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Canadian Rail 372 1983

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Canadian Rail 372 1983

Canadian Rail
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No.372
January-
1983

Published bi-monthly by the Canadian Railroad
Historical Association P.O Box 148 St. Constant P.Q.
JOL IXO. Subscription rates $21.20
(US
funds if outside Canada)
EDITOR: Fred F
Angus
CO-ODITOR: M. Peter Murphy
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
FRONT COVER:
ON A DULL, LATE-WINTER TUESDAY
MORNING a group of commuters
waiting at Valois station for the
train to Montreal. Although it
was now the second half of the
twentieth century, March 11 1952
to be exact, the train was little
changed from the days before the
First World War. Although steam
would be around for another eight
years, the wooden coaches were
very near the end of their
careers as they were retired in
the summe r of 1953.
Canadian Pacific photo No. 2782.
INSIDE FRONT COVER:
THE NEW LOOK ON THE LAKESHORE
COMMUTER SERVICE IN 1970 is
aepicted by these two views t~keh
at Montreal West in July of that
year. Following retirement of the
old heavyweight steel coaches,
service was provided by the nine
new double-deckers, forty 800-
series commuter cars and some rail.
.
diesel cars.
Canadian Pacific photos E-1727-1
and E-1727-2.
ISSN 0008-4875
NEW
BRUNSWICK DIVISION
P.O. Box 1162
Saint
John,
New Brunswick E2L 4G7
ST. LAWRENCE VALLEY
DIVISION
P.O. Box 22 Station B
Montreal, Que. H3B 3J5
BYTOWN RAILWAY SOCIETY
P.O. Box 141, Station A
Ottawa,
Ontario K1 N 8V1
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
P.O. Box 5849, Terminal A,
Toronto Ontario M5W 1 P3
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
300 Cabana Road East,
Windsor Ontario N9G 1A2
GRAND RIVER DIVISION
P.O. Box 603
Cambridge, Ontario N1 R 5W1
NIAGARA DIVISION
P.O.
Box 593
St. Catharines,
Ontario L2R 6W8
ROCKY MOUNTAIN DIVISION
P.O. Box 6102, Station C,
Edmonton Alberta T5B 2NO
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN DIVISION
60 -6100, 4th Ave. NE
Calgary, Alberta T2A 5Z8
CROWSNEST
& KETTLE-VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 400
Cranbrook, British Columbia
V1C 4H9
PACIFIC COAST DIVISION
P.O.
Box 1006, Station A,
Vancouver British Columbia V6C 2P1
Train Z5Sdeparts Windsor Statioll
as CP Rails last passenger unit
By Orner Lavalee
Exactly 101 years and five months after beginning
rail services out of Winnipeg on May 1,1881, CP Rail
operated its last passenger train early in the
morning
of Oct. 1, 1982.
While responsibility
for the provision of inter-city
passenger services had been assumed by VIA Rail
Canada, which had been organized
for that purpose
in 1978, VIAs terms of reference did
not include
suburban services such as the Montreal Lakeshore
trains operating between Windsor Station and
Rigaud, Que. These continued to be operated
by CP
Rail
until the Montreal Urban Community
Transportation Commission (MUCTC) integrated
them in the
public transit structure effective Oct. 1.
This step does not mean that passenger trains will
. ;;pk~; JC.~(~~,,,~~ t194.4;0·1~pe
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not be seen on CP Rail lines. Just as many VIA
services operate over the companys lines under
contract using VIA rolling stock but manned by CP
Rail crews, the New Rigaud Line commuter service
will
be operated under a similar contract to the
MUCTC. In due course, the suburban trains will carry
the
colors and identification of the Montreal public
transport entity.
NEW ERA
Unlike many last runs, the departure of Train 255
from Windsor Station was not an unhappy occasion.
True, it had its symbolism
for historians and train
buffs, but the transfer
of responsibility to the MUCTC
marks the beginning of a new era of more trains and
greater frequency
of service, not to mention the
A SPECIAL TRAIN AT POINTE FORTUNE about 1895. The first car is
one of about the 1860s acquired from a predecessor railway,
possibly the South Eastern, while the rear car is a parlour
car. Locomotive 246 had been built in 1886 and survived until
1929. Note the headlight on the sloping tender.
Canadian Pacific photo No. 5669.
.
.., . . … r~· .
,,): .,;.
AT BEACONSFIELD IN 1895 the crew of the Pointe Fortune local
pause for a photo. Locomotive 624 was built in 1893 especially
for this service.
Canadian Pacific photo No. 25752.
slashing of fares to stations situated in the cities and
towns
of the Montreal Urban Community.
A
number of patrons have been temporarily
inconvenienced by the closing of some stations
which were in close
proximity to others, but this step,
which was necessary to convert the route into a true
rapid transit line, will be remedied by revisions
of
local transit bus routes in Montreals West island,
which the
MUCTC contemplates for 1983. This, plus
interchangeability
of tickets and flash cards between
trains and
connecting buses will not onlyfully service
existing patrons but hopefully attract many
new
ones.
HUMBLE BEGINNINGS
CP Rail service along the Lakeshore began in the
late 1880s
following the completion of what is now
the Winchester sub-division between Montreal and
Smiths Falls in 1887. The new Canadian pacific line
parallel led the older Grand Trunk (now Canadian
national)
Montreal-Toronto main line which had
been opened more than
30 years before.
At first, trains on the new route used the original
terminal station in the east end
of Montreal, known as
Place Viger Station, iooping around the west side of
Mount Royal through Outremont and Mile End. However, in 1889, a five-mile extension was opened
between Montreal
Junction (Montreal West) and the
new Wintjsor Station, giving Canadian Pacific the
opportunity to compete for local traffic with the GTR
as far as Vaudreuil, where the two lines diverged.
The first service, with intermediate stops, which
included Dorval, Valois, Beaconsfield, Ste. Anne and
Vaudreuil, was in operation
by the autumn of 1889.
The train actually operated between Windsor
Stations and Winchester, Ontario, arriving at the
Montreal terminal at 9:45 a.m. and leaving at 5:
15
p.m., daily.
For a time in the early 1890s there was an
additional stop at a half called Bel Air,
about one mile
(1.6 kilometers) west of Dorva( but this stop had
disappeared by 1893.
In that year, Canadian Pacific
leased the line of the Montreal
& Ottawa Railway
Company, which had been
built in the late 1880s and
whose 17-mile
(27 kilometer) main line extended
from Vaudreuil, via Como, Hudson and Rigaud,
to
Pointe Fortune, Que., on the Quebec/Ontario
boundary.
Rather than operate the Pointe Fortune line
as a
separate branch, its t
rains extended along the
Lakeshore from Vaudreuil to Windsor Station, with
two daily-except-Sunday trains arriving inontreal at
at 8:30 a.m. and 9:45 a.m. with
corresponding
departures at 5:15 p.m. and 6:15 p.m. Concurrently, a
new stop was added at Lakeside.
In November, 1894, a new station -St.
Antoine­
was added between Windsor Station and Montreal
Junction. Named for the abjacent residential
community of Cote St. Antoine, the stations name
changed to
Westmount with the renaming of the
community in 1897.
While these trains
followed the pattern of todays
commuter trains, in fact the nature of the traffic was
far
from that which we know today. There were few
daily travellers.
EVOLUTION
In an era before highways and motor vehicles, the
trains were used to bring milk and other dairy
produce into the city, buyers and sellers to the several
farmers markets, and businessmen and private
individuals
making occasional trips into the city.
However, the existence of two competing train
services literally side-by-side -those of CPR and the
Grand
Trunk -encouraged the more affluent to rent
or purchase summer cottages in the area. This
superimposed a new and different social class on the
bucolic villages along the shores of Lake St. Louis, a
change
which would in time virtually obliterate the
old-world, rural nature of the original French-regime
settlements.
A
summer home in this area had many advantages
afforded by
proximity to the water: sailing, bathing,
fishing and
swimming. The most important benefit,
however, permitted families with children
to escape
~.L .. .. the city in summer, a time of constant outbreaks of
:;.. contagious diseases. The term fresh air had
immediate and practical connotations
in the 1980s!
At first, the owners
of the summer homes tended to
remain in the city during the week, viSiting families
only on weekends. However, vigorous and innovative
traffic
promotion by the two railways, including
excursion fares, mileage and commutation tickets,
soon made it feasible for the
journey to and from the
city to be made on a daily basis, and the age of the
Montreal-area
commuter was born.
In subsequent decades, it was only astep furtherto
winterize the summer homes -many of these can
still be
found in the older section of the Lakeshore­
and the transformation from urban citizen to
suburbanite was complete.
EXPANDING
By 1897, Pointe Claire and Beaurepaire had been
added to the suburban stops,
as well as Little River
and lise Cadieux between Vaudreuil and Como, and
Hudson Heights and Lavigne between Hudson and
Rigaud.
In 1898, Bayview (now Baie dUrfe) was added.
After the
turn of the century, a station called Golf
Links, a mile (1.6 kilometers) east of Dorval, identified
the venue
of a new and growing sport. This station,
latter Summerlea, and situated
at 55th Avenue
Lachine, was closed in 1962
THE CREW OF THE PO IN TE FORTUNE
LOCAL in 1898 or 1899. Unfortu­
nately we do not have information
as to their identity.
Canadian Pacific photo No. 25748.
A PASSENGER BUYING A TICKET AT
A SUBURBAN STATION on the C.P.R.
line on March 11 1952.
Canadian Pacific photo No. B-2465-2.
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553
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. ~ ~ .. ..
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THE COMMUTER TRAIN PULLS INTO VALOIS STATION on March 11 1952,
and soon the waiting passengers will be en route to Montreal.
Canadian Pacific photo No. 5538.
BOARDING THE TRAIN AT VALOIS STATION on March 11 1952. The
wooden coaches were built between 1904 and 1913, and remained
in service until the summer of 1953.
Canadian Pacific photo No. 2783.
CANADIAN
unparalleled building of streets and highways. The
perceived
economies and acknowledged flexibility of
the automobile began to make serious inroads into
commuter traffic by the late 1950s. To meet rising
costs and declining revenues, the railways
responded by reducing train frequencies and raising
fares.
In 1957, Canadian National, the successor
to the
Grand Trunk,
withdrew its Lakeshore commuter
services west of Dorval, to concentrate on the same
problems in other areas which served exclusively.
About the same time, the new York Central Railroad
withdrew its own commuter service between
montreals
Windsor Station and Valleyfield by way of
Chateaguay and Beauharnois.
By 1960, all rail
commuter services in Montreal ha?
become, in the fact if
not in n~me, urban transit
9
R A I L
sevices. Yet a full quarter of a century was to pass
befors governments recognized this fact and moved
to intergrate the
commuter train services with bus
and subway networks.
Now finally, that step has been taken. The change
came
following the departure of the last scheduled
CP Rail
Town Train for Vaudreuil, on the late
evening
of Sept. 30, 1982. Actually, the need to take a
few
photographs to record this last run for posterity
delayed the departure
of 110. 255 until after midnight,
and
as a consequence, having lost its time-table
rights, the train ran
through to Vaudreuil as a
passenger extra,
bringing to an end ninety-three
years of train service by CP Rail to Montreals West Island.
(Re-printed with permission
from CP Rail News)
IN JUNE 1953 a big change came to the commuter service with the
arrival of the first of forty new coaches. These were the well
known and familiar 800 series, all of which are still in service.
The consist of the first train was in strict numerical order
from 800 to 809, and this lasted for a few months until gradual
rearrangement took place. These three views date from that time,
probably even before 808 and 809 were placed in service since the
train has eight cars. By late August all 40 cars were in use.
Canadian Pacific photos 9670, 9671, 9672.
SEVENTEEN YEARS AFTER THE 800s CAME, the 900-series double­
deckers went into service, in the spring of 1970. These two
views show them at Windsor station.
Canadian Pacific photos E-1589-1 and E-1728-4.
CANADIAN
11
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
Branch II nas Onlarlo & Quebec, Allanllc and Eut.rn Dlvl.lon. -Oonllr .. d
Three Rlversand Crandes Plies Ottawa and Presoott
–:][m~:~ Lv STATIONS Arl~~~f–II:][PIM.xdiM/ STATIOs llxdhtlP
….. t7. 0 Three Rivers 1/3.45 ….. f.::-::.:-I I
….• 7.10 3 … PU •• Juno …. 3.35 ….. P ….. A.i<. -Lv -A:r A ..... P.Jl •
…. 7.M I … Bt. M.urio …… 2.451 ….. 1.20 16.4~: 0 .. Ottawa .. l0 I .. 9.M I.n
….. 10.00122 Lao a la Tortue. 1.00….. 1.401 7 .O~I b … ChaudJero Ja .. 9.lb 1.17
….. 10.80:/1; . St. Tit. Juno. 3.:12.30 ….. fj .5017 .15101 .. Glouo.ater …. n.o11!l.nl
….. 10.WI30 Crandes Plle,,·tI215 ….. 1.53f7.2b·13 …. ManoUok …. 8.~21f2.111
A.M. Ar. Lv·lp .• 1. l.llI7.31m ….. O.ood ……. 8.2S12.17
Troin,o(th.Lo La I Rail 2.35i7.66~I .. ·K.mptvlll …. 8.0012.,•
le&ve St.Ti~ Juc;i~ro &,u~lL~!.m.,/;.(l; -f~.O; 8.00.31 .• KemptvtltaJo .. 7 .• 5 t.ll,
!i~;~rDr.~. J;~l~~.;bui~~rr:;:d·R~~:~ ~U:I~Ug~:;gI:: :,;p . .:!:orrv~ii~::: a:f> f1:H
t.Pi8~lJR~~· l:~~i~~~~vtA~. !ft~ ~:!~ .~::j!)2 A;oprsscotti:; !:!. t~::
Jun~. r9.:JJ a.ro., J 1.30 p.m.
Montreal and St. Euataohe Ie-Montreal and Ste. Agathe.
)!Xdi~~ STATIONS Mx )(x.!!I :hd ,gj STATIONS jM.- I.M.I-L. A:r A.M P.lI. A.M. I Lv Ar A· … ·I P ….
15.30,0 … Montreal,D&IBeSq. 8 .. 8.aC 1530·t 8,WI 0 I DMI~ntre~16! 8.30 8.30
•. 26·20 .. 0 •••• Ste. Thereae .• o ••• Lv 7.42 I 9 3520 .. ous e. I
.50 …… St. EU8taohe …… 17.1~ 8.20: . ·.,.Ste. Th.r ••• LVI7.~ 7.U
P. .. IAr 1.. A.M 6 28 9.43 ~., .. St. Lin Juno .. 1.311 .2
. 8.45 flO.OO Z7! … St. Janvl.r .. 11+.1615.41
.. ~ Montreal and St. Lin _~/10201;11IS~: ;1~:~:,ei..!OOt&25
~II~I STATIONS ~_7~ •••• . .. •• G.N.R ….. I , •. 20 …..
P.M. Lv -.r A.M. –1–1-Lv Ax —-
t5.30 0 Montreal, D&lbon.le Sq. 6 8.30 7.20, …… 33 .. St. Jerome .. 8.M …..
8.40;20 …….. Bt •. Th.re ………. 1.~ 7.50 …… /411 ….. Leoage ….. 6. . ••.•
1.45,.22 …….. 8t. Lin Jnno …….. 7f~ 7.551 …… 421· .. Bhawbrldge … 8.27 …. . 1.
55;211 ……… Muoouoh ………. 7.!~ 8.10: …… 40 …. PI.dmont …. 8.12 … ..
7.05,27 ………. 8te. Ann ……….. 7.06 8.25: …… 149 …. Bt •. Ad.lo …. 8.00 …. . 7.15:3
…….. .L •• PLain ……….. 8.M 8.50 ……. Mo..Ste. M.rgar.t .. 6.40 … ..
J.~OI3:> A,: …….. St. Lin ……. r;. t6.4O 9.20 ….. 591. .. B.II.lea Mill
l
6.201 .. : ..
. . v A.. 9.40: …… !63I .. Ste. Agath!1 ~.OOI …..
Montreal, Sorel and Stanbrldge P.>!.: A.>!. I LV,A.>!.I!.>!.
EXpiE.t P …. , …… Lv Ar …… ,p.,,~ E][PlI STATIONS jEXPI
11.00i
IB
.
30
°1·Stanbrldge 50 II.3:>j 6 ~3~ II . I
4.00! B.U 2 ….. B.dford ….. 11.211, 6 = P.iI: -Lv Montreal Ar A:M. =
4.15, B.42 ~ …… MYBtlo ….. 11.101 8 ….. t6.16 0 .. Wlnd.or St. 6 … 8.~ … ..
!I.40if8.M 10 …. Bt. Sabin ….. 10/hll16 ~8 ….. 7.05.24· ….. Vandr.ull. … 1. .. .. .
5.00
~.O~I1411 AFa~~~a~ ( 10.3:> 6 ~O ~: .. -: !7.2i:i01Ar …. Como …… ·lfIT =
__ I ____ ~ r.. .. v f-o-l ….. 7.35!32: …… Hud.on ….. 71~
!4.I~ …. 10 Ly Montrle Ar:lI.I~! 8.~ …. !7.38;:~! …. Hudoon Ht.. .. jf7.0b …. .
~:::: _ .. B •. JobnB 51 …. 110.(,2;~ ….. f7 451.16, …… LaVIgne …… /f7.OO … ..
8.00
1
9.1~IJ··_· .. parnbam … A{ 9.101545 J 7.55101 … Rli&uc1 ……. a.WV .. • 8.15 9.41
20/l:;~GaMle+I·z.L. 8.~ &.16. .. 8.15,47 .. PolnL Fortune .. 6.00.. •
f!.n ….. ,~I …. Papln •• u …. f8.4~!….. p.M.1 Ar Lv A.M:
8.29!IO.0?,26, … Abbotsford … 8.4li 4 ~… . _ ~
8.40110.2,:1Ii ….. St. Pt ……. 8.30, 4 2 F~ ana ~n.
7.00,11.1O·19 … St. Hyaolntb … 8.10/ 3 50
7.0;,Il.20jllISt. R …. I1. Jo.8. B.o., l·OO hid/l!Xd I_~ BTATIONS llxjd d
1.20,1I.4-il~I …. St. Blmon …. 7 ,. 230 ___ I! J[
7.13112.05,>31 …. 8 •. Hnl:l ….. 7.38, ·08 am am I . I am-pm
f7.40;12j16~1 … Cavlgn.o …. 17·31fI 66 II too t7.lO 0 Lv. Fa Irvllle .. Arl. 9 I 4.30
f7.46.12f25:.9~ … St. Prlm ….. lf1.24.fl.45IIfjl8· 17.48 2 …. Bay Bhoro …. I.I9.()7IH.22
7·&6il2.4o
l
,;], .. St. GuJllanm ••. /7.16:tl.3D 11.I~1 7.M Ar.Carleton.Lv·19.00jt4.15
P.M., P. … IAr Lv A.., P.M. am am 1 ani pm
SUTTON JUNCTION AND ST. CUILLAUME
—p&aBj}!aI1V1IB STATIONS Malllp.I ____ _
–~ —P.iI ~ -P.M. A.M
………… 18.66 B.lO 0 Ly ….. Sutton Juno ….. Ar 8.00· 820 …. ..
…… …… 7061 8110 , ……. Brom. Corner…….. 5.19
1
8.10 ….. .
………… 7.15 900 7 ………. Knowlton ………. 5.40 800 …. ..
………… 7·29917 14 Ar! w t ~L .. 8.25745
1
…. ..
7
•• 9 17 • v ……… 0 •• r.. ….. or 5 25 1 H
.. ·· .. …… 1…. ~ ., ~ ….. .
….. …… , 1.401 9.30 18 ……… W.terloo . .86……… 5 13it 7.U …. ..
….. …… 1–· , 9.39 19 ………… Ward.c………… 5031–…. ..
…… …… ….. 9.69 211 ……… Bav.i •• Mm……… 4 41 ……………. .
…… …… .. … 10.091 Z9 …….. South Rorton…….. • 32 ….. …… • .. ..
…… …… .. … 10.311 36 ……… Rorton F.II… ……. .10 ….. …… .. …
:::::: ::::::! ::::: :?~. ~ :::::::::·#I~ok~~~·:::::::::: i ~~/ ::::: :::::: .:::::
I
……. ·· .. 1…. II 47 ~9 …… Drummondvlll…….. 2.12 …………… .
…………….. 12.01 f4 , ……… St. G.rmaJu_…….. 2 31 ………. .
…… …… 1 ….. 112 20 ~91 ………. Boulogn ………… f 2 201 ……… ..
………… 1 ….. · 12 10i 76 ……… St. Gum.um ……… II I 001 ……… ..
P. . r.lf. I . P.M. A.X,
OTTAWA AND AYLMER
__ ~~t.~.!£.:.·~!…[,.!~TlO-~-j..!f~_!P Ex.j M,d , __
.. · …. i IOO~I 12.65~.t 9.30~: 0 ILV. Otta …. a .10 I Arl 8.
1100
1 [l.OOo/n]·: …… .
……. , 1.10 1.06 i .311! 2 ……… Hull. …….. 8.40, 10.W 4.16 ….. ..
…… .;r 1.20 ! 1.11 , [0.00 T … Dnob.,n. MUl …. 18.16 ·1.3.I.f 1.16 …… .
~c: . .:….!:1!:c..J.,.21L.!Q.IOO 10 Ar … Atlmer …. ~Lv,t 8.100110.31)0.1 I.m …… .
t Daily. except Suad..a,. ,,)100., Wed., Fri. ITun_, Ttlan .• 8a&. IR.tretb.mIlDa SLAtton •.
rte 4t ,tintH. , Thfli4! cn.i·, Tulle uQ!ll GOIlIIletloQ wtl~ P. P. Jaoc&toa Ra!l •• ,.
——-_ ..
R A L
BY OCTOBER 1 7
train was well
1892 the suburban
established
and the daily train was running
to Pointe Fortune. The times from
Montreal to Vaudreuil are shown on
the main-line time table, but
ra te s a
first
the
beyond Rigaud the train
special listing for the
time. This is the start of
afternoon Rigaud train that
runs today.
still
Collection of Fred Angus.
CANADIAN
12
R A I L
A DOUBLE-DECKER TRAIN headed by car 900 is photographed at
Hudson Heights in June 1970.
Canadian Pacific photo No. E-1715-2.
A RATHER RARE SIGHT was the use of SW1200 road-switchers on the
commuter trains. This view was taken at Vaudreuil on June 20 1979.
Note how short the train had become as commuters turned more and more
to the private automobile.
Canadian Pacific photo No. e-4349-16.
ON THE LAST DAY OF C.P. OPERATION all the commuter cars were run
from Windsor station to be ready to start the expanded service the
next day under the M.U.C.T.C. Four full-length trains are seen in
this view taken that afternoon.
Photo hy Fred Angus.
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v .. [011…. !I·.:,v~~~r ~~&tH)yH.2….f!O·.~:..:-l.!.!-!.1.:…:.!..,,;.~_.,_I~;..~ ~.l.tJ1t}:g IUV~J IIUI • >
THE DATE OF THE START OF C.P. SUBURBAN
SERVICE is not known exactly , but this
timetable, dated August 15 1889 shows
that suburban trains were already running
However it appears to have been summer
service only since the corresponding
winter timetables show no trains stopping
at any stations from Western Junction to
Beaconsfield inclusive, and no special
suburban trains running.
sew-ice de
. -Lakeshore
-·servic.
du-26ocfobre
·O~fober 26-
Collection of Fred Angus.
THE
LAST C.P. COMMUTER TIMETABLE
on October 26 1980 and
for almost two years.
is sue d e
ffe ct
was
remained in
_~I
!
,,;o~ …
<:~
11,..,. …
~x I
.~ .
:;=.~
CPRailB
CANADIAN
14
R A I L
ONCE AGAIN A FULL CONSIST of 800s as the afternoon commuter trains
begin their last runs as C.P. trains on September 30 1982.
Photo by Fred Angus.
LATE IN THE AFTERNOON OF SEPTEMBER 30 1982 a westbound commuter
train is nearing Dorval. Tbe long train of 800-class cars recalls
the days of the 1950s and 60s.
Photo by Fred Angus.
CANADIAN 15
R A I L
TWO VIEWS OF COMMUTER TRAINS PASSING DORVAL on the afte moon of
September 30 1982.
Photos by Fred Angus.
THE LAST PASSENGERS ARE WALKING TO THE TRAIN at Windsor Station
on the night of September 30 1982. Many may not have been aware
that this was a historic occasion.
Photo by Fred Angus.
THE LAST C.P. COMMUTER TRAIN about to leave Windsor Station on
the night of September 30 1982. This was also the last regular
Canadian Pacific passenger train, ending 101 years of service.
Canadian Pacific photo No. E-5059-4.
THE CREW OF THE LAST TRAIN JUST BEFORE DEPARTURE.
Canadian Pacific photo No. E-5059-20.
THE LAST PASSENGERS
ARE ABOARD, the
platform is deserted,
and the train is
about to leave about
1 1 : 45 P. M . on
September 30 1982.
Photo by Fred Angus.
SPROULS TRAIN
By C. Warren Anderson
Sprouls Train, an ancient story, will long be a
memory with some older people of the
Kennebeccasis Valley, in New Brunswick between
Saint John and Sussex.
John Sproul was the conductor. For some
forty
years he gave, the signal which controlled the
movement of the train that ran in the morning from
Sussex to Saint John, and returned to Sussex in the
evening.
There were many changes in personnel
of th~
patrons of this train during those years, but
conductor John Sproul remained. He saw many
people
of his own age grow old and gray with the
years and one
by one make their last stop; and saw
{,
also their little children grow to manhood and
womenhood.
To all of them he was just John Sproul; of Sprouls
train, the alert but kindly official
who seemed to have
become a vital part
of the life of that artery of
commerce which traversed the valley for forty-five
miles from the city
of Saint-John.
Young people who went away to the/United States,
or other places, and remained for ten or twenty years
came back to find Sprouls train still on the route, and
its always well-groomed
conductor still at his post.
He was part of the old life, and the sight of his erect
image moving down the aisle
of the car perhaps
…. .
.• f., … ·A …
, . .,~,
I , ~ ..
INTERCOLONIAL TRAIN crossing Lawlors Lake near Saint John about 1912.
The illustration is from a post card mailed at Gagetown New Brunswick
on August 10 1912.
CANADIAN
19 R A I L
brought back memories of days when a boy on the
meadow
or on the hillside, raised his head from the
tasks of the farm
to hear the familiar whistle of
Sprouls train at the curve, echoing back from the
hills; and
of thoughts and wonderings and longings
concerning
that mysterious world with which the
rushing train
to his boyist fancy was in some since
associated.
For that train had carried many a youth on the first
, .
/
stage of his journey to the world beyond the valley,
and
brought him back again with wonder tales of
cities and experiences denied the people in the
valley.
John Sproul was a conductor when there were still
patrons
of his train who spoke of Canada as a foreign
country and the Dominion very young. A whole
generation
of politicians passed in review, John
Sproul knew them all and they looked all alike to him,
in performance
of his duties to the country which
owned the railway, what reminiscances he could
have penned,
of griefs of parting, of joys of meeting,
of life and death, of quaint and humorous incidents
from day
to day through forty years of contact with
the people along the railway line.
Sprouls train is gone;
for the steam locomotives
and cars, so long familiar to its patrons, have gone
to
the scrap-heap, and more pretentious cars are
provided
for the travellers of today. The traffic of the
valley has changed with the years, and there is some
talk
of railway improvement.
The old order changeth;
John Spoul has gone to
solve the mysteries of that world which is more
mysterious to us than that which called
to the boy in
the meadow
or on the hillside years ago, when the
echoes
of the whistle of Sprouls train awoke the
echoes
of the Kennebaccasis hills.
John H. Sproul, exconductor of the Intercolonial
Railway died very suddenly the morning of March 17-
1912 at his home on Pit Street, Sussex.
That morning he
got up as usual had breakfast, and
shortly after started to walk into the sitting room,
when
he collapsed and died a few minutes later. He
was
76 years of age and was survived ·by his wife and
five children, three sons and two daughters.
Mr. Sproul was widely known in railway circles and
was in the service of the Intercolonial Railway
for
forty-seven years, forty years of this time he ran as a
conductor on the Sussex train.
He was on this train,
for so long a time, that the train
was
commonly know as Sprouls train.
He was superannuated early in 1910 and was a
devoted member
of the Presbyterian Church.
He was a man held in high esteem
by his many
relatives and friends – a person not
forgotten.
CONDUCTOR JOHN SPROUL who was born in 1836 and died in 1912. He was a
brakeman for 7 years and a conductor for 40 years
be fore he re tire d in 1 91 0 .
INTERCOLONIAL RAILWAY LOCOMOTIVE 56 at Saint John N.B. This
engine was built by Manchester Locomotive Co. in March 1875,
and later had a new boiler by Flemings foundry in Saint John
in 1889. It ran on the Sussex train about 1909-1910 before
being succeeded by 10-wheeler No. 167. It was sold to the
Caraquet Railway about 1910. In this photo Ned Haywood is the
engineer.
INTERCOLONIAL RAILWAY LOCOMOTIVE 55 at Hampton N.B. on July 3 1899.
Built by Manchester Locomotive Co. in February 1875, No. 55 survived
until October 1920 when, as C.N.R. No. 233, it was scrapped. This
engine was pulled out of the Sussex roundhouse at the time of the
fire at 10:45 P.M. on October 5 1900 by a locomotive from a special
train that arrived at Sussex at that time. On October 31 1910,
engineer Fred Whitney was fatally stricken on this locomotive while
bringing the train to Sussex from Saint John. Fireman Jack ODell
handled the locomotive until it reached Sussex.
Major C. W. Anderson
The death of Major C. Warren Anderson occured at
the Sussex Health Centre Oct.
11, 1982, following a
lingering illness.
Major Anderson, known to many as Andy, was born
in Sai nt Joh n, son of the late James and EI iza
Anderson. He attended Centennial School there later
moving to
Torryburn, where he was affiliated with the
church at Brookville for many years.
Commuting by train, to work in Saint John,led him
to become interested in the steam locomotive and it
became a
hobby. This hobby resulted in contact with
friends in Canada, U.S.A., and England. His
collection of some 4,000 pictures, with history and
many artifacts, is
now in the New Brunswick
Museum.
A veteran
of World War I, he served overseas with
the 9th Siege Battery, RCA and following the war he
served with militia.
World War
II saw Major Anderson once agaln in the
active force. He was stationed at officers barracks
and
~o. 7 District Depot, Woodstock Road,
Fredericton.
Major Anderson was married June 21, 1941, to
Margaret E. Richardson, RN, Sussex, and they
resided at Fredericton
for 20 years. Following World
War II, Major Anderson was
employed with the Forest
Service and upon retirement, moved to Sussex,
residing on Lansdowne Avenue until May,
1981,
when
they moved to the Kiwanis Nursing Home,
Sussex.
Major Anderson took an active interest in many
community activities. He was a life memberof Sussex
Branch No.
20 Royal Canadian Legion, receiving the
Legion Golden Anniversary Medal and 50-year
service badge.
He was a member of No. 21 F and AM,
Sussex; a
former president of the Kings County
Historical Society; and as an avid writer received
many awards
for his contributions to railway
magazines.
Major Anderson was a regular contributor to
Canadian Rail and submitted numerous articles on
the subject
of Railways in New Brunswick.
Major Anderson is survived by his wife and one
sister. Mrs. A.T. (Elizabeth) Galt,
Toronto and one
nephew, James, also
of Toronto.
(Kings County Record)
A humorous look at the first
two years of the P.I.I.R.
By ALLAN GRAHAM
Islanders traditionally take politics and religion
very seriosly. However, some
of the political off­
shoots have always been and continue to be fair
target practice
for newspaper editors and others.
This article
attempts to give brief coverage to some of
the more humorous comments on the P.E.I.R. as
found in the newspapers of 1871 and 1872.
In April
1871 the Railway Bill was passed by the
Legislature. In the April
17, 1871 issue of the
Examiner, a letter appeared from a farmer living near
East Point
who suggested one possible benefit from
the railway:
Every old woman who lives near the
depot
would keep a thousand hens and would have a
fortune made
for herself and grandchildren
while you
would say Jack Robinson.
Celebrations erupted in many parts
of the Island in
honor of the passage of the Railway Bill. The
Examiner correspondent in Georgetown described
some
of the celebration in that town:
Georgetown peopie … last evening
manifested the wildest excitement around a huge bon-fire
of tar barrels and other com­
bustibles, in full blast, on the public square, all
in
honor of the Railroad … all the windows in
town were beautifully illuminated with
candles, and
as Georgetown possesses a
Distillery, many a
spirit was as radiant as the
surrounding buildings.
The correspondent describes
Georgetown on the
day after the bash:
The little town has again
quietly sobered
down to its usual gravity, and it is only reason­
able that it should, after
exploding a ten pound
note
in gunpowder, and a few hornpipes to
ram home the charge.
Those communities not
originally destined to
have a railway felt quite
differently about the Railway
Bill. As the
Examiner reports, Montague was full of
malcontents, one of whom was described
as follows:

… one Samson and a Justice of the Peace at
tlla: I hear, threatens to muster a force and
tear up the track
as fast as it is laid …
CANADIAN
22
R A I L
In Summerside a banquet was held at Clifton
House in which the popping of the sparkling
champagne during parts of the evening sounded like
a feu de
joie …
The letters
to the editor continued to debate the
Railway. On May 8, 1871 the Examiner published a
letter from a
Cousin Katie of Charlottetown in
which she attempted
to give the feminine perspective
on the passage
of the Railway Bill. She gives the
following comments on why the women of P.E.I.
wanted
the railway:

… Suppose they (the gentlemen in the
opposition) have a Lady Love, which I trust
each one has or will have, residing about thirty
or forty miles from themselves, would it not be
much more pleasant for them to step on the
Cars and arrive at her home, clean and neat,
without one speck of this red mud being on
their clothes …
The same issue
of the Examiner contains a letter
from a resident
of Rollo Bay with a novel suggestion
for financing the railway:
Sir: I am happy to inform you that a move is
being made here in the right direction, it is to
agitate
for a tax to be levied on all old
bachelors
for Railroad purposes. From here to
East Point I can
count about fifty of them all in
a row, who are
no good to themselves or
anyone else
… We propose to tax them 10s
each per year,
till they get married …
On May 15,
1871 a Charlottetown resident
responded to the Rollo Bay letter
writer as follows:
The Railroad man from Rollo Bay is most un­
reasonable in giving
countenance to any
scheme
for imposing a Special Tax on
Bachelors. The pockets
of this worthy class of
citizens are already drained sufficiently. The
Railroad mans letter
abounds with clap-trap
about Bachelors that he should be ashamed
of. This self-denying branch of the population
should rather
be paid a bounty …
The
P.E.1. Government played footsie with the
tender calls
for the Railway. The firm Walker & Co. of
London was squeezed out of the race and Mr. W.O.
OBrien of Halifax seemed to have a strong possibility
:::&J
PURDy 83
GEORGETOWN PEOPLE •••• LAST EVENING MANIFESTED THE WILDEST
EXCITEMENT AROUND A HUGE BONFIRE OF TAR BARRELS ••
Sketch by Henry Purdy R.C.A.
of receiving the contract to build the Railway. The
P.E.I. Government managed to frustrate OBriens
efforts. The
Halifax Citizen of Sept. 9, 1871 expressed
the
problem as follows:
The Government objects to Mr. W.O. OBrien
on the ground that he does not offer sufficient
security. We in Halifax are inclined to believe
that the names of
Sir Edward Kenny and
Charles
Murdock, Esq. are sufficient security
for the purchase of the whole Island, far less
for the construction of a paltry railway
through its interior.
By far the most humorous editorial on the early
days
of the P.E.I. Railway concerned the poorly­
planned and executed turning of the first sod. The
Patriot of Oct. 7,1871 contains an extensive editorial
describing this sad and sorry affair. It goes on to
call the event the greatest fizzle in the
history of the
Colony. For most of the day the sod-turning was to
take place, no one knew where and exactly when the
sod
would be turned. In the afternoon word was
spread
that it would occur at 5 oclock that evening.
This time was
not suitable for farmers who had to
travel
home long distances –as the editor
commented, though most of our sturdy
plowmen … may have seen sods turned prettily before,
(they) never saw a railway sod in
their lives. This
editorial describes in graphic detail what transpired
that
afternoon on Kensington Road:
No doubt they (the farmers) expected to
behold some fair lady, with a silver spade,
raise a neat little bit of
turf into a mahogany
wheelbarrow, and see it trundle off and
deposited
as the first of a mighty embankment
over which the iron horse would speed at an
early day. The Railway Commissioners and
No doubt they (the farmers) expected to
behold some fair lady, with a silver spade,
raise a neat little bit
of turf into a mahogany
wheelbarrow, and see it trundled off and
deposited
as the first of a mighty embank­
ment over which the iron horse would speed at
an early day. The Railway Commissioners and
their masters, however, had no such sight for
the gaping multitude. An old dilapidated
wheelbarrow, in which
an ordinary man with a
common spade deposited a lump of earth, was
was what men and horses had seen before and
only asses need care to see again … Scarcely
anybody saw the sod, unless it were the
youngsters who tore it to pieces, and pelted
the crowd with the fragments.
Nobody raised
a cheer except
two or three half-wits …
After the surveyors maps become public
knowledge the public began complaining about the
circuitous route. Since the contractors were paid by
the mile, hills and gullies were avoided.
Two quotes
from
the Patriot describe this problem with claraity, the first from Dec. 30,1871, the second from
Feb. 21,
1872:
Near
Hunter River, we have been credibly
informed
that one mile of country gives two
miles and
11 ° yards of narrow guage! At North
River
it requires three miles of railway to get
one and a half miles nearer Summerside!!
We
believe it is somewhere in the same vicinity
that the line crosses a widows five chain farm
three times!!!
The railway crosses roads at
11 places
between Travellers Rest and Kengsington, a
distance
of five miles, and a very level country.
It crosses the main post road
four times in
three miles in the same
locality.
Allover the neighbouring areas of Nova Scotia
and New Brunswick and even
further, the P.E.1.
Railway issue was being freely debated and laughed
at. The
Halifax Church Chronicle did a great job of
summarizing the feelings
of off-Islanders re the
Railway when it commented:
It seems that some interested individuals
have been applying the law
of circular sailing
to railroads, and have been studying how to
avoid every knoll, and every slope, and thus
have given the proposed line some
of the most
graceful curves, and in the most masterly way
put an iron girdle around every hill in order to
avoid tunnelling, and
cutting through, we
were going to say the rock, but there are no
rocks.
II I AM HAPPY TO INFORM YOU THAT A
MOVE IS BEING MADE •••• TO AGITATE F
OR A TAX TO BE LEVIED ON ALL OLD
BACHELORS •• II
Sketch by Henry Purdy R.C.A.
CANADIAN
24
R A I L
NO DOUBT THEY EXPECTED TO BEHOLD SOME FAIR LADY, WITH A
SILVER SPADE, RAISE A NEAT LITTLE BIT OF TURF INTO A MAHOGANY
WHEELBA RROW ••
Sketch by Henry Purdy R.C.A.
IT SEEMS THAT SOME INTERESTED
INDIVIDUALS HAVE •••• PUT AN IRON
GIRDLE
AROUND EVERY HILL ••
Sketch by Henry Purdy R.C.A.
, (/lUlU ttl
Meanwhile on the Mainline
Lawrence A. Stuckey
The story of our Divisional Engineer, Paddy
Bowmans Long Weekend in Saskatchewan in
February 1947, (Canadian Rail Feb. 1982) brought
back memories and caused me to look up my journals
and trip records. At the time I was firing in the
mainline pool, Brandon on Broadview, and can add to
his story.
Mr.
Bowmans story begins on Thurs. Feb 6. The
storm really began on Mon. and from the beginning
was forecast to be a dandy. Tues. morning I was
called for No. 7 with engineer Albert Kaufman.
Engine 2848 was having trouble so they were adding
2924 on the point out of Brandon. Extra sections and
assisting engines on passenger are manned by
freight crews. As the 2924 was going through she was
considered the train engine. This meant we got the
2848
while the regular crew got the pony. When we
started
plowing heavy drifts I began to have trouble
keeping up steam. The problem was snow packing in
the ashpan cleanouts,
reducing air intake under the
grates, a
known problem of these engines when
running second of a doubleheader. I cleaned them
with the ash hoe at every stop and managed fairly
well. The storm was getting worse by the hour but we
didnt lose much time to Broadview. Coming east in
the evening
with engine 2345 on First 74 we were
having such a tough battle the dispatcher annulled
Second 74 at Broadview. No more freight trains
would run for several days.
Thurs. there was nothing moving but passenger
trains, all doubleheaded, and
running late. That
evening I was called for No.1 with engineer Fred
Cook, engine 2449, coupled behind the 2451, for just
after midnight. The radio said heavy snow, wind
gusting to 50 mph, temperature -18 F. My wife has to
help me push the front door open to get out, city
streets were plugged so no taxis operating, and my
half mile walk to the depot was heavy going. Arriving
there we found No. 1 delayed taking on coal at
Portage and W.E. Kingston, our superintendent, was
in the dispatchers office, considering holding her at
Brandon. Operators reported the mainline didnt look
too bad so we were given a clearance and a blessing.
For a few miles the two engines did fine with the
heavy train and I was
getting occasional glimpses of
the tender of the 2451 through swirling snow and
smoke. You
dont open the side window of a second
engine bucking snow or you will soon have a cab full.
The
cut at mile 7 was heavily drifted, the two big
engines barely made it through, and snow piled on
the running board, blocking my front window. From
then
on it was like working in the engineroom of a
ship,
only the pitch and sway of the deck and the roar at the
stack indicating movement. The engineer
worked steam and I made it according to the pulse of
the engine ahead, whose engineer we presumed
could at least see the signals. We did fairly well to
Virden, where we stopped for orders, but had to take
slack
twice to get rolling again.
At Elkhorn, our midway service stop, the plot
thickened. It is enough of a job to fill a big tender at
night,
with a foot on the peg to hold the spout down,
one hand on the
water valve lever and the other
pointing a flashlight into the manhole which is
belching steam, without leaning into a hurricane full
of snow with temperature far below zero. We watered
both engines and moved up to the coal dock. The coal
wouldnt run freely and both crews combined to fill
each
tender. Then we had to clean the fires, which
had become heavy, and clear the ashpans, working in
snow over our knees. I dont know how long all this
took but I know I was glad to get back in the warm cab
and
get my parka off. A fact worth noting here is that
for the fellow who had to work steam power in the
winter the CPR had the worlds finest engine cabs.
From there on
both engines working to capacity
failed to make the running time. On arrival at
Broadview we were not asked for a delay report. We
were so late
that they were glad to see us. We hiked
across the street
to the World Cafe where our
Chinese friend greeted us as he did all incoming rails,
Did you have a good trip. We laughed and told him
to
stop joking and start cooking. We were soon
snoring in the company bunkhouse.
About midafternoon I got up and headed across the
yard
for dinner. To my amazement No.1 was right
where we left her, in front of the station. She would be
there
for another couple of days. For two days we put
in the
time as best we could, mostly sleeping, eating
and listening
to the wire in the operators office. The
mess on the Estevan sub. you
know about. Sat.
evening No. 53, the local
from Brandon made it with
two 1200 engines and four cars, a few hours late. No.
60 had left Regina with a 1200 and only gotfour miles
before she
floundered in the snow. They COUldnt get
her out, and COUldnt get
to her, so they killed and
drained the engine.
Brandon was holding five
westbound passenger trains, each with two engines
and a Pullman had been
put at the disposal of the
crews so
they could spell each other off while
maintaining steam to heat their coaches. Two
eastbound were stuck at Indian Head, three at Regina
and several
more at Moose Jaw. Between Moose Jaw
and Regina a snowplow and its three engines were all
on the
ground. Things were bad all over. As usual,
when it
finally stopped snowing, the bottom fell out of
the thermometer. Some branches hadnt had a train
since the blizzard of Jan. 20 and planes were
dropping groceries to small towns. One plane on skis
rescued one
of our engine crews marooned with a
dead engine. For
two days I drew eight hours payout
of each tenty-four and was fairly comfortable. But it
wasnt
worth speculating as to how or when we would
get home.
At 8:00 AM Feb. 9 I was called
for Third One to
Moose Jaw, firing the 2310 for engineer A.R. Smith of
Moose Jaw, coupled ahead of 2311, manned by Fred
Cook and Johnny Williams of Brandon. It was a clear
sunny morning but temperature below -30 F. Snow
drifts were packed like concrete and I saw some
heavy horses walk over one
without sinking the depth
of their hooves. Plowing such drifts is dangerous
work as plow points can lift them. We had a straight
meet
order with No.4 at Sintaluta. We waited an hour
in siding till she came -flying green flags. The order
just said No.4, which means all of No.4, and we had
no inkling there were three sections, each an hour
apart, till the last went by with no signals. We were
there
about four hours with snow blowing in around
the engines. There was a
struggle to free the train,
then we had to back down the
siding and charge a big
drift to get out on the mainline. At Indian Head we
took on coal and water and crossed over to the
eastbound track
as the westbound hadnt been
cleared. Long snow cuts often
higher than the cab
windowsills and just the width of the engine. In places
huge
lumps of hard snow had rolled back onto the
rails. At
60 mph the 2310 with her wide smoke
deflectors, would
gayly pick these up and toss them
over her head, causing
me to periodically duck
behind the boiler in case a chunk came through the
window. At Regina we pulled into the station and
were directed to back into the yard to let six sections
of NO.8 go through. This took several hours during
which I made the terrible discovery that the 2310s
flue sheet was leaking and soaking the
front part of
the fire. As we were lifting the train to pull up to the
station the
2311 blew a piston ring and went lame. It
was getting dark, I was getting tired of the job, and my
lunch was gone. After an hour or so the conductor
came up and handed me a mit full of orders. I read the
clearance and the running
order and told him they
were no good, that they were made
out for Third One
and in a half
hour No. 1 would be outlawed (12
hours late). An
hour later he came back with a new set to run
as First Three. I put up the flags, turned the
classification
lamps to green and we left town. From
there to Moose
Jaw it wasnt too bad. We had several
slow orders,
where gangs were working, one rerailing
a snowplow,
which I welcomed as they gave me a
chance
to blow up steam in my leaking boiler. It was
after
midnight when we arrived in Moose Jaw, ran the
engines to the
shop and washed up. Jock Bennett the
Master
Mechanic told us to deadline through to
Brandon as there were no engines for us in
Broadview. This was the best news
of the day. We
wanted to
go uptown and eat so we boarded it. We
had just made ourselves
comfortable in the smoker of
a day coach when the news agent came in from the
diner with an urn of coffee and a basket of
sandwiches. We pulled him into a seat, bought the lot,
and tied into it like a pack
of coyotes. One doesnt
provision
for fourteen hours on a passenger engine
-even in
winter.
Coming into Regina the conductor told us NO.7
was coming in seven sections and he had a meet
there with six
of them, which would take several
hours. A large hotel near the
depot was keeping its
dining room open all night. While we were having
breakfast there
two more Brandon engine crews
came in. One had been on a
snowplow and the other
on an auxiliary wreck train with a big hook rerailing
a
plow. Picked up a copy of the Regina Leader and
was pleased
to read an editorial praising the railway
men
who were working so hard to try to provide
transportation.
This was doubly appreciated as they
had recently been very critical of our unions.
Back on the train we were all asleep before it pulled
out and I never blinked
an eye till the conductor
shook me and told me we were coming into Brandon.
I had been away nearly five days and was sure glad
to
get home. A few days later in our bulletin book we
found a letter
from Mr. Bailley, the General Manager,
thanking all
Brandon division enginemen who had
worked on the Saskatchewan District
during the
recent storm.
I
didnt know it then but the aftermath of that
blizzard would still provide me one of the toughest
and most memorable trips I ever made. I would draw
the
snowplow that finally broke through the two
branch lines to Miniota and Lenore. But thats
another story.
——–..–.. __ ~~.~_.~ _______ , __________ o::_
CORRECTIONtt! In our recent article on the
history of the C.R.H.A. the photo· at the 75th
anniversary commemoration of the C.P.R. last
spike, November 6 1960, was incorrectly
captioned. This photo, taken by C.P. photogra­
pher R. Ramaciere includes the entire group.
From left to right they are: Orner Lavallee,
Robert V.V. Nicholls, Donald Angus, Leonard A. Se
ton, Frank A. Pouliot, Ian Macorquodale.
Canadian Pacific photo No. 36691-1.
CANADIAN
27
R A I L
THE BYTOWN RAILWAY SOCIETY has done a great deal of work on
the restoration of business car 27 of the Thurso and Nation
Valley Railway. These photos, by Duncan DuFresne show some
of the work, as well as views of Society trips on the T & N V.
ON THE 1980 By town Railway Society trip T. & N.V.R Nos. 11
and 7 are surrounded by log piles at mile 46.
SEVENTY-TONNER No. 11 pulling the 1981 excursion. Consist
includes a number of log cars to give the impression of a
revenue train.
ON AN EARLIER TRIP ON THE T. & N.V. we behold business car 27
bringing up the rear of the train.
WORK ON THE A END of car 27 on December 15
1979.
Duncan DuFresne painting the truss
rod on the left side of car 27 on
fanuary 19 1980.

A END TRUCK REASSEMBLED on March
22 1980. Standing, left to
right we see Phil Jago, Ian
Walker, George Viens, Duncan
DuFresne, John Halpenny. Seated
is Doug Smith.
ASSEMBLY OF A END
TRUCK. March 15 1980.
REASSEMBLY OF DRAFT GEAR
ON A END. April 5 1980.
Left to right are depicted
George Viens and Colin
Churcher.
C.R.H.A. .
communications
EDITORIAL
All of us associated with the CRHA and CANADIAN
RAIL magazine are pleased to present our January­
February issue no. 372 in the new 8lh x 10lh inch
format. In order to make 1983 a complete success we
need
your help in three ways: First, we ask you to
renew your own subscription as quickly as possible if
you have not already done so. Second, we require
your assistance in obtaining a substantial number of
new members, a membership application form is
included in the centerfold of this magazine for this
purpose, please pass it on to a friend who you feel
might be interested in joining the CRHA. Thirdly, we
invite you to
submit an article for publication in
CANADIAN RAIL. Remember that all the articles
published are submitted by you the members for the
enjoyment of others. Our policy is to publish articles
in the first
language of the author, either French or
English and if in French an English translation will be
provided
alongside.
May we take
this opportunity to thank you for your
continued support and with your help we look
forward to another great year of CANADIAN RAIL in
these
difficult economic times.
Fred Angus, Editor Peter Murphy, Co-Editor
JANUARY -FEBRUARY
CRHA COMMUNICATIONS is published by the
Canadian Railroad Historical Association.
Contributions of items about the activities of
members -including photographs, newspaper items,
etc. are solicited, and
should be sent to Bruce
Ballantyne 266 McElroy Dr. Kanata, Onto K2L 1Y4,
Telephone 613-836-5601.
All
membership enquiries should be directed to
Jim Patterson, Magazine and Membership Services
at
Box 282, St. Eustache Que. J7R 4K2, Tel. 514-473-
7766.
Mail for
Canadian Rail The Canadian Railway
Museum and Board
of Directors should be directed to
P.O. Box 148, St. Constant Que. JOL 1XO (514-632-
2410)
* * * * * * * * * * * *
NEWS FROM THE DIVISIONS:
Pacific Coast Division:
During the past summer and fall, PCD members
participated in two field trips. One was to the ex-CP
depot at Port Moody which has been relocated and
restored. On
September 25, about a dozen members
and their families attended the unveiling by Parks
Canada of a commemorative plaque at Yale. The
ceremony marked the work of the many thousands of
Chinese immigrants who helped build the Pacific
Railway in the 1880s.
Calgary & Southwestern Division:
The C & SW Division produced a special November
edition of their newsletter Flagstop for the Calgary
Model Railway Show. The issue was used as a
handout and included a brief article on the history of
the CRHA and the C & SW Division (a good way to
kill two birds with one stone – a handout and a issue
of the newsletter, all in one printing). The show by the
way was a great success for the Division.
There is a corretion to the list of events as shown in
NOV-DEC COMMUNICATIONS. The tour of the
CP
Alyth Yard is on April 21, 1983 NOT March 23.
Niagara Division:
The Division has issued its first publication a photo
book (812 x 11) on the Niagara, St. Catherines &
Toronto Railway. It contains 50 black and white
photographs mostly taken in the 1940s and 50s. The
number printed is very small so order now. The price
is $8.50 ea. plus 90¢ postage. Write to AW. Panko
R.R.
#1, Fonthill Ontario LOS 1 EO.
Toronto & York Division:
We forgot to mention in the last issue of
Communications, the upcoming 8th Annual
Toronto Model Railway Show sponsored by the T & Y
Division. the show will be held on March 12 and 13,
1983
from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. each day. The
location in Queen Elizabeth Exhibit Hall, Exhibition
Place and the admission is $4.00 for adults, $2.00 for
children 6-13 years of age and free for kids 5 anc
under.
For additional information call 416-487-2648 group
rates are available by calling this number.
Rflfreshments will be available.
CANADIAN
31
Upcoming monthly meets of the Division will be on
March 10, April14, May 12 and June 9 at 8:00 p.m. The
location is 235 Queens Quay West in the York Quay
Centre at Harbourfront, in the Loft.
By town Railway Society:
The Societys annual meeting was held on Tuesday
January 4, 1983 at which time the following were
elected
to the executive:
Preisdent: Earl Roberts
Vice President:Ches Banks
Secretary: John Tasseron
Treasurer:
Mike Iveson
Directors: Dunc du Fresne
John Halpenny
Bruce Kerr
On Monday December 13, 1982 the Car 27
resoration crew had a treat as a result of all their
efforts. The car was hooked on the end of the regular
log train for a run to Mile 46 on the Thurso Railway.
The trip included meals on the restored galley stove
and an
unscheduled photo runpast. The railway
superintendant, Gaetan Lafleur, even made a suprise
visit when, from the hi-rail car that was following, he
radioed
the engineer to stop so he could get on Car
27.
New Brunswick Division:
Work continues on the development of the
Divisions new museum at Hillsborough. (See photos
in December Canadian Rail). Grant money is in the
process
of being forwarded for the site, assuring a
static
display for the tourists next summer. The
Division is looking at the possibility of live steam
operations and it looks encouraging.
The museum has taken possession of a speeder
which, along with a rebuilt trailer should assist crews
greatly. A new
Museum Site sign is being made by
the
two members of the Division as well.
• * • • * * • * • •
SPECIAL NOTE
Another item that was missed in the November­
December issue of Communications is the
announcement of the formation of the Smiths Falls
(Ontario) Railway Museum Association. Smiths Falls
is a Divisional
Point on CP Rails Montreal-Toronto
and Montreal-North Bay lines, and is therefore a
railway town. In addition the old Canadian Northern
(eN Rail) line from Toronto to Ottawa passes through
the community.
R A I L
In co-operation with the Smiths Falls & District
Chamber of Commerce the Association is attempting
to secure the use of the old CNoR station along with
the surrounding small yard, for the museum site.
Initial contacts with the CN Rail have been
encouraging.
The association has a new logo designed by local
artist
Craig Campbell. It features a steam locomotive
driving wheel with a railway lantern in the center.
One local resident, Mr. M. Guard, a CP Rail
engineer handled the last stem locomotive through
Smiths Falls. The Association would like additional
information concerning the locomotive (CP #5411 a
2-8-2
Mikado) such as its history and final dispotion.
For more information or to answer the above
question please write to:
Bill Le Surf, President
Smiths Falls Museum Association
P.O. Box 962
Smiths Fals Ont. K7 A 5A5
* * • * * * • * * *
SWITCH LIST
Item 83-1
Larry Lineman, 4596 John St. Vancouver B.C.
V5V 3X2,
would like to buy photographs of CN,
GT, GTW, DW
& P, CNoR steam locomtovies.
Item 83-2
Claude Trudelle, 2811 Indian CR. Dr. M. Beach
in Florida 33140, has a large selection
of rail
magazines
for sale. These include Rail
Classic (1970s),
Trains (back to 1942),
Railroad Magazine (1961-75,. He also has a
large variety
of slides and movies in mint
condition, taken in Canada, the U.S. and
Mexico.
Item 83-3
Paul Hjorth, 28 West 21st Ave. Vancouver B.C.,
V5Y 2C9 (Tel.: 879-8119) is looking for:
1) Steam locomotive electric headlight for use
with 32 volt Pyle-National K-240 tu rbine­
generator (dynamo) on restored steam
equipment.
Looking for full-case type
headlight such as used on CNR freight and
yard engines.
2) Also need hydrostatic lubricator from steam
locomotive or stationary, plant, preferably
CHICAGO, NATHAN or DETROIT lubricator,
any number of feeds.
Will pay pay
price for the above appliances.
All
correspondence answered.
e. uSlne
car
AN 81-CAR CP RAIL FREIGHT TRAIN SET OUT
for Sudbury, Ont., followed by the crew.
Puffing and panting, they chased the train
down
the tracks as it slowly chugged out of Chapleau,
Northern Ontario.
A brakeman caught it by
jumping on the the last car
and pulling an emergency brake.
And then a man found at the
controls of the
locomotive caught it, too -from the Ontario
Provincial Police.
Police said the man
who stole a ride was a transient
who had already jumped a train into Chapleau from
Sudbury.
It seems he wanted to go back, a police offical
said.
His return trip may be delayed.
He has been
charged with theft over $200. The train is worth
$9
million. (Montreal Gazette)
CN RAIL, A DIVISION OF CANADIAN
NATIONAL
Railways, has inaugurated its daily Laser
Service between Montreal and Toronto.
For $275,
CN will haul a trailer delivered to it by 8:30
at night, Mondays through Fridays, to the other city
by the next morning. A
CN spokesman said the trailer
would be ready
for local delivery by6 a.m. orearlier.
In Montreal, CN receives trailers at Montport
Terminal, in Toronto at its Brampton terminal.
The service
is billed as a competitively priced, fuel­
efficient alternative to the highway route. Ron
Lawless, CN Rail president, said that theres a market
for more than a million trailersa year between the
two
cities.
(Montreal Gazette)
FEDERAL LEGISLATION IS NEEDED TO
preserve historic railway stations that are being
demolished at an alarming rate the Ontario
Heritage Foundation says. The railways are under
federal jurisdiction, outside the
authority of the
Ontario Heritage
Act and they can remove any old
buildings they want.
Canadian Pacific plans
to demolish at least five
stations in Ontario alone -in Mississauga, Toronto,
Chatham, Nipigon and Renfrew. Mississauga
officials planned to meet with CP representative to
stop the proposed
demolition of the Stretsville
station, built in 1914, the last building
of its type in
Mississauga. Since 1970, it has been used asa freight
office. CP has offered
to sell the station for $1 to any
interest group provided
it is moved to make way for
construction of a track maintenance building. A
similar battle has been
going on for almost a year to
save the 80 year old Toronto West Junction station,
which CP wants to demolish
fortrack improvements.
The West
Toronto Junction Historical Society wants
the station preserved
for use as a farmers market.
CP has a standing policy to sell old stations for $1,
but the costs associated with removing the buildings
are usually too high
for most groups.
In recent years CP has been replacing outdated
buildings with more functional, energy-efficient
structures, said CP spokesman. These stations
were
built in a different era for different needs, and if
they dont fit into the type of railway operations we
have today,
we remove them. Canadian national has
also been removing old stations, but has been more
co-operative with citizen groups lobbying to
preserve them.
S. Worthen
CANADIAN
33
R A I L
THE FLYWHEEL, AN ENERGY STORAGE DEVICE
as old as the traditional potters wheel, is being
brought back to use for tests by the Metropolitan
Transportation
Authority (MT A) in the New York City
subway system as a possible way of reducing energy
consumption. The flywheel
propulsion system
permits kinetic energy generated
during braking to
be stored onboard the individual car as mecancial
energy and then
put back to work when the car
resumes acceleration.
Conventional propulsion systems
allow braking
energy
to be wasted in dissipation heat -either in the
dynamic brake resistors or in the brake shoes and
wheel treads. Naturally, this heat contributes
to
passenger discomfort in nonair-conditioned
stations and tunnels during warm weather.
Two existing subway cars have been outfitted with
this new system for extensive tests. The
undercarraige of each car has two 7-ft long flywheel
units. Each flywheel
is an assembly of four discs 20 in.
in diameter and weighing 150 Ibs. The rotating shaft
assembly can acheive a maximum speed
of 14,000
rpm, spinning in a vacuum
chamber encased in a
steel
containment shell 3% in. thick.
Tests show that a cars flywheels can actually
furnish about half the energy required
to bring it up to
maximum speed. The balance comes from the
third­
rail electric power applied to the traction motor. As
the
energy of the flywheel is used to accelerate the
car, the flywheel drops to about 70%
of top speed.
The next deceleration recharges the flywheel with
energy, and the cycle
is repeated.
Before the start
of a trains run, the flywheels are
spun
up to speed from the electric power system.
Thereafter, automatic controls keep the flywheel
speed in range
of 9800 to 14,000 rpm, independent of
local variations in grades and speed limits.
When a car
is accelerated, its motors draw power
from generators geared to the
spinning flywheels.
When the car decelerates, the process
is reversed; the
cars motors act
as generators (as in conventional
dynamic braking) that supply power to the
flywheels motor-generators, thus speeding up the
flywheels.
Though flywheel subway cars are not expected to
run
on their own power alone, they could do so in an
emergency. For example, during a
power shutdown,
if the track ahead is clear, a flywheel train could move
to the next station on its own
power and thus allow
riders
to get off with ease.
With a full load
of 110,000 Ibs, the flywheel­
equipped cars are capable
of speeds of 50 mph, the
maximum operating speed on the New York subway
system.
(Electrical Construction and maintenance) THE STEAM
LOCOMOTIVE IS ALIVE AND WELL
and
coming off the production line at well over a
week in Datung where thrives the only factory
of
its kind in the world.
At the heart
of Chinas coal-bearing province of
Shanxi the Datung Locomotive Factory is a delightful
reminder that the age of steam and the age
of the
atom coexist
happily in China and, in their different
ways, are vital
to economic progress.
The factory,
once the object of a pilgrimage by the
late French President George Pompidou,
as well as
countless other railway enthusists, has turned out
3,800 engines in its time. Its first, produced in 1959, is
still shunting coal somewhere in China.
Theyre made
to last, said Mr. Chi, one of the
managers
proudly. China is still a developing
country. We have plenty of coal, oil, is expensive and
our railway network is vast. So the steam engine will
be here
for some time.
The factory,
which covers over 2.25m sq metres,
employs 8,200 workers and is virtually self­
sustaining. It has its own cinema, theatre, schools,
bank, shops and hospital. It is festooned with the
usual slogans
exhorting the workers to even greater
heights.
We
produce everything from the raw materials to
the finished
product here, said Mr. Chi. The factory
produces one basic engine -known as the Much
Forward -in two versions: one generating 3,500 hp
and a smaller one with 2,200 hp. They are produced
for the home market although last year Japan
purchased a single engine. We
ve no idea what
theyll use it
for, said Mr. Chi.
The price: about £100,00Oper engine –
not very
much more than the most expensive Rolls-Royce.
Which seems
entirely appropriate.
Financial Times (UK) Nov.
23, 1982.
CP
RAIL IS NEARING COMPLETION OF
preliminary construction work on its $600m
Rogers Pass tunnel project. Work on the surface
route,
including construction of access roads and
temporary bridges as well
as right-of-way clearing,
now is complete. Initial geotechnical work in
advance
of roadbed construction has also been
finished. Work on tunnel portals
is slated for
completion by the end of November. The project
involves
constuction of two tunnels – a one mile
tunnel which will
go under the Trans-Canada
Highway east of Rogers Pass, and a nine mile tunnel
through Mt. MacDonald, passing about 100 yards
beneath the eXisting
Connaught Tunnel. The project
is aimed at
eliminating a bottleneck in the railways
main line from Calgary
to Vancouver by reducing
gradients and allowing
CP Rail to run longer
westbound freight trains.
(SRS News)
DOZENS OF JASPER BUSINESSMEN HAVE BEEN
counting their losses since last November 15,
when federal transport minister Jean-Luc Pepin
canceled Via Rails Supercontinental, which
annually brought more than 100,000 tourists to the
mountain town. Two weeks ago a partial solution to
Jaspers woes was
announced: Via and B.C. Rail
have agreed to
synchronize the schedules of two
passenger trains in order to create an Edmonton­
Vancouver service starting October 31. Meanwhile,
however, the merchants have
grown increasingly
alarmed over a Parks Canda cost-cutting proposal to
close Highway 93, the road between Jasper and Banff
known as the Icefield Parkway, during winter.
The federal tourism office says that every 100,000
visitors generate
$9 million in fresh cash, observes
the
towns Chamber of Commerce president Walter
Urquhart, owner of a riding academy. We say there
were 110,00 train passengers
arriving in Jasper last
year. In 1982,
other tourists have not increased to
pick up the slack, so for the first time in years, some
local hoteliers have
turned on their vacancy signs at
night. One
car rental company has pulled out.
. __ Cancelled Supercontlnenlal
Route .
… B.C. Rail. Davlin.,
…. Via. SkMna Train
Until Mr. Pepins axe fell, a traveller who preferred
trains
to autos, airplanes or buses could board the
Supercontinental at 7 a.m. any day of the week in
Edmonton, and expect to arrive in Vancouver
25
hours later. A one-way coach seat was worth $52
when the train was canceled. Eastbound tourists,
meanwhile, could board
the train at 8 p.m. in
Vancouver, and arrive in
Jasper at 3:10p.m. the
following day, or Edmonton at9:30 p.m. During peak
season, usually
July and August, Via ran 450-
passenger trains daily,
which were 90% occupied
between Vancouver and Jasper, says Michael
Williams, public relations
manager of the crown
corporations western division.
The new Via-B.C. Rail venture
will be considerably
more expensive, and much less convenient. A
westbound traveller will be able to board Vias
Skeen a train, which
now leaves Edmonton at 4:30
p.m. every Sunday, Wednesday or Friday. He will
arrive in Jasper at
10:40 p.m. the same day, and in Prince George, B.C. at 6 the
following morning. The
Skeena continues to Prince Rupert, while the
passenger transfers to a self-propelled day-liner at
the B.C. Rail
station about five miles away. That train
departs at 7:30 a.m. and arrives in North Vancouver
8:30 p.m. The passenger must then take a bus to
downtown Vancouver. Total travelling time will be
about 28V2 hours, and the cost of the two legs of the
trip now stands at $91, although it likely will be
reduced.
Another drawback: B.C. Rail will set aside
only 20 seats for tour groups, whereas Vias
Supercontinental could handle much larger
numbers.
Jasper merchants charge that the new service will
not undo the damage caused by the demise of the
Supercontinental. Certainly that impact has been
measurable.
Linda Ray, former manager of the
towns Budget Rent A Car outlet, says her superiors
in Calgary decided not to open April 1, after the
normal winter closure, because they had only seven
advance
bookings. The year before, tourists arriving
by train had reserved 100 cars by March 31. George
Andrew, assistant manager of the Astoria Motor Inn
and
Andrew Motor Lodge, says Japanese tourists
last year purchased 271 room nights at his familys
hotels. So far this year hes selling at only half that
rate. The Athabasca Hotel lost 120 room nights,
which had been pre-booked by Japanese skiers
between January and April, and recorded a June
occupancy rate of only 76%, compared to 95% last
year, says
Manag8r DArcy Carroll.
Chamber president Urquhart contends that
because Canadas credibility with the Japanese was
badly damaged by the severing of the Vancouver­
Jasper rail link, the new service will suffer. We
have to re-establish
our credability in the
international market, he observes.
In the
meantime, Jaspers legal battle over the
cancellation of the SuperContinental continues. The
Chamber of Commerce last fall applied to the Court
of Queens Bench for an injunction preventing the
discontinuance on the grounds that the federal
cabinet had acted illegally by skirting the Canadian
Transport Commission and resorting to an order-in­
council. The application was rejected, so the
chamber on May 11 presented its case to the Federal
Court of Appeal. A decision is pending.
Visitor access may be even further restricted if
Parks
Canada goes through with a proposal to close
the Icefield Parkway for the winter from the North
Saskatchewan River crossing to Jasper. David Day,
the parks assitant superintendent, argues
that his
department must cut budget this year, and that there
are very few other services which can be dropped.
Maintaining Highway 93 from November to March
costs $88,000 to $100,000, he points out, although
daily usage sinks from 412 total during November to
154 in January and 150 in February. The figure rises
to 303 in March.
Closing the road would probably touch off another
furore in the town, particularly since the Chamber of
Commerce is trying to arrange one-week ski
packages
involving three days in Banff and tw~ in
Jasper. Sums up hotelman Carroll: Theyre making
Jasper more and more inaccessible.
(Alberta Report)
AFTER YEARS OF STUDY, CANADIAN NATIONAL
Railways is planning to relocate its downtown
rail yards and create 80 acres of prime land for
new
commercial development.
The city and CN have reached agreement in
principle on a plan to reduce the size of the yards,
which lie north of 104th Avenue between 10151 and
1t6th streets
A
city planner says the proposal, expected to go to
city council by year-end, calls for office and
commercial development at the east and residential
at the west end of the area.
J. Allan Hermanson, CNs regional manager 01
planning, says relocation talks have been held by a
standing
committee formed by CN and the city.
Hermanson says western rail traffic has increased
sharply and CN had
to reassess and upgrade its
facilities
on its transcontinental route, which cuts.
through the city adjacent to the Yellowhead Trail.
CN added new yards at Bissell, west of Edmonton,
and at Clover Bar to help handle increased traffic.
But downtown, CN requirements for space are
shrinking because of the relocation of industry which
relied on the line. Relocating the track to the new
yards,
Hermanson says, would be relatively easy,
CN must, however, preserve some
core trackage. It
is
committed to providing track for the LRT, to an
interchange with CP Rail which gives the railways
access
to each others track, and to providing Via Rail
with facilities if it is successful in its bid to the
Canadian Transport Commission to extend its
Calga
ry-Edmonton passenger service to downtown
Edmonton.
Nevertheless,
the companys focus has been on the
bare-bones needs
of its downtown operation.
When a development agreement for
the prop~rty
has been signed, Hermanson says developers will be
Invited
to present proposals to the city and CN which
is fl
exible on the timing of redevelopment.
Glen Swanson, assitant general manager of
operation and maintenance for CP Rail, say CP Rail
must even
tually relocate some of its downtown
operations
as well because of traffic congestion.
But before it will make any move, CP Rail wants
to
ensure its competitive position and that its customers
will be maintained.
E
ven if it wanted to, its commitments to the Via
extension and t
he CN-CP interchange bar it from
vacating its
downtown yards.
But Swanson says the need
to preserve the track
doesnt
preclude major development, noting
Calgarys Gulf Canada SQuare is built around a
railw
ay track.
In 1957, CP
Rail purchased 640 acres of land north
of Ellerslie as a hedge against the day we would have
to relocate our yard facilities.
CP Rail would now prefer to locate its yards further
south
of the city, in the County 01 Leduc.
Louis Fortin, CP Rails Alberta North
superintendent, says retocation to Ellerslie is not an
assumption which should be made,
Movi
ng the Strathcona yards would cost between
$30
million and $50 million -a price which the city or
the province
would have to pay.
CP Rail
is not going to put up any Iront money to
do something that we werent going to do anyway.
(Edmonton Journal)
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS AND CP RAIL
ha
ve reached an agreement to buy the Canadian
assets
of Consolidated Rail Corp. (Conrail) of
Philadelphia. The· deal would see CN and CP Rail
obtain the Detroit River Tunnel. the main railline
between Ni
agara Falls, Onl.. and Windsor and three
branch
lines conSisting of a total of 274 miles of
track, as well
as an international bridge between
Niagara Falis,
Ont .. and Niagara Falls, N.Y. The
Canada S
outhern Railway Co .. 71 percent owned by
Conrail. o
wns the rail lines and the Niagara River
Bridge, which are leased
to the U.S. company. The
transaction
is subject to Conrail and Canada
Southern entering
into a mutually satisfactory
agreement
for the acquisition 01 the Canada
South
ern Rail line. Negotiations in that regard are
contin
uing but an agreement in principle has nol yet
been reached.
S. Worthen· Toronto Slar
THE SOO LINE RAILROADS RECENT PURCHASE
of the Minneapolis, Northfield & Southern
Railway could be the first step of Significant CP
Rail
expansion in the US, Certain ex Rock island
lines may be
candidates tor acquisition. The prize in
1983 will be the Illinois Central Gulf which links
Chicago with New Orleans,
The Canadian carrier and SP seem to be the two
most interested in the ICG.
which has been turned
around over the last six years with $2,5B In
investment. Forbes Magazine th
is year rates the ICG
as a good railroad. The Sao line and ICG connect
Chicago. and if the coal export business should pick
up through the Gulf ports, the ICG could be a very
lucrative property.
(SRS News)
BACK COVER:
ON A JUNE DAY IN 1970 C.P. Rail l
ocomotive 4071 and its train of
BOO-series conunuter cars was photo­
graRhed in a sylvan setting at
Hudson Heights en route from
Montreal to Rigaud.
Canadian Pacific photo No. E1517-10.
Canadian Rail
P.o. Box 282 St. Eustache, Que., Canada
J7R 4K6
Postmaster: it undelivered withIn
10 days return to sender, postage guaranteed.
I.~_~
third troi .. .,.
cl … cl ….
~1IMfT 78
St·E-.a….

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