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Canadian Rail 365 1982

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Canadian Rail 365 1982

Canadian Rail a
No.365
JUNE 1982

CANADIAN
Published monthly by the Canadian
Railroad Historical Association
P.O. Box 148 St. Constant P.Q.
JOL lXO
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
!RONT COVER ~
Huntville and Lake of Bays
locomotive No. I, originally
built in 1888, as running
about 1930.
OPPOSlTE~
INTERIOR OF FORMER CANADLAN
PACIFIC RAILWAY DINING CAR
ARGYLEnow at the museum at
Cranbrook B.C. This car was one
of four cars built in 1929
for service on the C.P.R.s
premier train the Trans
Canada Limited. Highlights
include inlaid black walnut
panelling. axminster carpet
and five tables set with
original C.P.R. silver, china
and glass.
Photos Cranbrook Museum.
R4IL
155M 0008·4875
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN DIVISION
60-6100 4th Ave. NE
Calgary, Al berta T2A. 5Z8
OTTAWA
BYTOWN RAILWAY SOCIETY
P.O. Box 141, Station A Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8Vl
NEW BRUNSWICK DIVISION
P.O. Box 1162
Saint John,
New Brunswick E2L 4G7
CROWSNEST AND KETTLE-VALLEY DIVISION
P. O. Box 400
Cranbrook, British Columbia
V1C 4H9
PACIFIC COAST DIVISION
P.O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2Pl
ROCKY MOUNTAIN DIVISION
P.O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Alberta T5B 2NO
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor
Ontario N9G lA2
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
P.O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto Ontario
M5W lP3
NIAGARA DIVISI(}J
P.O. Box 593
St.Catharines, Ontario
L2R 6W8
ST. LAWRENCE VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 99
Ste. Doroth~e, Quebec H7X 2T4
THE HUNTSVILLE AND
LAKE OF BAYS RAILWAY
by Eric Lloyd
INTRODUCTION
From the beginning of history the many water-ways of Canada were
the only lines of communication and transport available.
Unfortunately rapids and water-falls were encountered in these
water-ways when sudden changes of level occurred, and these could only
be overcome by portages. Portage was really doing it the hard way,
and it meant carrying the canoe around the rapid or waterfall, and
embarking again once slack water was reached. Most of the Canadian
Railways came into being simply to replace the many portages exper­
ienced by the weary traveller. Another type of portage occurred when
the level of one lake was higher than its next door neighbour, in
which case the canoe was carried uphill from one lake to the, other.
Just such a portage occurred between the south-east corner of
Peninsula Lake and the nor~h-west corner-6f th~Lake of Bays. Just
over a mile in length and none of it level, and to make matters even
worse the intervening ground was exceptionally rocky.
Steam ships and trains were in existence when settlers began to
replace the Indians, the white hunters and trappers in the MUSKOKA
district of Canada. Steam paddle wheelers were already sailing on some
of the MUSKOKA lakes, though the routes they plied were not long, and
would meander over the lakes to various ports of call, rarely more
than three miles apart.
The settlers, assisted by the local lumber interests, built
locks and dredged out canals so that gradually one lake was connected
with another. The railways that pushed their way into the MUSKOKA
district, and the numerous tugs and steamers on the lakes enjoyed
a great freight in cordwood, lumber, and other forest products.
Towards the end of the 19th. Century a new industry sprang up
in the area, that of tourism. Seeking relief from the humid summer
air prevelant around the Great Lakes, more and more urbanites were
prepared to put up with 12 hours travelling to reach the fresh air
of the MUSKOKA. So there developed bit by bit a steamer traffic
following well designated routes and meeting all the north bound
trains. As would be expected, these pioneers did not push into the
hinterland, but contented themselves by building their summer cottages
on the shores of well traversed lakes.
Steam navigation was already established in the upper MUSKOKA
Lakes, Veron, Mary, FairYr Peninsula and Lake of Bays, when a comp­
arative newcomer the late C.D. Shaw took over the combined interests
in the 1 890 s •
CANADIAN 165 R A I I.
The same C.D. Shaw saw glorious prospects in the neck of the woods, and
his ANGLO-CANADIAN LEATHER CO. at HUNTSVILLE went a long way to­
wards making this town what it is today. The possibilities of this
area as a summer paradise caused him to acquire the Marsh and Denton
Steamship interests, and the purchase of BIGWIN island in the lake of
Bays on which he built the BIGWIN INN. A little dredging was all that
was required to link Huntsville with Fairy Lake, and a canal was cut
through the cat-tail marsh to link Fairy Lake with Peninsula Lake.
This work was carried out around 1900, and thus a water-way was est­
ablished from Peninsula Lake right through to HUNTSVILLE. In order
to get the vacationers from Peninsula Lake to the mushrooming resorts
on the Lake of Bays a stage was set up to cover the intervening 1 1/8
miles. It was soon evident that to carry the volume of traffic a
railway was required, and to this end a charter was granted for the
construction in 1901. So was born The Worlds Shortest Complete
Railway System, known as the HUNTSVILLE, LAKE OF BAYS & LAKE SIMCOE
RAILWAY AND NAVIGATION COMPANY or HUNTSVILLE AND LAKE OF BAYS
RAILWAY, or the PORTAGE RAILWAY or simply THE TRAIN.
There appears to be some confusion about the actual date when
operations commenced, but I favour the 1903/4 date for track laying,
because 1905 is given as the date of purchase of the first locomotives.
ROUTE
The height of Peninsula Lake is 931 feet, and the height of the
Lake of Bays is 1034 feet. In order to get over the lump between the
two lakes the railway had to rise to 1050 feet. Since the rise from
Peninsula Lake was greater than the rise at the south end of the line,
a switchback was used to gain the necessary elevation at the north
end of the line.
The wharf at North Portage on Peninsula Lake consisted of a long
open sided shed with an office building built into the east end, and
it was here that the steamers which navigated the lake tied up, in
order that the passengers, mail, etc. could be off-loaded onto the
Portage Railway. Two tracks ran parallel to the rear of the shed, one
being the main line, which was joined to the other siding by a stub
CANADIAN
166
R A I L
I /
HUNT SVILLE, & LAKE of BAYS RLY.
Nos 1.&2.
Porter Loco Works Nos 911 & 912
of 1888.
b! £ Il t 1
HUNTSVILLE, & LAKE of BAYS No I.
As running circa 1930.
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CANADIAN
169
R A I L
switch. The main line started on a gentle grade up to an embankment
raised about 4 feet higher than the surrounding ground, and continued
to climb up a 6% grade into the stub switch which led to the switch
back. It eased out of the switch back, still climbing, and ran on
a terrace cut in the hillside which at this point was fairly steep,
reaching to some 30 feet above track level. The hillside levelled
off, and the main line, still climbing, made its Hz:st crossing of the
road. Continuing to climb, it soon reached its maximum height and
traversed a cutting which then led to a very gentle downgrade. The
line then skirted the edge of a small lake, and gently drifted down
grade to the next road crossing, and on to the stub switch which led
off the spur to the engine house. A little further on it again crossed
the road, and then split up into three sidings by means of stub
switches and ran to the wharf at South Portage on the Lake of Bays.
The wharf at South Portage again consisted of a long open sided
shed, which projected into the lake. One track ran under the shed,
the right hand track passed the water tower and ran on to the open
side of the wharf, and the left hand track ended in a dead end spur
just to the side of the wharf.
Most of the line passed through densely wooded country mainly
silver birch and maples, and it must have been a real wonderland of
colour in the fall.
HISTORY
This line was built to haul tanbark from what is now the forests
of Algonqui~ Park, to the tannery at Huntsville, and tourists to the
resorts on the Lake of Bays, together with local mail, and freight,
steamed its merry way for just over fifty years. The rails were
originally laid to a gauge of 3 feet 8t inches, probably because the
two Porter locomotives which first operated the line were built to
that gauge. The track laid with light flat bottom section rails, was
laid on rough sawn ties about 9 inches wide and spaced at approximately
2 feet to 2 feet 6 inch centres.
The trains always appear to have a box car at the head end of the
consist, no doubt it acted as a safety measure to prevent cinders from
blowing into the passengers eyes, especially when working the locos
hard on the up grades. In most photographs the two original Porter
locomotives appear to have been double headed, probably out of sheer
necessity to cope with the climb out of North Portage. By 1948 the
two original locos were put out to grass, and two heavier locomotives
built by the Montreal locomotive works were purchased second-hand
from the Canadian Gypsum Co. These two locos were built to a gauge of
3 feet 6 inches, so the Portage Railway was regauged to this gauge to
accomodate them, and the rolling stock regauged to suit. The smaller
of the two locomotives, No.5, then worked the Portage Railway for
the rest of its life, until it closed down in 1959; the second loco­
motive, No.7, was found to be too heavy for the light track, and rep­
osed in the engine house.
In later years the steamer IROQUOIS II used to leave Huntsville
twice a day to connect with the railway, so that passengers could
make the round trip to South Portage and back again. In this way
it carried several thousands of passengers, and about 500 tons of
local mail and freight every year.
CANADIAN 170 R A I L
Only two accidents are recorded, one in 1942 when the train
became derailed by running into an adventurous cow, which strayed onto
the right of way, and one in 1954, when it just became derailed while
speeding along at the maximum of 14 miles per hour.
So at the end of the summer season in 1959 The Worlds Shortest
Complete Railway System crept into oblivion, one would have thought
to rust away in peace. But not so, the complete railway, lock, stock
and barrel was bought up in 1963 by Mr. Percy Broadbear, moved to St.
Thomas, Ontario, and built as a line for tourist purposes at PINAFORE
PARK.
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CANADIAN 171 R A I L
LOCOMOTIVES
The first two locomotives to operate the line were purchased
second hand from E.B. EDDY CO. of HULL, Quebec in 1905. These appear
to be standard locos for industrial or light railway use as built by
the PORTER Works in 1888, and were numbered with builders numbers 911
and 912 respectively. When first running they were fitted with diamond
stacks, acetylene head lights, and cross-head driven boiler feed pumps on
the right hand side. There were no lower panels fitted to the cab
fronts, the reason for this is at present unknown. When running later
the diamond stacks were replaced by shot-gun stacks, the head~lights
removed, and the cab fronts adorned with metal cross braces to prevent
them listing either to port or starboard. These locos carried the nos.
1 and 2 respectively on cast metal discs fitted to the front of the
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CANADIAN
172
R A I L
smokebox. They were sold in 1948 and it is believed that they are now
at the Pioneer Village Museum, in Minden, Nebraska, from which I hope
to be able to get more details, in order to make reasonably accuratce.-­
drawings of them as running on the Portage Railway.
In order to replace the two Porter built locomotives, a further
two locomotives were purchased from the Canadian Gypsum Co.in 1948.
These locos were also known as locos 1 and 2, but were in fact never
given these numbers, the smaller of the two carrying its original No. 5
plate, and there is no pictorial evidence that the larger, No.7,
ever had a number plate. These two locomotives were built by the
MONTREAL Locomotive Works in 1926, and carried the builders numbers
of 66948 and 67167 respectively. Both these locomotives were built for
3 feet 6 inch gauge, so it was to enable these to run that the entire
Portage Railway, and stock, were regauged.
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CANADIAN
173 R A I L
The smaller of the two locomotives, No. 5, b~ilder s No. 66948,
had 9 x 14 inch cylinders, 27 inch diameter drivers on a wheelbase of
54 inches. The overall length was 18 feet 6 inches, and the overall
width 8 feet 2 inches, the weight in working order was approximately
20 short tons.
The larger of the two locomotives, No.7, builders No. 67167 had 10 x 16
inch cylinders, 30 inch diameter drivers on a wheelbase of
57 inches. The overall length was 20 feet 6 inches and the overall
width 9 feet 1 inch, the weight in working order was approximately 30
short tons.
Both these locomotives have now been beautifully restored, and
run on the PINAFORE PARK RAILWAY at St. Thomas, 66948 sporting No.1,
and 67167 sporting No.2, the latter loco having been converted to oil
firing.
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CANADIAN
174
R A I L
ROLLING STOCK
The longest possible train that could have been made up would have
consisted of two locos, two box cars, (used for baggage and mail),
two flats, and two coaches (formerly street cars) one of which was
usually open. It has been suggested that four bobtailed horsecars
were acquired (some from Sea Girt NJ, and some from Toronto), and that
these four were converted into two bogie passenger cars. This could
quite possibly be true looking at the cars at the tail end of the
train in two early photographs.
There were possibly three flat cars, and two box cars, the latter
being fitted with side and end windows, and the usual sliding doors
in the early days. Two open ex-street cars served as passenger cars
in later days and they were, a double truck car from Atlantic City
built by Jackson and Sharp of Wilmington, Delaware, this car being 42
feet long and 7 feet 2 inches wide. The other was originally a single
truck car from the Toronto Suburban Railway, built by the Toronto
Railway Co., and was 29 feet 6 inches long and 6 feet 8 inches wide,
this car being mounted on arch-bar trucks when running on the Portage
Railway. All the stock had link and pin couplers, and the ex-street
cars were fitted with long radial mounted links.
These last two cars are now preserved at Pinafore Park; and the
larger one has been refurbished, and once again is carrying tourists,
and posing for photographs as it did on the Portage Railway.
HUNTSVILLE, LAKE OF BAYS & LAKE SIMCOE RAILWAY & NAVIGATION CO.
The railway was built in 1902 to havl tanbark by an otherwise all
water route to the tannery at Huntsville, Ontario, Canada. The 1 1/8
mile railway was built because of the difference in levels of Peninsular
Lake and the Lake of Bays would have made a canal completely impractical.
The railway, originally 38t gauge, was changed to 36 gauge
sometime between 1948 and 1951, and remained at this gauge until its
closure in 1959. Another change occur~ during the railways history,
a change of operational interest from industrial usage to passenger
hauling.
Situated in the heart of a tourist area that contained several
resort lodges, three of which were Bigwin Hotel, Tally Ho Inn and Lumina
Cottage Resort, the passenger hauling became a profitable
summer enterprise.
The President was Mr. C. R. Lennan of Huntsville.
The Stock is listed below:
No.
1 No. 2
Noo 1 No. 2
* The and
Porter 1888 0-4-0T
Porter 1888 0-4-0T
1905 -1948 1905 1948
Montreal Loco Works of 1926
Montreal Loco Works of 1926
0-4-0T
0-4-0T
1948 -1963 ) 1948 -1963 )
*
Montreal locos were originally Canadian Gypsum Coo Nos. 5 & 7
were moved to an amusement line at St. Thomas, Ontario, in 1963.
Open Bench Electric Streetcar from Toronto
Open Bench Electric Streetcar from Delaware
1 Box Car
2 Flat Cars
Possible sources of information are Omer Lavallees Narrow Gauge
Railways of Canada, and Model Trains for June 1955.
CANADIAN
176
R A I L
HINT~VILL.f I L.AI<.C of e..Ays.,
if j.AK£ $,11 C 0;· RAIl-WAy Ii?
I.IAVIGIITION C. 0
/
~.
_B.
East elevation. South elevation.
NORTH PORTAGE.
~it
.-.—
Office building,
constructed of
board and batten
siding. Roof covered
with tar paper. Train
shed roof covered with
tar paper shingles.
I
J
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N
Train shed roof covered with tar
paper shingles. The roof had quite
a sag by 1958. (See pt.lotos). I L
~J.-!=~i ====4 ~–__ -~—~–~—=-­
——-+~
SOUTH PORTAGE.
Scale of elevations.
Scale of plans.
F -I
o
i
10
i
20
These spurs lifted in later years
probably when the line was regauged.
i
40
CANADIAN
178
R A I L
Cranbrool. continues
worl. on its unique
railwaq museum
By: Garry W. Anderson.
THE EXHIBITION GALLERY at the museum at Cranbrook is housed in
former C.P.R. baggage car 4555 built in 1929. It contains moveable
exhibition wall panelling and a full track lighting system. Many
local and touring exhibitions in art and history are presented
every few weeks. The open interior space of the baggage car and
the absence of windows make it ideal for such displays.
Photo: Cranbrook Museum.
CANADIAN 180 R A I L
Work continues at an even pace on the restoration of the
Railway Museums set of classic passenger cars. The set is the only
one in existance of the Trans Canada Limited, a beautifully app­
ointed first class transcontinental train built by the Canadian
Pacific Railway in 1929. In that year 15 complete sets were built;
all sets other than the one now in Cranbrook were demolished.
The identity of the first of the cars at the Museum, the
walnut-panelled dining car Argyle, was accidently discovered upon
its arrival. The panelling was found hidden under layers and layers
of paint, and was restored in 1979. Since then a methodical search
across Canada uncovered the other cars of the original set – a bagg­age
car, a sleeper, and a parlour Solarium-lounge.
The baggage car was donated by C.P. Rail and brought to
Cranbrook free of charge from Quebec City. The sleeper was donated
by C.P. Hotels and brought out free of charge from Toronto. The
solarium was purchased with help from the B.C. Heritage Trust and
brought to Cranbrook with help from C.P. Rail. In the late spring
of 1981 a B.C. Lotteries grant made it possible to purchase the land,
fence and other services to expand the site to include all the cars.
The dining car Argyle has been restored to its original
splendour complete with inlaid black walnut panelling, Axminster
carpet and displays of railway china silver and glassware. As well,
it houses a gift shop and it is a treat to have refreshments in the
refurbished splendour of the Argyle.
The baggage car, which has been converted to a gallery, has
heat, air-conditioning, and relative humidity controls which allow
it to attract a wide variety of the more unusual touring shows, as
well as hosting a range of local shows in both art and history. As it
was a baggage car, it has relatively few windows, again ideal for
gallery display.
The dining car and the gallery have been visited by approx­
imately 23,000 persons last year, and they are very popular with schools.
In December 1981 the Museum, with aid from the Federal empl­oyment program
Community Development Project, hired six people for
seven months to complete most of the restoration of the solarium car.
The restoration of the sleeper will follow. The job-creation grants
are most suitable to this labour-intensive restoration, where a great
deal of hand-crafting is necessary.
The solarium-lounge car (so named for its unique high-windowed sun room
at one end) is a beautiful car with inlaid walnut panelling
similar to the Argyle except the inlay patterns are different. Chairs,
sofas and a cafe will present quite a different car for the public to
enjoy. The sun room, finished in walnut, originally contained eight large
leather chairs, and featured exceptionally tall windows to let in the
health-giving rays of the sun. The next room forward was the observation
lounge where large stuffed-plush sofas and chairs allowed patrons to
relax in supreme comfort for the long transcontinental journey. This room
contained exquisite inlaid patterns on the black walnut panelling and had wide
plate-glass observation windows topped by gracefully arching trim.
There is also a complete cafe and kitchen area with the kitcken
floor still covered with copper sheeting. The Museum hopes to re-outfit
the kitchen so that refreshments and light meals can be served by a
corps of volunteers to help raise funds for museum operations.
CANADIAN
181
R A I L
Although the Museum has received money for the restoration pro­
ject, the federal funds are almost exclusively for wages, and little of
it can be used to purchase such necessary items as carpeting, upholstery
or expensive heating and air-conditioning systems that are crucial in
controlling humidity to preserve the panelling. The Museum also must
raise substantial sums just to stay open, so special fund raising is
necessary. To date nearly all capital restorations have been done without
using any municipally-raised funds, but instead have been assisted by
provincial and federal governments and private foundations and corp­
orations.
The concept of this unusual gallery is due to the foresight of
the Cranbrook Archives, Museum and Landmark Foundation which was formed
in 1976. The Cranbrook and District Arts Council aids in financing and
programming
the exhibits. The Museum-gallery is located at 1 Van Horne
Street in Cranbrook B.C. on the main thoroughfare. For further inform­
ation and exhibit scheaules write P.O. Box 400, Cranbrook B.C. VIC 4H9
or phone (604)-489-3918. ~
A CLOSE UP OF THE BLACK WALNUT PANELLING in the restored dining car
Argyle. Note the pinstriping and floral inlaid pattern in the
highly varnished wood.
Photo: Cranbrook Museum.
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uUSlness car
BOMBARDIER INC. WILL REBUILD AND UPGRADE 42 DIESEL LOCOMOTIVES FOR
Pakistan. The work will be done in Pakistan by local workers
using components supplied by Bombardier and Bombardier technical
specifications and support. The project will begin within a year and
last for 18 months. The new project follows completion of a similar
job involving 51 locomotives.
Ontario has become alarmed at the number of branch lines in that
Province which ~ave either been abandoned, approved for abandonment,
or are likely to be abandoned. Transportation and Communication
Minister James Snow wants a systematic and comprehensive review of
the network before further decisions are made. Over the last 20
years more than 680 miles of branch lines in Ontario were abandoned.
A further 250 miles is the subject of future applications to abandon.
THE MARKER
JASPER MERCHANTS AND OPERATORS OF TOURIST FACILITIES PREDICTED DRASTIC
drops in business whe~ VIA announced the end of rail service from
Vancouver and the pathetic three day a week service from Edmonton.
Now that this has happened for two months, the merchants have announced
that their predictions were far too optimistic. The drop off in bus­
iness has vastly exceeded expectations.
THE MARKER
JOINING THE EFFORT TO RAISE FUNDS TO REBUILD SAN FRANCISCOS CABLE CAR
system, Pacific Telephone Company has mounted an employee camp­
aign, Save The Cable Cars. It is voluntary and open to all
Bell System employees in California. Cable car mementos are given to
each contributor, varying according to the amount of the donation.
State and federal funds ~ill provide all but S10 million of S58.6
million needed to assure continued operation of the cable railway.
CANADIAN
183
R A I L
August 1, 1873, was the date the first cable car rolled in San
Francisco. The number of cable car lines continued to increase toward
the turn of the century. In 1906 all but eight lines were destroyed
by the great earthquake. Five more routes were abandoned a few years
later. The three remaining lines today are as popular with out-of­
town visitors.
PRS NEWS
YOU WANT STATISTICS? YOU GOT THEM, SAID JOHN LITTLE, CHIEF TICKET
officer for VIA Rail in Saint John, in one of the liveliest
presentations Thursday night at the Progressive Conservative
Task Force on Rail Passenger Service.
Mr. Little then proceeded to an fold a long, cumbersome computer
print-out which spilled out over his desk at the hearings in the coun­
cil chambers of Saint John City Hall.
Pick a date, he challenged Chairman Don Mazankowski and the
live other PCs conducting the hearings. You give me a date from
August 2nd and I can almost guarantee you that the coach will be
filled in excess of 85 per cent.
When the smilling PCs declined the other offer, Mr. Little said,
Okay, I will, and picked Aug. 13. The print-out, listing the
number of gasseng~rJ trav~lling more than 250 miles at each stop on
the Atlant~c Ltd. route from Halifax through Saint John to Montreal,
showed that coach 1110 was full from Brownsville Junction in Maine
to Sherbrooke, Que., and when the train arrived in Montreal 73 of the
76 seats were occupied.
Mr. Little then pointed to coach 1111 of the same date and said
that 71 of the seats were filled when the train arrived in Montreal.
The capacity of Atlantic Ltd. varies depending on how many cars
are used but averages about 450. Mr. Little said on Aug. 4, there
were 409 passengers when the train reached Montreal.
Do you believe me now? he asked. That doesnt sound like
188, does it?
Mr. Little also cited revenues for the Saint John office from
July 1980 to July 1981. The increase was $124,652 to a total of
$672,652 for this year.
Thats a 22 per cent increase. What more does he (Transport
Minister Jean-Luc Pepin) want?
TRANSPORT 2000
IN rODAYS INDUSTRIALLY DEPENDENT SOCIETY, COMMODITIES CLASSED AS
flammable liquids, flammable gases and corrosive substances are
indispensible to Canadas economy. Everything from fibres to
antifreeze, cosmetics to resins, plastics to pharmaceuticals rely
on the safe and economic transport of these commodities.
CANADIAN
184
R A I L
CN Rails commitment to the safe handling of dangerous commod­
ities was underlined in a speech by R.A. Walker to the Propane Gas
Association of Canada in Calgary October 22. Mr. Walker, who is
vice-president -Mountain Region, CN Rail, pointed out that although
the public undoubtedly may feel endangered because of a specific rail
accident in their vicinity, we are affected by every rail accident;
our people are at the greatest risk; our operations are hampered and
our business jeopardized by every derailment. Cleanups are expensive.
Equipment and roadways are damaged, freight is damaged, and the flow
of traffic is disrupted. On a western mainline, the blockage from a
derailment may stand in the way of six million dollars per day of our
revenue traffic.
Mr. Walker agreed that the potential is there for danger in
handling these commodities, but emphasized that there is no record
of any deaths resulting from railway transportation of dangerous
goods in Canada. However, the railways continue to search out new
ways to prevent accidents, and to protect people and the environment.
As one example, through the Association of American Railways a
careful study of tank car explosions was made leading to a proposal
for three innovations. These were:
– A head shield to protect the head of tank cars from penetration by
couplers during derailment;
– A top and bottom shelf coupler designed to keep cars coupled, not
allowing, the couplers to slide by one another to puncture a car;
-Thermal insulation to protect the contents of a pressurized tank
car from the heat of any fires that may occur.
Such positive action on the part of industry to reduce public
risk often leads to the governmental authorities accepting these
innovations and making them mandatory regulations. As a result on
June 30, 1981, all 112 and 114 size tank cars on Canadian rails had
these devices in place.
Not all government regulations are concerned with equipment
innovation. As an example, the Canadian Transport Commission recently
passed a new amendment to the Regulations for the Transportation of
Dangerous Commodities by Rail. It will have far reaching effects
on documentation, placarding and marshalling. To gather background
on these new regulations (referred to as the 11th amendment), Movin
talked with CN Rails Gerry Rath, system special commodities officer,
Transportation.
Although revisions to Canadian regulations for the transportation
of dangerous commodities have been underway for some time, Mr. Roth
explained that the recent passage of similar legislation in the
United States accelerated adoption of the new amendment in Canada –
simply because of the considerable volume of dangerous commodities
moving between the two countries.
CN MOVIN

by Wayne Me.Kell
If photo #1 doesnt give away the location of this little story,
ehoto #2 definQtely tells you. Conrails unusual platform caboose
U18360 is a permanent Canadian resident, and is used by Conrails .
Beauharnois switching crew. The concrete whistle past (complete
with splints) betrays the lines St.Lawrence and Adirondack heritage •.
CANADIAN
186
R A I L
In photo #3, the Southbound Conrail train (designated MCSY)
headed by 2349 and 2594 picks up a string of cars from the siding
at the Station.
Carbide
Hydra Quebec
Pre
1930s
Main
Line
Standard
Chemical
WESTERN
Y A R 0 S
IJ) … o ~ n .,. .-
o % :0 ;,.,
EASTERN
YARDS
I
,
Location
of
VieWS-O
not
to
scale
-Jg
4-82
After hooking them onto the train, the engines ran across the
St.Louis River to the western part of their yards where #2349 was
detached, and run ahead onto the Union Carbide Chromasco Siding.
In photos #4 and/or #5*she sits ~ere as the engineer does checks on
#2591, which has been doing the switching duties at Beauharnois for
the previous month or so. She is a U-23 (sister to 2594), and is
going back to servicing at Massena N.Y., to be replaced by #2349.
Photo #6 was taken beside #2591 as the engineer ran brake tests
on the locomotive while his front end trainman waited. After he ran
her back to #2594 in the background, #2349 was reversed back in front
of the two General Electrics, and placed on the string of cars.
Ordinarily the 2 engines (#2591 & 2594) would
station and pick up the train and he on their way.
April 24, 1981, no jumper cables could be found to
engines and the G.M. unit ha~-permanently attached
back up to the
However on this,
connect the 2
jumpers.
with
So in photo 17 all 3 ore coupled together, ond the train left
#2349 in the lead connected to 12591, with 2594 idling,
I assu.e that the replace.ent .witcher arrived in Beouhornois
with the Montreal bound troin on Monday the 26th.
*Note, Photo 005 is on the back COWl
,

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