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Canadian Rail 373 1983

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Canadian Rail 373 1983

Canadian Rail
No. 373
MARCH -APRIL 1983

.,
, –

Published bi-monthly by the Canadian Railroad
Historical Association P.O Box 148 St. Constant P.Q.
JOL IXO. Subscription rates $21.20
(US
funds if outside Canada)
EDITOR: Fred F Angus
CO-EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
cover
B.C. Electric P.C.C. southbound on Kitsilano trestle
1947.
After 43 years service, the line which extended
from Hastings & Richards Sts
., downtown to Kitsilano
Beach is
going out of service. Hit hard by the
competitive
MacDonald Bus it had long been living
on
borrowed time, operating only at rush hours and
catering to a mere handful of trolley diehards. Last
trolley pulls out of Kitsilano loop at6.26 P.M., January
15, 1949.
Photo courtesy of Norm. Gidney, Burnaby, B.C.
opposite
Last train to cross the False Creek Kitsilano trestle.
Trip
arranged by B. C. Hydro Rail, for the media and
retired Hydro Rail employees on Oct. 21, 1982.
2 return trips across the trestle. Hydro diesel #910-
freshly painted, and 2 Tourism B. C. cars – -The
Chemainus River
power car and the lounge
observation
car Brittania.
Photo
courtesy of Norris Adams, Vancouver
Last steam train
out of Steveston for Vancouver on
B.C.E.R. tracks,
July 3, 1905. B. C.E.R. took over with
electric service the next day.
Photo
courtesy of Metro Transit Photo Archives
ISSN 0008-4875
NEW
BRUNSWICK DIVISION
P.O. Box 1162
Saint
John,
New Brunswick E2L 4G7
ST.
LAWRENCE VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 22 Station B
Montreal, Que.
H3B 3J5
BYTOWN
RAILWAY SOCIETY
P.O. Box 141, Station A
Ottawa, Ontario K1 N 8V1
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
P.O. Box 5849, Terminal A,
Toronto Ontario M5W 1 P3
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
300 Cabana Road East,
Wi
ndsor Ontario N9G 1 A2
GRAND RIVER DIVISION
P.O. Box 603
Cambridge,
Ontario N1 R 5W1
NIAGARA DIVISION
P.O. Box 593
St. Catharines,
Ontario L2R 6W8
ROCKY
MOUNTAIN DIVISION
P.O. Box 6102, Station C,
Edmonton Alberta T5B 2NO
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN DIVISION
60 -6100, 4th Ave. NE
Calgary, Alberta
T2A 5Z8
CROWSNEST
& KETTLE-VALLEY DIVISION
P.O.
Box 400
Cranbrook, British Columbia
V1C 4H9
PACIFIC
COAST DIVISION
P.O. Box 1006, Station A,
Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2P1
lhetale
1666-1g62
By Norris Adams
A link across False Creek – – a mediator in a small
and close knit empire.
In her 96th year, she was still defensive and geared
up to go on. Her epiphenomenon being that of a new
comer – -B.C. Place. The Vancouver Sun for
October 21 82, had this to say in part, quote: Hydro
laid on the trip for the reti rees as a ceremon ial wrapup
for the trestle, which has become redundant with the
conversion of the railyards on the North Shore of
False Creek into B.C. Place. The trestle started
out as
a link in an electric passenger transit system using
street cars and connecting
downtown Vancouver
with farms on the South Side
of False Creek and
beyond: The trip referred
to was the two car
mour~ers special, principally for ex employees and
for the media. The consist was from Tourisms fleet­
power car, Chemainus River and the open rear
platform, brass rail, lounge observation car Brittania.
The pulling, pushing honours were awarded to B.C.
Hydro Rails freshly painted engine #910. She saddly
flaunted her white flags, in the
accompanying drizzle.
This farewell ambassador made
two round trips
across the
112 mile trestle and then the curtains came
down
for all time – -demolition would be the next
order
for this historic bridge. She was probably the
fi rst of the eig ht bridges to span the creek and ran ina
southwesterly direction from the Drake Street yards
to the Kitsilano rail shops situated in a small triangle
where tracks diverge to the west
or to the east, or
alternately east with a twist to the south. Somehow
the trestle remained endureingly snug
as the hub of
a small empire. For a few years at the turn of the
century, C.P.R. steam trains crossed, initiating their
Vancouver -Steveston branch line 16.90 miles. Metro
Transits photo archives catalogue relates:
July 3,
1905, C.P.R. locomotive pulls last train out of
Steveston for Vancouver on B.C.E. tracks; train
includes a box car and two passenger coaches. Some
houses are visible in the background. B.C.E.R. took
over the service the next day. There are some doubts
about, B.C.E.R. service the next
day as no electric
overhead wires can
be seen in the picture.
Steveston, at the mouth
of the south fork of the
Fraser River was a busy port and fish processing centre. Railway business centred round the canneries
and the farms on Lulu Island. One could always be
aware that
their tram was approaching Steveston, by
the impulse reflexes of thei r nose to the strong smell
of fish. In 1909, the Marpole -New Westminster
branch was wired and altogether business began
to
flow from these lines and those south of the Fraser
River and
North of False Creek. Much of the freight
funnelled across the False Creek trestle, was handed
to the C.P.R. at the west end of the Drake Street yards.
B.C.E.
R. and the C.P.R. agreed to handle the other
roads cars in
their designated territories. B. C.E.R.
would switch cars
for patrons, -often the sawmills
along the south shore of False Creek. The C.P.R.
for
its part would switch V & L.I. (B.C.E.R.) from Granville
Street to the B.C.E.R. terminal at Carrall Street. The
B.C.E.R. continued
for a short time to use the old
C.P.R. steam passenger station at the north end of the
Kitsilano trestle and just a few steps west
of Granville
Street.
In this little empire the C.P.R. had been well
endowed and also had great expectations
of the
golden or
Midas Touch.
February 13,1886 was a promising gold letter day
for Canadian Pacific, as it made the decision that
Vancouver should be its western terminus, enticed in
part by the prospects of its excellent harbours, either
on Burrard Inlet
or on English Bay.
The B.C. government of 1886 approved
of
Vancouver, in preference to Port Moody, by giving
large grants, in fact some 17,000 acres. This
represented part
of the present downtown and most
of the area
surrounding False Creek. The terminal
line was completed in 1887.
The C.P.R. spokesman, Mr. Abbott, at the
ceremonies marking the arrival of the first train,
replying to Vancouver mayor McLeans address said
in part: I take the greatest pleasure in congratulating
you upon the completion of the Canadian Pacific
Railway.
We have been greatly oppressed by
property owners along the line between here and Port
Moody. And then further, We have managed
to
overcome these obstacles. Here we are, and here we
will remain. This part of Abbotts speech was
intended to pass on the information that the C.P.R.
View looking northwest. Shows B.C. Hydro rails on the south shore of False Creek. Also shown the third
Granviffe Bridge, the open swing span
of the Kitsilano Rail trestle and further west – -the Burrard Street
traffic bridge. False Creek has had
8 bridges crossing it.
Photo courtesy
of Norris Adams, Vancouver
Looking
further to the east in the cleared Drake St.
yards site on the north side of False Creek.
Photo courtesy
of Norris Adams, Vancouver.
CANADIAN
42
R A I L
will not extend the line to English Bay until they have
sold
their real estate at Vancouver. Such was
calculated
as a gimmick to frustrate speculators of
that era. There
is an interesting, historic, almost
prophetic wall map in the special collections room
of the library at U.B.C. The dateline
is 1886, and a line
shows that the end of the English Bay
br~nch would
be at Trafalgar Street and that distance would be
2,9077/12 miles from Montreal. As incorporated in
1886, Trafalgar Street would be the western
boundary of the City of Vancouver, in this area. The
proposed terminus of the English Bay branch, is
shown. in a photo at the city archives, as a heavy
square post set between the rails whose ends are
angled upwards. The track eventually was used
only
once, and that was in industrial service. The shale
stone quaried nearby was found
to be unsuitable for
the building stones needed in the new city. Major
Matthews, the late city archivist, pictured
with a C.P.
visiting official at this point, suggested a
monument
be erected. But nothing ever seemed to happen. Lets
cross the trestle (the hub) to the late Drake Street
yard area. The yards are now gone
but the
roundhouse remains, firmly set
up by 1898. From that
time on the C.P.R. leased its lands around the creek to
a succession of industries, sawmills, lumber-related
industries, predominating. The C.P. panorama at
Drake Street was always busy and.interesting
for the
layman, railfan
or historian. There were many
facilities there, a car repair shed, various stores,
blacksmith shop, woodwork, dining and sleeping car
furnishings, coach wash racks, oil shed. And of
course the roundhouse, which many would like to see
demolished. Visionaries now see it
as a part of an
architectural, functional, intergraded complex – a
real bonus to B.C. Place.
Such would give some needed recognition of
our
debt to those who brought about our lower mainland
origins,
through the vital necessity, dreams and hard
work of railways.
The greatest scenario in this complex seemed to
me, to be the venerated cluster of classic steam
locomotives and variety of service and passenger
cars. Foremost
for most people was 2860, The Royal
Hudson namesake, -3716 – a C.
P. consolidation
freight engine 2-8-0 freight engine
built in 1912, and
the baby -Herb Hawkins
#1077 a 2-6-2 Prairie
class, once used for logging on Vancouver Island.
3716 would power the Museum train on the mainland
routes, whereas 1077 would do the
honours on
Vancouver Island. There were coaches handed down
from C.P.s former transcontinental train
The
Dominion and a combined business crew -diner­
a legacy from the American Freedom Train. There
was
daily a well-ordered string of coaches from the
Canadian going through the wash racks. Cars were being groomed
for the summer Royal Hudson tourist
run
to Squamish, and others to readied for film
sequences, superintendents cars, and old standard
sleepers in apparent
limbo, that might be used as
converted roadside restaurants. Always, always -­
a good show! In 79 the Museum train, moving by B.C.
Hydro Rail, crossed the trestle in its visits to B.C.
communities, spent 4 days on exhibit at Steveston.
The Vancouver Sun
of July 10 82, gave a foretaste of
things to come: C.P. Rails tracks on the north side
of
False Creek, the Kitsilano Trestle and the Dunsmuir
tunnel down town will be removed just in time to allow
for new access roads to the citys Sports Stadium, a
B.C. Place official said Friday.
The tunnel which will
be used
for Rapid Transit must be cleared by August
15 and the tracks and the trestle must be vacated by
October 31 82 according to a Canadian Transport
decision announced Friday. The tunnel which
connects C.P.s
harbourfront tracks to the former
Drake Street yard, traversing under downtown
Vancouver was
built in 1932. It greatly facilitated the
movement of trains over the years, which previously
had
to cross busy downtown streets at grade, causing
monstrous traffic jams.
The tunnel will be revamped
– -to
two tracks (one on top of the former) and
several major stations
built in, – C.P. sold its
interests in the False Creek rail lines, trestle and
tunnel in 1980 to B.
C. Place for 27.4 million dollars.
The one and a half mile South Shore line along the
south side of False Creek serves
as a vital freight
industrial line and
as of October 82 was extended
along the east end of the Creek, then turning west
briefly to its team tracks near Carrall Street. This
revised route
took the old trestle out of its role in the
hub.
Since 1905, the B.C.E.R. now the rail division of
B.C. Hydro, has run trains over the trestle under an
agreement with the C.P.R. The B.C.
E. moved
Drake Street
yard looking east.
Photo courtesy
of Norris Adams, Vancouver
#374 first passenger train into Vancouver, May 1887.
Now rests on Park land near the vacated site of the
street car loop
at Kitsilano Beach – -which was 180
feet east
of the centre line and the street car loop.
Photo courtesy
of Norris Adams, Vancouver
Plaque on C.P.A. engine
374 at Kitsilano Beach.
Photo courtesy
of Norris Adams, Vancouver
A wall map in the library at U.B.C. shows that the end of the English Bay Branch of the C.P.R. would be at
Trafalgar St., 2,9077/12 miles from Montreal or very close to todays Cornwall & Trafalgar Streets.
Photo
courtesy of Norris Adams, Vancouver
Early
morning departure from Drake St. yard finds #2860 Royal Hudson, extra tender and extra 011 car
and a B. C. Railways diesel, just clear of the fixed steel span of the Kitsilano trestle. Burrard Traffic Bridge
slightly west. Photo courtesy of Norris Adams, Vancouver
Show.s
how the emerging tracks from
Drake
St. yards join in a 1/4 circle
entrance to the steel spans of the
Kitsilano trest/e. Note the precautions.
Photo
courtesy of Norris Adams,
Vancouver
CANADIAN
45
R A L
interurban passenger cars and freight over the
trestle, and
freight continued to move over it after
street car service ended
in the early 1950s. Towards
the end of 1982, only one train in each direction used
the trestle. The first trestle almost closed False Creek
to navigation.
At various times the creek in part, was
either dredged
or filled. There was dredging done in
preparation
for the planned C.P.R. terminal at
Kitsilano and again when Granville Island was being
built. False Creek and its future have always been
controversial. Some saw it
as a barrier to easy
communication within the city and debated whether
to build new bridges or fill it in. Some said it was
destined
for heavy industry and some emphasized
livability. Parks Boards and City Planners proposed
using False Creek for residences and
for Parks. Part
of the reclaimed land lies east of Main Street and now
supports the C.N.-Via station, B.N. freight offices and
service tracks. During World War 2, False Creek became the
building and launching spot for ships to be used in
the war effort. The
normally fixed steel span of the
Kitsilano Trestle
would be floated out on a barge to
enable such ships to get on
their way. The C.P.R. too,
built ships in False Creek during the Gold Rush of
1897.
The recent careful demolition of the trestle,
while it saddened some, was a cause
for rejoicing for
masters
of water-borne craft.
The Burrard Bridge was
built in 1932 – -just
slightly to the west of the Kitsilano trestle. It is a six
lane
highway type traffic bridge % of a mile in length
near the entrance to False Creek. It carries traffic high
enough to avoid
conflict with navigation. Huge
Liberty ships from west coast shipyards could glide
easily under, on
their way to join the Battle of the
Atlantic. The bridge piers have provision for a rapid
transit vertical lift span
below the highway deck.
Heres
how Chuck Davis recounts it in his column
Royal Hudson #2860 in the Drake St. roundhouse,
rods
down, in general annual Spring preparation for
the summer Squamish tourist season.
Photo
courtesy of Norris Adams, Vancouver
CANADIAN
46
R A I L
Drake Street Roundhouse Diesels mostly in evidence
also turntable.
Photo
courtesy of Norris Adams, Vancouver
Drake St.
yard looking east towards the Gambie
Bridge,
after 9 storage tracks have been lifted. Shown
is the point where G.P. & B. G.E.R. would exchange
cars.
Photo
courtesy of Norris Adams, Vancouver
CANADIAN
47
R A I L
Sunday Brunch in the Sunday Province for Sept.
21, 1980 – – a picture is shown as under the Burrard
Bridge, such as street cars, trams
or trains might have
found themselves in – -Lets
quote: No, youre not
seeing things. That is the Burrard Bridge and it does
have a lower level.
That addition exists only in the
artists imagination, although back when
the bridge
was designed, provision was made
for a second level
for rail and street cars. They just never got around to
it. The lower span
would have raised vertically for
boats by means of lifting machinery hidden in the
ornate superstructure.
Once again, we are indebted to
the Sunday
Province
of June 26,1932 and I quote: Then one of
the most involved questions affecting the situation
was
introduced – -what was to be done about the
old Canadian Pacific Railway trestle bridge,
under
lease to the B.C. Electric Railway Company? With the
trestle remaining it was argued there
would not be the
free movement
of marine traffic that would result if it
were removed. Negotiations were therefore
com­
menced with the C.P.R. and the Dominion Govern­
ment toward removal
of the trestle and the City
proposed to construct a lower deck to the projected
Burrard Bridge to carry the railroad lines contained
on the trestle. Eventually,
an arrangement was
reached
under which the C.P.R. promised to
contribute $250,000 toward the lower deck cost, if the
Dominion Government would pay the same, Some
of the steel girder cages were erected and can be
seen, to-day –but, the project was never finished.
The Kitsilano trestle came close to
extinction in her
46th year instead
of that of her 96th.
The former Kitsilano Railway Shops are tucked
partly under the south section of the Burrard Bridge.
As I write this, the shops are being torn down – –
lacking a
sprinkler system they represent a fire
hazard. I n the heyday
of street car, trams and electric
locomotives, often 200 men
would be employed. A
great variety
of equipment would be on display, and
finally some buses, too. One of the seemingly great
indignities came when, the old wood streetcars,
divested
of any recoverable material, were turned on
their sides and burned. In a distant spot, in the
adjacent
municipality of Burnaby, some 36 p.c.c.s,
lacking a buyer, succumbed to the old enemy rust. I
dont remember that any of the big trams that
operated in the Fraser Valley ever came to Kitsilano
-thats a question
for an old pro to answer. But it is
interesting to consider the league they belonged to.
Compared to
city cars, they were bigger, faster and
heavier and subject to standard railway regulations.
Whistles were often
the pet personal property of
individual motormen. They would puttheirwhistleon
and take it of, before and after their runs. Also many
had
their own driving stools – -sometimes
ornamented. They were
proud members of their
union associations – -the motormen belonged to
the Brotherhood
of Locomotive Engineers and wore
the traditional hat,
similarily, the conductors to the
Drake St. Yard roundhause -last minute groaming
far #2860 Rayal Hudsan in the campany of a C.P. and
a Via diesel unit. Same static Museum Train
equipment & exhibits an the left.
Phata
courtesy .of Narris Adams, Vancouver
B.C. Museum Train, Drake St. Yard #3716 a
Consolidation freight engine 2-8-0 built in 1912,
shown in off-season rest.
Photo
courtesy of Norris Adams, Vancouver
Order of Railway Conductors, and wore the yellow­
banded stiff pill box type of hat with the word
conductor on the front. Their blue serge uniforms
were usually neatly pressed and often a red rose from
their gardens formed a smart boutonniere. All of
these men gave
their best, in courtesy, dependability
and in speedy service. Factors often envied these
days by the public.
The Kitsilano shops, were set in a triangle at the
south end of the trestle at a
point where routes
diverged. The
#12 Kitsilano carline was more familiar
to me – -it ran 8
city blocks to its original 1905
terminus at Vine Street. The cars were
double
enders that did not end to be turned on a wye or a
loop.
This type of manoeuvre predated
my arrival in
Vancouver by several decades. It was likely a 2 man
car operation. But in 1931, one man cars were
introduced on the Kitsilano carline and a new loop
was completed at Yew Street, on
block of Vine Street.
Norm. Gidney, gives an excellent picture
of P.C.C.
#431, in a beautiful, revealing setting at the Kitsilano
Branch terminus in 1947. The car has circled the loop.
The
motorman-conductor assured that it is now his
proper departure time, boards his car after punching
the time-recording clock. The big X on the
front dash
tells that this
is a one man front loading car. The route
number -in this case 12 is carried along with the
destination sign on the front upper face. Older cars
would have carried this number separately, in a roof­
box display on the right side. The
outdoor location is a lounging,
swimming, picnic spot & near the beach.
Slightly behind is an old, but characteristic
Vancouver street
corner arc lamp, hung out on a steel
yard arm
from a wood pole. These were cal1~d-Chin~
Hat Lamps. The 4 original P.C.C. cars were given to
the #12 route, as succeeding ones did later, as
req ui red.
Altogether 36 were received, and more were
on
order in order to rephase the 4th Avenue route.
Wartime shortages and deliveries and the reluctance
of the union
to fully accept the one man prinCiple,
spelled
their doom. The conviction of the B.C.E.R. led
to the Rails to Rubber programme. Some of the
older cars were Brill pattern, semi convertibles,
with
clerestory roofs built by American Car in 1911. Some
made by Brill themselves, with arch roofs were 1912
models. When the B.C.E.R. was in greatest need
of
street cars, North American builders were snowed
under with orders and little wonder that B.C.E.R.
hastened to
build some of their own. By no means a
classic – -the barrel-side type seemed
their most
numerous standby. Many of these cars were
beautifully and
comfortably rebuilt in their own shops
around 1940. Street
car service ended in Vancouver
in 1955. They had proved a major factor in residential
and retail growth and development. All these cars, a
great variety of them -were a lovely sight
to citizen
and railfan, alike,
as they strode across the Kitsilano
trestle at
different times and for different reasons.
Engine 374 was a
woodburner now on public
exhibit at Kitsilano Beach. It was presented to the
City Archives by the C.P.R. August 10, 1945, after
CANADIAN 49
R A I L
being restored in C.P.s Angus Shops. The Vanqouver
Herald,
for Feb. 2, 1983 had this heartening news,
quote: The Provincial Heritage Trust will grant
$40,000 to the Canadian Railroad Historical Associa­
tion to
put the engine, abused by weather and
childrens pranks over the years, in better shape.
Hopefully, the engine will be moved to a more
gracious spot, amongst familiar surroundings, in the
roundhouse complex in B.C. Place, near the Drake
Street yards.
At present she languishes near the spot
of the vanished street car loop at Kitsilano Park.
To the writer, it is with some regret that the trestle
could not have lived to observe its 100th birthday
concurrant with Expo 86 – -in fact for the duration.
The old street car rails end at Chestnut Street and this
is alongside Vanier Park. Park and ride patrons could
have left
their cars in a moderately up-dated lot there.
Then they could have boarded
push-pull trains for a
station near the roundhouse in B.
C. Place. People­
mover systems are on official lips these days. First,
there is the A.L.R.T.
now building between New
Westminster to
downtown Vancouver. The Vancouver
Sun, January
18 83 reveals a new dream, quote:
Thompson said the people-mover would follow a
route from Vanier Park to Granville Island,
under the
Granville Bridge to the north shore
of False Creek,
east across the site to
Abbott Street and then
downtown. The people-mover that B.C. Place is
looking at now is a Swiss trolley car made by
Habaggar.
Drake St. coachyards, looking west towards Granville
Pictured are
a variety of cars: official business, former
summer Squamish run, and many old standard
version
and removal.
The late Kitsilano trestle was virtually a key for
passengers or rail freight, in whatever direction they
moved and all
that for a vigorous 96 years. One good
memory remains – -she escaped a conceived
execution in the 30s and added approximately
another 50 years in useful, fruitful public service. A.D.
1886
through 1982. Good Show!
TRAILER
Suggested Additional Material:
ENGLISH BAY
BRANCH, C.P.R. VANCOUVER,
produced by David L 1 Davies in 1975,25 pages with
maps,
an excellent and very thoroughly researched
authorative
study. Available from Pacific Coast
Division, Canadian
Railroad Historical Association,
P.O. Box 1006 Station
A VANCOUVER, B.C. Ask for
B.C. Rail Guide #8 Priced at $2.00
B.C. ELECTRIC RAILWAY book should be on sale,
Spring 1984. Brian L. Kelly, Brian
is one of most
respected and
sought after authorities on the
B.C.E.R. and B.C.
Hydro, as an illustrative speaker.
More
information? Write to: The Target Rails Group,
4036 West
36 Ave., Vancouver, B.C. V6N 2S9
METRO
TRANSIT ARCHIVAL PHOTOGRAPH
CATALOGUE – -several hundred photos of street
cars, trams, street scenes, locomotives, sold at
modest prices. Catalogue is free
for the writing.
Address: T.
E. Magee, Metro Transit Operating
Company
850 South West Marine Drive, VANCOUVER
B.C.
V6P 5Z1
Bridge, and slightly beyond is the Kitsilano trestle.
transcontinental The Dominion cars, some for the
sleepers
rumoured for roadside restaurants, con
Photo courtesy of Norris Adams, Vancouver
Pictured from the adjoining Burrard bridge, looking northeast toward the fixed span. The moveable span
is seen open for navigation -a characteristic position. The demolition was done carefully, and
stringers, ties and piles were saved. The third Granville Bridge across False Creek looms high in the
background. Trolley & diesel & gas busses have used it for 35 years, but no provision was foreseen to use
street cars. Photo
courtesy of Norris Adams, Vancouver
Shows
how the trestles fixed span was removed and
floated away
by barge, typical of occasions when
large ships had to leave the Creek.
Photo courtesy
of Norris Adams, Vancouver
Two barge-based high cranes lift the moveable span
from its pedestal.
Photo
courtesy of Norris Adams, Vancouver
Two cranes carefully let the moveable span down on cradles on a barge for a trip up the creek. Arrow
Demolitions Co. advertised a steel fixed span 140 feet and a steel swing span 120 feet. The ties were sold to
landscape gardeners, the tracks for spurs. Some piles were
of doubtful value due to rot.
Photo courtesy
of Norris Adams Collection, Vancouver Public Library.
/:ookin.g east and unde/the Butrard Str:eet bri towards the
I~te Kitsilano Rai/way trestle: Note the
, steel
cribbIng under the road deck. This .was erected,

anti9ipating astte~trailway and trains -right-of-way,
and thats-
ho.wif ended, simply ~anticipatibn,;.
PhetocoiJrtesy ,of NOtrisAdams; Vanpouver
,., ~ , .. A . …..,,. ~
These cars
on
holding
service tracks
just
outside
the
RC,ER
Kitsilano
Shops
built
in
1913,
and
currently
being
demolished, The
shops
were
in
a
triangle
between
diverging
tracks: -to the west
RCER
#12
carline
,
and
to the east the
V.
&
L
I,
(RCER)
tracks
to
south
shore
industries
,
and
a
curve
off
this to the
south
for
the Vancouver,
Marpole
and
/
or
Steveston
or
New
Westminster,
and
Fraser Valley
traffic
, A
brewery
formed
the
other
side
of
the
triangle
on
the
other
side,
Photo
courtesy
of
Number
13178
Vancouver
Public
Library
, ,
o :t> Z :t> o :t> Z
en ~
::0 :t> r
Kitsilano Loop, 1947, P:C. C. 431 about to leave the
terminus for downtown Vancouver.
The conductor­
motorman has just punched his car card -a time
honoured custom –authorizing him to leave.
Note:
the China Hat arc lamp, above and to the rear of this
r.Rr
Photo courtesy of Norm. Gidney, Burnaby, B. C.
(
Kitsilano trestle looking south with Burrard St. Bridge
in the background. Vancouver 1947. Note the array of
trams and street cars in the background and outside
the Kitsilano Shops,
and also that the line is double­
tracked. The piles under the track bed where P. C. C.
408 is shown are believed to have been of Australian
long-lasting wood –possibly gumwood. The car is
about 7
1
12 city blocks from the loop at Yew Street,
double tracked and high iron.
Photo courtesy
of Norm. Gidney, Burnaby, B. C.
CANADIAN
56
R A I L
An oldie B.C. Electric Box Car x 50, with top
running board and brake wheel, its fate & future not
known, waits under the Burrard Bridge, while Hydro
shops nearby are being demolished.
Photo courtesy
of Norris Adams, Vancouver
Old Kitsilano carline now shortened to end at the
barrier at Chestnut Street. A house now stands
astride the
former right-of-way, ahead. This is just
one city block from the Kitsilano car shops-now
being demolished.
Photo courtesy
of Norris Adams, Vancouver
CANADIAN
57
R A I L
Portable Fire equipment in shed, seems a bit quaint,
Drake Street Yards.
Photo courtesy
of Norris Adams, Vancouver
Interior of Kitsilano Barn 1925
Photo courtesy of Brian L. Kelly C/O Metro Operating
Company.
FtlrllI
18&H.

…,..-

ltjlf> li-,-.
*
…..
J
bll
l
..
,
Plan
of
the
City
of
Vancouver, Western Terminus
of
the Canadian
Pacific
Railway
1886.
Wall
map
in the
Special
Collections
, U.B.C.
Library
, Vancouver.
Photo
courtesy
of
Norris
Adams
, Vancouver
() :l> Z :l> o :l> Z
at ~
;u :l> r
CANADIAN
60
R A I L
B. C. s Museum Train ready to leave Drake Street yard
on a goodwill promotion trip.
Photo
courtesy of Norris Adams, Vancouver
C. P. freight leaves Vancouvers waterfront via the
Dunsmuir tunnel for Drake St. yard.
Photo
courtesy of Norris Adams, Vancouver
Kitsilano trestle swing span in process
of demolition,
is towed under the Granville Sf. Bridge. No streetcars
were to use this –the third Granville
Sf. False Creek
span. Photo
courtesy of Norris Adams, Vancouver
Destination signs from B. C.E.R. gas busses, found in
the rubble
during the demolition of the Kitsilano
shops. When street cars finished in
1955, gas busses
filled in till trolley bus overhead
could be installed.
See also picture where older buses of B. C. Rapid
Transit
sit beside street cars in the Kitsilano Car
Shop.
Photo courtesy
of Norris Adams, Vancouver
Note the gtrder cages under the traffic deck
of the
Burrard St. Bridge. Intended for street car and railway
tracks –the
project was never finished.
Photo courtesy
of Norris Adams, Vancouver
,
1
~
Hydro
diesel
and
2
Hydro
Thrall
Door
boxes
on
the
late Ki
tsilano
trestle. This
picture
appeared
in
B. C.
Hydros
annual
report
for
1980
/81
with
this
notation:

Major
repairs were
made
to
railway
bridges
over
the
Fraser
River
and
to the
Kitsilano
Trestle
following
accidents
involving
barges.
Photo
courtesy
of
B. C.
Hydro
Photo
l}

H
3.$.
Ii
() ~ 2 ~ o ~ 2
~ ~
::0 ~ r
This
photo
apparently
taken
from
a
plane

in
1953-­
shows
Drake
St.
in its finest
hour
–lots
of
activity
and
facilities
and
equipment. The
roundhouse
seems
destined
to remain
as
part
of
a
complex
within
B.C.
Place
and
may
become
the
new
home
for
engine
#374
now
languishing
outside
in Kitsilano Park from
overactive
children
and
weather. The trestle is
.shown, the carbarns
and
vaguely the
#12
carline
right-of-way
to Kitsilano Beach loop.
Photo
courtesy
of
Province Collection, Vancouver
Public
Librarv.
BOMBARDIER INC. OF MONTREAL PLANS TO
combine forces with other Canadian companies
interested in Singapores
multi-billion-dollar
mass transit project and .form a bidding group,
according to Raymond Royer, president of its mass
transit division.
Assembling a
bidding consortium for projects such
as the Singapore development would be the first step
in
building a turnkey capability in the international
mass transit field, he said in
an interview. I do not
believe that Canadians will be able to succeed, in the
long term,
if we go only for producing (subway) cars.
Bombardiers mass transit division has been
highly
successful in the export market. Since 1980, it has
signed contracts
for rolling stock in Mexico ($100-
million), New Jersey (100-million) and Portland, Ore.
($25-million),
as well as making a record-breaking
$1-billion sale to New York City.
But without broader export support from other
transit-related companies in Canada,
Bombardier
will find it increasingly difficult to win such contracts
in future,
Mr. Royer said.
We believe that with the experience on the export
market that we have developed and the attitude
buyers have developed towards
us, we can help
(other companies) become involved. For Bombardier,
it is part
of a total strategy.
The payback would come with the emergence
of a
broadly based Canadian capability in the growing
international market for mass transit systems.
Contracts for the Singapore project will not be
awarded for at least another year, but the first stage in
bidding (the qualification round) is almost completed.
car
Bombardier hopes to form a group from among the
Canadian companies invited to bid on various
aspects
of the project.
The Singapore
contract could yield $140-million
for Bombardier. More important than the size of the
contract, however, is the prospect
of a first sale in
Asia, a lucrative market for major projects.
Competition
for the Singapore contract is intense;
more than 1,500 companies from countries such
as
West Germany, France, the United States, Britain and
Japan are expected to bid.
In case of the Singapore contract, an inability to
offer a complete
turnkey bid will not necessarily be a
problem, Mr. Royer said, because the Government
probably will
not want to award the entire contract to
companies from one
country. But a broader
Canadian expertise in
the field would be desirable.
The whole project will
cost up to $5-billion. He
estimates that the first phase, which involves
17.1
kilometres of track (14.6 in tunnels and 2.5 on the
surface) and 144 subway cars, will cost about $1.4-
billion.
The second phase will extend the system above
ground to a total
of 70 kilometres and will mean a
contract
for about 400 cars.
(GLOBE
& MAIL)
PREPARATIONS ARE WELL UNDERWAY
TO
celebrate the centenary of the Canadian Pacific
Railway in Calgary
this year.
It was
August 11,1883 when the first train moved up
to
the Elbow River -four days later the railway bridge
CANADIAN
66
was completed and the train continued into the new
townsite.
On August 11,1983 the
Glenbow Museum will open
its
doors to a new exhibition celebrating the
accomplishments
of the CPR 100 years ago. The
exhibits will cover a whole
floor of the museum and
they will be on display until May
4, 1984.
From September
21 to 25, 1983 the Glenbow will
sponsor The CPR West Conference, which w!
examine the Q,rrival of the rail company in the west In
1880s and its impact on the region up to the 1920s.
Registration fees are $90.00 before May
31, 1983
and $100.00 after. The conference is limited to 300
delegates. For more information
contact Joyce
Gibson,
Glenbow Museum, 130 -9th Avenue S.E.
Calgary T2G
OP3, telephone 264-8300.
As part
of its own celebrations CP Rail will bring
into Calgary, the Central CommunityTrain which will
feature memorabilia from the early days
of the
railway. The travelling exhibition is being produced
by Omer Lavallee, corporate historian and archivist
for CP Rail.
(FLAGSTOP, CALGARY
&
SOUTHWESTERN DIVISION)
MONTREAL-BASED BOMBARDIER INC. SAYS ITS
$1-billion sale
of 825 subway cars to New York
City wont be jeopardized by the recent ruling by
the U.S. Commerce Department that Canada unfairly
subsidized the deal to the tune
of $91.2 million U.S.
The ruling has no impact on the
contract
whatsoever, a Bombardier spokesman said.
However, the buyer
of the cars, the New York
Metropolitan Transportation
Authority (MT A), would
be liable for countervailing duties equal
to the
amount
of the subsidy should the U.S. International
Trade Commission now
conclude that it caused
material
injury to U.S. industry.
The commission
is to decide by March 21 whether
the subsidies harmed U.
S. industry, namely the Budd
Co.
ofT roy, Mich., which lodged a complaint after the
deal was signed last year.
The Commerce Department said subsidization
equal
to $110,-565 U.S. on each car came mainly
through financing provided to the
buyer by Canadas
Export Development Corp. (EDC).
The Bombardier spokesman noted that, should the
trade commission order application
of the duties, the
MT A has the option of appealing
or asking the EDC to
let it seek alternate financing in the U.S., where
interest rates have fallen sharply.
(MONTREAL GAZETTE)
R A I L
CN RAILS OPERATION OF THE OVERLAND
container service by Terra Transport,
in New­
foundland, has become so successful that one
01
its competitors (Atlantic Container Express Inc.) has
abandoned its weekly service between Montreal and
Corner Brook, Nfld. According to a report by the
President
of ACE, the overland container service
offered by CNs Terra Transport, using
their own East
Coast Ferry operation and then by land to Corner
Brook from Port aux Basques, at much lower rates,
had
cut deeply into ACEs direct waterborne cargo.
ACE fears that
further expansion by Terra Transport
may also jeopardise ACEs St. Johns service.
(SRS NEWS)
CANADIAN
NATIONAL RAILWAYS NET LOSS FOR
1982 will be about $223 million, compared with a
year-earlier
profit of $193 million, the company
said.
Its the biggest loss in the Crown-owned corpora­
tions 61-year history.
Almost half the loss results from CNs decision to
write
down the value of two substantial investments:
an 18-per-cent interest in Eurocanadian Ship­
holdings Ltd., which operates the Cast shipping
group, and
wholly-owned Central Vermont Railway.
CN said the decision to write down its Cast
investment, which totals $62 million,
is based on the
effects
of an 18-month decline in demand for ocean
shipping.
The commercial viability of Central Vermont
Railway, which Montreal-based
CN has owned since
1927, has been seriously affected by the merger
of
several American railroads serving the same eastern
market, the
company said in a statement.
Jean-Guy Brodeur, a
CN spokesman, said a
breakdown
of the two investments is not avai lable
yet. But,
he said, its almost a writeoff of the values
involved.
CN Rail, Grand
Trunk Corp. and TerraTransport
are expected to suffer total net losses of $120 million,
against a year-earlier
profit of $241 million.
The 1982 loss on rail operations includes a loss
of
$296 million from transporting grain at statutory
rates, the
company said. With the exception of grain,
which accounts
for 20 per cent of CN Rails workload,
all major
commodity movements declined.
CN Enterprises, a division formed last year to
manage CNs non-rail activities,
is expected to have
earned a
profit of more than $60 million in 1982. The
profit reflects the better results of CN Marine and CN
Exploration. CNs
trucking and hotel businesses
were
particularly affected by the depressed eco­
nomy, the
company said.
(THE GAZETTE)
CANADIAN
THE PERENNIAL WARM WEATHER TRAFFIC AND
parking
problem in the vicinity o~ Vict~ria ~ark in
Niagara Falls,
Ontario is pro~~tlng City, NI~ga.ra
Parks Commission tourist association and Provincial
officials to give c~nsideration to a system which
would combine new parkinggarages, located rem?te
from the river, and a special transit system which
would connect the garages with the Falls area.
Whether a fixed rail
or auto train type of system would
be adopted has not to date been revealed, but Mayor
Wayne
Thomson of Niagara Falls has stated that he
would prefer to have transit cars moving on rails.
The system
would also serve other tourist attractions
in the area, such
as Marineland and Game Farm,
Pyramid Place, the Panasonic Tower, the Skylon
Tower, the Lundys Lane motel strip, Ferry Street and
Clifton Hill. The system would also connect the
tourist areas with downtown Niagara Falls, where a
ten-block redevelopment scheme is presently pro­
posed, including a shopping mall, office buildings, a
convention centre and a hotel. The actual resident
population of Niagara Falls is about 70,000, but ~he
number of people in town on an average day dunng
the tourist season greatly swells that number.
A prime concern is that congestion in the .
tourist
areas causes the average visitor to stay in the city less
than 2% hours, while the average length
of stay in
other resort locations is two to three days. John
Hoffner, President of the local
tourist association and
a
member of the transit planning committee, says that
the new transit system has to be a unique one, and
not
just some standard system which people can see in
their home towns. (Until 1932 the area had the open
cars
of the Great Gorge Route, without any doubt one
of the most spectacular and memorable trolley rides
ever
to have been operated on this continent). The
thinking is further that daily passes would be sold for
use on the new system, at a price in the region of $2 to
$3, enabling the tourist to use the facility not only for
sightseeing purposes but also for multi-ride hopping
between the various points
of interest, more
conveniently and quickly than he drives his car (or
walks) at the present time. Meanwhile, the Niagara
Parks Commission is planning to install a people
mover system
of its own (technology not revealed) i.n
the area of Victoria Park, and design work IS
reputedly already under way. The intention would be
to
incorporate the people mover into the larger
citywide system when the latter is constructed.
(NIAGARA DIVISION)
CN RAIL PRESIDENT AND CHIEF OPERATING
officer R.E. Lawless told an international
conference on material handling
that the future
economic health of the railway system will depend in
67
R A , L
part on further innovations in material handling
systems.
Speaking to the International Material Manage­
ment Society in
Toronto, Lawless said that growth in
the demand
for rail freight services, particularly in
western Canada,
will require the achievement of new
levels
of productivity, equal to what has been
achieved over the past
couple of decades.
INGENUITY
Despite the current downturn in traffic and
revenues, he said,
we must be prepared to respond
quickly when the economic picks up steam. We cant
just shut down, and wait for things to get be~ter. T~is
preparation, he noted, will call for the same Ingen~lty
and willingness to innovate which materials handling
professionals have demonstrated in the recent past.
Linking the modern development
of CN Rail to the
growth of material management as a field of study i.n
its own right, he said,
we hope and expect thiS
parallel development will
continue. Because, not­
withstanding the
current economic difficulties, we
are looking ahead
to extensive growth in the demand
for our services.
Lawless said that the recession will somewhat
affect the
timing of expansion plans for the western
rail system. But, he said, the developments will take
place in full
confidence that economic growth in
western Canada will
follow.
(KEEPING TRACK)
STEAMTOWN MAY BE MOVING: DON BALL,
Steamtown U.S.A. Director, says they are
thinking of moving to Scranton, Pa. Mr. Ball
claims the State of
Vermont has failed to provide an
adequate level of support for the museum. The Dept.
of Transportation has spent 98% of its railraod
budget on the purchase of the Washington County
Branch of the D
& H, and other Vermont rail lines,
and none
forthe tracks Steamtown uses. Attendance
has been
dropping since its peak of 75,000 in 1975.
The State
of Vermont refused to erect a sign on 1-91
that could have diverted about 2% of the traffic to the
museum. Scranton, PA is
thinking of incorporating
Steamtown into a
three-part development project-­
a $13.8 million hotel renovation, restaurant complex
at
an old railroad station and a recreation area with
ski slopes. Steamtown
would be located in an old
freight yard and operate a trolley line to the
recreation area a few miles away. Surveys indicate
the possibility
of 200,000 to 300,000 tourists in the
Scranton area, near the eastern resorts of the
Pocono mountains. Talks began in
July, and are in
the discussion stage Steamtown doesnt want to
move from Vermont,
but if it does, it would take at
least two years.
THE 7.0KM (4.3 MI.) SCARBOROUGH RT (RAPID
Transit) Line, the
first application of a newtransit
concept for Metropolitan Toronto, will bring
direct rapid transit service to the Scarborough Town
Centre. It will be a tool
to help shape land use and
increase
economic development along its route. The
new lines link with the easterly terminal
of the Bloor­
Danforth subway at Eglinton Avenue and Kennedy
Road, together with the re-routing
of surface bus
routes in Scarborough, will ensure that passengers
obtain the maximum benefit from the speed and
convenience
of the new transit facility.
Approval
of the Scarborough RT was granted by
Metropolitan Toronto and the Ontario Municipal
Board
in September 1977. Original design plans
called
for the use of Light Rail Transit (street car-type
vehicles on a private
right-of-way) on the new line,
but as a result
of support from elected representatives
of Scarborough and approval by Metropolitan
Toronto Council, a change in technology to a system based on the Intermediate Capacity Transit System
(ICTS) developed
by the Urban Transportation
Development
Corporation (UTDC) was approved.
The modified
ICTS design is a computer assisted
rail transit system which employs steel wheel/steel
rail vehicles powered
by linear induction motors. It is,
in effect, a
mini-subway, fully grade separated with
pre-paid platforms and high-level loading. The basic
passenger
carrying capacity of the ICTS system
ranges from less than 5,000 to over 20,000
passengers per
hour in each direction. Modifications
to car/train lengths, headways, running times, etc.
provide
for operation outside the basic range. While
the system is designed
for fully automated operation,
the
Scarborough RT will operate with manned trains
at all times.
The ICTS vehicle, which does
not use the wheels
for traction or braking, will operate at reduced
vibration levels compared to conventional steel
wheel/steel rail vehicles. This is made possible
by the
{
-g
f
[L…..—-. __
At Grade
Elevated
Underground
Station
…….••••
•••••••••••••••
At Grade Elevated
linear induction motor traction system. The UTDCs
advanced design steerable
truck allows the axles to
swivel radially and
follow the rails through curves,
resulting in less squeal,
further contributing to
quieter train operation and lower vibration levels.
Completion
of the Scarborough RT is scheduled
for late 1984 at an estimated cost of approximately
$181-million. The capital funding is being provided
by the
Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto and the
Province of Ontario. The Province has also agreed to
pay a special subsidy toward the operating cost in
recognition
of the lower ridership levels expected in
the early years
of operation and in return for
commitments on the part of the Municipality to
encourage
public transit use through land use plans
and
other measures.
The
leTS vehicle has been designed to be
acceptable for elevated operation. The lightweight,
welded
aluminum cars are small, making their visual
impact on the environment low. Track, roadbed and
current collection systems are similar to those of the
subway system. However, the use
of the linear
THE
FINANCIALLY TROUBLED MUSEUM OF
Transportation in Boston,
MA has presented a
plan to a Boston bank aimed at saving a
major
part of its collection from sale at a foreclosure
auction. The museum shut down last May, a victim
of
inflation, high operating costs and reduced attend­
ance. The museum directors decided that any future
reopening of the museum will be dedicated solely to
automobiles, rather than encompassing all modes
of
transportation. The directors will sell about $300,000
worth of pieces not needed for the new museum. The
money from the sales will be used as direct loan
payments to the bank. The repayment plan
is also
contingent upon the impending sale of the museums
portion of the wharfsite building it had occupied
before its shutdown. While nothing
is final yet, both
the Museums Board of Directors and the Bank
representatives are optimistic of a realistic solution to
the Museums problems.
The Manchester Union Leader
of December 30
reports that a group of North Country businessmen
are negotiating to buy the MT. Washington Cog
Railway from the Teague family. Sources close to the
group, which declined to be identified by name, say
that a price
slightly under $1 million has been agreed
to pending approval
of an in-state bank loan. The deal
could
be closed by mid-January. Mrs. Ellen Teague
was quoted
as saying she is delighted and pleased
that the potential buyers are from the local area.
(THE 470)
CANADAS FIRST ELECTRIC FREIGHT RAILWAY
will use locomotives that are at least nominally
Canadian. The British Columbia Railway has
ordered seven 178 tonne 6000 HP equivalent Model
induction motors for propulsion and steerable-axle
trucks to reduce wheel wear on curves are features
designed to reduce operating costs and minimize
noise. The cars will be
12.7 m (40) long -about the
size
of a standard diesel bus -and each will
accommodate
30 seated and 55 standing passengers.
Normal operating speed will
be 70km/hour and they
will be operated in trains
of two, four or six cars.
The 7.
0km (4.3 mi.) Scarborough RT starts at the
Kennedy subway station and proceeds north in
an
open right-of-way adjacent to the CN rail line to a
point just north of Ellesmere Road. At this point, the
line turns east in a 11O-metre (360) tunnel under the
CN line and then rises to
an elevated structure
through the Town Centre area to the terminal station
at McCowan Road. The line will be completely grade
separated at all roads along its route.
This alignment permits an extension to the Malvern
area and
accommodates opportunities for other
possible line extensions.
(TTC TED WICKSON)
GF6C electric
locomotives from Diesel Division,
General Motors,
London, Ontario. Underneath the
full-width body, however, the curious will find that the
50 kv AC electric power is converted to tractive effort
by transformers, converters, and controls supplied
by ASEA of Sweden. The units are of a full-width
carbody design, 20.7 metres long, carried on six
powered axles. Delivery is scheduled
for late 1983
and early 1984. The
Tumblers Ridge coal branch of
the BCR,
including two major tunnels has been under
construction for some time, and is to haul 7.7 million
tonnes
of coal annually on a 15 year contract. Mines
located at Quintette and Bullmoose will
be served by
this line to the main line at Anzac. Trains will consist
of 98 118 tonne hopper cars of coal.
(THE MARKER)
SOME YEARS
AGO THE IDEA OF A POOL OF
boxcars
seemed
to be a good way to combat the
chronic shortage of freight equipment. The pool
would
be available for all to draw upon and so Railbox
was born and eventually grew to a fleet
of 25,000
units. The
company is a part of Trailer Train which,
owned
by thirty major railroads, has similarly
supplied flatcars
for piggypack use for thirty years.
Now Railbox is hard hit not only by the economic
downturn but by the major shift away from the use of
boxcars in favor of i ntermodal trai lers and containers.
(Drive
through any port city and note the mountains
of containers testifying to the effect on that
commerce
as well) About 75% of Railboxs are idle
and default
is staring it in the face. Railboxs
difficulties should
not effect parent Trailer Train.
(RAILROAD ENTHUSIASTS JOURNAL)
CANADIAN 70
R A , L
LANGLEY
IOWNSHIP
MAPLE RIDGE
MAISQUI
PROPOSED
ROl/TtS
fOR INnGRATED
COMMl/TtR IRANSIT SYSTEM
_ TrOlnRoule
____ .. Honey Bus Roule
-Mbslon8usRouie
-PI Meadows Bus Roule
@ Ploposod Siolion
Mapping out commuter line: The proposed commuter service will run along the Burrard Inlet from downtown. Vancouver to Port Moody and into Port
Coquitlam. From Port
Coquitlam, the fine will link up with the communities of Pitt Meadows, Maple Ridge, Haney and MISSIOn.
PART OF THE DRAMATIC CHANGE OCCURRING
within the Vancouver Division is the proposed
modification
of the existing freight line, from
Vancouver to Port Coquitlam,
to also accommodate
commuter trains.
Don Stewart, manager, development, says the
Vancouver terminal of the
commuter rail service will
be the former CP Rail Station on Cordova and
Granville streets.
CP Rail will operate the rail
commuter service, part of an integrated rail/bus/sea­
bus/ ALRT system,
for B.C. Transit.
From Granville Station, rail
commuters will be
able to go north via the Seabus, or south or west to
bus connections, Mr. Stewart says.
The Seabus is
unique in that it is a ferry transporting people across
Burrard Inlet, from Vancouver
to North Vancouver.
The rail
commuter service is a separate venture from
the mass rapid transit planned
for the lower
mainland. However, the rail service complements the
other planned transit system.
Earlier, CP Rail turned over the
Dunsmuir Tunnel
for
an underground light rail transit link to B.C. Place.
Rail
commuter users will be able to transfer to the
advanced light rapid transit system.
The
commuter rail line will run along the CP Rail
right-of-way on the south shore of Burrard Inlet
through Port
Moody into Port Coquitlam, a distance
of
17 miles (27 kilometres).
In order to conti nue to move our own freight traffic
along the lines,
we are undertaking various capital
improvements, says Mr. Stewart. Initial
work at stations includes some demolition
and building of platforms at the initial station, Port
Coquitlam, and the final station, Vancouver Granville.
Some
work will be done as well at the intermediate
stations at
Coquitlam Centre and Port Moody. New
track will have to be laid and it will be necessary to
lower the existing track by six feet (two metres) in
front of the Vancouver station. B.C. Transit will also
install stairwells and escalators for passengers
disembarking.
The track improvements and station improve­
ments necessary for our operating efficiency must be
made in
order to assure safe, comfortable movement
of
commuters and no disruption to our own freight
traffic.
The service
is estimated to cost $35.6 million over
four years. There will be two trains inbound in the
morning and two
outbound in the afternoon,
scheduled
to run at peak traffic times.
It is estimated that 65 per cent of all commuters
working in the downtown area are within a five block
radius of the Vancouver Station. The Vancouver
Station will be the hub
of Canadas most unique
transportation network, says Mr. Stewart.
CP Rail will
do all construction work and be
responsible
for safe operation of the service on behalf
of B.C. Transit. All costs for construction and
operations will
be borne by the crown corporation.
B.C. Transit has purchased five locomotives and
will lease
22 cars for the service. The trains will move
900 people each, says Mr. Stewart.
Over the three years following the inauguration of
the service, we will do additional grading track work,
ballasting,
building a new bridge over the Coquillam
River and extending the bridge at Windermere Street.
When this
is completed, the potential will be there to
expand the service as needed to four trains each way.
Studies indicate that the populations of CoquitJam,
Maple Ridge and Port
Coquitlam will double in the
next decade. Thus the project will fit into the
changing requirements of the lower mainland
tran
sportation network.
(CP RAIL NEWS)
THE INTRODUCTION OF LRC TRAINS ON THE
Quebec-Windsor corridor brings Canada a step
closer to the high-speed passenger train service
of Europe and Japan says Rejean Bechamp, vice
president
of planning and development for VIA Rail
Canada Inc.
It may take ten rr :Ire years before we
see high-performance trains in Canada comparable
to certain
other countries, but theres no doubt we are
entering a
new railway age. VIA now runs 18 LRC
trains a day in the Corridor, including three each way
between Montreal and Toronto. According to Mr.
Bechamp,
On the Montreal-Toronto corridor, a train
every
hour is our long-term objective. We are
convinced the market is there to support that
frequency. We see ourselves carrying 30 to 50 per
cent of the total intercity traffic in Canada in the 300-
500 mile range. It·s more and more apparent the
airlines are not interested in the short haul, and more
and more businessmen are
taking the train for
reasons of cost and service.
On the Quebec-Windsor corridor, VIAs LRC trains
operate at
top speeds of 155 km/h. The objective is to
reach top speeds of 200 km/h by 1990. The 540 km
journey from Toronto to Montreal would then take
three
hours forty minutes instead of todays4 hours 30
minutes. The trip between Toronto and Ottawa would
be covered in 2 hrs 40 min., between Montreal and
Ottawa in 60 min, and between Montreal and Quebec
City in 90 min. For all this to happen means exclusive
track for passenger trains. to eliminate the wear and
tear
of the freight trains which makes speeds in
excess
of 155 km/h unfeasible.
The VIA LAC lIeet consists of 50 passenger cars
and
21 locomotives. which will be expanded by 1985
to
100 cars and 31 locomotives.
(TRANSPORT
ACTION-TRANSPORT 2000)
Back cover
BCR; TUNNELLING AND BRIDGE BUILDING
continue apace on the Tumbler Ridge line. (CO)
Despite the
higher initial cost, authority has been
given
to electrify the new line thoughout. $10m. will
come
from federal and provincial funds to offset the
extra $14.2m. cost. Elaborate ventilation systems in
the 15 km.
of tunnels will be avoided. 98·car coal
trains
will operate over the 130 km line: 7 new
locomotives will be ordered to run on the 50 kv.
system (the second in
North America, after Black
Mesa and Lake Powell
in Arizona.), at $2.6m. each,
abOut $700,000 more than
a comparable diesel, but
with an expected longer life and lower manitenance
costs. Design
work is being done by CP Consulting
Services Ltd. of Montreal. Some new diesels will be
needed
for the Anzac-Prince George haul, where the
trains will move on
to CN tracks. The only NA builder
cu
rrently making electric units of the size needed
(6,000
hpj is General Electric, but rumour is the
GMOO will build the units at its London, Ont8riO,
plant,
under a manufacturing arrangement with
ASEA
of Sweden. Overhead catenary at 50 kv. will
feed 6-axle locos. Remote
Control Cars #106, ACC 7.
8,9 (aU ex-BN) are on lease to CPo
(The Sandhouse)
MR.
MICHAEL TOOLE. A 24-YEAR-OLD GRAPHIC
designer arrived five minutes early for the last
train, the 1.10 a.m. from
Oxford to Banbury. A
porter had to
admit that the train had left five minutes
earlier. but BA
promised to get Michael home
somehow.
He expected a taxi
but instead SR provided a 117
Ions, 100 mph diesel locomotive crewed by two
amused drivers.
Twenty·five minutes and 22 miles
later the VIP one passenger special pulled
into
Banbury.
Mr. Toole,
who had been visiting his girl friend.
said: I
couldnt believe my eyes, I was the sole
passenger.
British Rail said yesterd
ay: We aim to please.
Regulations say that if a passenger
is stranded and
Its
our fault we have to do something about it.
The 1.10 did pull out early so we gave the young
man the full works.
(DAILY TELEGRAM UK)
Hydro train on the Kifsifano trestle. Taken rom the
opposite side
Photo courtesy of 8. C. Hydro Photo
Canadian Rail
P.o. Box 282 St. Eustache, Que., Canada
J7R 4K6
Postmaster: if undelivered within
10 days return to sender, postage guaranteed.
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