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Canadian Rail 366 1982

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Canadian Rail 366 1982

Canadian Rail ~
No.366
JULY 1982

CA
Published monthly by the Canadian
Railroad Historical Association
P.O. Box 148 St. Constant P.Q.
JOL lXO
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germani uk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
FRONT COVER
WHAT COULD BE A MORE ENJOYABLE
OUTING on a warm summer day in 1882
than a picnic trip to Lachine by
train and a thrilling steamboat ride
through the Lachine rapids on the
return? It is now late afternoon
and the paddle-wheeler Corsican is
passing under the famous Victoria
bridge just before docking in
Montreal as the happy travellers
watch the passing scenery.
INSIDE FRONT COVER.
THE FIRST CANADIAN STREET RAILWAY
WEST OF THE GREAT LAKES was the
Winnipeg Street Railway which was
incorporated on May 27 1882, and began
operation on October 20 of
the same year. Like several systems
in the East, sleighs replaced the
horse cars in winter months when
the tracks were covered with snow. This
is a builders photo taken at
the John Stephenson factory in New
York before the sleigh was delivered
to Winnipeg.
Smithsonian
Institution
photo No. 72-2813.
~IL
ISSN 0008 -4875
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN DIVISION
60-6100 4th Ave. NE
Calgary, Al berta T2A 5Z8
OTTAWA
BYTOWN RAILWAY SOCIETY
P . O. Box 141, S ta ti on A Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8Vl
NEW BRUNSWICK DIVISIOtl
P.O. Box 1162
Saint John,
New Brunswick E2l 4G7
CROWSNEST AND KETTLE-VAllEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 400
Cranbrook, British Columbia
V1C 4H9
PACIFIC COAST DIVISION
P.O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2Pl
ROCKY MOUNTAIN DIVISION
P.O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Alberta T5B 2NO
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor
Ontario N9G lA2
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
P.O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto
Ontario M5W lP3
NIAGARA 01 V I S I 00
P.O. Box 593
St.Catharines, Ontario
l2R 6W8
ST. LAWRENCE VAllEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 99
Ste. Doroth~e, Quebec H7X 2T4

8IIluu
JIIIS
by Fred Angus
It had been a hot July in eastern North America. Only the
day before fourteen people had died of sunstroke in New York,
as the heat wave reached its climax. It was not that bad in
Canada, but it was still very uncomfortable, so there was great
relief when the cold weather came in on Friday night accompanied
by violent thunderstorms. Now it was Saturday, July 29 1882,
and the work week ended at noon. Even the stores would soon
be closed for this was the summer that the early-closing move­ment
began to toke hold. People who lived near their place of
work walked home, while those farther away took the horsecar.
In Montreal the hot weather of the lost week had been hard on
the horses; surely there was a better way to run street cars.
Certainly cable cars could not be used in Winter, but perhaps
this electric railway that hod opened lost year in Berlin was a good
ideo. After all, electric lights were now being Instulled.
Maybe in ten years there might be electric street cars.
The Montreal Doily Star that day was big -eight pages
instead of the usual four; there would be lots to read that
weekend. There were many things happening. A war was raging
in Egypt as Britain invaded and established control there.
In Far-away Indo-Chino the French were adding to their empire,
for this was the age of colonial expansion. The war in Afghan­
istan had ended but there was serious unrest in Ireland, and
heavy inflation in Argentina. Locally the news was not as grim,
for these were good times. The Federal election hod been over
for more than a month, and Sir John A. Macdonald was assured of
remaining in office for at least five more years. People were
wondering about the bones of the prehistoric whale that had just
been unearthed near Smiths Falls, or speculating on whether
the Shamrocks would win the championship. One could also wonder
if Dr. Scotts Electric Hairbrush could really perform all
the wonders claimed for it, and if one was not taken in by that,
NO RADIO, NO TV, NOT EVEN ~·IOVIES in 1882, but for only one cent you
could read the news of the world, and find out the latest progress
on the construction of the C.P.R., C.A. Ry. and smaller lines. Besides,
the advertisements were as much of an enter,tainment as todays T.V.
commercials.
CANADIAN
198
R A I L
there was still the danger of being fooled by one of the well­
made counterfeit fifty-cent pieces that had just appeared in
circulation in Montreal.
But above all the news in Canada this July a century ago
was about railways. This Saturday the Star had no less than
five articles of importance as well as condensed timetables of
the lines out of Montreal. West of Winnipeg the construction
crews of the C.P.R. were setting records as they built the line
across the prairies in their rush to reach the goal of five­
hundred miles that year. For the first time it looked as if
the transcontinental railway might be finished afterall and so
complete the confederation begun fifteen years before. Under
the guidance of General Manager Van Horne it even looked as if
the 500-mile goal for 1882 might be reached too. The depression
of the 1870 s was now only an unpleasant memory, and the new
West was opening up at last.
In the East too, railways were in the news. The Canada
Atlantic was under construction from Coteau to Ottawa dnd
expected to open soon. In Nova Scotia, work had begun on the
line from Oxford through Pictou to New Glasgow. In Montreal,
the C.P.R. had just announced that they would build their new
shops on what is now Delormier Avenue, and their new passenger
station was under construction on Dalhousie Square, with opening
set for December. This would be much closer to the city centre
than the old Q.M.O.& O. station at Hochelaga; almost as conve­
nient as Grand Trunks Bonaventure depot. It would even be ligh­
ted by electric light; a real innovation for 1882. But the un­
fortunate side of railway travel was also in evidence this
July 29. Two days earlier there had been a tragic accident near
Smiths Falls when two locomotives and ten cars were wrecked in
a collision in which the engineer of one of the trains died a
horrible death. The line was still blocked that Saturday
but would soon be clear.
The following five articles are all taken from the MDntreal
Daily Star of July 29 1882 and show in a most vivid way just how
much railways were in the news. Most of the illustrations are
from a book entitled Picturesque Canada which was published
in 1882 and shows the many aspects of Canadian life in those
days, some of which were closely connected with railways. So
come back 100 years and read the news items and announcements just
as they appeared when they were current news, in the days when
the rail network of Canada was taking shape.
MONTREAL HAD DOUBLE-DECKER HORSE CARS in the 1880s, and these views,
all taken in 1882, show them in action. Despite the saving of street
space, double-deckers did not survive in the electric car era in Canada.
CANADIAN
N
ORTH SHORE RAILWAY-
Commenolng on TnUlLBDAY, .lllIle lit, 1882,
.Tralna ruJ; iii loll?WB.:
KtxeO. MaU. &P t~~~!;.
—–I—-~—-I—-
Leave 1I0che-
lCo.~~~.~:: 0.1Qp.m.8.00 p.m. 10.00 p. m. 9.30&1II
.,d~~.~~~~~~ 8.00 .. m.9.S0 p. m. 6.80 Po Ill. 2.(Op.m
Len. Quobeo
for 1I0uhe-
I.p. …….. ~.80P.m.~O.10 .. m. 10.OOp.m. LOOp.m
JIm.. at
x.!~~h:~~!:. 8.15 a.m. 4.41)p. m. 8.30 .. m. 9.1Op.tII
IllIja for JoU-
c~te ………. lS.16p.m •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

.A:~t!..~~~~l.l~ 7.40p.m. …………………………… .1
LeAy.,Jolelte
for Mocha-
aQ& ••••••••• 6.00 .. m… •••••••••• II ••••••••••• ! ……. e(
,4……. at
Hoobel&l/ ….. 8.~0a.m. …………………………… .
lratlaleave MII.l·;nd 810&lon TI!N W!IUTE8 LATEB
!han Hoch.l~Ila.·· MaQDlftoonl Pol aDO Oan on all Pal­
~Pg:eT 1>117 enlIa, and oleo1loll· Oars on Night Traina. .
~uutlal Tr:.1n1 lea … Montreal Alid ~u.bec a p.m. All
1ram, RUt> bv Mom….u· 7f…… Bure . oonn.oUon. willa
he .(;anaOtan 1aolllo r,lway k> and from 0 …..
Oeneral officeo-1H PlaceDAtmer
Ticket officaB,.18 :tt … d.um •• , Montreal. OPr,;::l6
~t .. ~!ta BolO; Quebec. canadIAn ~b::l~ar,
189 Sl1l>orlntenaeut.
NORTH SHORE RAIL WAY.
SPE(I.t.I. NOTICE.
An Qrr1Ilemenl haa beon mnde wttla CanadInn·P.olflo
RAII ….. y for conlIn.,., of .Wlnll tickotl ond c1teClrln.1I
balSg.iro at Mile :F.nd Station. Therefore pa.eenller
trains will otop U Milo End … usuaL
…. DA;VIS,
17G.::.2 ____________ F~IP.rlnl.~~~n.!:_
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
200
R A I L
———
~atl~,Oa.d.
~……..-………/…/~
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY,
EASTERN DIVISION.
The Only Direot Line to. Ottawa
Ole Capllal or&be Dominion,
And the Great Lumbering DI~trcta of the Upper Ottawa
RlvOf.
Through ltlthout.OlIooge. and WIth speed unrinlled.
Two Jut Expresa. Trains Dally to Ottawa. ilia No.
ElelllWt IIBI1 LuxurIOUs ParlorOa att90chetl.
LBA.vtNG MONTREAL.
Morning Expre … 8.110 II. m., w4th parlor car, fot 0.,­
1
W
/1, f.~mbrokc,,,Mattawa, CaledonIa Spring, lind
lit. intermedIate stations.
Evoninll Ext>re~ 5.4.0 p. m., ..nth Parlor Car. for Ot­
lawa, llrooltv1l1e and Illi ·pOints,w •• t. Parlor Car
to OltaWIl, and through Sleeping car tor Toronto,
DetroIt and Chloago.
Accommodation train, n. Po m. for Bt. .Jerome, at. IJII
and all ths other fnshionab~ IllbUtban Bummer re-
• Ions ea.t Of St. Jerome.
The time ll1yen abon lel1lng Montrellil. from Roche­
l&Aa Depot. Ten mlnutee Illtor from Mile End.
io floli:eh, Rate., and All tnformrttlon regardlaa
paasengor b.u8.lneBl, apply at the Compllnye Ticket ofll.~
__ 103 ST • .JAMES 8THEET • ..IfiI/I
GEO. W. HIBBARD,
Awst.-Gon. Pan. Agent.·
W. C. VAlV JJ;-()RNE, I AICCHER nA;KER
Gen. Mantl,ller. G1!n. Suot •
l1i9~
Rapid Work being Accomplished.
St. Paul, Minn., July 27. –Some of the most rapid
railroad building ever done is naw in progress on the
Canadian Pacific, and before next spring the iron track
will penetrate a distance of 663 miles west of Winni­
peg. Mr. D. C. Shepard, of the contracting firm of
Langdon, Shepard & Co., has just returned from the
scene of operations on the extreme nor{hern route, and
where the firm has a 500 mile contract which is to be
completed this year. In February last Mr. Shepard
contracted to construct 500 miles of road for the
Canadian Pacific, and to complete the work during 1882.
Of that number of miles about 50 were partially graded
and nearly completed. Work began in March, but owing
to the snow and water, the late spring, md the freight
blockade, operations were greatly retarded until June
1st. The initial point was Flat Creek, 33 miles west
of Brandon. The grading is now all under way. The end
of the track was 127 miles west of Flat Creek

I
on Thursday, July 27th, and the g~ading was completed
50 miles further, in fact the grading is all well under
way to Moose Jaw Creek, midway between the 105th and
106th meridians. The grading is progressing at the.
rate of six miles per day, and the iron is being placed
at the rate of three miles per day. The contractors
have 4,200 men at work, including teamsters, and 1,600
teams. The present rate of track-laying, however, will
soon be increased by four miles per day, two gangs of
men being put on in reliefs, and work fifteen hours
out of the twenty-four instead of eleven hours, as
at present. They will show a record at track laying
which has never been surpassed on this continent.
In fact, the iron now is going down just as fast
as it can be pulled from the cars. Notwithstanding the
adverse influences encountered early in the Spring,
the contractors expect to complete the 500 miles of
grading before it freezes up, and perhaps fifty miles
more. The track-laying will go on all Winter, the
grade will be all ironed by Spring, a distance of 653
miles west of Winnipeg. Not only that, but it is hoped
to carry it fifty miles further beyond the crossing of
the Saskatchewan River. Mr. Van Horne is not going
to leave the ioad, but some of the railroad men think
so. The report has been denied upon authority.
A HORSE CAR ON RICHMOND STREET IN LONDON ONTARIO in 1882. This is typical of
the thousands of horse cars that provided the bulk of transit service in most
of the cities of North America in the 1880s. Where there were steeper grades
two horses would be used.
CANADIAN
202
R A I L
IN THE HORSE CAR ERA the rails could not be used in winter in areas of
heavy snow. This view in Quebec City shows a passenger sleigh which provided
service when the horse cars could not run.
THE FORMER Q.M.O. & o. BRIDGE AT BORDEAUX had just become the C.P.R. I slink
to Montreal, and four years later it would be used by transcontinental trains.
7
A C.P.R. TRAIN CROSSESTHE KAMINISTIQUIA RIVER near Fort William.
Near
here the construction of the C.P. line had begun in 1875, but
the last spike on the Thunder Bay -Winnipeg section had just been
driven on June 19 1882, and the railhead was now hundreds of miles
to the west.
MONTREALS PORT WAS THE FIRST TO BE LIGHTED BY ELICTRICITY, and these
views show trans-shipments being made between train and ship under the
brilliance of the newly-installed electric lights early in 1882.
CANADIAN
204
R A I L
CANADA ATLANTIC RAILWAY
Ottawa, July 28. –Trains on the Canada Atlantic
Railway now run across to this side of the Rideau. It
was expected that they would cross the canal and enter
the city this week, but owing to the bridge not being
yet completed they will not come into the city before
next week. Yesterday, by a special arrangement, Rev.
A.A. Cameron and other passengers were invited to make
the trip from Ottawa to Coteau. The first rail on this
road was not laid until the 25th of July, 1881, and it
will be seen that pretty rapid progress has been made.
After leaving Ottawa the first station is Hawthorne,
and shortly afterwards the Mer Bleu, an extensive swamp
of more than local celebrity, is entered upon. The
second stopping place is Eastmans Springs, at one time
a Summer resort of some prominence, and possessed
of splendid mineral springs. Here a neat and commodious
station house has already been erected. Bearbrook comes
next, followed by South Indian, 23 miles from here.
Passenger and freight trains are now running regularly
to Coteau, Casselmans, Roxboro. Maxville, Kenyon,
Alexandria, Glen Robertson, Ste. Polycarpe and Coteau
follow in order. The road runs through the counties of
Carleton, Russell, Prescott, Glengarry and Soulanges.
The curves and gradients are favorable. There are
no grades over twenty-nine feet per mile going east
and thirty-nine feet per mile going west. The deepest
cutting is only about twenty-two feet. The bridges
along the line have been built by the Toronto Bridge
Company. It is the intention of the Company to put
a fast train on the road, making the trip from Ottawa
to Montreal in three hours and a half. The plans
of a low level bridge across the St. Lawrence will soon
be completed and presented to the Government for their
approbation. In a short time the entire line will be
open to traffic, and great beneficial results are ex­
pected, more especially for the lumber trade, as this
line will give a short route to the eastern markets.
FATAL RAILROAD COLLISION.
Smiths Falls, Ont., July 28. –Edward Burns, the
engineer, expired this evening, half an hour after the
collision below here. The body lies in the house of
John Sharpe, from whence it will be removed as soon.
as preliminaries can be arranged. It is now doubtful
if an inquest will be required. It depends upon the
wishes of his family. His two sons have arrived, and
are getting all the assistance requisite from the sym­
pathizing inhabitants, as well as others present.
Some ten cars are totally wrecked, and serious damage
done to both locomotives. A large crowd of passengers
are delayed at Smiths Falls, but hope to have a
train during the night, although the track will not
be clear. They will ferry the baggage over the broken
track and debris. All the employes, from the engineers
down, acted nobly, sticking to their posts until just
at the moment when the collision was about to take
place. Burke, the fireman with Burns, thought poor
Burns was with him until he saw him imbedded in the coal
of the tender. Burns has a large family in Brockville,
but being an industrious and steady man, leaves them
in pretty good circumstances. He was 57 years of age.
It was rumored that one man was thrown forty feet into
a field, but it was ascertained that such was not the
case. Two or three receiving slight concussions were
the only injuries received by anyone excepting Burns.
Sir John A. Macdonald arrived by special shortly after
the collision, but returned to Ottawa after an hours
dealy. At present a large force of men and officials
are at work getting the line in order. As Brockville
is only 28 miles from Smiths Falls, and the bulk of
rolling stock being north, it is difficult to make up
trains, as several engines are required at the scene
of the disaster.
TWO RIVAL MODES OF TRANSPORTATION are seen at Ste. Annes Que. The Grand Trunk
bridge was like a short version of the Victoria tubular bridge until it was
rebuilt in the 1890s. Steambo.ats still carried a good share of the passenger
traffic; the ones shown served the lower Ottawa river and connected with the
broad-gauge Carillon & Grenville, thence via another steamboat to Ottawa.
Some of this traffic would be lost that very summer of 1882 when the Canada
Atlantic opened its through service between Montreal and Ottawa.
THE RAILWAY ACCIDENT.
Ottawa, July 29. –Mr. Spencer, Assistant-Sup­
erintendent of the Canadian Pacific, returned to-day
from holding an investigation into the causes of
yesterdays accident. He found that the engineer was
to blame in proceeding onwards from Irish Creek, when he
should have waited there. The loss is estimated
at $12,000. It is a curious coincidence that a son of
the engineer who was killed, was discharged some time
ago for doing the same thing at the same locality,
running without orders.
ONE OF THE EARLY LARGE RAILWAYS IN CANADA lost its identity in the
summer of 1882 when the Great Western Railway merged with the Grand Trunk
on August 12. This view shows the Great Western station at
Hamilton, Ontario in the last days of the G.W.R.s independant
existance. A busy scene is observed as the train pulls in.
ONE OF THE STRANGEST RAILWAYS IN CANADA was the line laid across the
ice of the St. Lawrence river at Montreal during four winters from
1880
to 1883. Note the extra-lOng timbers under the stringers which
support the ties. This distributed the weight over a wider area.
,…
1 A TRAIN ROUNDING THE CURVE AT LINDSAY ONTARIO.
2 THE TWO BRIDGES AT WINDSOR NOVA SCOTIA as a train crosses the railway
bridge while pedestrians on the covered road bridge watch.
3 A PASSENGER TRAIN CROSSING THE BRIDGE AT PARIS ONTARIO.
~ A &~ALL SADDLE-TANK LOCOMOTIVE busily pushing a cut of ore cars at the
Acadia Mines in Nova Scotia.
CANADIAN
208
R A I L
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY.
New Workshops.
Keeping pace with the growth of their extensive
system, the Directors of the Canadian Pacific Railway
have just passed the plans for the erection of now
workshops, work on which was commenced last Monday by
the contractors, Messrs. St. Louis Bros.
The new shops are three in number. The largest of
them facing Col borne Avenue will be used for the cons­
truction of locomotives, and measures 450 feet in length
by 120 in breadth. It will be fitted up with all the
modern appliances for the construction of locomotives.
Facing St.Catherine street, the paint shop will
be erected 130 feet square, six tracks being laid
t~rough the buildings. An extensive drying house
will be attached to it. Alongside this workshop a
new boiler house will be built, to be fitted with three
of the largest boilers in the city. The chimney will
be 150 feet high.
The new smithy will be 200 feet in length by 70
feet in breadth, covered with a novel iron roof.
All the buildings will be fire proof, the cons­
truction being generally of brick and iron.
THE BUILDING ON PLACE DARMES THAT
HOUSED CANADIAN PACIFICS HEADQUARTERS
from its start in 1881 until the
offices moved to Windsor station in 1889.
THE KETTLE CREEK BRIDGE at St. Thomas Ontario is a picturesque
setting for the on-coming train. One was well-advised to pay good
attention to the sign!
1
1
CANADIAN 209 R A I L
THE EUROPEAN & AMERICAN SHORT LINE RAILROAD.
New York, July 28. –Sir Charles Tupper, the Cana­
dian Minister of Railways and Canals, visited New York
to-day for the purpose of closing a contract with the
European & American Short Line Railway Company recently
formed for the construction of the first section of
the line through Nova Scotia, viz., from Oxford to New
Glasgow via Pictou. Sir Charles having made thorough
enquiry, and perfectly satisfied himself as to the
ability of the company to successfully proscute the work,
executed tne contract in the presence of Mr. Schreiber,
an officer of the Department of Railways. The Short
Line Railway was represented by Dr. Norvin Green, Pres­
ident of the Western Union Telegraph Company, and among
the members of the board are General Vasquez, A.L. Black­
man and Erastus Wiman. Mr. Blackman intends to start
next week, to commence construction as soon as possible.
2
A VIEW OF YALE B.C. in 1882 during the time when Andrew Onderdonk was
building the very difficult section of the Canadian Pacific up the
Fraser Canyon. Yale was the head of navigation, and above that was
the rushing currents of the Fraser.
2 THE BRIDGE ACROSS THE SAINT JOHN RIVER near Newbury Junction New ilrunswick.
RAILWAY lIME 1A13LJj;S
GltAND ·,RUNl{ JeAlI.WAY.
GOING W .Il~·.l:-J>::. .. roa. for all pOiuts WOOl, n.ao a.m.
and ly p.m. idl,,;odl l:l.;Ju p.m. ~or Cornwall, iJ p.lIt.
Fur audf6ul1, u,10 p. Ul. .I…)::
J V 11: ,nWM lUR WBSr-
1l:~ltre!8, 7.~ .. ii a.m;_ l:J }J.J!l. ~ltxed., 13 p.m. Oornwall,
9.30 a.m. );rom , uatont!, H.30 a .• ll.
. GOING EASI-Rlehllluud an ,a,ao p.Ul. bilxed k> I,!uohoo, K,chmondn,d bland POhl, 7.
00 a.m. qu~hec lind Portland, 7.:iO,a.m., 10 p.m; ~1.
HYl)cllllho, 0.10 p.m. ,,RnIVlI-From QUGDOC and,Port­
land, 6 a.m., 7 ,il~ .111. hland lond, 11:50 a.m;, 11.00
p.m. al!H1acl~tho, H.uO a.m. Mixed from Quebec,
1Ilcllmond, etc., u.OO p.ll1. and 10 p.m.
FOR LAC,ltIN.I!.-7, 7.~~,~,!J~ a.m.; 1:& noon,a.30, ~ ll.l:
p.,: nnl1:! ,·p.m: on SalUrdys Only. Wdnesdl an
oaturdy lLOO 1,.m., St. Lambert, 81: Henry and Polu~
lit. OJt:i.!4,1., 5.45,7.0:;, H.:10 .IU., 12.10, J •• )O. II. 1<.,. and
~.,lOlPl:; Snturd3) onIX :3 ,P.m. 1r01l1 LA.r.hlM,7.:.!t.
8.:.lO, 0.il9,a.Iil,.1,.,~,,~.:m, • p.ln. ana on, 8atqMarl
drllYat·U:O p.m. wednesday Bnd SalurdlYi 11;301.10.
From st. Lnmbert, ,lolnt St. Cbrle. ana Sa. lIonrl,
11.10, 8, 8.~O a.m., 1, 4>.ao, t1.40 nn.1 8.46,p.rn… Salur·
d,,), ,)llly 11.40 p.m.,
c.;ENTnAL VERMONT BAII,WAY.
OOHW SOUTH AND ~;A~:r-St. Johns anllSt. Aluans,
7.10 anti Ii a.m., a.~o p.m., 13.30 p.nl. lJoston,7:1O and 1I
a.m., o.ao p.m. New York, via SI; Aluan. Anu 1r01,
1.10 n.m. nnd 3.!0 p.n, Ne~ York, via Whlto Rlyer
Juncllon and Sllrlnglibld. !J n.m., 0.::10 p.n.. Watorloo
alld Magog, :I.!W P:lll. ARRIvlt-From !Jooton, 8.L;
a. .. 7.~0 p.1I1. nlid 10.l0 p.m. N.owYork, via 8prlnrr
1101<1, 8.15 n.m. New York ,Ill Iroy and, St. Alban ..
8.20 … 01., 10.10 Pf.Il.
SOUlH.EASTERN RAILWAY.
001210 SOUTH AND EAS1-Boston, .. I Newwrl, 9.01)
LI11. ana U.30 p.m, Local traIn to Knowllon and Rloh­
ford, exeopt SauJ{lay., [; 1. n •.• do. SalnrdaYH, 2 p.m.
ARIIIYJi-From lloaton at 8.20 .m. and 8.15 p.m.
DEI.AWARE AND,lIUD.IiiON ItAIJ.wAY.
ooiNG SOU·IH…,.New, York, Itoy, llouse. Poml ~II
8t. John., 1.15 a.lll. and;. ~O p.m. AJUuvlI YJ LIll. and !0.-10, p.m.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
LlIAV. for Ollaw&, 8.30 .m., 0.40 ,p.m., ,mlxod
trnln, 7.40 p.m. ~t. Jeromo and 8. LIJi, U.OO p. m.
Tralnl 100 HUo·);lId Stallon ten minute. lator tban
110cI16I .. g:>. }orom OttnwR, mixed 9.00 n.m., 12 ,noollt
and 0.00 p.m. }rom lIl, Jerome anu cll. LIJi, II Lm.
MONtnE, AND ~UUEL UAILWAY.
Jor Sorel~llonavonlure, a.30; HocbeIl4la Ferry, 4.30;
l.CaI1l.er . Mo,n,aryllle (Jacql1es Cartl.r Pier), 0 p.m.
A:rrt .. o-80reJ. 7.ao p.m. Tue, Salurdays, (rpm lAnl/uOUll Whlrf, Va.l! •. Returu.l.a .. e
:l.20 p.m …. rrlve 6.10 p.m. Arrln-From Sorol.!l a.m.,
Jacques Cartier Pil>r, and 11.10 nona,velllure D.pOl.
CENTRAL VERMONT R~
-FAST LINE.-
FOR NEW YORK _to» nOSTON.
Ebrec E:.;pr,ells Iralol11 dai1T to New York
.and nOlllion, with 1II11hlRn Rnd
W,llftr • .t,:.~n Patllolload
SleepllllrCR RRCbed.
lRAINS LEAVE MONTREAL<
7.13 ~.m,.-DAY EXPRESS (or rroy, Albany, N ….
York, Sl>rlnllft~ld, No … LondonA1;14 BoSton:via Fllcb­
Inqg,
9.00. ~.m-LrMIlBD EXPRESS for Boston vi
Concord, b,!anck.~tcr, N~ahun, Lowoll, arrlvlnll In ll~.tou
al ~.~O p .. in., .. nd Now :lork Via Whll. HI .. cr Junctlon a~
10.3( p.m ••
3.laO P ….. -FOT Wtetloo Rnd Ma!lO.Q.
3.20 p.m.-:-NIGHT EXPRKs,g for Ne …. York, wi
Troy, nrrl .. lng I.n Now York (.40 nex~ mornlog .
6.:10 p.m.-NIOUl EXlUESS for noston, /ria Lowal
and Fltcbburg; Now, York, uia 8prlngl101d.
GOING NORTH.
FAIIJT TaAIN FJtO.lI lfEW YORK.-lh
lIlp:hl,l.xpress,lI.a TrOT, J9n .. es Now York at 6.30 p.1D
And,arrlv.!!; In~lo11trel nt 8.2i> …. 1U.
IdI tlckets :nnc)FreJRht Ral. apply a. ~bB Central Vel
mon1I3Uroa.:tOJHce, lau 81. Jamos slreot.
,… (J. ljtOXEGR …. VE,
Canadian P,enller Agen*-
S. W. HOBART. H. f.·CUUI1~(,I~.
Oeneral Sup~11ntendBnt. Uan. Pais. Allonl.
st. AlballO, VI., October :.I7tb, lain. IlU ..
SOUTH EAST.I:<;RN RAILWAY
-AlIlI-
MonREAL AND BOSTON AIR I.INE ..
The only line rllnnlng Ihrough Ibe WHIT.!!: ~IOU1(.
UltS PORTLAND and OLD OIlCHARD H);ACIi
Th6 onI1 dlroc~ allel best rOllto t{) WHIT~ MOUNlAIN~
Cuncor lrovldenoe, llost{)n, and all pOints In tew .t::ngIlln also. to Iho ~aatern l·ow.llsblp, Newport, .Lak~ Mem
phrom311oll, cio.
LEA VE MONTREAL.
No. ~9.00 a.m.-TllHOUOH VAY RXPRES3 fo:
Boslon. 1Illh Par/or Car aUllcbod. ruBO for Portlnnrl wiU
larloio Car atrnclell. I,
No. 0-0.00 p.il,.-(.Excopt Saturdays) LOCAL THAll
tor Kno … nO/l and Ricllforel and Inlormediat. slatlons.
~o. 4,-0.30 p.,,,.-lHROU(Jji NiGHT EXP1U;S:l,wltl
Fullman 8100plu(I Car (or BOSlon. No. 18-:.I.OU
p.m.-(Salurd~y8 only) LOCAL :(RA!.li
lor Nc,yport, Knowlton and InlcrmcctiMo ~!atlon •.
Pn.soligers laking tho !J a. m, I rain arrI va at Pc.rtlan At 8.30 Blld Old Orchard al 0.00 tbo .mQ evenlilJl, paBl
In t.hroul/h tho ot)ebratcd Whlt,e Mountain Notch.
EIC:lIunt Parlor Oars OD Day Imino, betVee)1 Montreal
and Porllanct, and .llont!oal and -Boston; and Pullmau
PaI~re Sloopln8 Cars on Night train. bctweeu ~onlteal
aud Boson.
No.4 .tops ooly at Chambl), Canton, Marla .. IlIe Woat
F:lTIlhallt, nnd ,luwanavllla botw~en Monlrulli and Rlell­foro,
except saturdays, …. hon It will stop at nt! slatiou&
BRADI,EY BARLOW.
Presld~ill tlnd General Mtmazcr.
.t.. A. AtACKINNO:.
4S As.Isbnt Ma .,airor.
~IANY YEARS BEFORE ALBERTA
OIL WAS DISCOVERED Canada
had a
petroleum industry
centered in the Petrolia –
Sarnia area of southern
Ontario. A train of tank
cars passes an oil field
with its distinctive
derricks.
PROGRESS OF CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY TRACK CONSTRUCTION
WESTWARD FROM WINNIPEG SEASON -1882
MILES FROM
WINNIPEG
169.3
180.2
188.3
196.8
211.1
219.3
226.5
235.4
243.1
249.4
256.3
263.8
271.1
278.9
286.4
294.1
302.0
312.0
323.6
332.0
341.0
347.9
SIDING
NUMBER
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
N A M E
Virden, Man.
Hargrave, Man.
Elkhorn, Man.
Fleming, N.W.T.
Moosomin, N.W.T.
Red Jacket, N.W.T.
Wapella, N.W.T.
Burrows, N.W.T.
Whitewood, N.W.T.
Perceval, N.W.T.
Broadview, N.W.T.
Oakshela, N.W.T.
Grenfell, N.W.T.
Summerherry, N.W.T.
Wolseley, N.W.T.
Sintaluta, N.W.T.
Indian Head, N.W.T.
QuAppelle, N.W.T.
McLean, N.II.T.
Balgonie,
N.W.T.
Pilot Butte, N.W.T.
DATE RAILHEAD REACHED
THIS POINT
April 12 1882 (Wed)
Detailed track records
not maintained until
June 21 1882.
June
29 1882 (Thu)
July 4 1882 (Tue)
July 7 1882 (Pri)
July 12 1882 (Wed)
July 15 1882 (Sat)
July 19 1882 (Wed)
July 22 1882 (Sat)
July 25 1882 (Tue)
July 28 1882 (Fri)
July 31 1882 (Mon)
August 3 1882 (Thu)
August 8
1882 (Tue)
August
11 1882 (Fri)
August 15 1882 (Tue)
AugLls t 17 1882 (Thu)
CANADIAN
Track Built 1882
-Directim of
cOlSttuction .
(6) -Indicates siding ….wer
before name assIgned.
212
R A L
(14)
QUAPPELLE ~ SU (16) • I r j
SINTALl1IA .(15) (13)
WOLSELEY GRENFELL
(lZ)
0AKSIIElJ (10)
, PERCBVAL
J_,~
B~ll)j 1
I
(I~ I~
1~~ ..:15
,.J,t,U -(9~S i ~
BROAIJVII)j IIIlI~ I 7) WAPEJ.LA. I
S)~4IN
(~)
C l e 9 t P l a i tI
o r
t It
(10)
SECRETAN 2
~
QIAPLIN PARKBEG mRTlAOI
N i 8 B 0 U l
Cot e a u
10 ZO 30
CANADIAN
213
R A I L
356.4 Regina, N.W.T. August 21 1882 (Mon)
365.8 1. Grande Coulee, N.W.T. August 24 1882 (Thu)
373.2
2. Pense, N.W.T. August 26 1882 (Sat)
381.0 3. Belle Plaine, N.W.T. August 29 1882 (Tue)
390.0
4. Pasqua, N. W. T. September 1 1882 (Fri)
398.1 5. Moose Jaw, N.W.T. September 4 1882 (Mon)
406.2 6. Boharm, N.W.T. September 7 1882 (Thu)
414.2 7. Caron, N.W.T. September
11 1882 (Mon)
423.2 8. Mort1ach, N.W.T. September 14 1882 (Thu)
432.4
9. Parkbeg, N.W.T. September 16 1882 (Sat)
442.8 10. Secretan, N.W.T. September 22 1882 (Fri)
451.7 11. Chaplin, N.W.T. September 27 1882 (Wed)
461.1 12. Ernfo1d, N.W. T. October 3 1882 (Tue)
471.5 13. Morse, N.lq.T. October 10 1882 (Tue)
480.3 14. Herbert, N.W.T. October 14 1882 (Sat)
488.9 15. Rush Lake, N.W.T. October 18 1882 (Wed)
496.4 16. Wa1dec; N.W.T. October 21 1882 (Sat)
504.4 17. Aikins, N.W.T. October 25 1882 (Wed)
510.5 Swift Current, N.W.T. October 27 1882 (Fri)
519.3 1. Leven, N.W.T. November 1 1882 (Wed)
528.6 2. Goose Lake (now Webb) November 6 1882 (Mon)
538.2 3. Antelope, N.W.T. November 15 1882 (Wed)
546.0 4. Gull Lake, N.W.T. November 21 1882 (Tue)
554.5
5. Cypress (now Carmichael) November 27 1882 (Mon)
565.1 6. Sidewood, N.W.T. December 9 1882 (Sat)
575.2 7. Crane Lake (now Piapot) December 22 1882 (Fri)
585.6 8. Colley (now Cardell) December 30 1882 (Sat)
589.16 ——–Early January 1883.
CONSTRUCTION TERmNATED FOR SEASON
This table was prepared by Canadian Pacific
Corporate Archives, Montreal.
June 2 1982.
THE SPIRIT OF THE PUSH TO THE WEST is captured by this view of a C.P.R. train
steaming away to the horizon on the just-completed track across the prairies.
When the view was made, in the summer of 1882, the tracklayers were setting
construction records which would see almost 500 miles of progress.
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
RAILWAY
SLEEPING
CAR
t:==J
c:::::J
c::::=J
c:=J
C=:J
[=:J
C=:Jc:=J
c::J
c:=J
c:=::J
C=:J
c=J
c:=J
c:::::J
c:=J
c:=J

i:
~
.
V)
I
I=-.u
~
s
)~
e
o

~–

~
R
( c
:;.
…. 0<.
..
~
P
……
,

c.c
CAR
BUILDER
DATE.
WEIGHT
FINISH
L,
6H
TIN(,
~Y5Tt

HE&TINO
SY
ST
EM
VE5TISU1..E.
PlATroRM
B-Utl
..
T
OUTSIO-
!tt..l5.IOE.
El.Ec,T,e

01L
~
….
~
kf.ATE.R
T(
AMHEAT
51:.L.KIRK
~Qey
IBez
WHITiWOOO
IM
….
O()
..
~y
I
AGMF.
SAkt.R
Ic.oNs.OL
~
NON
e..
wooo
80
SMITH

CANADIAN
PACIFICS
SLEEPING
CAR
SERVICE
began
in
1882
when
three
cars
were
ordered
from Barney and Smith
of
Dayton Ohio
for
use
on
the
new
lines
running
west
of
Winnipeg. At
first
they
may
have had
only
numbers,
but
were soon
named
SELKIRK,
IGNACE,
C~40RE.
They were
the
first
of
hundreds
of
C.P.R.
sleepers,
and
the
start
of
the
world-famous
service
which
continued
for
97
years
until
it
was
taken
over
by
VIA
Rail.
No
photos
of
these
pioneer
cars
are
known
to
exist,
although
all
three
cars
lasted
well
into
the
twentieth
century.
This
drawing
was
made
in
1902.
BRAI(E VI.A.
S –
c:::::::J
I
,f–
:
,,

—–.J
~
-d
!
0
0
~
0
I
?Ml
I
ti~-
I
() l> Z l> o l> Z
III ~ …. 01 III
:u l> r
VIC
MONTREA.L AND VICTORIA BRIDGE.
~
THE RAILWAY WONDER OF CANADA in 1882 was still the Victoria Bridge
which had been opened 22 years before. Although its biggest-wonder
status was soon to be eclipsed by the then-building C.P.R. it was
the most impressive sight seen by the visitor to Montreal of a
century ago. Fifteen years after these views were made the bridge
was reconstructed into the wider truss-work structure that stands today.
Public Archives of Canada photo No. C27985.
CANADIAN
218
R A I L
ILLUSTRATIONS or VICTORIA BRIDGE appeared in many places in the
nineteenth century, but in 1882 it even appeared on Canadas money!
The
Bank of Montreals brand-new issue of $10.00 bills dated
January 2nd 1882 had as its centre piece an ornate roman-numeral
X. In
the upper-left shaft of this X we behold a tiny but clear
engraving of Victoria bridge complete with a train emerging from
the South portal! A point of interest is that this issue of notes
was made by the B. of M. to depict their new officers after former
President,George Stephen and General Manager,R.B. Angus left the
bank to become officers in the new Canadian Pacific Railway. This
note issue continued until 1888.
THE OTHER NOTE THAT SHOIVED VICTORIA BRIDGE was the Dominion of
Canada $4.00 bill that appeared later in 1882. Yes, the bridge is
there, just under the ornate 4 on the left-hand side, and this
time it is more of a broad-side view and even includes a raft
going underneath. This note continued in use until 1900.
The
signatures on these illustrations have been obliterated
since these notes are still legal tender eVen after 100 years.
CANADIAN
219
R A I L
II. A.M.
i. Detroit, Mich.
,,,,6 P.M. II ••• A.M.
Alask& . Danvllle, Va.
7.37 A.M. 36 A.M.
Bangor, Me. i Denver, Col.
… 19 P.M •. ~ 9054 A.M.
Buffalo, N.Y. Dubuque,la.
11.38 A.M. 0.5 A.M.
Charleston,S.C Galveston, lex
11.34 A.M. 10·35 A.M.
Clnelnattl,O. Havana, Cuba
11.16 A.M. II .. A.M.
Columbia, S.c.
11.10 A.M.
Cllveland, O.
II • ., A~ M. 11II.>;Io.t
Hannibal, Mo.
10.53 A.M.
Hamilton. Onto
11.:4 A.M.
Houston, Tex.
10.30 A.M.
Hartford, Conn •
… 03 P.M.
Indlanapolls,lnd
11.10 A.M.
Jetln (,11), ML
10.45 A.M.
Jaeksonvllle,l/l.
10.53 A.M.
Knoxvllle,Tenn
11.18 A.M.
Key West, Flo
11.7 A.M.
London, Eng.
4.54 P.M.
Fe.
9.50 A.M.
Savannah, Ga.
1I·3~·A.M.
Louisville, ky, Madllon. WI.,
II … A.M. 6A 101
Little Roek,Ark 10.5·.
10.45 A.M. I Macon, Ga.
l rth k 11.·3 A.M.
eav wo , • Memphl.
10·35 A.M. 10.53 A.M.
Milwaukee, WI •. Mexico
11.00 A.M. 10.18 A.M •
Mobile. Ala. Nashville, Ten.
11.07 A.M.
N.london, Ct.
…06 P.M.
N. Haven, Ct.
…00 P.M.
Nebraska City
10.:10 A.M.
lytf~~:K~,~ Newark, N.J.
11.59 A.M.
San [ranelseo t
8.+4 A.M. ~ .04 P.M.
Salt Lake City. St.Stephn,NB
9 .• 6 A.M. 12,3 P.M.
Tlffi TRAVELLER OF 1882 still had to contend with a multitude of
local times as can be seen in this chart taken from a tourists
guide of that year. The local times corresponding to noon in
Montreal are shown for many places in North America and overseas.
This confusion was not destined to last much longer, for in 1883
the concept of standard time, largely advocated by Sandford
Fleming,
came into being and soon spread worldwide.
CANADIAN
221
R A I L
~.,
6
~ OC
~~~[][l7F.···
~ ,MDTREDAweUoL
,c:JJm~
L—~_-==-lfZr /::-
__ —–C-R-~,~______J r———-­
,THE OHAMP DE MARS SOHEME.
·Tbe .bon pIlla. 11 tbo one propOIiu!.by tb.-OanCld.laD··Paolfio R&il … ,. CompaDY, the ,obotILl hein,
to plaoe tb. fnlght .hed. mulr:ed 4 OD. tb, plaD on Dal~~u • .I.. a,quare, 8x&.endln, to BOllloooun Itreet
8 from. Notre Dame to Commluionen ,treet, moludJJ:i., ODe .ld • .of .No~re name .treeL The
~bger depot, ·tt~iJ propCled to~lao OD. the Champ de M.n by meanl of a double t.re.ok klD.D.l~
JlWked 10 iDtho pl.n ~d.r alboutte. ure. The conrad.. latfonD. and offioo. ,extending
!rom BelrJ laa …… far .. .t.b ….. t. ,. oOrDer~ the City ilall 21, tt. maiD. approaoh to the depOt
to bq,~~. mUD. ~f JlrojlO&ed.ltreet, oonUD.uaLion ~l Jaaquil C.rtfer8Quare f? 1lUlDiD& from }l{ou. .
Dam. CTaJg i!!),.;lb ,!&o~. or tho dopo Ia _r~od f 1 n Ih. plan.
DURING THE SUMMER OF 1882 there was much speculation as to the site
of Canadian PacificS new terminus in Montreal. The old Q.M.O. & O.
depot at Hochelaga was too far away, and a new one at the Quebec
gate was planned. One such plan, proposed that summer, appears here.
Eventually the decision was made, and the new Dalhousie Square
station was opened on December 4. This building was not destined to
be the main terminal for long, for it was eclipsed first by Windsor
Station in 1889. then the new Place Viger in 1898. But the 1882
structure still survives. not too different externally from what it
was like when it saw the departure of the first transcontinental train.
HOME FROlJ THE ROOKIES.
WIu he Inrepld Dajor KOlte… Ira8
beea Doi.D£ iD be Bocky MolUUaiDs. –
Major Rogers. the intrepid explorer of the
Rock,. Mountains, who is eng~ b,. the-elIDa­
dia.n.P&eifio R&ilway in SUlTeying a route across
the mount&ina to Kamloops on the ~c lide,
has J;u.st returned to this eity,.hsving 1ini!hed hi8
,urTey for this ,.ear,.and baring neee88fuJly oom­
pleted what he left here last ,.ea.rto ,coomplisb,
namel,., first, a good pass through the Selkirk
range of mountains, and seoond, a route from
the SIIIIlDlit of th. Rocky Mountains to Calpny,
at whlich point the-section under the charge Qf
the Major ends. The survey from the-summit to
the latier placo has been aecomplished and at­
tended with the most aarufa.ctol1 results, and
the lice is now being loeated by two engineering
staffs,..and pushed on with a.ll posaible speed.
This is rendered neccaar:r bJ the manelloUB
rapidity and enterprise with which the traok­
layingja being pushed ahead, the main line at
present extending to within a Terr
IIhort distance of the Saskatchewan lUver. From
this point to Calgarry,. the distance iscompara­
tinl,. ahort, and the section from that point to
the snmmit of the Rooky MountaiDII will be
constructed next Slimmer. Major Rogers is highly
sa.tisfied with the result of hi! labors, and lIays
that the-ronte he haa succeeded in fiDdin~ will be
upwards of 150 miles ~horter than t.he northern
pus whioh was lune,.ed 1>7 the Department of
PubliG. Works some years a,o. The
highest titude at which the rails wm be
l:;:.id is 5,500 feet aboTe the level of the lea,
whilst the Cen.tn.l Pacilio touohea an altitude of
7,500 feet in the Sierra NOYada.. The
gradients, Major Rogen lI&yll, will be lewer
than on au,. traullcontinental ~ whilst DO
summit tunnellmg will be neoenar..:r. The
raTines are denaely wooded with the finest
timber it· has eyer beeD the Majors good fortuue
to .aee, .iucluding pine, Donglau far-and cedar,
while the T&lle,.S contain good pasturage on the
Western .slope. Next years suney will embrac.
the route from the summitwestwarda.
ALTHOUGH NO ONE IN THE EAST KNEW IT AT THE TIME, another historic
event had just taken place by the end of this July in 1882. Far
away in the mountains of British Columbia, Major A.B. Rogers had,
on July 24, confirmed the existance of the pass through the Selk­
irks through which the C.P.R. would run and which would bear his
name. It was not until Rogers return to Montreal in December that
the news was made public, and this historic news item is reprinted
here exactly as Canadians first read it in the Star on December 9 1882. Note
the old spelling of Calgary. This announcement was a
fitting climax to the eventful happenings of 1882.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY.
EASTBRN DIVISION.
THE GRAXD ,,INTER t.::AnNIV.i.L
CoUlmencn wIth be opetlln;:-or TJIE MO~1lt1tA L em
T1.1lldl)lVa.
On Mondny. Deeemher 4tb. 18S2.
WbeD Pahenrer Irl.lnR .. m ~orumt:nce lunQjD~ to ~01.
froID tbel!EW QUEBEO Q£TIt hL£lO~, hich
la alt,atec1 … ,thln e!Ul, ecce .. kJ all u..
hokt., Uld .. qual1er ., a mIle
IIINrCT tbCl l~ tJtneo Uuw.
thlold (O!.UI •• utu.re
~~t V.)IOI.
TO CELEflJCA.TE … UIJi EIENT.
%:be c-adMl1 r.cUla lUll will . aETllB…I
XICKETb rrom ,>3(lnlTlaJ:.o ~l J
.&.1 f!i.~lH~Ll: ~ … nE
BOB un ROUNO TRIP.
TlClitu …. 111 ba MOO) 1.0~ anti.,.. Tu~~,.. WtKIn …..
I Tlmndnl. D .. cflnher (.~. ,t, i, :10:16:00<1 to n:tllnl
QuI 1 $.::IIUrdll), J.:ecttll.oo:1 Uth, ll~:!.
ruUU:lI!:RER IO TAKE Tn}! TBUN 4T TnE NEW
:lrAnON.
TlcUb on Ml …. the Wlndl:)T P.ok!; 10l 6L Jun.
Sheet, and .. t Quebflc 0, n .. 1101l..
• (,Iro. w. HIBBARD.
ARCDER nAKF.R., A5lIlGoD.Iafl$. Agent.
General Superintendent. _ 281 7
EPILOGUE
This
1, the end of our brief excursion to the world of Canadian
railroadin, in 1882 -.a world which no one now living has ever
,een in real life. We have tried to show it as it appeared to
the avera,e person reading the papers, riding tho trains and
seoin, tho ,ights. For this reason we have illcluded a few extra
details to try and brina the era to life. In aany ways it 101 a
very different world but in others it was .uch the same as the
present day. So as the sun sets over the prairie we .USt leave
the ti.e of wood-burnina loco-atives. paddle-wheel steamboats,
wooden railway cars, horse_drawn stroet cars and the buildint of
the transcontinental railway. One is free to decide which is the
bot tor ti.e, 1882 or 1982, but it is certain that the p~ple and ev
ents of 1882 had a great influence in the ~king of tho Canada of today.
8ACK COVER
IN 1882 AS IN 1982 the line betlfeon Montreal and TorontO was the
busiest in Canada. A Montreal-bound Grand Trunk passenger train
crosses the bridge at Port Hope Ontario. The express train .ade
the run in twelve hours! Today LRC trains run on the ,e.e route
in little .are than a third of tho tiae.

Demande en ligne