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Canadian Rail 357 1981

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Canadian Rail 357 1981

Canadian
No.357
OCTOBER 1981
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CANADIAN
Published r;]onthly by The Canadian Railroad Histori
cal Association
P.O. Box 22, Station B Montreal ,Quebec,Canada H
3B 3J5
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: I~i 11 iam A.
Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
FRONT COVER.
CANADIAN NATIONALS FA.10US STEAM
LOC0i10TIVE 6060 on one of its
numerous special excursions, as
depicted by New Brunswick artist
Cameron King.
INSIDE FRONT COVER.
A STUDY IN FIRST AND SECONG
GENERATION CABS with one of each
manufacture. C.N.
2544 and 9178
with snowplow shields are seen
at Stratford Ontario on March 22
1980. With much of the C.N. shops
shut down, this view is becoming
quite rare.
Gordon R. Taylor.
~IL
ISSN 0008 -4875
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN DIVISION
60-6100 4th Ave. NE
Calgary, Al berta T2A 5ZB
OTTAWA
BYTOWN RAILWAY SOCIETY
P . O. Box 141, S ta t ion A Ottawa, Ontario
K1N BVl
NEW BRUNSW ICK DI VI SIQrl
P.O. Box 1162
Saint John,
New Brunswick E2L 4G7
CROWSNEST AND KETTLE-VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 400
Cranbrook, British Columbia
V1C 4H9
PACIFIC COAST DIVISION
P.O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2P1
ROCKY MOUNTAIN DIVISION
P.O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Alberta T5B 2NO
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor
Ontario N9G 1A2
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
P.O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto Ontario
M5W lP3
NIAGARA DIVISION
P.O. Box 593
St.Catharines, Ontario
L2R 6WB
ST. LAWRENCE VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 99
Ste. Dorothee, Quebec H7X 2T4
f

CJHE cpAlrtTlrtGS
BY (fIMEROrt q(lrtG
It is a great pleasure to be able to show a selection of
steam locomoti~e paintings by Cameron King of Fredericton N.B.
Mr. King was born in Plaster Rock N.B. in 1915, and gradu­
ated from the University of New Brunswick in 1936 with a B.Sc.
degree in Civil Engineering. From 1937 to 1939 he worked for the
N.B. Highway Department and later for the Aluminum Company 6f
Canada except for two years in the R.C.A.F. during the war.
In 1946 he joined the Chief Engineers office of the C.P.R. and
was Senior Engineer in charge of special trackwork at the time of
his early retirement in 1975. lie then moved to Fredericton, and
from 1976
to 1980 worked for the N.B. Department of Natural
Resources.
Cameron King
is a member of the Fredericton Society of
Artists, and in 1980 and 1981 has had exhibitions of his works at
the University of New Brunswick. ~fost of the paintings shown here
were at the latter exhibition held at the U.N.B. Alumni ;femorial
Centre from ,fay 17 to ~lay 31 1981.
The artist has depicted these locomotives in what he con­
siders. typical views and landscapes, and he has emphasized the
detail which he considers essential to portray the steam loco­
motive as a live working machine, monstrous, noisy and, in the
eye of the artist, a thing of beauty.
A DETAILED BROADSIDE VIEW OF C.P.R. 4-4-4 ·No. 2929.
CANADIAN
295
R A I L
ARRIVAL AT FREDERICTON, C.P.R. 2929. After her run in after
meeting the ~ontreal or Boston trains at Fredericton Junction.
Watercolour 18 X 24.
CANADIAN
296
R A I L
BRANCH LINE, C.P.R. 422. This ten-wheel typical tea Kettle
operated freight or mixed trains on branc.h lines either with light
traffic or where track or bridge conditions limited weight of
motive power. Natercolour 18 X 24.
\
CA NAD I AN 297 R A I L
STEAM EXCURSIO~. C.P.R 1201. This li~ht Pacific engine is
shown on a steam excursion organized by the 1,lu5Cllr.I of Science and
Technology in Ottawa. Watercolour 21 X 28.
CANADIAN
298
R A I L
THE ATLANTIC LIMITED, C.P.R. 2901 NEAR FREDERICTON JUNCTION.
This Mountain-class locomotive operated for a number of years on
the Saint John to ~ontreal train. Watercolour 18 X 24.
CANADIAN
299
R A I L
(,
FREIGHT TRAIN, C.P.R. 3696. This consolidation-class engine.
operated on the Bayshore. Watercolour 18 X 24.
CANADIAN
300
R A I L
STEAM EXCURSION 1973, C.N.R. 6060. Her first excursion
after being refitted was in 1973. She went west to Alberta in 1980.
Watercolour 18 X 24.
CANADIAN 301
C.N.R. 5270 WITH PASSENGER TRAIN.
display at Centennial Park, Moncton N.B.
R A I L
This engine is now on
Watercolour 18 X 24.
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Eastern Gateway
to western Resources.
By Kenneth A. W. Gansel
Thunder Bay Ter~inals Limited, located in Thunder Bay, Ontario
serves as the gateway for coal from Alberta and British Columbia
.oving to industries in Eastern Canada. The ~ajor user of the
coal is the giant coal fire4 ther~o generator stat~on of Ontario
Hydro at Nanticoke, Ontario. Ontario HYdro in fact purchased the
loco~otives and coal cars for both CN and CP just for bringing the
coal fro_ the West to Thunder Bay where it is shipped by ship to
Nanticoke on Lake Erie.
Thunder Bay Terminals is a wholly owned subsidiary of Federal
Industries Li~ited of Winnipeg. Federal owns such companies as
The White Pass and Yukon Corporation Limited and the Neptune Bulk
Terminals in Vancouver, the counter part to the Thunder Bay oper~
ation.
Construction
ational in 1978.
a transpor*v-tion
ement of western
of the Terminal began in 1975 and became oper­
The purpose of the Terminal was to establish
link between rail and water to satisfy the mov­
Canadian coal.
During the construction of the Terminal, an expansion was
undertaken to receive Saskatchewan LIGNITE for unloading and
shipping by way of an underwater tunnel to the On*ario Hydro
generator station situated on Mission Island.
The Terminal is located on the 236 acre McKellar Island
within the city limite of Thunder Bay and is bordered on the
north by the KAMINISTIQUIA RIVER, and on the south by the McKellar
River and the east by LAKE SUPERIOR. The Terminal is served
by both CN and CP by means of a loop track which perimeters the
property. The trackage is sufficient to accommodate one compietely
loaded 105 car unit train and an empty 105 car unit train without
encroachment on the main line of CP Rail.
The accomModate the handling of each coal train, the unit
train, powered by four 3000 H.P. locomotives, is brought through
the Thaw Shed, with the first car being positioned either in the
Thaw Shed or on the Dumper, using the locomotive power.
The Thaw Shed is 600 feet long and will accommodate 10 cars.
During winter ope~ation, the propane fired infrared heaters, with
a total combined eutput of 50 million BTUs per hour, are ignited
from the Du~per Operators cab. Although the Thaw Shed with hold
a total of 10 cars, there are only six heated b,ys. Large
circulating fans continually equalize the ambient temperature and
motorized vents located on the roof of the building are vented to
atmosphere when temperatures reach 180
0
F. The circulating fans
are necessary because all of the heat transferred is not by means
of infrared, but a large portion of the heated air is conducted
through openings between the ends of the cars to assist thawing
in these difficult arees.
CANADIAN
304
R A I L
ON BOARD THE CANADIAN TRANSPORT. The Ship loader is
radio controlled by the foreman on board the ship. Note the sign
in the left background showing 19,754 tons loaded so far.
Kenneth A.W. Gansel, June 1980.
CANADIAN
305
R A I L
With the first car spotted on the Dumper, the locomotive
crews leave the site. The Dumper Operator takes complete control
of the train by manually positioning the Positioner and inserting
the indexing arm. The Positioner is driven fully forward until it
hits the buffers, which also sequences the automatic positioning
cycle. When the first car has been discharged by rototing the
Dumper 160
0,
the Positioner traverses automatically ~n a reverse
direction to pick up the next car, which is accomplished without
uncoupling the cars. The Positioner automatically inserts its arm,
then accelerates in the forward direction and advances the unit
train exactly one car length. This positions the next car on
the Dumper. Now the Dumper Operator can continue dumping cars
semi-automatically by depressing two buttons on the control consol
in the Dumper Operators cab. This cycling is repeated for each car
of the unit train. During winter months, a sensing device detects
the shorter length of the caboose as it approaches the Thaw Shed,
and begins a process of automatically switching off the heaters with
enough time delay to allow adequate cooling before allowing the
Positioner to advance the next car.
Each car containing 100 tons of coal is discharged by .egns of
a hopper under the Dumper onto a Pan Feeder. This F.eeder resembles
a bulldozer track six feet wide and 53 feet long. The Pan Feeder
has two speeds resulting in a receiving rate of 4000 tons per
hour on fast speed, and 2000 tons per hour on slow speed. The Pan
Feeder, being made of steel, prevents damage from occurring as
a result of large frozen blocks of ice and coal. From the Pan
Feeder, coal is discharged through a transfer chute, which guides
the material through a grizzly designed to scalp off the frozen
lumps of coal while allowing the fines to drop straight through on
to the conveying system. The large pieces not passing through the
grizzly, are directed into the lump breaker which breaks them up
into small pieces not exceeding eiiht inches in diameter.
RECLAIMER. Each bucket holds 10 tons, or 6000 tons per hour.
Kenneth A.W. Ganse1, June 1980.
CANADIAN
306
R A I L
Dust control must be provided in the Dumper area for two reasons.
First for protection of the environment and cleanliness of equipment
and second, to prevent dust laden air from entering the Thaw Shed where an
explo.ion could result while the Thaw Shed is in operation.
For these reasons, ~ust-laden air is continually being drawn from
within the dust shroud which envelopes the Du~per, using two dry type
collecting units. A third unit services the lower levels of the
Dumper building. The accumulated dust is conveyed by screws to a
mixer where water or calcium chloride is added before the dust is
deposited back into the mainstream of product flow.
A metal detector on the receiving system will stap the belt
and speay a dye on the coal .arking the location of foreigh material.
There is aleo a tar detection system that will stop the conveyor in
case of dam.ge to equipment.
To permit easy trouble shooting a mUltiplex xystem provid.s
i~formation directly to the Control Tower and records any shutdowns,
indicates the type of trouble and its location. A mini computor
records the defect, indicates the time of shutdown and again records
the time when the system becomes operational.
There is a belt scale on the receiving system that gives a
printed read-out at the Control Tower. This scale will produce an
accurate total of inventory when the total of the shipping scale
is subtracted.
While the cO through the stream at an 85 second interval discharging the sample
onto a separate conveying system which transports it to a sampler.
The Sample Building is a separate structure with specialIzed equip­
ment that is manned by an independent testing company.
The Yard Conveyor
is installed on an elevated berm an extends
some 4000 feet to a Surge Bin. There is a second tear detector
system that will stop the Yard Conveyor and will annunciate on
panels at several locationl.
The raised berm also serves as a runway to carry the trackl
that are com.on to both the Stacker and Reclaimer.
The Stacker is a tripod construction with three legl and a
tripper trailer. The Stacker can traverse the entire length of
the stockpile area depositing the coal by slewing or by making
longitudiaal passes. The Stacker boom will only reach half the
width of the storage stockpiles so bulldozers are used to push the
coal to the outer edges of the piles. Due to the danger of spont­
aneous combustion, a large moHile vibratory Compactor is used to
compact the piles to a density of 70 Ibs. per cubic foot or greater.
To achieve this density, increments of 18 inches are neEessary while
stockpiling. The Stacker is aleo monitored by the multiplex system
and will record any shutdowns or malfunctions of the equipment.
During the receiving of a coil train, water sprays are used to
control dust at transfer p~int~. These sprays are controlled by the
Stacker or REclaim Operators and may be used at various points and
in various combinations to achieve optimum dust control before the
product reaches outside atmosphere. The stockpiles at present
will accommodate up to 1,250,000 tons of coal, with a density of
70 Ibs. per cubic foot and a moisture content of 8 per cent. This
THUNDER BAY
TERMINALS LTD.
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CANADIAN
308
R A I L
storage space is adequate to stockpile coal during the winter months
while the Great lakes are ice bound.
The Reclai.er operates similarly to the Stacker. There is
a bucketwheel at the end of its boom and through the use of luffing,
slewing and traversing motions will pick up the coal and deposit it
on the boom conveyor at the rate of 6000 tons of coal per hour.
The boom conveyor carries the coal to a chute and loading table
that reload the Yard Conveyor which in turn carries the coal to a
Surge Bin. While dumping a train, the coal may by pass the Stacker,
but because the Dumper limits the du~ping rate to 4000 tons per
hour, the Reclaimer has the ability to add 2000 tons per hour to
the load on the Yard Conveyor thus bringing the ship loading rate
to 6000 tons per hour; the systems capacity.
The Surge Bin is divided into four hopper sections, with each
section having its own belt feeder capable of loading at 2000 tons
per hour. The Shiploader Operator had individual control over the
Feeders and can adjust the flow from zero to 8000 tons per hour.
There is a dry dust system~as well as water sprays at the loading
point of the Shiploader Conveyor belt that are controlled from the
Shiploader.
A shipping conveyor extends the entire length of the dock and
discharges the coal onto the Shiploader conveyor belt by means of
a Tripper and loading Chute.
CAR DUNPER. Can dump one car every 90 seconds. Each car has
100 tons of coal. Kenneth A.W. Ganscl. June 1980.
CA NAD I,N
309
R A I L
The Shiploader is a bridge type construction and traverses
along the dock to permit loading of a vessel witheut the need for
repositioning the ship. The Shiploader has a moveable shuttle
with a rotating loading spout to evenly distribute the load. The
material flow is stopped wbi~the Shiploader is being positioned
in an e~pty hold and during this time, the Surge Bin allows the
Reclaimer 9nd Yard Belt to continue 6perating. When the Shiploader
is again ready to receive material, the operator may use any ot :Ill
the. feeders for a maximum loading rate of 8000 tons an hour which
will agGin empty the Surge Bin because the Reclaimer has an operating
capacity of 6000 tons per hour.
The Belt Scale on the Wharf Conveyor will keep a cumulative
total of arl shiploading as well as a printed read-out in the
Control Tower.
The
entire shiploading operation is accomplished by way or a
radto controlled unit whereby an operator can conduct the operation
from the deck of the vessel being loaded.

Although the dock at the present time can accommodate a vessel
of u~ to 750 feet in length, it has the provision for additional
dredg~gg of the slip to accommodate vessels of 50,000 tons having
a len~th of 1000 feet.
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AUrmlATIC POSITIONER. Can move a 100-car train without the
aid of locomotive power.
Kenneth
A. W. Gansel. June 1980.
CANADIAN
310
R A I L
The storage yard has a syste. of drainage ditches that divert
all surfa.e water to lined settling ponds. These ponds are then
used as storage for supplying water to a high pressure yard spray
syste~. This s~ray syste~ ~ay be controlled automatically fro~ the
Control Tower so that the coal piles may be kept moist and stop
any dust fro. being blown from the~. Should this system fail,
there is a backup mobil!. water spray truck which has a capacity
of 5000 gallons and a high pressure pump that is directed through
an adjustable spray head ~ounted on a turret. This truck is
complete with equip.ent for dust suppression on the ter~inal roads.
A number of computer program.es provide operating and mainten­
ance control such as Store security, man-power scheduling and
preventative maintenance.
THUNDER BAY TERMINALS LTD. Loading the Canadian Transport
with 30,000 tons of coal.
Kenneth A.W. Gansel, June 1980.
ION
ONE OF THE FEW VIA LINES TO ESCAPE UNSCATHED from Pepins cutbacks
is the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway passenger service on Vancouver
Island in British Columbia. In this photo by Susan Miles we see an
R.D.C.
in the VIA colours about to cross a highway underpass at
Cowichan station B.C.
GOtiE Birr NOT FORGOTTEN. Former steam excursion locomotive 6218
basks in the sun on her display grounds ill Oakes Park in Fort Erie
Ontario. With a fresh coat of black paint old 6218 still looks as if
she could steai11 011 for years to come.
Photo by John Russell.
CANADIAN
313
R A I L
A NEW DAILY OCCUPANT OF BAYVIEW JUNCTION is til, newly-introJuced
Amtrak train between Toronto and »lew York City. Over an hour l~ I c here
is train 99-98 the Maple Leaf heading to Toronto from the Big Apple.
F40PH unit 346 with its Amfleet coaches are the usual consist of this
train. Here, it is passing a Sarnia-bound C.N. f,,; I-,t
Photo by John Russell.
UIDER TilE WATCIIFUL EVE OF A C.N. POLICE OFFICER, a lon~ freight
comes on to the Dundas Sub. in llayview .Junction (Hamilton) Ontario.
Unit 9563 and two other GP-40-2 units head towards a Sarnia Destination.
C.I, police have stepped up their patrols at Oayview keeping railfans
in check for trespassing on this very popular section of C.N. property.
Photo by John Russell.
C.P. RAIL UNITS 4569 and 4504 near Woodstock Ontario on ~Iay 31 1981.
This train is known as the pickup and is a local that picks up and
sets off cars at the yards along the line. On this day it had more
than eighty cars.
Gordon R. Taylor.
CANADIAN
316
R A I L
C.P. Rail No. 1802 was rebuilt from old unit 8746. Here we see it at
Woodstock Ontario on May 31 1981 while on a weekend layover from its
job of working cement plants in the area.
Gordon R. Taylor.
CANADIAN
317
R A I L
C.N. No. 460, class YBU-2, photographed on May 3 1981 at the engine
terminal at Sarnia Ontario. Its mate is No. 306.
Gordon
R. Taylor.
CANADIAN 318 R A I L
LESS THAN A MONTH OLD when photographed at St. Thomas Ontario,
Norfolk and Western 8075, a C30-7, is seen on October 14 1979.
Gordon
R. Taylor.
ONE OF THE LAST BUDD CAR SETS TO RE~IAI N I N THE C. N. PAl NT SCHEME,
-the cars of VIA 665 eastbound London -Toronto stop at Stratford
on October 13 1980. These cars are now painted in the VIA colours.
Gordon R. Taylor.
VIA FPA4 So. 676S photographed on eastbound train 74 heading for
Toronto on April 2S 1981. Note the absence of the VI. logo on the nose.
Gordon R. Taylor.
SACK cnVI:R.
. [-636 C.P. RAIL I.OCctlOTiVES wi-th one T.II. ~ 8. 5.1t(:l1er
tucke..! in behind lead a n:I;at1vely-short C.P. Rail Starl1&:lt
rn:i!:ht through Bayview .lunction on its return ttlp to 10rolll.o
yards 011 June 28 1981.
Photo by John Mussell.

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