, to William C. Van Horne who had
been appointed General Manager but who was
still in Milwaukee as his term of office with C.P.
did not start until January 1 1882. This interes­
ting letter
reads as follows:
W.C. Van Horne Esq.
6th Dec. 1881
Milwaukee
Dear Sir,
We have no official car and the president con­
templates having one built. He has been furnished
with
the enclosed plan by the Pullman Company
but before adopting it I have suggested he should
ask you to give it some consideration as I am under
the impression you advocate some novelty of
arrangement that would prove a benefit. If you
were to communicate with the Barney Smith Co
and get a plan from them embodying your ideas,
forwarding it here for approval before Mr. Stephen
leaves for Europe, we should be much obliged. –
We think special accommodation should be set
aside for the cook and porter, as if they are not
thus provided for they are apt to make themselves
comfortable anywhere. The other details seem
rather good altho (except for servants) there does
not seem any call for upper berths as it is not
proposed to have a sleeping car for a large number
of people -eight I suppose would be enough.
Pullman has given no estimate of price, but says
the car can be delivered five months. from date of
order.
Yours truly
R.B. Angus
It should be noted that the car in question was
not intended for use of Van Horne (who, as we
have seen, was assigned car No. 10 in August 1882)
but was for George Stephen, the President. How­
ever
it was felt wise to obtain the advice of the soon­
to-be General Manager on the proposed
layout
of the car. Unfortunately the plan submitted with
the letter has not survived, but the eventual order
was given, not to Pullman or Barney and Smith,
but to the Ohio Falls Company of Jeffersonville,
Indiana. The car
was delivered on June 1 1882 and
was named Metapedia, after the river in the
Gaspe Region where Stephen and his associates
used to fish for salmon during their leisure time.
So by the summer of 1882, both the President in
Montreal
and the General Manager in Winnipeg
each had an official car.
Before long, however,
it appeared that the met­
apedia was not quite large enough for its function;
perhaps the limited accommodation mentioned
above
was a bit too limited! However the issue was
forced early in the Autmn of 1882 when the Met­
apedia was heavily damaged by fire. For some time
its future was in doubt as it was thought that the
heavy repairs required
might not be worthwhile
economically. Eventually it was decided to repair
it, and it was sent to Barney and Smith who rebuilt
Car 38 by the transfer table at Angus Shops about 1929. Note that the upper sashes of the side windows were still shaped
as in 1883. These were later changed to a simpler shape but are slated to be restored in the future.
Canadian Pacific Photo 4392.
CANADIAN
120
R A I L
it at a cost of $7000.00 (about half the cost of
a new car) which shows that the damage must
have been severe. As a point of interest, another
car Metapedia was built in 1886 and for two
years there were two cars with the same name in
use, referred to as Old Metapedia and New
Metapedia. Old Metapedia was renamed Cham­
plain in 1888 and served until 1925 when, as car
British
Columbia, it was destroyed in a rock­
slide near Princeton B.C. Since
Metapedia was
out of service in the Autumn of 1882, and was
considered
too small anyway, a new official car
was planned. It is strange that there is no official
record
of an appropriation of funds or the placing
of the order. However the order was placed some­
time in the Autumn of 1882, with Barney and
Smith
the well known car builders of Dayton
Ohio. The new car was
to be 60 feet long over
end sills (compared
to 52 feet for Metapedia),
and was of first class construction. Cost of cons­
truction. was $13,500.00, to which was added 30
percent import duty, making a total expense of
more than $17,500.00, a large sum for 1883. In
due course the car was completed and on March
2
1883 joined the C.P. fleet as the Saskatchewan,
the tenth official car of the C.P.R., and the second
to bear a name.
The Saskatchewan must have presented an
impressive sight when it was delivered
to C.P.s
Hochelaga
shop that March day. Fresh from the
builder, its exterior board-and-batten sides were
resplendant
in painted and varnished finish and gold
leaf lettering.
The large plate glass windows at the
ends, extending up into the letter board, promised
spectacular views
of the line to the directors who
would soon be riding the car. The interior was elaborately finished in carved mahogany, plush
upholstery and delicately
etched glass. It was a
true product of the decade which is often termed
the elegant eighties, and while not as flambo­
yant as some private cars of the period, its decor
gave the impression of a solid tasteful elegance,
a car
most; fitting for the directors of what was
soon
tooecome the longest railway in the world.
The name chosen for
the car was also approp­
riate
for the job it was to do. The C.P. R. line had
just been completed
through the Saskatchewan
territory and the name was symbolic of the new
Canada which would soon be opened
to settlers.
Until
the coming of the railway the valley of the
Saskatchewan seemed mysterious and almost as
remote as
the moon would be today, and few
Canadians had been within a
thousand miles of it.
While
there is no proof that the name was chosen
by Van Horne it
is quite likely that it was.
Few
contemporary records survice of the ear­
liest
days of the career of this car. One letter that
does exist is to the companys insurance agent
saying
tl:1at the new directors car had just been
delivered
at Hochelaga and should be covered for
$10,000.00 until a full valuation could be made.
This was less
than 60 percent of its cost so pre­
sumably
the coverage was soon increased. The car
was assigned to President Stephen and it remained
the Presidents car for several months until, in the
Summer of 1883, the rebuilt Metapedia was
returned
by Barney and Smith. Metapedia was
then once more assigned to the President, it now
being considered large enough in view of the fact
that Saskatchewan was available too; possibi­
Iy also its accommodation had been altered in the
rebuilding. During this time the Saskatchewan
had its first moment of history when it was a part
of the first train into Calgary in August 1883,
and a number of the C.P.R. directors took part
in the commemoration of this event. In mid-1883
Saskatchewan was assigned to the Vice-President
who was then Duncan Mcintyre, one of the or­
iginal C.P.R.
syndicate, though it was available to
the other directors as well. The following year
Mcintyre resigned and on May 14 1884 the direct­
ors
appointed Van Horne as Vice-President in
addition to his duties as General Manager. Van
Horne had
already moved from Winnipeg to Mon­
treal,
and now he relinquished the use of car 10
and was assigned the Vice-Presidents car -the
Saskatchewan. So began an association between
man and car that was to last for thirty-one years;
the remainder of Van Hornes life. The part played
by
the car during that period has earned it a prom­
inent place
in the history of Canadas railways.
The next two years were ones of unprecedented
activity as the railway was pushed to completion
in readiness for the opening of the transcontinental
line in June 1886. It is during this time that crisis
after crisis occurred which several times threatened
to bankrupt the whole enterprise. The Saskat­
chewan was Van Hornes home as he was con­
stantly travelling from point to point directing
operations and making decisions which might
make the difference between success and failure
for
the C.P.R. How many of these decisions were
made on board the Saskatchewan we do not
know, but it was at this time that the legends were
made as the epic story moved on to its conclusion.
Across
the prairies, through the mountains, at
innumerable stations, the indominatable Vice
President
and his car seemed to be everywhere!
Early
in 1885 the most serious financial crisis
threatened to stop the work, but that one too was
surmounted and construction went ahead through
the Selkirk mountains, the last barrier. Some even­
ings,
after a good days work, the sound of some
,;,~~~{ .. —….,~—~….,.,~!
-:~.::,
A detail of a swing door in Saskatchewan showing the woodwork and the fancy glass. NOfidhe photo of Van Horne on
the wall.
Canadian Pacific Photo 12175.
CANADIAN
122 RAJ L
classical aria would be heard coming from the
Saskatchewan and echoing th rough the wi lei
mountain passes. Everyone knew what that meant;
the Big Chief was satisfied with the days work and
was expressing his satisfaction in music on the
violin. Then the most historic moment of all occurr­
ed
on November 7 1885 when the last spike was
driven,
and car Saskatchewan was present. The
following June 28 the first through transcontin­
ental train left Montreal for Port Moody and the
big push was over at last.
1886 saw the first of the annual inspection
trips by Van Horne across the system. While there
was much business to be conducted there was also
time for relaxation, and stories are still told of the
parties and entertainments held in the dining room
of the Saskatchewan during these tours. In 1888
George Stephen resigned the Presidency, and on
August 7 1888 William C. Van Horne became the
C.P. R. s second President. One might have thought
that he would now take up the use of the Pres­
idents car vacated by George Stephen. What actual­
ly happened was that Saskatchewan was now
designated the Presidents car and so continued to
be used by Van Horne. Despite his down-to-earth
practical nature Van Horne evidently had some
sentiment for the car he had used during the diff­
ictJl:i: years and he continued to use it for the rest
o
f.:·his career. About this time the first modern­
itation took place. In company with most pass­
enger cars it was lighted
by oil lamps, but in the late
eighties
experiments were made with gasoline
vapor lighting despite
the potential danger of this
highly explosive
mixture in a wooden car. Even­
tually
these lights were removed and the car rev­
erted to oil light, but about 1901 the Gould elec­
tric lighting system was
fitted, and electric light
continued on the car from then on.
On May 24 1894 Queen Victoria conferred a
knighthood on Van Horne who thus became Sir
William. Interestingly
the only known photograph
of him on the Saskatchewan was taken at Stoney
Creek B.C. only one week before this event. During
most of the Van Horne years the Saskatchewan
was available, on numerous occasions, to digna­
taries and
important persons such as Govenors
General.
The list of those who have ridden this
car would read like a Whos Who of important
Canadians of the late Nineteenth century. One
notable occasion occurred in 1888 when Govenor
General,
the Marquess of Lorne and his wife the
Princess Louise left Canada for England at the end
of the Marquesss term of office. They made the
journey from Ottawa to Quebec City aboard the
Saskatchewan and their impressions of the
accommodation have been recorded for posterity.
No story of the Saskatchewan in this period
could be complete without mention of Jimmy
French the porter on the car for many years. He
became a close
confident of Van Horne and each
had great respect
for the other. In the 1890s
French went to Chicago to seek his fortune there,
but soon longed for the C.P.R. and he returned to
Montreal. At first Van Horne pretended no to want
him back, but one day the Saskatchewan was
going
out, no porter was available (probably due to
intentional manoeuvring) and Jimmy French was
assigned
to the car. For a few hours there was a
feigned coolness
between Van Horne and the por­
ter, but then the tension was broken and things
were soon as
they had been before. In the Summer
of 1901, on a very hot day, Jimmy French was
preparing
the car for a run when he collapsed and
died aboard the Saskatchewan. The chief mo­
urner at the funeral was Sir William Van Horne.
On
June 12 1899 Sir William resigned the
A very interesting group of photos showing work being done during the exterior restoration of Saskatchewan at the
Canadian Rai/way Museum.
All photos by Harvey Elson.
presidency of the C.P. R. and became Chairman of
the Board.
As would be expected he continued to
use the Saskatchewan which was now assigned
to the Chairman and Directors. However his act­
ivities now took him to far distant places such
as
Cuba and Guatemala so his C.P. official car was often used for other purposes.
In 1901 the future
King George V and Queen Mary (then Duke and
Duchess of Cornwall and York) came
to Canada and
two special trains were assembled. It was decided
to include the Saskatchewan and the car under­
went a considerable modernization. The board­
and-batten siding which had been
so fashionable
in the 1870s and early 80s was now considered
obsolete so it disappeared and was replaced by
varnished mahogany tongue-and-groove sheathing
in keeping with the standard for C.P. R. passenger
cars first adopted
in the mid-1880s. Several win-dows were closed up, some were squared off, and
the end platforms were lengthened and strength­
ened. However
the interior remained much as it
had been and most
of the ornate woodwork rem­
ained intact. The outside appearance, however,
had considerably altered and
in fact did not change
much again during
the remainder of the cars career
except for
the much-later application of tuscan red
paint.
In the first decade of the twentieth century
it still had its moments of glory, one being in
August 1906 when it was on a train that attained a
speed of 79
3/4 miles an hour near Bagot Manitoba.
By now Van Horne was beginning to get old
and
he realized that his active days with the C.P.R.
were over. Accordingly with a certain
amount of
sadness
he retired from the position of Chairman
of the Board on May 9 1910 (just three days after the start of
the reign of George V), Saskatchewan
CANADIAN 124 R A I L
too was getting old and it was then declared a spare
car at Montreal,
but it still retained its name and
was, of course, available
to Van Horne whenever
he wished
to use it. During the next five years he
did use the car on occasions, but then on September
11 1915 the news bulletin Van Horne is dead
was flashed across the country. So ended the career
of the man who was almost certainly Canadas
greatest railroader. Three days later car Saskat­
chewan went on its saddest journey when it
was
the last car of a special funeral train, hauled by
locomotive 2213, which carried Van Hornes
rem­
ains
to his home town of Joliet Illinois where he
was buried. The coffin was carried in a baggage
car which had been fitted up
as a chapel, but those
accompanying the move slept
in the Saskatche­
wan which went with its master on his last ride.
When the Saskatchewan retu rned to Montreal
it was once more a spare car,
but not for long.
On January 18 1916 it was assigned to the General
Superintendant
of the Eastern Region at Montreal
and was renamed Laurentian. Thus it lost its
orginal identity which it had had for 33 years.
It remained Laurentian for 18ss than a year, for
later
in 1916 the districts were reorganized and the
Eastern Division became the Quebec District.
So
it was that November 27 1916 the car was renamed
Quebec and was assigned
to the General Super­
intendent of the Quebec District
in which pos-
Itlon it remained for almost thirteen years. In this
reorganization of districts there was also a Sask­
atchewan District and here the confusion starts.
It would have been nice if the old Saskatchewan
could have been assigned
to its namesake district
but this did not happen. Curiously, the Genl Supt; of
the Eastern Division was A. E. Stevens,
who became Genl Supt. of the Saskatchewan
District
at the time of the reorganization. Too bad
he did not take the Laurentian with him when
he went West -the name Saskatchewan would
have been restored
to its rightfu I place. Instead
the former Q.M.O.
& O. parlour car which had
become the Earnscliffe and,
as we have seen,
was used by Sir John
A. MacDonald from 1890
to 1891, was, on March 15 1917, renamed Sask­
atchewan and was assigned
to the Saskatchewan
District.
In this position it remained until February
29 1928 when it became No. 25 and remained
in
service until the early 1960s at which time it was
retired and subsequently preserved by the Puget
Sound Railway Historical Society
in the state of
Washington. Following the renumbering of the
second Saskatchewan a third car received that
name. This was the former business car St And­
rews which had started life
in 1886 as the sleep­
ing car Australia. It carried the name Saska­tchewan from early 1928 until
May 20 1930 after
which it became Champlain. later No. 4 and
Soon after the paint was scraped off, the Saskatchewan is hauled out of the No.2 building at the museum to be photo­
graphed.
Photo by Gordon Hi/I.
Freshly varnished but with the railing not yet restored, the Saskatchewan poses for a photo at the Museum.
Photo
by Gordon Hill.
Saskatchewan forms a backdrop
to a group of antIque auwmOIJlleS on a visit to the Canadian Railway Museum. The
railway car was almost forty years old when most of the autos were built!
Photo by Gordon Hill.
CANADIAN
126
R A I L
, ~ .. ,
~ .
..
0.
• ~. t.
. ~ … ~ ..
-. .
. …
was retired and scrapped in December 1959. Fin­
ally,
in 1930, a brand-new steel Saskatchewan
was built and carried the name until 1962 when it
received
number 12 under which identity it rem­
ains
topay. Thus we see that there have been four
cars nat:J;)frd Saskatchewan, three of which were
wooderWcim built in the 1880s so it is quite easy
to see~wlfy historians, seeing a photo of a car let­
tered Saskatchewan, can become quite confused
as to which is which!
Meanwhile, what was happening to the original
Saskatchewan? It remained on the Quebec
District, bearing the name Quebec, until August
23 1929. By now it had been in service for 46
years and was considered an old car. New steel cars
were being
built for district superintendants and
a new Quebec went into service in the Summer
of 1929. The old one was downgraded to a division
superintendants car, was stripped of its name and
given number 38. It was assigned to the superin­
tendant of the Trenton Division near Toronto and
was destined to remain in that service for the next
twenty-nine years. No. 38 was still finished in the
varnished wood, one of the last cars to retain
this finish,
but about 1930 it was finally painted
tuscan red like all the other passenger equipment,
both wood and steel. In 1933 the car reached the
age of fifty years but few now recognized it. Most
of the people who had built C.P.R. were now gone
and
although stories were still told of the days of
Van Horne they were fast receding into the past
and
not many knew, or cared, that the old Sask­
atchewan was still around. This was the time of
the great depression and there was little effort
, . ~ ,. .
0,
made in those days to preserve relics of Canadian
history.
Another quarter-century went by and car No.
38 continued in its duties on the Trenton Division.
Due
to its good construction and equally good
maintenance over the years, the car remained in
good condition, and its interior was still much as
its had been
in the 1880s. By the late 1950s
retired steel passenger cars were being converted
into official cars, and the old wooden cars were
rapidly being retired. At last No. 38, after 75 years
of active service, came to the end of its active life
and was retired in 1958. In company with other old
cars it was slated
to be scrapped, but at this time
the C.R.H.A. learned of the retirement of the car.
Despite
the confusion of names, consultation of
records and measurements confirmed that No. 38
was in fact Van Hornes car the original Sask­
atchewan, built by Barney and Smith in 1883
and used by Sir William Van Horne. As it happened,
the C.R.H.A. had recently acquired business car
No. 37 but due to lack of storage space had rel­
inquished it again, and it had been scrapped. This
time, however, rescue was at hand. The Domin­
ion Bridge
Company in Lachine offered to house
the car and accordingly the Canadian Pacific Rail­
way Co. donated car 38 to the C.R.H.A. and it
was moved
to Dominion Bridge November 1958.
Five years later the new Canadian Railway
Museum
at Delson was sufficiently advanced to
be able to house wooden equipment under cover,
and No. 38 was moved to the Museum in 1963.
It has remained there ever since and recently had
the tuscan red paint stripped off and was finished
CANADIAN
127
R A I L
once again in varnished wood. At the same time the
old name Saskatchewan was restored so today
the car closely resembles its appearance in the
years from 1901 to 1916.
Today the Saskatchewan is one of the most
prized exhibits of the Canadian Railway Museum
as it
becomes a centenarian. As one sits in the din­
ing
room it is not diff j cult to imaqine that one can
almost hear the sound of the conferances that
took place there long ago and hear the voice of
Van Horne as he made the decisions and gave the
orders that resulted in the completion of the link
that bound the country together a century ago.
It
is sincerely hoped that this car will long sur­
vive as
one of the historic relics that played an
important part in the history of Canada.
The interim exterior restoration complete, Saskatchewan is shown with operating steam locomotive John Molson II
near the main entrance to the Museum.
Photo by Gordon Hill.
THE GAZmE, SATURDAY, MARCH 21,1959 21
Van Hornes Car Number 38 Is Kept
As A Memento Of Railroad History
A
N old-fashioned railroad car
bearing number 38 stands
at a Montreal siding today, the
only survivor
of one of Can­
adas greatest stories.
Number
38, the private car
of Sir Wilfiam Van Horne, vice­
president
of The Canadian
Pacific Railway at its comple­
tion
in 1885, has been retired
fromservice. Now it awaits its
final
rest in a museum.
The
car is 76 years old origi­
nally but when it hare proudly
the
name Saskatchewan, it
c~lried Van Horne and his colo
leagues to Craigellachie, B.C.,
in 1885 for the driving of the
last spike, completing the CPR
from
coast to coast.
Donald Smith,
later Lord
Strathcona, swung the
hammer
in Eagle Pass, that Nov. 7, iii
th~presence of Van Horne, and
Chief Engineer Sanford Flem­
ing. The hoot
of a steam whistle
and the chime
of the sledge on
by
Patrick Nagle
the spike echoed through the
Selkirk Mountains, honoring one
of the promises
of Confedera­
tion.
The first Transcontinental
. -tiny
by modern standards –
was composed
of an engine, a
baggage
car and the two pri­
vate
cars of Smith and Van
Horne, the Saskatchewan and
the Metapedia.
The human participants
in the
last spike
drama have all died.
The engine that pulled their
midget
train was lorn apart for
scrap years ago. And the Meta­
pedia burned to her trucks
at
Princeton, B.C., in 1925.
Even the last spike is gone.
It was cut up into trinkets for
railroaders wives, and the
maul used to drive the spike
was
last seen in Lord Strath­
conas
basement -being used
The interior of Sir William Van Hornes private car
to break coal for the furnace.
Number
38, built in 1883 by
Barney and Smith, Dayton,
01)io, is still in magnificent
condition .
It is constructed entirely of
mahogany and the interior
panelling still g
lows dark red
in the
light of its brass lamps.
In the ma
ster compartment is
the original
brass bedstead –
riveted to the floor.
The Saskatchewans salva­
tion is due
to the fore-sighted­
ness of
1ts former owners, the
CPR, and the enthusiasm
of its
custodians, the Canadian Rail­
road Historical Association.
The association, composed of
railroad men (both buffs and
experts)
has gathered the finest
collection
of early Canadian
rolling stock to be found any­
where. Members
have spent untold
hours
of their own time ferret­
ling oul these pieces, and then
put
in more hours-with th@,
aid of pUblic·spirited companies
-resloring them.
Besides the Van Horne
car,
their work in the past year has
inlol ved the,
discovery and res­
toration
of several old street
cars–some built as early as
1895-and the negotiation for
larger pieces
of stock such as
soon·to·be-scrapped
steam loco­
motives.
The association plans to
re­
store the Van Horne
car to all
its former glory. and
possibly
use it for executive meetings
in the future.
In carrying out the
restora·
tion work, the association has
received support from such
firms as the Montreal
Trans-
portation Commission. the CNR and CPR and Dominion Bridg&
Ltd.
The association has acauired
the relics to start a museum,
and is currently working on its
biggest problem: a place to
put them.
The logical spot would be a
roundbouse such as houses
the
famed Amencan railway mus­
eum at BaltllTIOre. Md. or at
least something of a similar
size -possibly an abandoned
street car barn.
A museum committee head­
ed by Prof. Robert Nicholls
of
McGill is working on a propo­
sal that would establish
ana·
tional Canadian railway mus­
eum here. preserving a great
part of the country·s history
and heritage-the story of her
railroads.
An article which appeared in the Montreal Gazette in 1959 when the Saskatchewan was acquired by the C.R.H.A.
THE FIRST TEN OFFICIAL CARS ON C.P.R. LINES
June 1881
Late 1880s
1907
July 1881 1884
1886
Late 1890s
1929
Apr. 1882
Oct. 1882
1886
1890s
May
1907
1963
May 1882
Feb. 1885
Feb. 1886
Sep. 1894
Oct.
1916
Dec. 1919
Nov.
1920
C. 1921
1929
C. 1932
C. 1948 1964
June
1882
1883
1888
Mar.
1910 July 1920 1925
June
1882
C. 1885
C. 1886
Feb. 1890
June 1882
1884
1890s
1906
1913 CAR 7
Bought from
Canada Central Ry. Ex C.C.R. Official Car
Converted to Revenue Car
Wrecked at Caledon Ontario
CA R 1 (Assigned
to Western Lines)
Bought
from Grand Trunk Railway
Converted
to Pay Car 1.
Renumbered to Pay Car 25
Converted
to Revenue Car
Retired
CAR 9
Leased from St. Lawrence & Ottawa Ry. Ex Car 9
Bought and renumbered 77
Renumbered 78
(to avoid confusion with Car 77 in West)
Renumbered 14
Renumbered 1
Retired and donated
to C.R.H.A.
CONTRACTORS CAR
Built new by Harlan & Hollingsworth for Langdon Shepard & Co.
Purchased
by C.P.R. and renamed Construction Car
Numbered 76
Named Rosemere
Renamed
New Brunswick
Renamed Rosemere
Sold
to Edmonton Dunvegan & British Columbia Ry.
Renamed Dunvegan
E.D. &
B.C. became Northern Alberta Railways
May
have been renamed Peace River
Probably renumbered 3
Retired and donated
to Heritage Park in Calgary
CAR
METAPEDIA
Built new by Ohio Falls Company
Rebuilt
by Barney & Smith (after fire damage)
Renamed Champlain
Renamed Nanoose
Renamed British Columbia Destroyed in rock slide near Princeton
B.C.
CAR 1 (Assigned to Eastern Lines)
Bought from Q.M.O.
& O. Ry. Ex Official Car 1
Named
Hull
Renamed Jamaica
Destroyed
by fire at Ottawa Station
CAR 112
Built new as Pay Car
Converted to Official Car 112.
Renumbered 25
Renumbered 10
Retired
lC:
I
r
i
;
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~
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-,-
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AND
UPPER BER,H
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rr
Elevation view of Saskatchewan as it likely appeared
the board-and-batten sides.
Drawing by James Shields.
I ,,j
.. —
Br.
.JiL i!eo .lli(.l 2e J
I I
.L
I ~ I ~
VPPER
~
~
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) (~
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.. s,)
47
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-~
~rc:jJ7~?E
r A_n i.

T·· • •
.,,,.
…….
/

V
I
/

,/

[] [JJ
~
SorA.
AND
[
UppeR BEFTH.
V
_L..
r-~&U.TH u.P!o __

– r·
L . —-1
t(.J ~
-.
M~;:f!8/ ~ d>
,
/ ui
0
. ~~lI)
/ •. —-c::.
~
00 ……….
U
w
a,,~
[/,~.
~
Sa-AT
Q
j ;( PACAq. ~ ~ H.ATe~.
UPP.p.
~~
L.OC.KE –
e.fIIlTM
– -.. ==(
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~O-Q Q~I:
A plan view of Saskatchewan after its modernizati
how some of the 1883 windows were modified while at
J
I I [-=::J c:=J I I ! 1 I I DI 1 I ID
~ I F I Q H ~ I LiV ~ y-.
!JDD DO DO g
I
I
,-,-
II II II II
lli
H
fl
A
f
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bJJ
L..,
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~en new in 1883. Note the large windows at the ends, and also
.s·ars· 1 oIIe
0,1 .. , .. 11. I …. 131 Stb
I I
If
I II

(;Ht..$T Or
/ l )00
DW·O<~TOL.~T QJ
0 °1 I~
.L
/;
l5
RAN E,
P
JoLRROIt …..
/,
KITCHEN,
PAIV …….. ROOM.
(w·e.
/
-.-
10-0 _ e,8
/ /

>~
I-z,f
(0–~–4
-~
EJ MWR
v,
C.OTHr.~
/
BED

T_~
L.oCk:E.R: LOCK.R
R£,.,..lO
, ,.. (!o,.q.:

, .. :
~
~ G PAS.sAQ,E. ~…:
,=4 , — =l F=- , ,~ ..
UL
..
m , .. –
_IOI: –
~ I
AME
r) 1901. Jhis is essentially the same as it is today and shows
were closed up.
!~
~
~-
(I
~
.,..~,
,=I
…… I
IB: lo-i
;
~
oj
4
0 0
I> < I)
4 <
a i
..
~
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)
u ~
II.
r<
~
== =
D-D=~
II
~ =
f J
~ + )) ~ + ))
,/ ~ ./~s~ms
s … -I ,: Ga i/,,-
J
0
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VI
W
fv10vABL.k CMA1TI D

,–
,-
i
1-
—, .-.-
f–!
_-L-.LL:::.lL/, _
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IA: F I
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DINING ~OOf¥.
r.
[j
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r-
U
Aug. 1882
1885
1890s
1906
Mar. 1917
July 1919
Aug. 1956
1976
Nov. 1882
1886
Mar. 1883
Jan. 1916
Nov. 1916
Aug. 1929
Oct. 1958 CAR 10
Bougl1t
from St. Lawrence &. Ottawa Ry. Ex Car 10
Renumbered
77 (Inadvertantly duplicating Car 77 in East)
Renumbered 15
Named
Ullooet
Renamed Alberta
Numbered 39
Retired
and became Hunting Lodge
Preserved at Fort La Reine Museum
CAR 137
Built new as Pay Car
Converted to Van 137. Later retired
CAR
SASKATCHEWAN
Built new by Barney & Smith
Renamed
Laurentian
Renamed Quebec
Numbered 38
Retired
and donated to C.R.H.A;
THE OTHER THREE C.P.R. SASKATCHEWANS
SASKA TCHEWAN /I
C. 1881 a.M.O. & O. Parlour Car Chapleau
June 1882 North Shore Railway Parlour Car Chapleau
Sep. 1885 Bought by C.P.R. as Parlour Car Chapleau
May 1890 Converted to Official Car and renamed Earnscliffe
Mar. 1917 Renamed Saskatchewan
Feb. 1928 Numbered 25
1964 Retired and sold to Puget Sound Railway Museum
Canadian Pacific Photo 20072.
SASKA TCHEWAN 11/
Jul. 1886 Built by Crossen as Sleeping Car Australia
Nov. 1913 Converted to Official Car and renamed St Andrews
Jan. 1928 Renamed Saskatchewan
May 1930 Renamed Champlain
Jan. 1934 Numbered 4
Dec. 1959 Retired and scrapped
Photo bv Omer Lavallee Julv 1947.
SASKA TCHEWAN IV
Apr. 1930 Built by C.P.R. as Official Car Saskatchewan
1962 Numbered 12
1983 Still on Cp Rail Roster
Canadian Pacific Photo 204969.
HUe
963
.4
west
of
Win
nI
peg
.
Tracklaying
en~s
for
the
1
883
s
eason
.
1QC
~
..
4(> ….
GAP
The
Approach
o . Miles
to
the
Mountains,
10
20
30
canadian
Pacific
Track built 1883
Mile
74.26
-750.28
west
o[
Winnipeg:
6.
02
tliles
of
track
laid
7
July
18
83.
Progress
of
Track
Construction,
1883
Miles
from
Temporary
Permanent
Date
railhead
Miles
from
Temporary
Permanent
Date
railhead
Miles
from
Temporary
Pe
r
manent
Winnipeg
Designation
Name
reached
this
point
Winnipeg
Designation
Name
reached
this
point
Wi
nnipeg
De
s
ignation
Name
589.2
(Consl
ruc
tof1
slanell
fot
1883
season
althis
point
on
18
ADrill883.)
749.8
S
idin
g 10
Lathom
9 Ju
ly
1883
906
.3
Siding
27
Canmore
17
October
1
883
5
96.5
Si
d
ing
9
Maple
Creek
25
April
1
883
75
7.4
Sidi
ng
11
B
assano
11
July
1883
9138
Siding
28
Outhil

23
Octo
b
er
1
883
605.6
Siding
10
Kincarth
(a)
5
May
1
883
765
.9
Sid
i
ng
12
Crowfoo
t
14
J
ul
y
1883
91
9.2
Sidi
ng
29
Banff
27
Oc
t
ober
1883
6
15
.2
Sid
ing
11
Forr
es 10
May
1883
776
.5 S
id
ing 13
Cl
un
y 17
July
1883
926
.9
Si
d
ing
30
Cas
tl
e
Mountain
1
Novembe
r 1
883
627.7
Siding
12
Wa
l
sh
15
May
1
883
784.9
Sid
i
ng
14 Gl
eic
hen
20
July
1
883
937
.6
Siding
31
Silver
City
(d)
7
Nove
m
ber
1883
638.
1
Siding
13
Irv
i
ne
21
May
1
883
793.7
Si
di
ng
15
Namak
a
25
Jul
y
1883
945.3
Sidi
ng
32
Eldon
12
November
1
883
650
.9 S
idin
g
14
Dunmore
28
M
ay
1
883
801.0
Si
ding 16
Str
at
hmo
re

27
July
1883
955
.2
Siding
33
Laggan
(e)
19
November
1
883
660
.1
Me
d
icine
Ha
t 8
June
1883
809
.3
Siding
17 Ch
eadle
30
July
1883
959.5
(Conslruction
tn(lec
lor
1883
season
at
this
p::ln!
on
30
November
668.0
Siding
1
Stair

12
Ju
ne
1
883
81
9.3
Si
di
ng
18
La
n
gd
on 2
Augus
t
1883
1883.)
67
5.
0
Si
d
ing
2
Bowell
14
Ju
ne
1883
829.7
Sid
ing
19
Sh
epa
rd
6
August
1
883
9
60
.6
(SUmfTl
ll
01
Kicking
Horse
Pas
s anll
boundary
between
North
Wesl
Terrilo/les
anll
8rHish
Columbia)
686.
5 S
idin
g 3
Su
ff
ield
19
Jun
e 1
883
838.9
C
al
gary
15 Augu
st
1
883
No
t
es
: •
tnllieales
slalion
no
lOnger
S
hown
011
working
timetables.
6
95
.1
Sidi
ng 4
La
nge
vin
(~)
21
June
1
883 848
.3
Si
ding 21 Kei
th
30
Au
gu
st 1
883
(al
Now
Kincorth.
Sask
.
7
04.0
Siding
5
Kini
n
vie
25
Ju
ne
1
883
861.7
Siding
22
Cochra
ne
11
September
1
883
(b)
Now
Alderson
. Atti.
71
3.2
Sidi
ng 6
Tilley
27
Ju
ne
1883
872.0
Si
d
ing
23
Ra
dn
or
18
September
1
883
(el
Now
Gap
.
Atla
Cd)
Now
CasUe
Mo
unlain.
Ana
.
723.0
Siding
7 B
antry
2
July
1883
880
.6
Si
d
ing
24
Mo
r
ley

24
Septe
m
ber
1883
(e)
Now
Lake
l
ou
isli.
Alta
733
.0
Siding
8
Cassils
4 Ju
ly
1
883
893.
1
Siding
25
·
Kananaskis
8
Octob
er
1883
As
a r
esult
01
Sub~uenl
resurveys
.
sid
ing
an(lline
relocation
.
the
mileages
g
iven
as
Detween
adjacerl
l
localions
may
not
correspctlO
with
IIISla
n
ces
in currenl limelatlles.
740
.6
Siding
9
Southesk
6 J
ul
y
1883
9009
Si
ding
26
T
he
Gap
(c
)
13
October
1883
Source
.
Canal:!ian
Pa
ci
lic
Corporale
A
fchlVe
s. RGl (M-92)
THREE NEW BOOKS.
By Sandy Worthen.
The Manawatu Line
A Commemoration of the Wellington and Manawatu
Railway Company.
By T.A. McGavin First published October 1958.
Second edition August 1982.
New Zealand Railway and Locomotive Society Inc.
P.O.
Box 5134, Wellington, New Zealand.
Price:
NZ $6.00
Please add 10%
for overseas postage.
Over
the past two decades and before, the New
Zealand Railway and Locomotive Society has
established an
enviable reputation for first quality
publications, both hard-cover and soft-cover. Many
of these books have been produced and some have
been
written by the Editor of the Societys New
Zealand Railway Observer, Mr. Tom A. McGavin.
Most
of Mr. McGavinS pieces have the true
authenticity of first-hand experience; this is as it
should be, for Tom is a former railwayman.
The Editor and the Society did not disappoint their
adherents in 1982; two new publications were
forthcoming. Well, the first soft-cover book wasnt
exactly new. It was a second edition -and pudate-
to the Manawatu Line, originally published in 1958
on the occasion of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the
amalgamation of this railway company with the New
Zealand Railways system.
Mr. McGavins book was and is intended to recall
the work of the men who built the 1 067 mm-gauge
Wellington and Manawatu Railway and operated it
successfully for 22 years, from 1886 to 1908. This
book is the successful realization of Mr. McGavins
intention.
In
addition to the interesting narrative, there are
pages and pages devoted to side-elevations and
illustrations of the railways motive power, including
(surprise!) steam locomotives built in 1889,1896 and
1904
by the Baldwin Locomotive Works, Eddystone,
Pa., USA.
The W&M Ry., projected originally in the late
1870s, was
intended to link Wellington with
Longburn, 83 miles 14 chains north through the up­
and-down wilderness of forest and flax-covered
swamp on the west side of New Zealands North
Island. It wasnt an easy task, but, as the book tells, it
was
done. For most of the 22-year existence of the
railway, the
Baldwin 2-6-2s (four), 2-8-2 (one),.2-8-0s
(four), 2-8-2s (two), 2-8-4T (one) and 4-6-0s (two)­
and sundry other steam locos from Manning Wardle
and Company, Leeds, England and Nasmyth Wilson
and Company Limited, Manchester, England, ran
mostly to time over the undulating, curvy line. The
1 062 mm-gauge passenger cars had a strangely
familiar look to the visiting North American,
resembling, not unnaturally, passenger cars on any
one of the State of Colorados several narrow-gauge
railroads.
The Wellington and Manawatu Railway also
passed
through that town invariably associated with
New Zealands early railways: Paekakariki, today an
important town on North Islands west coast.
While the W&M Ry.s best running time from
Wellington to Longburn was 210 minutes, today the
80.7 miles
is covered usually in 109 minutes. Mr.
McGavins story recounts the events associated with
the development of this accelerated service.
CANADIAN 136
R A I L
Preserved NZR Locomotives
-and Railcars
By Neill J. Cooper First edition: 1982
The New Zealand Railway and Locomotive Society
Inc.
P.O.
Box 5134, Wellington, New Zealand.
Price:
NZ $16.00
Please add 10%
for overseas postage.
Much has been written in the United Kingdom and
United States railway enthusiast publications in
recent years about New Zealands Kingston Flyer.
This steam-powered vintage passenger train, in
operation since December 1971, has been and is the
envy of steam-locomotive operating organizations
world-wide. The inauguration of the Flyer service
in
1971 sparked widespread interest in the
locomotives and railcars preserved in New Zealand
and
it is this subject that Neill Coopers hard-cover
book Preserved NZR Locomotives and Railcars
addresses.
Why railcars, too? Because diesel railcars were
used in many important services on the NZR, just as
the
Budd Rail Diesel Cars were in the United States
and Canada.
Students of New Zealand Railways
remember the diesel railcars supplied by the Vulcan
Foundry Limited (England) in 1940-41, which were
placed in service in 1940-42.
All
of the preserved steam electric and diesel
locomotives and diesel railcars selected for
preservation by various railway enthusiast societies
and museums have been chosen for their historical
sig nificance and, freq uently, thei r concu rrent
association with enthusiast societies as the motive
power for sponsored excursions.
The photographs selected by Mr. Cooper for
presentation are by Messrs. Cole, Mayer, McClare
and Turner, amongst others, and are of uniformly
excellent quality. It is quite remarkable how this
degree
of quality can be obtained in a publication of
this modest dimension (24.5 x 18 cm).
Mr.
Coopers book presents a comprehensive
description in text and pictures of all of the former
NZR locomotives and railcars presently preserved in
New Zealand. For each
exhibit or group of exhibits. a
concise history is offered, explaining the service(s)
that each provided
during the time that it was in
service. (One
might say she, as for steam engines,
but the sex of electric and diesel locomotives and
diesel railcars has never been
promulgated.)
There are more than 80 black-and-white
illustrations of excellent quality, primarily chosen to
show each exhibit during its working life, although
some pictures have been selected to show the items
in
their preserved state.
The uninformed reader will be astonished to learn
of the number of exhibits preserved, their ages and
their various locations on North and South Island. It
is
quite astonishing -and certainly reassuring –
that so
many locomotives and railcars of such a
variety have been saved
from scrapping and, in some
cases, restored to operation.
World of Steam
By Collin Garratt First edition: 1981
Working Steam Locomotives of the World.
Octopus Books Limited
Doubleday Canada Limited
105 Bond Street, Toronto, Canada M5B 1Y3.
(416) 977-7891/977-4677 Price: $16.95
These days you have to be on the alert constantly
to intercept those magnificent publications of
Octopus Books Limited (Hong Kong) as they come
sailing through the intricacies of Canada Post Inc.
The latest in the seemingly never-ending stream is a
coffee-table creation titled World of Steam,
subtitled Working Steam Locomotives of the
World, authored and assembled by Colin Garratt
(the obvious pun is refused!), who says: To me, the
steam
locomotive -like the female form -is
i
rresistably photogen ic.
, So
what else is new?
The information on the fold of the books dust­
jacket explains further that Mr. Garratt is a
perfectionist, sometimes taking as long as three
weeks to
photograph one subject. One of the number
of concl us ions possible from this statistic -perhaps
the
most important one -is that it may have taken
Mr.
Garratt the better part of nine years to take the
more than 150
coloured pictures included in the
book. A note on the title page says that the camera
used was a Practica and the film was AGFA.
Indeed, it
is a little difficult to digest all of the visual
material in
this volume. While the dark blue printing
of the text on light blue background is very
decorative, it is excessively hard to read. The
photographs are truly astonishing: the AGFA film
seems to favour red-orange-yellow lithography and
so it
enhances spectacular shots of coruscations of
sparks from the chimneys of wood-burners
(Paraguay) and scintillations of feux dartifice from
coal-burners in the interiors and exteriors of steel
mills
(India). The colouration of veldt and pampas
suggest the season; the general outlines of the steam
engi nes
there observed only hint at their real age and
true state
of preservation.
The
picture titles are extensive and poetic,
reflecting the eccentricity of the ~hotographs. For
example:
The great Victorian engineer Isambard
Kingdom BruneI stated that . if you are going
on a very short journey, you need not take your
dinner with you or corn for your horse … an
adage which fits these two Fireless locomotives
perfect/yo The concept of a steam engine
without a fire is incongruous to most people,
but the Fireless is ideal for shun tung in works or
factories which have a ready supply of steam …
(Ludlow Jute Mill, Calcutta, India.)
The usual rules about the use of text out of context
may be applied.
But it is all, all, very entrancing -well, nearly all,
that is -the last several pages on the scrapping of
steam locomotives being somewhat excessive, in
this (biased) reviewers
opinion. No matter how
prettily presented, there is still a faintly necrophilic
aroma; no amount of prose, purple or otherwise, can
justify the inclusion of various disjointed parts of a
steam locomotive, and theres seldom any
cacaphony in the breakers yards other than the hiss
of the cutting torch.
Whether or not you agree or disagree with Mr.
Garratts
opinions, or whether or not you use or dont
use AGFA or FUJI orKODACHROMEI
KODACOLOR, World of Steam is a desirable book
to have just to be able to inspect the remarkable
pictures from time to time and to be reassured that,
somewhere in this wide and wicked world, fires in
fireboxes are
boiling water in boilers to power the
cyclinders of a reciprocating steam locomotive.
You may also wish to read the text from time to
time to determine where the steamers were in the
period prior to the publication of Mr. Garratts book.
At the price, who cares about the cons?
e. uSlne
car
ONE CANADIAN SILVER DOLLAR PAID TO
Home Oil Co. Ltd. by Alberta Pioneer Rail­
way Association has saved the life of historic CPR
coach no. 5J., 100 years old last survivor of the
orginal
rolling stock built for CPR.
Ironically the once elegant car was salvaged by
sheer luck in timing from being splintered out of
the path of a new highway being built near Blair­
more
for a provincial government that professes
extreme concern
for the preservation of historic
artifacts.
One
of two first class day coaches built by
Harlan & Hollingsworth in Wilmington (before
Canadian
content was invented), no. 5cl cost US
$5,500.
It had mahogany doors and interior finish
in mahogany, cherry and oak,
with seven coats
of varnish inside and out.
Bought by the Alberta government in 1913, no.
5J. was rebuilt as a mine rescue and training car
and
worked in the Crowsnest Pass until 1935 or
1938 when it was sold to West Canadian Collieries
and placed
off its tracks on a cement base at the
Greenhill mine tipple. Its interior was rebuilt for use
as an assay office until 1958 when the mine closed,
but the car was left on the site. It was retained by
Scurry-Rainbow Oil Ltd, which bought the mine
property, and by Home Oil after it bought Scurry.
Home
oil acted promptly when APRA learned
the car was in
the path of the new highway. APRA
members collected a salvage crew with active assi­
stance
from Alberta Culture and Transportation
executive staff, City of Calgary officials and CP
Rail. Heritage Park directors and general manager
Rick
Smith agreed to provide a temporary site
pending
restoration.
At a ceremony in Heritage Park, Calgary Mayor
Ralph Klein presented the silver dollar on behalf
of APRA to Ron Watkins, Home Oils vice pres­
ident of government and industry relations, who
gave the mayor a bill of sale for the car. Money
is being raised for restoration and
negotiations are under
way for a permanent site.
S. Oil Week
A
RECENTLY COMPLETED FOUR-YEAR
research project, aimed at reducing the
amount of settling on the rail line to Churchill,
in northern Manitoba, has shown some positive
results.
Although further analysis is required before
longterm conclusions can be drawn, the research
CANADIAN 139
R A I L
has indicated that track settlement and maintenance
can be reduced
w.hen heat pipe technology is used to
maintain the rail subgrade in a frozen condition year­
round.
The project, conducted by a consulting firm in
Edmonton, and funded by the federal government
under the Prairie Branchline Rehabilitation Program,
tested the use
of heat pipes to lower the temperature
of the subgrade in areas where track crosses from
peat bogs
to islands of permafrost. The pipes work
by drawing heat from the ground and keeping the
permafrost in a continuously frozen state.
The areas, on 492.4 kilometres between
Wabowden and McClintock, in northern Manitoba,
present CN Rail with annual
track settling problems,
referred to
as sinkholes. These require extraordinary
maintenance and seriously affect train movements
on
the line to Churchill. The consulting firm choseto
monitor five sinkhole locations north of Gillam, out
of about 245 locations in the 820.7 -kilometre rail line
from The
Pas to Churchill. The tests have shown that
track settlement and maintenance were reduced at
sites that had previously been very troublesome.
The cost of work on remaining sinkhole locations
is conservatively estimated at $15 million. This is in
excess
of the high cost of regulartrack rehabilitation
work required to upgrade and maintain the rail line.
Significant changes in the terrain conditions, soil
type and climate
occur on the Hudson Bay Railway
south
of Gillam, the report explains, and further
field work and an additional instrumented test
section
would probably be required to evolve an
effective design
for sinkholes in this region.
The report also states that any further application
of heat pipe technology to overcome thaw settlement
problems will require additional planning and
design.
S. Keeping Track
BRITISH
COLUMBIAS ROYAL HUDSON IS FOR
lease! Three companies have presented bids
to that Provinces Tourism Department to lease
the locomotive,
which has almost become a
trademark
of the city of Vancouver and the west
coast in general. Tourism
Minister Claude Richmond
has stated that
The Royal Hudson is not for sale and
never
will be for sale. Proposals have come forward
from three companies to
enter into an operating
agreement with the
government and to share the
profits. If a
company can broaden the Royal
Hudsons base
of operations and save money for the
taxpayers, we will take a
look at it.
S. The Marker THE FEDERAL
GOVERNMENT PLANS TO SPEND
$3.7
billion over four years to improve and
expand Canadas western rail system.
At a news
conference here Feb. 1, Transport
Minister Jean-Luc Pepin said the program will result
in $16.5
billion in direct railway investment during
the next decade. The initiatives will provide about
375,000 person-years of employment nationally.
The federal government plans to introduce
legislation early in the next session of Parliament to
replace the 86-year-old Crow Rate with a new grain
transportation regime.
In the interim, to ensure that this transportation
initiative brings jobs and investment as soon as
possible, the federal
government willmake payments
of $313 million to the railways, so that additional
railway construction and investment can be
undertaken
this spring.
The
minister of finance announced that special
additional capital cost allowances for new
investments in track and other railway assets will be
extended
for five years, to the end of 1987. This will
provide an important tax benefit to encourage
investment, Mr. Pepin said.
Commitments
CP Rail and CN Rail have made commitments to
invest $806.6 million in 1983.
The government said its initiatives are designed to
remove a long standding barrier to economic growth
and diversification in Western Canada, and will help
generate much needed jobs and spin-off activity to
stimulate economic recovery and development
throughout this decade.
These investments will alleviate capacity
constraints and bottlenecks which would have
clogged Canadas western rail network by 1985, Mr.
Pepin said.
The added capacity will ensure that more
Canadian grain, coal, potash, forest products and
other goods can be moved to export markets when
world demand strengthens.
The governments investment will strengthen and
diversify the Canadian industrial economy, he said.
The revised
freight rate structure will remove
disincentives
to livestock and specialty crop
production and food processing in Western Canada.
Complementary initiatives will enhance feed grain
production in Estern Canada.
To ensure Canadians realize maximum economic
benefits from these transportation incentives, the
government also announced incentive and
assistance measures totalling $250 million over five
years
to promote industrial and agricultural
development.
Of the $250 million, $75 million will be provided to
ncrease the supply capability of western
CANADIAN
140
R A I L
manufacturing and·service sectors and to expand the
western
food and agricultural processi ng base.
Agricultural assistance of $175 million, aimed at
capitalizing on new economic opportunities, will
increase agricultural production and provide the
necessary research and marketing infrastructure in
Western
and Eastern Canada.
The federal announcement came after years of
debate on the need to reform the western
transportation system and to change the Crow Rate.
The rate was fixed in 1897, leaving the railways and
the government to carry the burden of subsequent
losses, Mr. Pepin said.
New Policy
The new policy will mean the rates western farmers
pay
for shipping grain will be brought more in line
with actual costs. Grain freight rates will increase to
slightly less than double the current fixed level by
1985-86, and farmers
and the government will share
cost increases under a new formula.
S. CP Rail News
CN
HAS APPLIED TO THE CTC FOR PERMISSION
to abandon its Middleton subdivision, which
runs from Bridgewater to Middleton and
Bridgetown. The railway has been experiencing
annual losses averaging more than $300,000 on the
line. If the
CTC determines that the line should be
retained in the
public interest then CN becomes
eligible for a subsidy.
Rail
traffic on the 67 mile line has declined from
309 carloads in 1977 to 111 carloads in 1981. Present
service is provided
by a turnaround freight from
Bridgewater as required and averages about one trip
a week.
The line WfJ,S opened in 1905, providing the first rail
lin k to the
South Shore. It carried both passenger
and
freight traffic and was widely used by travellers
from New England to the South Shore who came to
Nova Scotia by ferry to Yarmouth, to the Valey and
then across the
mainland to coastal communities.
CN notes in its arguments that alternative service
to Middleton and Bridgetown could be provided by
the DAR,
which interchanges with CN, and its own
Intermodal Trucking service, as well as other
trucking firms in the area.
The Caledonia subdivision which branches off at
New
Germany is not included in the application but
would be eliminated with the abandonment of the
cross-country line. An application to abandon that
line was filed in 1972,
and the CTC recognized it was
uneconomic but ordered the line maintained and it
has been under
regular review.
S. SRS News
THE MANCHESTER UNION LEADER OF
December 30 reports that a group of North
Country businessmen are negotiating to buy
the MT. Washington Cog Railway from the Teague
family. Sources close to the group, which declined to
be identified by name, say that a price slightly under
$1 million has been agreed to pending approval of an
in-state bank loan. The deal could be closed by mid­
January. Mrs. Ellen Teague was quoted as saying
she is delighted and pleased that the potential buyers
are from the local area.
THE FREDERICK CARTER, THE CN MARINE
vessel which maintains the link between North
Sydney, N.S. and Port aux Basques, Nfld., is the
largest railcar ferry in the world.
This information, which Lloyds Register of
Shipping passed on to publishers of The Guinness
Book of Records, will appear in The Guinness Book
of Facts and Feats of Ships and Shipping. The new
book, to be published this year, will contain a color
photograph of the Frederick Carter.
This ice-breaking ferry of 34,606 cubic metres is
148 metres
long and 21 metres wide. She was
constructed by Davie Shipbuilding Ltd., of Lauzon,
Que. and entered service in 1969.
C.N PMOTO
Her lower deck is capable of accommodating 39
loaded railway freight cars on five lines of track, and
the upper deck aft has space for 12 transport-trailer
trucks.
The ferry bears the name of Sir Frederick Carter,
Newfoundlands first prime minister. He held this
position between 1865 and 1870, and again from
1874 to 1878.
In 1880,
Sir Frederick Carter became chief judge of
the Supreme Court of Newfoundland, which joined
Confederation in 1949.
S. Keeping Track
~ Prince George
• •

• •

••••••••••••••••• . .
• •
• •
Redpass
Jet.
Edmonton-+


• • • • • • • • • • • • • •
CNRAIL



Tete Jaune connection,
Robson subdivision,
Mountain Region
COMPLETION OF= THE $28-MILLION TETE JAUNE
connection, in eastern British Columbia, has
given birth
to a new subdivision in CN Rails
Mountain Region.
The Tete Jaune
connection, placed into operation
in July, 1982, is a 15.2-kilometre rail link between CN
Rails B.C. North and South lines. This results in 46.6
kilometres
of double track west of Redpass Junction.
The connection has become part of the new
Robson subdivision,
which stretches 47.9 kilometres
to
link Redpass Junction with the new station of
Charles, on the
Albreda subdivision. This station was
named
for Major J.L. Charles, a long-time chief
engineer in CNs
former Western Region, and marks
the
location of the west leg of the wye connecting the
Robson subdivision
with the Albreda subdivision.
Symbolic spike driver
Last October,
Major Charles participated in a
symbolic spike-driving ceremony officially marking
the designation
of the new station.
The east leg
of the connection has been named
Spicer,
for Jack Spicer, a former CN corporate and
Mountain Region vice-president.
The Robson
subdivision also includes the 32.5
kilometres of track,
from Redpass Junction to
Taverna, that was previously part of the Tete Jaune
subdivision. Taverna is
another new station, named
for Joe Taverna, a former master mechanic on CNS
old Kamloops division.
Construction of the Tete Jaune connection lasted
three years. It was
part of the plant expansion
program
under the direction of Lloyd Hostland,
engineer, plant expansion, Edmonton, Evan Scales,
• • • • •• Robson subdivision
• • • •
•• TeteJaune connection
Albreda subdivision
Tete Jaune subdivision
Vancouver
~
construction manager, and Ed Stewart, project
officer, both of Kamloops.
Expropriation not required
Mr. Hostland noted that the preparatory work and
necessary approvals required before
construction
could begin took just as long as the actual building of
the line. All the land needed for the right-of-way was
acquired without having to resort to expropriation,
he said, explaining that this meant convincing local
property owners of the need to locate the line on their
properties. It also involved delicate negotiations on
the
part of Warren Brown, who was senior real estate
representative in Edmonton at the time.
While the paraliel B.C. North and South lines are
close
to each other for almost 32.2 kilometres west of
Redpass Junction, a 91.4-metre difference in
elevation had
to be overcome. This accounts for the
length of the connection.
Three grade separations were constructed to carry
the new trackage over the Yellowhead highway.
The clearing, grading and structures work was
carried
out by private contractors, but CN Rail forces
were responsible for the location work, organization
of public meetings, gaining environmental
approvals, surveys and administering the contracts
during construction.
CN Rail maintenance-of-way forces
constructed
the track structure and engineering signals
personnel are working to install a new signal system
on
the Robson subdivision. This system is to be
completed in the spring.
S.
Keeping Track
CANADIAN
A HUNDRED YEARS AGO WINNIPEG PRACTICAL­
ly sold its soul to lure the Canadian Pacific
Railway
to pass through this city rather than
through the town of Selkirk, 50 kilometres to the
north. But the
relationship between Winnipeg and
the CPR lately has
become more and more like a
marriage
whose best days are past. And todays
generation of
politicians seems to be working as
hard to get the railway out of the city as their
forebears did to get it in.
The most recent event in the growing
estrangement was an announcement by Manitobas
Minister of Urban Affairs, Eugene Kostyra, that the
provincial Government plans to bring in legislation
that
would end tax concessions CPR property enjoys
in Winnipeg.
Under the current agreement, signed in
1965, the railway pays
70 per cent of the tax bill it
might otherwise be paying. Under the agreements
structure of graduated increases, it would not pay
100 per
cent (estimated now at about $1.7-million)
until the year 2005.
That the ralway pays any taxes is
counter to the deal struck by Winnipegs city fathers
in 1880. Then, as well
as providing a bridge overthe
Red River, land for a station and $200,000 in cash, the
city offered complete tax exemptions on railway
property in perpetuity.
The railway
subsequently made Winnipeg the
commercial
and transportation capital of Western
Canada. But
times change. Over the past few years
both the
city of Winnipeg and the provincial
Government have made it clear they
would like the
railway -at least its massive marshalling yards
that
cut through central Winnipeg like a giant desert –
gone.
The CPR yards and right of way take up the
equivalent
of 40 city blocks and include 75 miles of
railway track.
Internally they have caused no end of logistic and
transportation problems. For
as long as Winnipeg
has existed, the yards have been a formidable barrier
isolating Winnipegs north end from the south.
Two
long bridges and two underpasses connect north
and south Winnipeg over and under the tracks. But
they are not enough. A few years ago the city almost
built a third overpass in response to agitation from
residents of the northwest
corner of Winnipeg for
better connections with downtown. But the plan
caused so
much commotion from downtown
residents whose neighborhoods would have been
142
R A I L
disrupted by the construction that the city backed
down. It was at this point that many city officials were
converted to a belief in rail relocation.
But relocation of the yards was.estimated to cost
between $180-and $200-million. The CPR said flatly
that it alone would not pay for this. Through
scrambling at three levels of government went on for
a couple of years, no agreement for payment from
the
public purse emerged either. Now the city faces
the
reconstruction of one of the major existing
bridges over the tracks -on Salter Street -at a cost
of $36.3-million.
Every once in a while
something happens that
once again ignites relocation talks. In December,
when a runaway locomotive caused an accident, an
explosion, and a fire in the yards, pressure to move
the tracks again increased.
This time it was
Manitobas Minister of Highways and
Transportation, Sam Uskiw, who asked Canadian
Transport Commission hearings into the accident to
consider railway safety within the city of Winnipeg
using the
broadest possible terms of reference. He
meant that the best guarantee against an
accident in
the centre of the
city was to remove the railyards.
S. Globe and Mail
CANADIAN 143 R A I L
MONTREALER RIDERSHIP DOWN: AMTRAK
officials say ridership on the Montrealer has
dropped nearly 16 percent in the past year
and are concerned about the trains ability to
compete with the cut-rate airline fares now available
in
Burlington (VT.). In November ridership dropped
30 percent at the Essex Junction station which is the
closest
to Burlington. PEOPLExpress, a no-frills
airline, began service between Burlington and
Newark on Nov. 15,
offering four flights a day at a
price
of $19 and $29. The cost of a one-way ticket
between Essex Jct. and New York aboard the
Montrealer is $55. The air flight takes less than an
hour,
while the Montrealer takes nine hours and runs
at
night. Other stations near Burlinqton have noticed
PRELIMINARY WORK ON THE $600 MILLION
Rogers Pass tunnel project has been completed.
Other main line improvements projects at Greeley,
Redgrave and
Glenogle on the Calgary-Vancouver
corridor were also completed last summer while work
will resume this spring at Twin Butte and Sicamous
Narrows.
About $22 million worth of contracts for the
preparatory work at Rogers Pass were awarded early
in July. The work provided about 125 jobs during the
five months that followed.
To date, overburden at the east portal of the nine­
mile (14.4-kilometre) tunnel, one of two tunnels to be
built, has been excavated
up to the rock face of Mount
Macdonald so that actual tunnel work can begin. a
drop in riders also. The arrival of PEOPLExpress
prompted USAir to cut its rates considerably,
dropping them below the price of the Amtrak ticket,
too.
S. Nashua Telegraph Via The 470
AS A RESULT OF
UNION NEGOTATIONS
recently concluded in the United States, the
caboose could become extinct. The railroad
operators contended the caboose was an
anachronism in these days of hot box detectors and
centralized traffic control, and that the tail end crew
should ride up front. On several U.S. railroads
phasing out of the caboose is now starting.
S.
FLAGSTOP, Calgary and Southwestern Division
Concrete retaining walls have also been built here to
retain the overburden.
At the west portal, a 1,100-foot (335-metre)
reinforced concrete box has been built through
which future west-bound freight trains will exit under
the Trans-Canada Highway at Cheops Mountain. The
highway was temporarily diverted to permit this
construction.
Also completed was work on the 10-mile (16-
kilometre) surface route between Rogers siding and
the east portal. The work included building access
roads and
temporary bridges, as well as the clearing
of a new right-of-way.
When the Rogers Pass project is finished, it will
provide new trackage designed to eliminate the most
: •••••• ::.~~ 00
Rogers Pass
Grade Improvement Project
+t+P++ Existing Line
—Connaught Tunnel
-Proposed
line
GlaCier.~ ••
•••• Proposed Tunnels
_ Trans Canada
Highway To Calgary
.
..
, .
..
Mounl Macdonald , ••
,.
,~
Mount Tupper
Beaver River
restrictive bottleneck on CP Rails main line between
Calgary and Vancouver.
With its reduced grades, the new section
of line will
allow the railway to operate more, and longer, west­
bound freight trains carrying increased tonnages to
the Pacific Coast.
At Sicamous, B.C., CP Rail freight trains are
now
rumbling over the Sicamous Narrows waterway, 44
miles (70 kilometres) west
of Revel-stoke, on a new
double-tracked swing bridge.
SWING BRIDGE WORK
The 84-year-old
manually-turned bridge it replaces
is being dismantled
as part of an $11 million project
which will include two miles (3.2 kilometres) of new
main line,
siding and storage track. Work began last
year and is expected to be completed next
spring.
Built higher over the water than the old structure,
the new
bridge doesnt have to be swung open as
often to allow pleasure craft and barges by on the
short waterway
which connects Mara Lake with
Shuswap Lake.
The
bridge also operates a little differently. Rather
than
just pivoting open, the new span lifts and turns.
An
operator controls the bridge.

This design makes for a more secure fit at the
connections between the swing span and adjoining
approach spans and will result in a longer life for the
rail
connections, said Tony Bowman, project
supervisor with Special Projects, adding maintenance
costs will be reduced
as a result.
During construction, a shoo-fly or temporary
diversion was built at the west end of the bridge so
freight
traffic was not interrupted. An average of 24
trains cross the waterway in both directions each day.
A 165-ton (150-metric-ton) capacity crane on a flat­
bottomed barge was used to position the five 75-foot
(23-metre) steel spans and two 157-foot (49-metre)
swing-span girders
of the new bridge.
LINE RE-OPENING
The Okanagan sub-division branch line between
a 2
I I Miles
r-r—1 Km
a 1 2
Sicamous and Armstrong, which has been closed
since Oct.
25 while construction was underway, will
be re-opened soon.
Meanwhile, the
$8 million bridge construction and
double-tracking work at Twin Butte, 13 miles (21
kilometres) east of Revelstoke, has halted for the
winter.
A 290-foot (88-metre) steel
bridge spanning Twin
Butte Creek was built this summer and will be double­
tracked and put into service early next spring. It will
replace
an aging existing structure which is unable to
handle the increased
tonnage forecasted for the
Vancouver-Calgary main line.
DAYLIGHTING
A smaller bridge over Greeley Creek, seven miles
(11.3 kilometres) west of Twin Butte, is also
scheduled to be
double-tracked this year.
The project will also include the laying of 8.5 miles
(13.7 kilometres)
of double-track between mileage
113.0 and 115.4 at Twin
Butte and between mileage
117.4 and 112.1 at Greeley.
At Redgrave, 22 miles (35 kilometres) west of
Golden, B.C., the improvements included diverting
the main line to reduce
the curvature of the track,
adding 2,970 feet (900 metres)
of new track,
extending a siding to accommodate long trains and
daylighting a tunnel.
The term
daylighting refers to either the partial or
total removal of an existing tunnel to permit trains to
travel through open space at increased speeds.
About 100 feet (30 metres) of the tunnel was removed
here this summer.
The
daylighting operation has increased train
speed
to a uniform 35 mph (55 km/hr) over a 12-mile
(19-kilometre) distance. Prev,iously trains had to
reduce speed by
10 mph (15 km/hr) when entering
the tunnel.
At Glenogle, seven miles
(11 kilometres) east of
Golden, a 24-foot (7.3-metre) bridge was built and the
siding extended by 3,000 feet (915 metres) to also
accommodate long trains which might meet there.
FURTHER TO OUR LEAD ARTICLE IN THE
January-February issue of Canadian Rail, the
Montreal Urban
Community Transit Com­
mission assumed responsibility
for the operation of
commuter service on CP Rails Lakeshore line eff­
ective October 1, 1982. Billed
as a new way of
travelling by C. T. C. U. M. fares were drastically
reduced
within the MUC territory but remain out
of reach to those commuting from beyond the Is­
land of Montreal. Example an adult monthly pass
from St. Anne costs $37.50 while the same from lie
Perrot (some three mi
les further) costs $86.65. The
same pass from Rigaud, western terminus of the line
costs $92.25. In addition the CUM
territory fare
permits bus and metro transfer while
it is not in­
cluded in
passes purchased off the island. A sub­
stantial increase in parking
has been observed at the
St. Anne Station since
introduction of the new
fares.
Two diesel units Nos. 1303 and 1305 have
appeared in the new blue, purple and white MUCTC
colors. While the blue and white fit in with all other
MUCTC
color schemes on buses, metro cars, police
cars, etc., no one seems to know iust where the purple
came from. While colorful from a distance
the locomotives
look like they might have been
manu·factured by Lionel or American Flyer, at
least
thats how I see it.
Peter Murphy.
IF YOU NOTICE
ANY NEWS ITEMS THATMAY
be of interest to our readers please clip them
and mail along with a black and white crisp
photo
if available to The Business Car c/o Peter
Murphy, 75 Sevigny Ave., Dorval, P.Q. H9S
3V8.
Please indicate the source of the item so it may be
correctly cred ited.
t<.s !V~l>l.<:>
• I. ~! :~ :j.~£l:(~ ~~fl …. :rl:,.m(t … ><
, ;j~rttf;.: Ii ~~~:~:M>:: <
C.R.H.A. . I.
communications
NEWS FROM THE DIVISIONS
PACIFIC COAST DIVISION:
At the annual meeting in March the following
were elected
to the executive for 1983-84 .,
President Ron Keillor
Vice President Rick Shantler
Secretary Doug
Buffrum
Treasurer Ross T~omas
Director Norm Gidney
CALGARY AND SOUTHWESTERN
DIVISION:
The April Meeting involved a trip. to Cp Rails
Ogden S:,ops with Bert Hayne~ as gUide .. Mem~ers
saw an assortment of locomotive types In various
stages of major repair. The remains of Baldwi.n
Switcher No. 7072 were there
as well as F7B unit
number 4445 ready to be painted after its con­
version
to a hump slave unit numbered 6800. As
an additional treat No. 6800 was lifted by the
overhead crane
and transferred to the exit line.
GRAND RIVER DIVISION:
TIle division has acquired and is moving the CP
Guelph Station to Cambridge. They have also
purchased the observation car used for the 1939
Royal Tour.
These items wil.1 form the nucleus
of their new museum for which they also have a
collection
of over 1,000 artifacts and docume~ts.
The site of the museum overlooks the Grand River
and the Lenr Tracks. Our thanks to Dave Tanner
for this info.
CANADIAN RAILWAY MUSEUM
SPRING 83 REPORT
MUSEUM REPORT -APRIL 1983.
Our Canadian Railway Museum at Delson-St.
Constant Quebec,
is scheduled to open for the
1983
se~son on Apri I 30th, and to open dai Iy
through Labour Day,
and week-ends thereafter
until the
end of October. Managing -Director Gilles
Ayotte, Curator David Monaghan, and. ~c­
retary Pierrette Fyfe are busy with publl.clty,
booking tours, interviewing staff; arranging signs;
and generally fighting the April wet season to get
everything ready
for our first visitors.
An Employment
and Immigration Canada grant,
under the
Canada Employement Program, has
provided the funds for a publicity staff of th~ee
full time employees to promote the Canadian
Railway Museum. Levis Jodoin,
Renee Carpentier,
and Johanne Dubois are working hard to contact
schools senior citizen groups,
tourist bus tour
oragniz~rs; and arranging improved highway signs;
which
has been one of our major problems In past
years. Guides
will be reporting for work late in
the month
to learn their jobs, get the picnic tables
out of storage, put the handcars out of doors for
the season and get the winters accumulation of
everything except snow that accumulated during
the winter
off the exhibits, and make them pre­
sentable
for the public. Dave Monaghan wi II have
the exhibit on the ground floor of the Hays Station
ready. Vic Rizzonelli
will have the store ready,
with stocks of books, souvenirs, enignemans caps,
yes, even enginemans flare pots used in the days
of steam engines all ready for sale.
Members, and visitors in general will be delighted
with the wonderful improvement in the Model
Railway, in the basement
of the Hay~ Station.
Member Odilon Perrault,
son Pierre, Bill Howell
and others have invested, they figure, 365 hours
of their time in re-Iandscaping the entire Railway,
installing
an oil refinery in the s~enery, rock ba~l­
asting all of the track, even putting a rowboat In
the lake. Odilon had the help of several young
local citizens under Programme Benado, spon­
sored by the South Shore communities surrounding
the Museum
to interest them in improving our
community.
These young people have taken a con­
siderable interest in constructing the new scenery
in the Model Railway, the results which you
will
see during your next visit to the Museum.
The Every Saturday Volunteer
Group has
been busy in cold weather and mild. Sydney &
Louisburg Combine Car No.4, built in Ar:nher~t,
N.S. in 1894, has had the sag taken out of ItS mid
section, the old
canvas roofing removed, and all
of the rotted roof ribs and decking replaced. It now
awaits a new canvas roof, The wood replica of the
DorChester, Canadas first locomotive, has been
placed on a raised
wood track. MTC Street Car
1959 is receiving considerable attention to its
ceiling, u
npainted since its 1959 retirement. The
preparation of stencils is under way to be applied
to the freight car exhibit that was painted last year.
So,
come and see our Museum Juring 1983. Youll
be very welcome.
THE BYTOWN RAILWAY SOCIETY
The societys popular book A Trackside Guide
to Canadian Railway Motive Power has been re­
vised and
expanded. To the list of the locomotives
of t
he larger railways has been added the units
of shortlines and industrial railways.
This is probably the only comprehensive list of
Canadian shortline and industrial locomotives over
published!
The industrial listings are by province
from
West to East by location with an alphabetic
cross-referen~ index of the comp,mies oWhing
the units. From Vancouver Island to St. Johns
Newfoundland,its all there.
The book has doubled in size but the price,
postage paid
is only $2.95 more, at $8.95. Theres
a full
colour picture on the cover too,
To order your copy send cheque or money order to
the Society at P.O. Box 141, Station A. Ottawa
Ontario, K1N 8Vl
GENERAL NEWS ABOUT THE
DIVISIONS:
On April 25, 1983 a cross -Canada conference
call was held among the Divisions and the national
executive
in Montreal. A brief .outline of the act­
ivities
of each division was part of the discussion
and it was suggested
that each provide a more
rietail
ecl outline for submission to communications.
So
come on gang let us know about your activities
and projects.
—<.
LEITERS FROM MEMBERS
By Foster, 3337 -42 S1 N.W. apt 172, Calgary
Alberta writes: I
enjoy receiving Canadian
Rail and am looking forward
to the new
format, In the near future. I hope to visit
tile museum.
From what I am tolcl it is well
worth a trip to Montreal.
SWITCH LIST
Item 83-8
The Fan Erie Historical Railroad Museum,
P.O.
Box 355, Fort Erie Ont. is looking fOr
tllack and w
hite negatives of CN 6218 (4-8-4)
for use as fund raising projects such as calen­
dars and
photo packs. Negatives will be
returned and the
photographer will be ac­
knowledged,
Item
83-9
Craig Ramsay, 402 Wardlaw Ave., Winnipeg
Man. R3L
0L7. Railway Books, in Canadian
Prices.
Please send for price list -let me
know what you want.
Item 83-10
Gilles Paradis, 6665 -44 Ave., Apt. 2, Rose­
mont, Montreal Que. H1T 2N9 would like
to
buy the complete 1963 set of Canadian
Rail.
Item 83-11


Peter D. Wel/moa, Tasia Consulting Services
P.D.Box 1
27, Station U. Toronto Onto is
still offering the special mentioned in March
-April
communications. For every photo·
graph ordered by members, an extra print
wi
ll be don~ted to the nearest Division. See
the liast issue of Communications for details.
<:.

Canadian Rail
P.o. Box 282 St. Eustache, Que., Canada
J7R 4K6
Postmaster: If undelivered within
10 days return to sender, postage guaranteed.
– ,

—–
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