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Canadian Rail 358 1981

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Canadian Rail 358 1981

Canadian Rail i
Na.358
NCWEMBER 1981
Another iarge narrow-gouge order for a do~eslic cusloMer is
represented by 36 gouge NFllO about to be trucked ot Port OUll
Basques, Newfoundland early in 1953. Greeo aod yellow 902 has
beeo taped ta prevenl any lalt water penetrotion, but WOI not
tarped as current .lIporl ftodels now are. Originally lhe uoit bar.
the steo~ age classification of Y_4_a aod haulage rating of
40%. This .yste~ WOI reploced in 1954 by a diesel_electric
classification based on builder, lervice and horsepower. The
902 etOIl became GR-12a, /IIeaning; buill by Genez-ol Hotors; onigned
to Rood Switcher service; 1200 horsepower; and the fir.t of that
type of 10cOlllotive to be ocquired (ie. 0). DOs only narrow-gaulle
do •• stic units wez-e the 47 NF110j210 ond the 6 GBs for Newfoundland
service, although 36 and lIeter gouge foreign cuslOMers included
New Zealand Railways; Brazil, Hogiono, Federal Rwys, & Vitofia a
Hinos, and [Oltern Bengol Railway during the first quarter century.
C4
Published J:1ontllly by The Canadian Railroad Historical Association
P.O. Box 22, Station B Montreal,Quebec,Canada
H3B 3J5
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germani uk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
FRONI COllER
In-plant PlotograIfu; of General
futors -Diesel Division at its
London Ontario canplex are not
eamon, but this and the follo­
wing four views provide visual
evidence of inside activities.
Toronto Hamilton & Buffalo GP7
72 (AlIS) sits in the IlObile
paint booth on offical opening
day, August 11th, 1950. 72,
already masked and spray-painted
is ready to be IlOved under the
tograph I s foreground, \hich
will inside out. The inverted U­
shaped oven is ccrnposed of 720
infra-red ray bulbs, set in
14-karat gold-plated reflectors
to maintain This method is still used for
most export orders, but prac­
tically all danestic custaners
roN specify urethane paint.
This fast-drying, hard chip­
resistant coating does away with
the need for the ilrpressive
looking paint was first applied in
test in February 1972. First
application in production was
for order C-357, 3 SD40-2s for
JCR in Januaxy, 1974.
~IL
ISSN 0008-4875
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN DIVISION
60-6100 4th Ave. NE
Calgary, Alberta T2A5Z8
OTTAWA
BYTOWN RAILWAY SOCIETY
P.O. Box 141, Station A Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8Vl
NEW BRUNSWICK DIVISIOtl
P.O. Box 1162
Saint John,
New Brunswick E2L 4G7
CROWSNEST AND KETTLE-VALLEY DIVISION
P . O. Box 400 . Cranbrook, British
Columbia
V1C 4H9
PACIFIC COAST DIVISION
P.O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2Pl
~OCKY MOUNTAIN DIVISION
P.O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Alberta· T5B 2NO
WINDSOR-ESSEX. DIVISION
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor
Ontario N9G lA2
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
P.O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto. Ontario
M5W lP3
NIAGARA DIVISION
P.O. Box 593
St.Catharines, Ontario
L2R 6W8
ST. LAWRENCE VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 99
Ste. DorotMe, Quebec H7X 2T4

A review of diesel divisions
first quarter century
By Don McQueen
Diesel Division is not hard to find in London, Ontario, no
matter which direction you come. The huge complex is situated at
1991 Oxford Street East between the north-south arteries of Clarke
and Crumlin Roods in the citys north-east industrial sector. Despite
all of the years at this location, the site still gives the visitor
the impression of parkland, partly because of the plants manicured
grounds, but also because of the open fields which surround Diesel
Division on all sides. And even if one misses the building signs
and water tower which announce the proprietor, one rarely misses
brand new locomotives sitting outside the erecting bays off Oxford
Street -particularly in the warm months o~ the year.
A quarter of a century ago gently rolling farm pasture was all
that was to be found at the present Diesel Division site. Oxford St.,
Crumlin and Clarke Roads were only gravel concessions on the eastern
side of a town with a population of 94,000 in 1949. What made this
part of pastoral south-western Ontario so unique for the EHD team
looking for a site on which to build a locomotive plant was the layout
of the railway lines. The first railway to cut across this farmland
was the Grand Trunk in 1857-58, building its London & Grand Trunk Jct.
Railway from Guelph to London via St.Harys. After 1924 this line
became CNRs Thorndale Subdivision. Cutting this CNR diagonal on
an east-west axis was the Ontario & Quebec Railway trackage into
London in 1892. This line is now CP Rails Galt Subdivision. The
proximity of these two lines just east of London, less than a mile
apart at the proposed site, and owned by the two potentially biggest
Canadian customers, played and important role in La Granges decision
to settle there in the late 1940 s.
Once the site was selected in 1949, building began on a plant
at which locomotives could be assembled in Canada from parts imported
from the mother plant at La Grange, Illinois. Originally known as
General Hotors Diesel Limited (GHDL) the plant has evolved to a stage
far exceeding original planning, for locomotive building became cons­
truction, not just assembly; locomotives were built alongside buses,
huge earth-moving equipment, school bus cbassis, and even special
military vehicles. From that limited beginning in 1949, the plant,
which became General Hotors of Canada -Diesel Division in 1969 (DD),
has become a much diversified component of the General Hotors multi­
national organization. It still is best known f6r its diesel-electric
railway locomotives, a fact that should not be too suprising when one
realizes that only two major Canadian railways did not, by 1975, have
DD locomotives working for them. They subsequently have, however,
joined the ranks of DD locomotive owners -DEVCO in 1979 and BCR in
1980. The only significant Canadian roads remaining without DD locomot­
ives now are Alma & Joncuieres; Asbestos & Danville; Greater Winnipeg
Water District; Thurso & Nation Valley; and Arnaud Railway, the narrow
gauge White Pass & Yukon.
CANADIAN 327 R A I L
HOW D. D. PUTS IT ALt TOGETHER
~
D~
(TO CoM.)
ml3
CAB
SEM8LV·
PAINT
FUEL llUtK
ASSEMBLV
,ra:
10 ~P ~E
BODV ASSEMBLY
4
PRIME MOVER
MOUNTED ON
FRAME.
CANADIAN 328 R A I L
Within a year of the first locomotive delivery -August 25, 1950-
the plant had constructed and delivered 131 locomotives. By 1954 more
than 500 units had been completed; in 1957 the 1000 mark had been
surpassed; 2000 by 1966; and by 1975 -the quarter century, 3255 loco­
motives had been built. A breakdown of customers and quantities is
given in the accompanying chart. However growth was not a constant, as
the graph General Motors Diesel Units Shieped -1950-75 demonstrates.
The first bulge between 1951 and 1960 obv~ously represents the demands
of the Canadian railways changing from steam to diesel technology.
During the lean years of 1961-1969 DD hung together by exporting models
to world railways which were doing what the Canadian railways had done a
decade earlier. The second building bulge during the 1970 s repr&­
sents not only the Canadian needs for second generation locomotives
to replace those built in the 1940 sand 1950 s, but also to meet a
higher horse-power-per-unit need to match the increasing tonnage demands
which Canadian railways have been experiencing.
Certain DD models became favoured over others du~ing the first
~uarter century. The grap~ Diesel Division -Total Models Built 1950-
1975 readily portrays these preferences. It 5ecomes apparent that
aurIng each domestic generation and in the foreign-builds there is one
favourite model with the customers. GP7/9s domina.ted the first generat­
ion. T he first GP7 completed was TH&B 71 in August 1950, and 13 years
later ACR 172, completed in August 1963, became the last GP9 built in
North America, The first SW900 was GN (now BN) 14 built in December 1950,
while the last SW1200RS CPR 8171, was delivered in September
1960. Wabash 1155 (later N&W 3657) was the first of the cab units; the
last, an FP9A; was CNR 6542, ending production of that model in July
of 1958. The challenger to the GP7/9 production totals, is the SD40/
SD40-2, which by 1980 had surpassed the GP7/9 numbers, although had
not done so by 1975. The first SD40 produced at DO was_CPR 5500 in July
~966, and the last was NdeM 8585 in February 1972. The first S040-2 was
built for CP Rail as 5565 in February 1972. Although this model is
still being built, the new 50 series may put an end to production of
this very popular model. Foreign production, although much reduced
in numbers indicates that same pattern of a one-model preference by
customers. The first B12 (a cab version of a G12) was produced for
Victoria a Minas (Brazil) as 521 in July 1953, while the first G12
was built in December 1953 as a demonstrator for Swedish State Railways,
number 7707. The last G12 constructed in London was New Zealand Railways
1545 in August 1967.
DD is also well known for its uniquely Canadian ~iesel models,
all of which were built in the first quarter century •. Mostnumerous
was the GMD-l model (a 1200h~ version of the ALCO RS-1), of which
101 were built for CNR and NAR. Also s~ecial were the narrow-gauge
NFllO/210 models built as a Ne·wfoundland version of GP7/9S. OD also
ex,erimented with diesel hydraulic indu9trial locomotives between 1956 and 1960 when 4
GMOH-1 and 1 GMOH-3 models were built. Best known of
that.grou, is the Blue Goose GMOH-l, which will soon be on display
at CRHAs Harbourfront Museum.
Over the 25 years DO has built several non-diesel or non-locomotive
products which prove interesting in themselves. Between 1963 and 1971 9
straight electric SW1200Mgs (Hotor Generator) locomotives were
built for Iron ~re Co. of Canada as 431501-509. CN received 30 BC-6
Another Au~ust 11 th, 1950 view of the erecting bay at Diesel
Division shows more official opening day activity. Alrea~y com­
pleted TH&B 71 (Al17) is displayed at the north end of the bay
waiting for the completion of sister GP7 72 for an August 25th
delivery. More eye-catching perhaps, is the staged trucking
of production unit C100-1 in the foreground. The FP7A was
to be delivered as CPR 4028 (A100) on September 14 th, 1950.
Originally GMDL built their locomotives on an east-west axis,
as shown in this photograph, but in a few years had oltered the
procedure to a north-south axis as seen in photos 4 & 5. The
diagram How DD Puts It All Together is based on present practice,
although the locat~on ot th~s photo is about stage 6 on that diagram.
CANADIAN
330
R A I L
Although the composition of this photograph taken August 11, 1950
is dramatically different from photo 2, it is, in reality, looking
in the opposite direction. The 125 ton FP7A C100-1 on the overhead
crane hovers over C100-2 still surrounded by several construction
jigs. F units are unique in their construction from later GP and
50 models, in that the frame is comprised of the car body, rather
than a 2-3 thick slag welded bed plate, cambered to balance the
weight of the prime mover and other mechanical parts. C100-1 had been
prepared for display by leaving one side un-panelled, so that
vistors could see the prime mover, electrical cabinents and steam
generator locations within the car body, as evident in photo 2 s view
of C100-1. None of these mechanical items hbd been installed yet
in C100-2 on the floor of the erecting bay. Both C100-T and C100-2
were finished and delivered as CPR 4028 & 4029 (A100-101) on September
14th, 1950.

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CANADIAN 332
R A I L
steam generator cars 15450-479 between November and January 1958 and
1959. A total of 50 mobile power generator cars were built for 15
customers between 1954 and 1960 but are not well known in railfan
circles because none of them received serial numbers as did all other
DivisonJproducts. The Portager story has adequately been told in F .H. Howards
articles found in April and May 1977 Trains Magazine.
GMDL began applying the well-known red oval builde~s plate to
its products right from the 1950 beginnings, replacing it with the blue
rectangular Mark of Excellence plate in February 1969 with CN Sd40
5076. The A prefix which appears on all DD serial numbers indicates
that the London plant was the first foreign production centre outside
of the U.S.A. Serial numbers began at A100 and increased numerically
with only 15 blanks occurring in the first 25 years. These were caused
by last-minute cancellations or alterations after the serials and shop numbers had
been permanently assigned. These blanks are A298-299
(1951); A1070-73 & A1086-89 (1957); and A1410-14 (1958). The only
duplication of serials took place in 1974 when DD built three replac­
ement G16CW units for Jugoslovenske Zeleznice (ZTP) to replace A2731-32
& 35 which had been lost overboard in the north Atlantic during the MV
Rumba episode of December 1972. Both the serials and road numbers were
re-used in this order.
Sharing work loads with EMD in La Grange has occured ~uring the
first 25 years too. In late 1972 there was an order for 30 SD40s which
DD had undertaken to build for CP Rail, but because of DD backlog
and customer need, EMD built CP 5629-58 at LaGrange. This was an int~
eresting reversal of a situation of some months before whe~ DD completed
an order for 10 SD40s for NdeM at London for an overworked EMD. NdEiM
8576-85 were the last SD40s built at DD.
A few groups of locomotives have been sold by their original
owners during the first quarter century. The earliest of these
resales took place in 1955 when 10 C&O GP7s (5720-29) were sold to NYC
as 5818-27. They still work in Canada as Conrail 5818-27. An inter­
national sale saw 51 GP7/9s of the QNS&L sold to Precision National Corp
between 1971 and 1972. PNC leased many of them to CP Rail but by 1976
they were rebuilt at PNCs Paducah shops, 35 became CNW units and 12
others part of the ICG fleet. Between 1974 and 1976 9 ONR FP7As have been
modified as GO APCUs 900-908. CNR sold NAR 2 GMD-1s in 1962;
Midland of Manitoba sold its SW900 to BCHydro in 1969, and RS sold its
lone DD product, an SW1200 to C&GT in 1973. Contrasted to these
relatively small volumes of original-owner sales is the 1977 and 1979
massive sale of 97 FP7/9 models of CN and CP Rail origin to VIA Rail
Canada.
For those readers whose interest is in paint schemes, the rain­
bow of colour combinations on DD products should provide considerable
satisfaction. No CNR cab uniti were ever painted at DD with the green
or gold nose configurations -those locomotives were all EMD products.
No first generation power was ever lettered in the script Canadian
Pacific found in that roads grey and maroon scheme. The first order
with that style of lettering was GP30 8200-01 in March 1963. The first
CN units to be painted in the red-end and black scheme were GP35s
4000-~1 in August 1964. CP Rails peppermint stripe scheme was first
applied to GP38s 3000-05 in May 1970. The current wide stripe vari-
An April 1963 view of the erecting bay shows SW1200MG 431501 (A 1945)
back into the line for minor fitting after being painted orange and
black. It is rare to find painted locomotives back in the construction
line, as most of the final work is done in the upfit area at stage 10
on the diagram How DD Puts It All Totether. This view is taken about
stage 5 on the dlagram. Most often he three tracks of the construction
line are filled with carmel brown units in primer, identification of
each unit known only by a chalked production number on the nose of the
unit. Production numbers consist of the contract number -if more than
one contract is being built -followed by a number indicating the
numerical order of that unit in the particular contract. 431501 was
the first in an order for 5 SW1200MGs ordered by rocc which left GMDL
on April 30 th, 1963. 4 more SW1200MGs ultimately followed the
initial order, although they had two sets of pantographs rather than
the single one at the rear of the unit shown here.
This June 1971 view of the north end of the erecting bay, taken
from the overhead travelling crane, clearly shows the triple con­
struction lines which allow the simultanious construction of nine
locomotives at once if the need arises. Grey and orange-yellow SD40
207 (A2544) was part of Quebec, North Shore & Labradors second (of
five) order for SD40/SD40-2 locomotives. At the time of this order
they were the most expensive single unit produced by the London plant.
Just behind 207 in the upper left hand corner of the photograph is
the coach line which shared space in the western part of the plant
erecting bay from 1961 to 1972, until coach production was shi fted
to the Highbury Ave in London, and then in 1979 to a brand new plant
in St. Eustache, P.Q.
Product
testing
at
DD
has
now
become
a much
more
routine
thing
than
it
originally
was.
Now
all
uni~
are
put
through
a
running
test
on a
mile-long
stretch
of
track
south
of
the
plant
adjacent
to
CP
Rails
Galt
Subdivision
(See
diagram:
How
DD
Puts
It
All
Together).
However,
in
the
1950
s some
elaborate
test
runs
dld
take
place
such
as
this
test
train
on
CN
with
B12 521 shown
at
Brantford
in
March
1953.
Maroon
and
white
521
(A430)
was
one
of
a 6
unit
order
for
Vale
do
Rio
Doce
of
Brazil,
although
for
the
testing
was
lettered
General
Motors
Diesel
Limited

and
carried
a
GM
he
raId
rather
than
a
Vito
ria
a
Minas
one
as
shown
in
photo
11.
Electromotive
Test
Car
ET909
was
imported
for
the
test,
making
quite
a
sight
in
its
blue,
silver
&
yellow
hues
looming
over
the
diminuative
B12
as
the
test
train
travelled
through
southwestern
Ontario
in
the
days
of
mainline
steam.
o :I­Z :I­o :I­Z III ~
~ 01 III
:u :I-r
r
/

ThiS April 28th, 1953 GMDL photograph oHersari ex,~e11ent comparison
betwe~n a domestic F and on export B, (CM.s modeldesigncition .for an
expo~t locomotive with ~ front end cab) •• Bloa, ~rey 6nd white F7A
1189 (A487) was delivered to the Wabash Railway lCanadaDivision) on
March 31 st, 1953. In 1960, the unit was renumb~red to 725 and ultimate­
ly became 3725 in the NCirfolk and Western amalgamation of Wab.ash in
1964. Having worked a,11. its life in southw,estern Ontario the F was
retired inS eptember 1979. Maroon and white 812 523 (A432) was comple}ed
in March but was not shipped until July 30th 1953 to Brazil, where,it
still works for its m.etergauge owner, Vitoria a Minas, but in a sim-
pli Hed colour scheme. The coni Herous trees on the right hond side
o,f th~ 812 are the clue t,o the Jocatioh of. the photograph -north
of tne GMDLplant almost at Oxford Street: a pOpular location for
builders photographs ,during the first decadeo,f production. Lofer
the wye ,at the south end of the property beside the CP Galt. Sub­
divis.ion replaced this location,for the companys photographic record
of their products.
300
2~0
200
150
100
50
CANADIAN
338
R A I L
GENERAL M01URS DIESEL-LONDON-UNITS SHIPPED-1950-1975
DOMESTIC PRODUCTION D
EXPORT PRODUCTION

..
~
..
.
-~
,:
~~
.
,.,.
,
….
,,.;…,
…-­

~:
,:<
~
……….

:::~h-:
-~..
Another
test
train
in
the
early
1950
s shown
here,
was
very
differ-
ent
from
the
812
run
mentioned
in
Photo
6.
Yellow
trimmed,
mroon
and
red
G12
7707
(A558)
was
built
as
a
General
Motors
Diesel
demonstrator
before
its
Dec.
31
1953
shipping
to
the
Swedish
State
Railways.
Shown
at
the
London
and
Port
Stanley
freight
sheds
on
Colbourne
St.
London,
the
G12
is
about
to
leave
on a
test
run
on
the
L&PS
south
along
the
electrified
line,
in
a
diesel
demonstration
run
and
a
clearance
test.
The
overhead
cantenary
is
visual
proof
to
ex
plain
why
the
L&PS
looked
to
export
models
rather
than
domestic
diesels
to
suit
its
needs.
Evi­
dently
the
electric
railway
was
convinced,
for
L&PS
ultimately
received
two
G12s
from
GMDL:L4
(A831)
on
Sept.
14,
1955,
and
L5
(Al324)
on
July
25,
1957.
When
CN
bought
the
L&PS
they
becam~
991 &
992
respectively,
and
once
the
overhead
had
been
removed
by
the
new
owners,
the
two
G12s
left
their
home
town
for
good
in
1966.
Delivery from DD is not always this spectacular. Domestic orders
are usually divided equally between CN and CP, the event now
rarely photographed by the company. This handful of Eastern Bengal
Railway B12s -the beginning of an order of 40 -had been posed
prior to their August 19, 1953 shipping. The photo has been taken
from the GMDL water tower between the north side of the plant and
Oxford St. East. The tan yellow and dark green units must have been
a photographers delight untarped as they were, for current over­
seas shipments are completely cocooned from the frame up. Flat car
mountings such as these have basically remained unchanged during the
quarter century, for all orders to New Zealand; Ceyloni Brazil
as well as Bengal have been shipped this way. Standard gauge units
are shipped on their own trucks over CN or CP, either working their
way to their new owner or as part of the train manifest.
CANADIAN 341 R A I L
ation of that scheme was first put on 5700 experimentally in January
1975 and as a standard scheme to 5718-57 beginning in September 1975.
CNs current red-cab and stripes was first applied to GP-38-2 5560
in June of 1973, but appeared with black cab numerals, rather ·than
white ones. QNS&Ls orange tongue and yellow bond were not applied
to its first pair of GP7s 100-101 in July 1951 as they were to the re­
mainder of the grey GP7/9 fleet which followed. ONRs SD40-2 1730-34
were delivered in March 1973 in the green and yellow scheme, but 1735-37
built in January 1974 were the first to wear the two-tone blue and
yellow design. During the first 25 years very few locomotives left
DD without full point, lettering and numbering. There were exceptions
however. All of the BCE/H SW900s left the plant with no ownership
lettering or numerals applied, even though the red arrow and candy­
stripe handrails were complete. ALCANs single SW900 of 1955 left the
plant with only the road number 1001 on its flanks -the owner chose
to remain anonomous. It is only in 1980 that an order ,left the plant
in primer paint and block undergear. This was because the 6 G26CW
for ZTP were delivered in a partially knock-down state, with the owner
finishing the job in Yugoslavia. Colour hues and combinations will
always ca~se an argument, but many railfans will agree that the most
pleasing colour combination and plaint scheme design ever put on any
DD locomotive is that which has been applied to Algoma Central units
over the quarte~ century.
DIESEL DIVISION CUSTOMERS: 1950-1975
Domestic Export
CNR 1663 Yugoslavia 144
CPR 711 New Zealand 138
QNS&L 1-41 Brazil 106
ONR 40 Pakistan 41
ACR 34 **E gypt 15
WABASH 27 Ceylon 12
C&O 24 Mexico 10
STELCO 24 Liberia 2
NAR 19 Sweden 2
GO 19
TH&B 14
BCH 12 9 Countries 470 units
NYC 12
QCM 9 ** built 1975; shipped 1976
100fc 9
CFP 3
DOFASCO 3
ETR 3
GN 3
ASTEEL 2
L&PS 2
MofM 2
MACKinnon 2
ALCAN 1
C&GT 1
DOSCO 1
DD 1
Elec.Red. 1
QI&T 1
RS 1
30 rwys 2785
units
Its
not
often
you
see
transportation
vehicles
which
make
railway
locomotives
look
small,
but
there
no
illusion
in
this
photograph
as
eN
BP40-2L 9451
(A3029)
is
literally
dwarfed
by a
chartreuse
green
electric
diesel
33-19
highway
off

hauler.
Both
these
DD
products
utilize
similar
parts
such
as
traction
motors,
electrical
components
and
a
645
prime
mover.
The
Pontiac
Firebird
is
a
Norwood,
Ohio
product,
but
the
models
are
DD
employees.
IA
case
you
cant
date
the
photograph
by
the
models
mini-skirts,
be
reassured
that
the
9451
was
delivered
to
eN
on
June
13th,
1974.
o » z » o » z III t.:) ~ ~ III
;u » r
Perhaps the best known demonstrator built by GMDL was the Blue Goase
GMDH-1 1001 (A1597). The two-tone blue hydraulic switcher spent its
first two years in demonstration runs and on display -such as this
one during the 1957 C.N.E. But by April 1958 the glamour shows were
allover; the two-tone blues were replaced by industrial yellow; and
travelling was restricted to within the GMDL property at London as
plant switcher, an assignment which was to last until EMD SW1500 113
came in November 1975. Before 1001s time as plant switcher, most of
this work was done by either.CN or CP power, or by switchers in
production at the plant. 1001 received a more permg.nent job simply
because the switcher construction had peaked by 1958 and GMDL had lost
the use of production units to do the work. After 1001 s retirement,
SW1500 113 remained as plant switcher for only a year and 9 months
until traded to Essex Terminal Railway for its SW8 102 which, to date,
is the current plant switcher. Meanwhile 1001 has been re stored –
thanks to the efforts of primarily one man, Al Howlett of London –
and is soon to become part of the CRHA-T&Y Branchs Harbourfront Museum
in Toronto.
CANADIAN
344
R A I L
To conclude this 25 years survey of locomotives built in London
let me pass on some Diesel Division trivia:
Naming locomotives belongs more in the age of steam, but NAR did
just that to all its diesels in 1979.
CPR FP7A 4028 was assigned serial number A100 in 1950, burned in
1965, and was remanufactured as GP35 5019.
DD did not build eN F3A/B 9000-9027, nor CPR E8A 1800-03; they
were all EMD products built before the 1950 London plant opened.
The most renumbered locomotives from DD were 24 GP7s built for CNR
as 7555-78; then 1700-23; to 4350-73; and finally 4800-23.
The shortest life span of any domestic DD locomotive was CN GP40-2L
9487: delivered September 3rd, 1974 and wrecked December 19, 1974.
The largest single DD order was C-376 for 102 GP40-2s by CN in 1975.
They became 9530 -9632.
CNRs first DD delivery was SW8 8500 in February 1951. The SW8
has returned to London as 7150 and is frequently seen switching the
plant that created it. What a seemingly small world!
-ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS –
All charts and graphs are the work of Bob McLarty, London; all photos
are from Diesel Division files. I am especially indebted to Gord S
outter, Public Relations Manager, Diesel Division, for without Gord s
help and understanding, this article could never have been written •
……
RECENT
DELIVERIES
FROM O.M.
DIESEL DIVISION I
LONDON ONTARIO
Pierre Patenaude.
BRITISH COLUMBIA RA!LWAY ORDER C-429 SD-49-2s
ROAD NUMBER SERIAL NUMBER DELIVERY DATE
751 A-3945 SEP 29 1980
752 A-3946 SEP 29 1980
753 A-3947 SEP 30 1980
754 A-3948 SEP 30 1980
755 A-3949 OCT 3-1980
756 A-3950 OCT 3 1980
757 A-3951 OCT 8 1980
758 A-3952 OCT 8 1980
759 A-3953 OCT 10 1980
760 A-3954 OCT 10 1980
761 A-3955 OCT 15 1980
762 A-3956 OCT 15 1980
These
units· are first purchase of B.C. Rail for GM-DD units.
They are equipped with extended range dynamic brakes, Q-type radiators,
fans, exhaust silencer, and ditch lights.
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS ORDER C-431 SD-40-2W;~
ROAD NUMBER
5354
5355 5356 5357
5358
5359
5360
SERIAL NUMBER
A-4032
A-4033 A-4034
A-40~5
A-4036 A-4037
A-4038
DELIVERY DATE
DEC 20 1980
DEC 20 1980
DEC 20 1980
DEC 21 1980
DEC 20 1980
DEC 21 1980
DEC 23 1980
CANADIAN
5361
5362
5363
346
A-4039
A-4040
A-4041
R A I L
DEC 23 1980
DEC 23 1980
DEC 23 1980
These
units are classified GF-30V assigned to Symington Yard.
They have
exhaust silencer, no dynamic brakes, have snow shield,
Q-type radiator, and a winterizing hatch over the first radiator fan.
C.P. RAIL ORDER C-430-1 SD-40-2s
ROAD Nill-IBER
5950
5951
5952
5953
5954
5955
5956 5957
5958
5959
5960
5961
5962
5963 5964
5965
5966
5967
5968
5969
5970
5971
5972
5973
5974
5975
5976
5977
5978
5979
5980 5981
5982
5983
5984
5985
5986
5987
5988 5989
5990
5991
5992
5993
5994
5995
5996
SERIAL NUMBER
A-3957
A-3958
A-3959 A-3960
A-3961
A-3962
A-3963
A-3964
A-3965
A-3966
A-3967
A-3968
A-3969
A-3970
A-3971
A-3972
A-3973
A-3974
A-3975
A-3976
A-3977
A-3978
A-3979
A-3980
A-3981
A-3982
A-3983
A-3984
A-3985
A-3986
A-3987
A-3988
A-3989
A-3990
A-3991
A-3992
A-3993
A-3994
A-3995
A-3996
A-3997
A-3998
A-3999
A-400Q
A-4001
A-4002
A-4003
DELIVERY DATE
OCT 17 1980
OCT 17 1980
OCT 21 1980
OCT 21 1980
OCT 23 1980
OCT 24 1980
OCT 23 1980
OCT 24 1980
OCT 28 1980
OCT 28 1980
OCT 29 1980
OCT 29 1980
OCT 31 1980
OCT 31 1980
NOV 6 1980
NOV 6 1980
NOV 8 1980
NOV 8 1980
NOV 11 1980
NOV 11 1980
NOV 13 1980
NOV 14 1980
NOV 13 1980
NOV 14 1980
NOV 20 1980
NOV 20 1980
NOV 22 1980
NOV 22 1980
NOV 25 1980
NOV 25 1980 ·
NOV 28 1980
NOV 28 1980
NOV 28 1980
DEC 3 1980
DEC 3 1980
JAN 14 1981
JAN 14 1981
JAN 16 1981
JAN 16 1981
JAN 17 1981
JAN 17 1981
JAN 21 1981
JAN 21 1981
JAN 23 1981
JAN 23 1981
JAN 26 1981
JAN 26 1981
PICTURED DURING THE TRANSPORTATION WEEK DISPLAY in the port of ~ontrea1,
is C.N. 5360 on May 30 1981.
Pierre A. patenaude.
CANADJAN
5997
5998
5999
6000 6001
6002
6003
6004
6005
6006
6007
6008 6009
6010
6011
6012
6013
6014
6015
6016
6017
6018
6019
6020
6021
6022
6023
6024
348
A-4004
A-4005
A-4006 A-4007
A-4008
A-4009
A-4010 A-4011 A-4012
A-4013
A-4014 A-4015
A-4016
A-4017
A-4018
A-4019
A-4020
A-4021
A-4022
A-4023
A-4024
A-4025
A-4026
A-4027
A-4028
A-4029
A-4030
A-4031
R A I L
JAN 28 1981
JAN 28 1981
JAN ~O 1981
JAN 30 1981
FEB 6 1981
FEB 6 1981
FEB 9 1981
FEB 9 1981
FEB 11 1981
FEB 11 1981
FEB 13 1981
FEB 13 1981
FEB 18 1981
FEB 23 1981
FEB 18 1981
FEB 23 1981

FEB 25 1981
FEB 25 1981
FEB 27 1981
FEB 27 1981
MAR 3 1981
MAR 3 1981
MAR 11 1981
~IAR 11 1981
MAR 18 1981
MAR 18 1981
~IAR 25 1981
MAR 25 1981
These
units are classified ORF-30U and are assigned as
follows: 5950-5984 to St. Luc, 5985-6005 to Winnipeg, 6006-6024
to St. Luc. They are equipped with extended range dynamic
braking, after cooler pipes on roof, Q-type radiator fans, and
exhaust silencers.
DEVCO RAILWAY ORDER C-432 GP38-2s
ROAD NlR-IBER SERIAL NlR-IBER DELIVERY DATE
220 A-4063 APR 10 1981
221 A-4064 APR 10 1981
222 A-4065 APR 11 1981
223
A-4066
APR 11 1981
These
units are equipped with hi-adhesion trucks, paper
air filters, and small fuel tanks. They have no dynamic brakes.
ALGOMA CENTRAL ORDER C-437 GP-38-2s
ROAD NUMBER SERIAL NUMBER DELIVERY DATE
200 A-4067 APR 24 1981
201 A-4068 APR 24 1981
202 A-4069 APR 24 1981
203 A-4070 APR 30 1981
204 A-4071 APR 30 1981
205 A-40n APR 30 1981
These units are equipped with dynamic brakes, snow shield,
rear back-up headlight, paper air filter, no rear number-board
indicators, and no hi-adhesion trucks.
C.P. RAIL SD-40-2 No. 5983, one of 75 new units (5950-6024) at Ballantyne
on May 16 1981.
Pierre A. Patenaude.
GP-40-2Ws 9615 9485 9536 bringing 306 into Taschereau yard on Dec 30 1980.
Pierre A. Patenaude.
GO USITS 104 101 108 110, C.P. IIniu 4567 5989 4138 lellvin, St. we
yaT~ It !allantync Que. on ~ay 16 1981.
Pierre A. Iatenaude.
IACII: COVeR
PlcnJRfD ON JUNE 23 1!181 it CP-!I 4500 frllshly ouuhopjled frOil Iointc
St. Charles shops in late Hay 1981. 4500 was the last foP-9 to orerate
In its ori,inal colours of ~reen and told.
Pierre A. Patcnlu~e.

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