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Canadian Rail 360 1982

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Canadian Rail 360 1982

Canadian Rail i
No.360
JANUARY 1982
MIE tSSrr.NIA OF TIlE C.R.II.A. has taken various forlls over the years.
The earlieSt we havo noted. scc~ingly in use by 1933, is depicted above and has
al.ost everything but tho [IfQverbial kitchen sink dis[llaycd
on it: Dy 1941 it had ass~~ed ~rc of its present fo~, but
still unJeTWcnt a number of changes including an ultra-si~pllfied
design with no woruing at all, anu in use until recently. The present
sy;:tbol, here shown in both I!nglhh and French for.s, h a .odification
of one dcsienod by John Loye, the Associations founder, and used ;15
early as 1939,
C4
Published monthly by the Canadian
Railroad Historical Association
P.O. Box 148 St. Constant P.Q.
JOL lXO
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
FRONT COVER:
WILLIA:,l CORNELIUS VAj~ HORNE
(1843-1915) who became General Manager
of the Canadian Pacific
Railway in January 1882, exactly
one hundred years ago this month. This photo
was taken in the
l890s, and was given to his
friend Hugh H. McLean of Saint
John N.B. on April 14 1894. It is
hand signed and dated by Van
Horne himself.
~IL
ISSN 0008·4875
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN DIVISION
60-6100 4th Ave. NE
Calgary, Al berta T2A 5Z8
OTTAWA
BYTOWN RAILWAY SOCIETY
P.O. Box 141, Station A Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8Vl
NEW BRUNSWICK DIVISION
P.O. Box 1162
Saint John,
New Brunswi ck E 2L 4G7
CROWSNEST AND KETTLE-VALLEY DIVISION
P. o. Box 400
Cranbrook, British Columbia
V1C 4H9
PACIFIC COAST DIVISION
P.O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2Pl
ROCKY MOUNTAIN DIVISION
P.O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Alberta T5B 2NO
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor
Ontario N9G lA2
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
P.O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto
Ontario M5W lP3
NIAGARA DIVISION
P.O. Box 593
St.Catharines, Ontario
L2R 6W8
ST. LAWRENCE VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 99
Ste. Doroth~e, Quebec H7X 2T4
Fifty years ago, on the even~ng of Tuesday, March 15 1932, the
Canadian Railroad Historical Association was formed in the Montreal
room of the Chateau de Ramezay in Montreal. The occasion was the con­
clusion of the Canadian Railway Centenary exhibition which had been
held for three weeks in the Elgin Gallery of the Chateau under the
auspices of the Antiquarian and Numismatic Society of Montreal. This
exhibition was to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the granting
of the charter of Canadas first railway, the Champlain and St.
Lawrence Rail Road, on February 25 1832.
Considerable interest in Canadian railway history had been
created by the exhibition, and a few far-seeing persons felt that
this interest should not be allowed to die, but should work towards
the commemoration of the more important 100th anniversary, that of
the opening of the C. & St. L., which would occur four years hence,
in 1936. Accordingly, the momentous step was taken of forming an
association devoted to the study of the history of railways in Canada,
as well as the collection and preservation of items relating thereto.
Thus was the C.R.H.A. born, with twelve charter members. John Loye
was the first president, Victor Morin the first chairman, and Robert
R. Brown the first secretary.
From the viewpoint of 1982 it is difficult to appreciate the
significance of founding such an association. Today there are many
railway historical groups, not to mention other railfan organizat­
ions, but in 1932 such associations were almost unknown. Not one
existed in Canada, and even in the United States the oldest was little
more than a decade old. It certainly was not the most auspicious
time to found an historical association. If the economic situation
seems bad today, 1932 was infinitely worse. The world was in the midst
of a major depression with few resources available for hobby interests.
On the positive side, however, much historical material was avail­
able, and much of Canadas rail heritage was then intact. Railway
operation was almost 100% steam, street cars ran in most major cities,
passenger trains were frequent even on small branch lines, and much
pre-1900 motive power and rolling stock was still in regular service.
There were then still living many older railway employees and pens­
ioners some of whose recollections would have gone back as for as the
1860 s. But IIfamiliarity breeds contempt, and little notice was taken
of this in those days with the result that many opportunities to
document and photograph were irretrievably missed as the railways
changed over the years.
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Ijilltoriral
~1I5nri1Ttim
CERTIFICATE
OF
MEMBERSHIP
N
…………
.
IS
a
duly
qualified
member
for rhe
year.
ending
December 3
J
sr.
J
9·32.
Signed
. .
Secretary.
No
..
~
..
.
iRailroall
~istoriral
Association
HEADQUARTERS.
CHATEAU
DE
RAMEZAY.
MONTREAL
,. ~
(!i.anabian
itailrOall
§,istoriral !ssnriation
FOUNDED
1932
ij;~r
i!tailroall
~ilitl1riral
A!I!loriatil111
was founded on the
night
of
Much
the
15th.
1932
. in the
Montreal Room
.of
[he
Cha
t~
u
de
Rameuy
Museum.
at
the
conclusion of the CANADIAN RAILWAY
CENTENARY
I.:X
HIBITION. which had
b«n
held for three week.
in
the
Elgin Gallery, under (he auspices
of
(he Antiquarian
t1
Numis
.
m.tic
Society
of
Montrul.
in observance
of
the lOOth anni#

usary
of
the granting
of
the
chuur
of
the first railw;ay in
C.nada.
THE
CHAMPLAIN
1
ST
. LAWRENCE RAILROAD.
February the
25th
.
1832

Victor
Morin. first Chairman:
John
Loye, first President;
Robt.
R.
Bro
……
n. first Secretary .
CHARTER
MEMBERSH1P
L.
w.
POWERS.
w.
E.
FOSTER
.
VICTOR
MORIN.
e.
L.
TERROUX.
W. M SPRIGGS. J.
E.
DOLMAN.
GEO.
W.
SINGLETON
. H. RAKE .
JOHN
LOYE. H. D. GUILLET.
ROBT
. R. BROWN. L.
A.
RENAUD. P. O.
TREMBLAY.
THOS
. O·DOWD.
o l> z l> o l> z
III 01 III
:u l> r
CANADIAN
6 R A I L
Once founded, the C.R.H.A. grew quite rapidly. The original
membership of 12 had grown to 26 by the end of 1932, to 60 by the
C. & St. L. centennial in 1936, and to 78 by 1939. World War II
then brought a halt to expansion, and membership declined until by
1947 scarcely twenty active members were left. However, in the post­
war years interest grew dramatically as the railways modernized and
the branch lines and old equipment disappeared. By 1950 the idea of
preserving full-size rolling stock was begun, and Montreal street car
274 was the first to be saved by the C.R.H.A. From this, the creation
of a museum was the next step, and so the Canadian Railway Museum was
born in 1961.
The twelve founding members have all passed cway, but the
association they founded is now a nationwide organization with many
divisions and museum exhibitions. The aims of 1982 are the same as
those of 1932, namely the collection, preservation, and disemination
of information and artifacts relating to the history of railways in
Canada, and this is being more and more recognized as a major part of
Canadian history. Much of what has been saved is due to the efforts
of private groups such as the C.R.H.A., since government initiative
on these lines has been conspicous by its absence. (For example in
1936 the Post Office rejected a request for a special stamp to
commemorate the railway centennial). Therefore to ensure the survival
of significant examples of railway heritage it is necessary that the
C.R.H.A. and similar-minded groups should remain strong. What could
be a better way to celebrate this, our semi-centennial year, than
for each member to ask friends and relatives to join the C.R.H.A.?
This would increase membership, and help to assure the perpetuation of
the association in the years ahead. Surely the difficulties today
are not as bad as they were in 1932.
The last fifty years have been a long haul, but have seen
much progress by the C.R.H.A. We all sincerely hope that the next
fifty will be equally interesting and productive.
F.A. January 1982.
William
Vanrbrne
ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO THIS :.fONTH the Canadian Pacific Rail way Co ••
then less than one year old, hired as its General ;fanager lIilliam
Cornelius Van Horne who was soon to become a legend in Canadian
railway history. His greatest achievement was, of course, the
completion of the C.P.R. nain line in less than five years; half
the specified time, but he had many other accomplishments in his
long career. The following article by Harvey Elson tells of some
of the events of this career, and gives an insight into the char­
acter of the person who may well have been the greatest rail roader
that Canada ever had.
SIR WILLIAM C. VAN HORNE (1843 -1915) who became General Manager
of the Canadian Pacific Railway in January 1882, exactly 100 years
ago this month. This photo shOl~s fl-im in later life not long before
he died at the age of 72.
CANADIAN
8
R A I L
WILLIAM CORNELIUS VAN HORNE
By Harvey W. Elson.
Termed by many as the ablest railway general in the world
Sir William Cornelius Van Horne was much more than just a dedicated
and experienced railwayman. He was, above all else, a man of
character, an incredible human being, with limitless energy and a
multitude of activities to keep him busy. He was a marathon poker
player, a cigar smoker whoie Havanas became so much of a trademark
that a brand was actually named after him, a gourmet who loved to
eat and drink but who did not above all else tolerate drunkenness
in himself or others. He was a man who seldom knew sickness and
was able to go without sleep depending on what he called his secret
to keep him going. He would often say I eat all I can – I drink
all I can, – I smoke all I can and I dont give a damn for anything.
He had the unique ability to turn rapidly from one form of activity
to another and to avoid over anxiety about any of his enterprises.
Van Horne was a massive thick-set bearded m_QJl_wh_Q..$e,_inte~ __
other than the building of a railway were many and varied. -He des­
igned and built his own house making it an expression of himself.
He was an avid gardener, specializing in roses, a violinist, a
conjurer, a mind reader, a caricaturist, a practical joker and an
amateur geologist who was given the honour of having some specimens
named Van Hornel after him. Van Horne was also a painter of some
merit and two of his paintings are preserved in the Canadian Railway
Museum at Delson. William C. Van Horne was born on the 3rd of
Febrvary 1843 in Chelsea Will County, Illinois of Dutch ancestry.
His family moved to Joliet in 1851, where he got his first job with
the ~ailroad in the spring of 1857 at the age of fourteen. His first
job ,was that of a telegraph operator with the Illinois Central but
her~ his reputation as a practical joker soon got him fired. He had
devised a stunt in which a ground w~re ran from the office where he worked
to a steel plate in the yards. There every man who stepped
upon the plate felt a distinct, though harmless shock. The yardmen
were baffled and angry but they didnt know who or what to blame as
Van Horne watched from the window, but this soon ended. The super­
intendant himself stepped on the plate and like all the others got
an unexpected shock, but he knew about electricity and traced the wire
back to the office where he confronted Van Horne. Here Van Hornes
honesty became his downfall for he confessed and was fired. From
here Van Horne never looked back. that fall he got himself a job as
a freight checker & messenger with the Michigan Central and soon was
instrumental in persuading the line that installing an independant
telegraph service would be profitable. He took over operation of
this service in 1858 and remained there until he joined the Union
Army for Civil War service as a telegrapher in 1861. His army
service was short however as it was soon decided that his services
would be far more valuable in keeping the railways operating. In
1862 he joined the Chicago and Alton Railway as an operator and
ticket agent at his home town of Joliet and soon won promotion on
that line. He was made trainmaster at Bloomington in 1864 and
superintendant of the entire telegraph system of the C & A in 1868.
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SIXTH
ANNUAL
REPORT
O
tTH
E.
ff.ESlD
EN
T
AND
pr~CTO~
Chicago
&
Alton
Railroad
Co.
FOR
THE.
YEAR
ENDIN
G DEC. 31,
186
8.
J$Su
eo
fE
BP-UA.RY,
18
69.
CHICAGO
:
RAND
.
Mc
NA
LLY
&;
CO
.,
PRINTE
RS,
5
.cLARK
STREET.
18
6
9.
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III co III
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CANADIAN
10
R A I L
BY 1875 Van Horne was General ~lanager of the Southern ~linnesota Rail Road, and
his name appears on the front page of the annual report.
His own report, printed in the same publication, shows the great
work he was undertaking to improve this financially-troubled line.
Very likely his ~ork at .this time drew the attention of James J. Hill,
also in linnesota. Hill, of course, was later one of the founders of
the C.P.R., and it was on his recommendation that Van Horne was hired
as General ~,lanal:er effective at the start of the year 1882.
Here his steady income persuaded him that he could marry so in March
, 1867 he took Miss Lucy Adaline Hurd as his bride. In 1870, Van Horne
, was made superintendant of transportation over the entire C&A system
land progressed in 1872 to the post of manager of one of the smaller
lines .owned by the C&A -the ·St. Louis, Kansas City and Northern.
On the first of October 1874, Van Horne assumed the post of president
·and general manager of another C&A owned road the Southern Minnesota
!
and five years later in 1879 he assumed the added duties of the gen­
. Jeral superintendant of the entire C&A system. It was here that he
:~id his first work with the railway dining cars – a task which later
in life was to prove quite benificial. In 1879 he left the Chicago
and Alton to take over the post of general manager and superintendant
of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St.Paul. Here during his first year in
office he inoreased the lines trackage from 2,231 miles to 3,755 miles.
In 1882 on Jan~ary 2nd, William Cornelius Van Horne assumed the
osition of General Manager of the fledgling Canadian Pacific -resp-
~sible for pushing the line through to the Pacific. Here he proved
h~s worth, his vast knowledge of the railway, and his ability to
~ mand the respect of the men who worked under him. He undoubtedly
ma~e his name with the construction ele.ments of the railway but even
before he joined the railway he commanded the respect of many every-
CANADIAN 11 R A I L
where he was. His fearless nature was obvious wh~le travelling in
a second class carriage on the Milwaukee Road somewhere in the
western states. When a negro woman entered carrying a small child,
three or four toughs in the car began teasing the baby, scaring it
by making faces and slapping it. The mother, terrified pleaded with
them to stop, but to no avail when Van Horne finially could stand it
no longer. He strode up the aisle and grabled the worst of the lot
by the collar so tightly that the man was almost choking. He had an
incomparable command of what his friends called forcible language.
He told the man that if he did not leave the child alone he would throw
him off the train by himself.
All Right, Capt n the man spluttered as he went back to his
seat leaving the child alone. Soon other members of the gang that
had been in the other car returned and would be heard proposing that
they fight it out with Van Horne but one of the gang said You just
deserved it and all was forgotten as they got off at the next station.
When they were on the platform, the conductor grabbed Van Horne and
tried to push him to the floor fearful that they would shoot him
through the window but he just stood his ground and settled back in
his seat. The Conductor went on Didnt you know who they were? That
was the notorious train roblers and murderers Jesse James and the two
younger brothers; but Van Horne was not fazed and just went on as if
nothing had happened.
It was this sort of thing that gained him the respect of his
men and they would not hesitate to follow him. At one particularly
dangerous trestle in the Canadian west the engineer balked at taking
the locomotive across. Van Horne told him to get down and he would
take the locomotive across himself. Hearing this the engineer stated
Well if you aint afraid, I guess I aint neither. He was a pusher­
he would push his men to the limit of their end~rance and get the most
work possible out of them. He led the construction crews riding
flat cars, hand cars and cabooses. Where rails were not laid he rode
buckboards and wagons visiting survey and grading parties. He was
continuously at the end of track either organizing supply brigades or
sketching,his men at work: He,above ~ll knew the value of honesty _ when he
d1scovered that h1s Ch1ef Eng1neer on the prairies, General
Ros~er wa~ involved in l~nd spec~lation he fired him immediately.
Dur1ng th1s term as pres1dent th1s honesty showed another side of his
character -his deep concern for his fellow man.
With the completion of construction, Van Horne moved on to trn
job 0: running a railway. He took particular delight in designing
sleep1ng and parlour cars. He engaged notable artists to do the
interior decoration and was of the opinion that any imitation could
well reflect the attitude towards us of either employees or passengers.
Thus he insisted that all woodwork in the cars be hand carved.
He loved to eat and would often inspect the railway dining cars.
He had quite an effect on the menu~ personnally approving most of
th:m himself; he designed others which would have blank spaces in
wh1ch the steward could write in the special selections which he
~ad on,hand: He issued strict orders by which absolutely no one
1nclud1ng h1mself would be able to have free meals on the dining
7ar~nd he changed the service according to public demand. One
1nc1dent occurred when a passenger wrote to Van Horne complaining
about the fact ~hat the company carried whiskey among the many bever­
ages served on 1ts cars -Van Horne agreed saying that it was indeed
~enea~h the dignity ?f the Canadian Pacific to serve whiskey and
1mmed1ately ordered 1t removed from the menus. (At that time whiskey
was considered the drunk of a labourer or lower class of person).
A s; gnificant
letter to
William C. Van Horne
Although the official date of Van lIornes appointment as General ~Ianager
of the C.P.R. was January 1 1882, much prelLninary work and correspond­
ance was undertaken between the company and Van Horne before that date.
Tilis letter, six pages long, was written by jUchard B. Angus, one of the
original members of the C.P.R. syndicate, on ~ovember 3D, 1831.
Some of the more illteresting iteJ,lS in the letter are as follows:
The official communication which you ~ill receive herewith is
intended to give precice embodiment to the terms of your engage­
ment. I trust it will be found satisfactory, but it can 0e
altered hereafter if in any detail you think amende,lent is re1-1ired.
I may mention the Executive Committee has all the power and auth­
ority of the Doard, but its proceding will be confirmed by the latter
at its first re!;ular r.1eeting.
I enclose copies of General order and circular anouncing your
appointment and also copy of circular we propose to issue in ref­
erence to Exchange passes. If you approve, your lithographed
signature will be appended.
McIntyre is at present in Ne~ York. He and others are of opinion
that several hundred tealS of horses can be got fro:n Quebec and
Ontario to undertake scraper and other work in the North Nest. The
means
of securinp, them can be deter.ained when you visit us in .January.
I hope before closing this note to procure for you a .. lemoranJUIo of
the dates on which deliveries of Locomotives and Cars may with some
celerity be expected. ~lr. Illackwell has returned fro, En~lanJ and
I understand is well satisfied with til results of his :nission.
After he has attended to SO:t1e business on the Eastern Division he
wi 11 seek an interview d th you in the iIest.
This letter was sent to Van Ilorne. pre5uTIably witll various enclosures,
in :lilwaukee, with copies to I.D. Stickney (Van lIornes ;lreJecessor),
General Rosser, ;·lajor Rogers (later of Ror,ers Pass fame), and il.R.
8aker in lIinnipeg. Just over a month later, Van Horne arriveJ in Winn­
ipeg and took up his duties as General ~Ianager.
.~
e3~~/!f~/.
I ~
v ., ~ .
, ffi~~
He took a deep and concerned interest in the service, or.en
taking the time to inspect the dining and sleeping cars making
suggestions on how to improve service. He took special delight in
designing passenger cars -especially sleeping and parlour cars. He
insisted that all Canadian Pacific cars be constructed of larger
dimensions especially with longer and wider berths. This in itself
probably originated from Van Hornes own immense size and his realiz­
ation that standard lenths at that time were indeed a little small.
He insisted that all interior woodwork in cars be genuine hand carved
a~ he firmly believed that every foot of imitation would have an affect
on the opinion and attitude towards the company of employees and the
travelling public.
During his career with the railway, he gained th. total respect
of his men~ actually working side by side with them. When the roadLed
was still quite new in 1886, Van Horne was conducting a number of
Eastern gentlemen on a tour of the line in regard to the valuation
of the govt section of the road built by Andrew Onderdonk. While
they were still on the CP-built sectipn of the road in the mountains
at Field B.C., Van Horne walked up the platform and spoke to Chas.
Carey the engineer with whom he had become quite friendly, Let
her out a bit, Charles, and we will show these fellows that they
are on a railroad fit to run now, even though the govt section is
not. Well Charley, a fearless and skillful engineer did let her out
and made a fifty-one mile run in one hour,doing a particular 17 mile
section from Donald to Golden safely in just 15 minutes, When they
pulled up with a flourish, flashing fire on the rails, and the brakes
put down ha d to prevent running by the platform, the ~entlemen from
the east needed no further demonstration of the superio:ty of the
railways own lines -Van Hornes close relationship with his men had
once again proved to be of value.
While Van Horne was President he was honoured in 1894, by an
honor he had twice refused – a knighthood he had been offered ever
since attaining the rank of President an August 7, 1888. Van Horne
resi~ned from the post of President on June 12, 1899 allowing his
hand-picked replacement T-f!.omas S htlughnessy to succeed him-; but-he
stayed on as chairman of the Company.
Despite his resignation as President, Van Hornes unyielding
strength carried him on. He went to the tropics undertaking the
electrification of the streetcar lines in Havana, Cuba. While working
on this he realized the need for a railroad across the isl~nd. He
arranged the financing of this venture during a visit to New York and
returned to construct the road changing what was once a ten day
trek to a one-day jaunt. He went on to build the Guatemalian Railway
before retiring as chairman in 1910. After his retirement him and
his wife; with their 3 children divided their time between their
four homes, a hug~ summer one on an island in Passamaquoddy Bay
N.B., a farm at Selkirk, Man., a luxurious winter estate in Cuba, and
their main residen,e – a 52 room mansion, on Montrears Sherbrooke
street, corner of Stanley. This home, much to the distress of the
majority of Montrealers was destroyed in September 1973, a victim of
so-called progress.
On September 11, 1915, at the age of 72, Sir William Cornelius
Van Horne passed away at Montreal. As a tribute to him, Windsor Station
in Montreal was draped entirely in black as his body was taken on his
private mahogany -pannelled business car the Saskatchewan on its
final journey -to Joliet, Illinois for burial. When his train left
Montreal on the day of the funeral, the railway paidto Van Horne a
tribute it has given no other man -all trains across the entire
system stopped completely for fifteen minutes. Thus the Canadian
Pacific paid to Sir William Cornelius Von Horne -the railway general –
their final and mo~t fitting tribute.
MBIBERS WHO ENJOYED THE TIm M & S C SPECIAL ISSUES last year w111 be
interested in seeing these photos of ;1. & S.C. combine car 107 in
operation at the Hal ton County Radial Railway museum at Rockl4ood Ont.
Inactive for many years due to difference in gauge, car 107 has now
been re-gauged to the ~luseum s 4 10 7/8 and is here seen during the
summer of 1981. Note the difference in size between 107 and L. & P.S.
car No. 8 which is also at Rockwood.
Both photos by Gordon R. Taylor.

ANOTHER ~IONTREAL ELECTRIC CAR preserved outside the ~ontreal area is
former ~Iontreal Tramways Company street car 957. This car was built
by the Ottawa Car Co. in 1911 and. remained in passenger service until
1952. It was then used for painting white clearance lines on the
streets until the end of tramway service in 1959. In 1963 it went to
the Seashore Trolley r·luseum at Kennebunkport ~faine. and it has been
restored during the last few years. Car 957 bears the paint scheme
that it had in the early 1940s. after the folding rear doors were
installed (1942). but before the large front numerals were abolished
(1945). The ,.,ork has been done with extreme care and great accuracy.
includinfl the duplication of the difficult-to-match olive green paint.
957 is a splendid exanple of how one of the older cars looked during
World War II when they did so much to carry workers in that difficult
time.
Photos by Fred ~aloney. October 12 1981.
JUST EAST or WOODSTOCK ONTARIO ON THE DOUBLE-TRACK C. N. HAIN LINE, we
see two views of VIA train #73 I llindsor on the Labour Day holiday, September 7 1981. GO units 505 was
leading, and 511 I Both photos by Gordon R. Taylor.
C.N. locomotive 4535 shut down at Stratford Ontario on October 11 1981.
The Stratford shops are nO~ closed, and C.N. has assigned a transfer
caboose to the stratford area for way freight service.
P~oto by Gordon R. Taylor.
HlJl.1P BOOSTER UNITS 110,168,167, 113 at the arrival yard of C.N.s
Taschereau Yard about to push a long cut of cars over the hump on
June 28 1981.
Photo by Pierro A. Patenaude.
CA NAD I AN 21 R A I L
A SWELL ACCIDENT IN BRITAIN
And now, a quick traffic report from a railroad crossing in the
Midlands of Britain. Willenhall, to be exact. The Ontario Provincial
Police News passed it along to Page Six.
According to the official British accident report, it was 11:30
a.m. when the automatic gates at the level crossing went down to block
traffic for a train.
Waiting at the crossing were an Austin mini, a Norton motor­
cycle, a horse and cart loaded with scrap metal, and a Maxi. And
behind it a Ford Cortina and last in line, a Mercedes.
As they waited in line for the train to pass, the horse sudd­
enly:. whinnied and dripped spit on the the motorcycle drivers neck.
Thinking the horse might bite him, the cyclist ducked, throwing
his right elbow in the horses face, his foot slipping off the clutch.
The motorcycle lurched forward and hit the back of the Mini, the
cyclist falling off his machine.
The horse, punched in the face, reared up, tipping its cart
so the scrap metal fell on the Maxi.
This pushed the Maxi backwards a few feet, ramming the front of
the ford Cortina.
At this point, a man walking his dog (a Jack Russell terrier,
the report sez) happened on the scene. He hurried to aid the injured
motorcyclist, but first tied his barking dogs leash to the automatic
gate.
Since the train had pa ssed, the automatic gate went up, yanking
the yapping dog 20 feet into the air.
Seeing the dog in the air, the owner shouted to a nearby pedes­
trian to lower the barrier.
The far-from-the-gate driver of the Mercedes at the end of the
line pulled out into the possing lane and headed across the railroad
tracks.
At this point the gate came down, crashing on top of the Mercedes,
with the yapping dog dangling from the roof.
Thus endeth the accident report.
Why do we never have fun accidents here?
CANADIAN
22 R A I L
WHERE IS eN 417?
One of the mysteries which authors Clegg and Corley
could not solve in Canadian National Steam Power was the final
resting place of locomotive 417, a 2-6-0 acquired in 1919 from
J.D. McArthur Company (#22) and formerly operated on the predecessor
roads of the NAR.
In October 1920 the CNs official retirement record
shows: In Armstrong Lake -could not be recovered. Unlike
other entries, no CN Region for disposition is shown.
The question is -which Armstrong Lake? It must have
a railway track beside it -unless it was on a barge! Presumably
on CN -or had it happened on the NAR, and in October 1920 someone
finally recorded that CN would never get the engine? How did it
get in the lake, and when? Has the lake now another name?
The CN record appears to indicate it had not yet been
renumbered to 417 -either because it had been in the lake some
time previous, or had not yet been repainted (as other engines had
not, in 1920).
For any definitive information the authors (and other
historians) would be thankful. Please write –
Ray Corley
41 Lynndale Road
Scarborough, Ontario
MIN IB9
-and if the story does unfold, it will appear in a later issue.
By
H. Elson
ALL ABOARD
R.J. Meyer
Published by the New Zealand Ry & Locomotive Society Inc.
P.O. Box 5134; Wellington, New Zealand.
NZ S21.~0 or £10 Sterling
196 pages 245m x 185m with maps, photos and drawings
The book spans the period of rail service serving the Lake
Wakitipu area – a period which spanned one hundred and one years,
four months two weeks and two days. The lune of gold was undoubtedly
the initial stimulies for the opening of transportation in the area
and in this book you will find not only the story of more than a
century of ships and shipping on Lake Wakitipu, but also the history
of the railways and trains that have been associated with the lake.
Until 1936, steamships provided the main transportation link between
Queenstom and the outside world, connecting at Kingston with trains
to Invercargill Gore and Dunedin. In this second edition, the author
delves deeply into the histo-ry of the line which closed forever on
21/February/1980 and which included the famed Kingston Flyers in
both original and revised versions.
With more than twice as many illustrations as the first edit­
ion, this second edition of All Aboard must be of absorbing inter­
est in this part of New Zealand and in New Zealand history in general.
Appendices give details of the numerous vessels and ships that have
served on the lake, and a comprehensive index completes this valuable
work. The book must be considered an excellent source of reference
for historians and others interested in this area of operation and
includes the full story of the steamer 5.5. Eamslaw which began its
career on the lake in 1912.
.
car
A RAIL LINE TO THE PACIFIC THROUGH THE PEACE REGION, A HIGH-RISK
investment scheme and major medical-science projects are
among plans for Alberta, says Economic Development Minister
Hugh Planche.
He told the legislatures heritage trust fund committee Monday
that fund dollars are doing a lot to improve Alberta, but the best is
yet to come.
As
early as next month, Mr. Planche intends to unveil a plan
to promote venture capital investments using some government money.
The opportunities in Alberta for business are soaring, but we
are short of patient (long-term) money.
He hinted one approach may be for the government to own some
buildings that high-risk companies could use for research and devel­
opment work, thereby cutting down on overhead.
Mr. Planche spoke highly of a proposed rail line from the Peace
region to Prince Rupert, which he called a strong possibility. He
noted that planners are considering adding a rail lire on top of
Dunvegan dam when it is built on the Peace River.
Dunvegan is now the railhead on the Edmonton-to-Peace region
rail line.
Mr. Planche said moving some agricultural products through the
Peace region may ease some problems for grain shippers.
We will be rationing grain cars by 1984, because the railways
dont want to move products at the statutory (Crow) rates.
He suggested the federal government give the railways more money, and
added provinces like Alberta could help by buying up some less­
used rail beds and renting them back to the railways.
Large amounts of provincial money wont be committed to rail
lines because Ottawa holds all the authority, and wont give any to
the provinces in exchonge for sharing new capital ,osts, he said.
LON MARSH VIA THE EDMONTON JOURNAL
CANADIAN
25
R A I L
TERRATRANSPORTS PLAN TO INTRODUCE RAIL CONTAINERS IS SEEN AS A MAJOR
step towards revitalization of the Newfoundland railway and
nearly all rail traffic on the island could be containerized
within three years.
Federal Transport Minister Jean-Luc Pepin announced that Ottawa
would commit more that $50 million to the project over a five-year
period.
Administered through Canadian Nationals TerraTransport system,
the plan calls for the introduction of containers as early as the fall
of this year.
Mr. Pepin said federal and provincial governments and CN saw
the program as a means of halting a severe decline in rail traffic
in recent years.
CONTAINERS BOUGHT
The purchase of approximately 1,400 containers is well under way and
once the program is implemented containers will move initiolly
on the CN Marine ferry Frederick Carter across the gulf to Newfound­
land.
Mainland railway flat cars will be used on board the ferry
for the gulf crossing.
The containers will be transferred to Newfoundland flat cars at
Port Aux Basques, then delivered to distribution centres at Corner
Brook, Grand Falls and St. Johns.
PHASED PROGRAM
The new method of moving rail freight on the island will be
introduced in three phases to permit an orderly shift to containers.
The first block of traffic to experience the ~hift will be
traffic moving in box cars now, such as food products and building
materials.
Traffic will be moved from origin in containers to inland
terminals at Toront9, Montreal or Moncton where they will be loaded
on flat cars for movement on high-speed container trains to the gulf
ferry terminal at North Sydney, N.S.
The second block of traffic to be shifted to containers –
possibly in early 1982 -will be commodities such as lumber, plywood,
brick and pipe. It will move in bulk form on conventional flat cars
and will be loaded into bulkhead flat containers at North Sydney.
The third and final block of traffic to be shifted will include
bulk commodities such as fertilizers, flour, feed grain, oil and gas.
EX PRESS CHANGE
The improved service profile offered by the rail container plan
will enable TerraTransport to reduce its linehaul costs by shifting
all express traffic to and from Newfoundland from highway trailers
to rail containers.
CANADIAN 26 R A I L
This will also be attempted, as much as possible, for express
.traffic moving within Newfoundland.
KEEPING TRACK

MAL~·BOOTH TO PROMOTE VIA RAIL CANADA TRAINS: THE FIRST INTENSIVE
passenger train promotion in Maine in more than 20 year~ took
placein Bangor beginning Thursday May 21, when a sales manag­
ement team from VIA Rail Canada Ltd. opened an information boath at
the Bangor Mall. The three-day exhibit featured VIA Rails Great
Trains of Canada one of which served the six Maine communities of
Jackman, Greenville, Brownville ·Jct, Mattawamkeag, Danforth and Van­
ceboro: The promotion focussed on Maine train service, integrated
into VIA Rails transcontinental schedules. -T rains 11 and 12, kn!~wn
as the Atlantic make regular stops at five of the six Maine stations
en raute between Mantreal and Halifax •. The train provides dining and
–sleeping car accommodat~ons as well as day-coach facilities. Bangor
was the . .only Maine city on the promotional tour. (Herb Cleaves)
The 470
ON ~OVE1~I3ER IS 1981 VIA RAIL, ON ORDERS OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNl,lENT,
discontinued service on many rail passenger routes amounting to about
one-fifth of the system. This most unfortunate move
has removed service from the following routes:
Victoria-Courtenay
Vancouver-Jasper Super Con.
Edmonton-Drumheller
Regina-Prince Albert
Winnipeg-Thompson
Winnipeg-Armstrong Onto
Ca p reol-Ho r.ne pa yne
Toronto-Barrie
Toronto-S~ouffeville
Toronto-Havelock
Montreal-S herbrooke
Mtl.~Halifax Atlantic Ltd.
Mtl.-Hull-Ottawa (N. Shore)
Ste-Foy-Chambord
Moncton-Edmundston
Montreal-Mt. Laurier
This surg-ery occurred without the benefit of public hearings,
although the CTC has already recommended~etention of 15 of the 21
affe.cted services and is studying several others; This end run
a~thority does exist in section 64 of the National Transportation Act
enabling cabinet to vary or rescind decisions of the CTC.
The rationale of the move is to reduce last years $300 VIA
l~sses whith trans~ort minister Pepin claims will reach $550 million
by 1984. About $100 million of the current figure is due to over­
charging by CN and CP, according to VIAs J. Frank Roberts. Les
Benjamin says passenger rail travel has incre~sed 35-40% in the last
year, that the government should increase rather than reduce spending.
He adds that the preoccupation with VIA costs doesnt extend to
subsidies for other forms of transport. –
TRANSPORT 2000, in vigourously opposing the proposed cuts, says
CANADIAN
27
R A I L
this negates the off oil government policy. A fleet-wide replacement
of some 1000 passenger cars would produce a very cost-effective, energy­
efficient, and passenger-attractive service.
TRANSPORT ACTION
CP RAIL PLANS TO FILE AN APPLICATION WITH THE CANADIAN TRANPORT COMM­
ission for authority to undertake the biggest single rail­
building project since it completed the transcontinental railway
almost 100 years ago.
The project will include driving two tunnels with a total length
of about 10 miles, building 11 bridges and laying 21 miles of new main
line track through the Rogers Pass area of the Selkirk Mountains in
British Columbia. It will take four years to complete, cost $500
million and employ up to 800 workers.
In announcing the application, W.W. Stinson, president of
Canadian Pacific, said the railway wants to start construction next
year, but will only be able to proceed with the project if a way can
be found for the railway to be compensated for multimillion-dollar
losses it incurs moving export grain traffic.
The start date depends on a solution to the grain revenue
problem because CP Rail cannot cnrry the burden of new investment
and the burden of grain losses, he said.
The Rogers Pass project is part of a 10-year, $7 billion
capital investment program planned by CP Rail for replacement, im­
provement and expansion of its rail plant and equipment to meet
transportation ~emand during the 1980s.
ADDITIONAL EQUIPMENT
The new trackage is designed to eliminate the most restrictive
bottleneck on CP Rails main line between Calgary and Vancouver.
With its reduced grades, the line will allow the railway to run more
and longer freight trains which will carry increasing tonnages of
Western Canadas coal, sulphur, potash and grain to the Pacific
coast far shipping to overseas buyers.
By 1990, the railway expects to buy about 12,000 additional
freight cars, more than 600 new locomotives, about 200 new cabooses,
plus more containers and associated terminal handling facilities for
intermodal operations.
During the same period, the company plans to build longer passing
tracks at key locations on the main line, make major improvements to
yards at Vancouver, Calgary, Winnipeg, Toronto and Montreal, expand
its centralized traffic control system and add new repair and maint­
enance facilities.
To do all of this and get the new capacity in place by the time
it will be required, we are going to need the assurance of an earn­
ings base large enough to meet the expected capital requirements,
Mr. Stinson said.
CANADIAN
28
R A I L
In my view, the best way to do that is to resolve the loss
burden incurred by the railways in moving export grain at the so-called
Crow rates. Canadas two major railways expect to incur losses of
more than $335 million this year in handling prairie grain.
The Rogers Pass project will reduce the westbound grade from a maximum
of 2.6 per cent to a maximum of one per cent. Reduction of
the grade and construction of the tunnel will permit the railway to
increase capacity of the line by about 50 per cent.
Notice of CP Rails intention to file the application was sub­
mitted June 27 and will be published in the Canada Gazette.
This was the first step in the regulatory process to CTC ap­
proval to construct the new line. The second step, which ~ill be taken
before July 30, involves filing with the CTC engineering plans and
track layouts, plus an assessment. of environmental impacts and meas­
ures to mitigate them.
Rogers Pass is a narrow pathway that rises to 4,000 feet above
sea level in the midst of mountains towering to more than 11,000 feet.
More than 30 feet of snow falls in Rogers Pass in an average winter,
and snow avalanches used to block the original railway route through
the pass from time to time.
To avoid the worst of the avalanche paths and to speed up early
train operations, the railway opened the Connaught Tunnel under Rogers
Pass in 1916. Five miles in length, the tunnel eliminated many of
the curves of the original rail route, cut out almost five miles of
snow sheds and reduced the summit of the rail line by 540 feet.
The proposed rail line begins at Rogers, B.C., a railway stop
in the Beaver Valley about 150 miles west of CaIg-ary. from Rogers,
the new track parallels the existing main line for about eight miles,
then enters a milelong tunnel under the Trans-Canada highway.
FINAL PHAS E
At the base of Mount Macdonald, it enters a ni~mile tunnel,
which will be the longest railway tunnel in the western hemisphere,
passing almost 300 feet under the Connaught Tunnel and some 840 feet
below the summit of Rogers Pass. The west portal of the tunnel is in
Cheops Mountain and the line reconnects with the existing rail track
about 3.4 miles west of Glacier, B.C.
The project is the last of four double-trac~ing projects de­
signed to increase main-line track capacity between Calgary and
Vancouver. The other three projects, costing a total of $46 million,
are located at Notch Hill and Revelstoke in British Columbia and at
Lake Louise in Alberta. The Notch Hill and Revelstoke projects were
completed in 1979 and the Lake Louise project is scheduled for complet­
ion this summer.
When
the Rogers Pass project is complete, heavy westbound
trains will use the new route with the maximum one percent grade
and lighter eastbound trains will use the existing route.
CA NAD IAN
29
R A I L
Engineering investigation and planning for the Rogers Pass
project began in 1975. Since most of the project is within the
boundaries of Glacier National Park, authority for surveys and other
exploratory work was obtained in advance from Parks Canada.
Consulting firms were engaged to evaluate environmental and
geotechnical concerns and to prepare a detailed report on measures
necessary to mitigate the impact of construction on the environment
of the area. This report meets the guidelines established under the
federal environmental assessment and review process.
CP RAIL NEWS
THE 21-MILE ROGERS PASS PROJECT, WHICH INCLUDES A NINE-MILE TUNNEL
under Mount Macdonald, will complete a four-phase program by
CP Rail ta increase its main line capacity between Calgary and
Vancouver.
During the 1980s, rail traffic in Canada is expected to grow by 60
per cent, with almost three-quarters of that growth in the West.
Most of the increased traffic in the West will be in export­
destined commodities: coal from British Columbia and Alberta; sulphur
and petrochemicals from Alberta; potash from Saskatchewan; and grain
from all parts of the Prairies. Traffic in other commodities such
as manufactured goods, forest products and general merchandise is
also expected to grow significantly.
By the mid-1980s, CP Rail will not have the main line capacity
to accommodate the increased traffic on its main line through the
mountains of British Columbia.
To meet the need the company began a double-tracking program in
1974 designed to reduce the westbound grade to a maximum of one per
cent on the main line between Calgary and Vancouver.
Four separate grades had to be reduced from their maximums of
1.8 per cent at Lake Louise, Alta., 2.6 per cent at Rogers Pass in
British Columbia, 1.7 per cent at Revelstoke, B.C., and 1.8 per cent
at Notch Hill, B.C.
IMPROVEMENTS
The Notch Hill and Revelstoke grades have been improved, and
the Lake Louise project will be completed this summer. Total cost of
the three projects is $46 million.
At Rogers Pass the existing grade limits daily train movements
to 15 trains in each direction on a sustained basis.
The steep grade requires that westbound trains stop at the Ro­
gers pusher station to pick up as many as five additional locomotives
to power them up the steep grade to the Connaught Tunnel. In the case
of 14,000-ton coal trains 12 locomotives, each generating 3,000 horse­
power, are needed.
This final bottleneck will be removed ln th f e
our-year project
at an estimated cost of S500 million in current dollars. Involved
will be the driving of two tunnels totalling more than 10 miles in
length, building 11 bridges, and laying 21 miles of new main line
track.
CP RAIL NEWS
TRI-PAK -ITS NOT HALF OF A SIX-PACK -ITS CN RAILS NEW IDEA FOR
improving piggyback transportation.
Each Tri-Pak unit consists of three flat cars permanently
joined together through an articulated connection which is seated in
a common truck. This arrangement is used at two points. The articul­
ated feature makes these cars handle curves more effectively.
Were building five of these units and expect they will not
only be more energy efficient, but less costly for maintenance, safer
to operate and give better rideability to reduce damage claims from
customers, said Fred Robinson, director, intermodal services, for
CN Rail.
The units will be lighter and, therefore, will require less
motive power to haul, which in turn, will produce a saving on fuel.
They are designed to carry the biggest trailer now in use –
the 45,11 or 14 m. trailer. A nosemounted refrigerator unit adds
22 inches to the length.
SHORTER PACKAGE
The Tri-Pak is shorter than the regular three-car linkup by
about six feet. We will be able to put more trailers in a train
consist of a given length and haul more freight with less fuel.
Kelly Arrey, system mechanical engineer, car, said the Tri-Pak
units were designed by CN Rail and built from scratch by CN Rail
employees at the Point St.Charles shops.
Some other railroads in the U.S. have similar units, but they
can only be top loaded whereas ours can be top loaded or circus
loaded ~the trailer is backed up onto the flat car).
He said the main reason CN Rail went to Tri-Pak was because of
the problem of carrying the 45 ft. road trailers.
The longest cars we now have are 89 feet, which are too short to
handle two of these trailers. This mean low utilization of avail­
able hitches and consequent waste of equipment and energy.
TWO CHOICES
There were two choices, make a longer flat car or move into
some sort of articulated unit that would accommodate more trailers.
A longer flat car was out of the question since the 89-foot
car is the longest allowed in interchange service and is more demanding
as far as track condition and maintenance are concerned.
The articulated unit was the answer since it would add length
and flexibility to the unit for a safer, smoother ride.
The nev Tri_Pak units which Point St. Charles shops e~ployees
began building earlier this yeor, co~e out of the shops in early
su~mer and were slated testing in the Montreal_Toronto corridor
before going into full service in the highdensity traffic zones of
the CN Roil system.
KEEPING TRACK
THE CPR RAILWAY STATION AT MCADAH, N.B.; HAS BEEN DECLARED A NATIONAl
historic site. A plaque will be installed on the structure
5epte~ber 19 in special cereMonies. The inscription on the p
laque will refer to the construction of the building, noting the
steeply-pitched roof ond dor.er windows.
ATLANTIC ADVOCATE
CN RAILS NEWEST INNOVATION IN PIGGYBACK TRANSPORTATION –THE
Tri-Pok –is now being t.st run in the Hontreal-Toronto
corridor. The five units, each consisting of three flat cars
perManently joined with articulated connections seated in a co.mon
truck, individually corry three of the largest road trailers now in
use. The articulated feature allows far a smooth and safe ride on
the 150 foot Tri_Pok. Above, CN Roil e.ployee, at Hontreal s Turcot
yard fasten a trailer to the hydraulic hiteh on the Tri_Pok.
AN ARTISTS RENDERING DEPICTS THE TICKETING BUILDING TO BE ERECTED
at GO Transits Oakville train station this su.mer. Part of
renovations to the entire station site, the 3,400 sq. ft.
building will include ticketing and waiting facilities, washroo.s, a
nd 0 link_up with the existing pedestrian tunnel to the train
platform.
BUILDINGS TO BE ERECTED AT fIVE STATIONS ON GO TRANSITS NEW HILTON
GO Train line will be of ,i.ilar design to the Cooksville
building depicted in this artists rendering.
BACK COVER:
NAPIERVILLE JUNCTION TItAIN 200 with Alco G420 405 at St. Luc Yard
on wo.y to tr,,ckagc It. Delson P .Q. on .. lay 31 1981.
Photo by Pierro A. PatcnauJe.

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