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Canadian Rail 355 1981

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Canadian Rail 355 1981

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Published r.lontilly by The Canadian Railroad Historical Association
P.O. Box 22, Station B Montreal ,Quebec,Canada
H3B 3J5
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
FRONT COVER
Toronto Hamilton & Buffalo passenger
train No. 182 photo­graphed
at Fenwick, Ontario in
August 1980. The TH&B in conjunc­tion with
CONRAIL operated the longest running international passenger
train in Canada. The
service which had been operating
between Toronto and Buffalo N.Y.
for 90 years terminated on April
25, 1981. Photo courtesy Kenneth
Gansel.
OPPOSITE
Anyone wishing to board the train
at TH&B IS Sm ithvill e, Ontari a
station must follow these elabor­
ate instructions in order to stop the
tra in. T hi s sign wa s posted conspicuously in the
station
window. Photo courtesy Kenneth
Ganse1.
ISSN 0008 -4875
CALGARY & SOUTH ~ESTERN DIVISION
60-6100 4th Ave. NE
Calgary, Alberta T2A 5Z8
OTTAWA
BYTOWN RAILWAY SOCIETY
P.O. Box 141, Station A Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8Vl
NEW BRUNSWICK DIVISIml
P.O. Box 1162
Saint John,
New Brunswick E2L 4G7
CROWSNEST AND KETTLE-VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 400
Cranbrook, British Columbia
V1C 4H9
PACIFIC COAST DIVISION
P.O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
Bri ti sh Co 1 umbi a V6C 2Pl
ROCKY MOurHAIH DIVISION
P.O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Alberta T5B 2ND
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor
Ontario N9G lA2
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
P.O. Box 51349, Termina 1 A, Toronto Ontario
M5W lP3
NIAGARA DI V lSI P.O. Box 593
St.Catharines, Ontari
0 L2R 6W8
ST. LAWRENCE VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 99
Ste. DorotMe, Quebec H7X 2T4
TI1

TI1E E D
by I~neth A.W. c.ansel
(End of Passenger Service on the TH&B Railway)
Canadas longest running international passenger train came
to an end on Saturday, April 25th, 1981. The joint train operated
by the TORONTO HAMILTON and BUFFALO Railway and Conrail from
Toronto to Buffalo, New York completed 90 years of continuous
operations between the two cities.
The TH&B passenger train was to be terminated at the end of
September 1980, however, a last minute reversal of the Canadian
Transport Commission order kept the train on until today. The
train is being replaced by a new service operated by VIA Rail
Canada and AMTRAK. The new train called the MAPLE LEAF will
run between Toronto and New York City. The route from Toronto to
the US border will take the new train through St. Catharines and
Niagara Falls, Ontario, and will not make use of the TH&B line
This was the typical BUDD service operated as train 182 in recent
years. This photograph was taken at WeIland, Ontario on the TH&B.
Photo courtesy Kenneth Gansel.
CANADIAN
231
R A I L
from Buffalo to Toronto via WeIland, Fenwick and Smithville. The
new train will still serve Hamilton but not at the TH&B Hunter
St~eet Station, instead it will stop at the VIA station on James
Street.
On the last trip of TH&B train #182 there were 3 RDC cars
and all three were filled to capacity with rail fans riding the
train for the last time. The TH&B served several of the small
farming communities of the Niagara Peninsula such as SMITHVILLE
and FENWICK which were still flag stops for the train. It also
stopped at WeIland and Fort Erie, before crossing the VICTORIA
Railway Bridge at Fort Erie and entering the United States at Black
Rock. The train stops at Black Rock for US Customs inspection.
The rail line between WeIland and Fort Erie is owned by Conrail
and a Conrail crew runs the train from WeIland into Buffalo as
train No: 376.
The TH&B station is still standing at Smithville, with its
turret tower and ginger bread styling. The Dunville branch runs
South from Smithville to Port Maitland on the shore of Lake Erie.
At one time in the 30s and 40 s there was passenger train service
on the Dunville line too.
The next stop is Fenwick, this consists of a paved area of
about 6 x 15 and a pole with the green and white hand-operated
flag stop signal. In a years time the estimated passenger volume
for Fenwick was about 30 passengers (on and off) for the total
year. Fenwick is located in the heart of Niagaras best apple
The TH&B station at Smithville, Ontario as photographed in August
1980.
Photo courtesy of the Author.
CANADIAN 232
R A I L
TH&B Station at Hamilton, Ontariu as it appeared in April, 1981.
Photo courtesy of the Author.
CANADIAN
233
R A I L
In Au~ust 1980 Ken Gansel photographed TH&B train 182 at Black
Rock ~Buffalo N.Y.) on Conrail iron. The train is clearing customs.
CANADIAN
234
R A I L
producing area, small farms and orchards border the railway line
through to WeIland. The train crosses the WeIland River on a
bridge which was built in 1972 as part of the new WeIland Canal
project which saw an end to the old TH&B Coyle yard in WeIland.
The train waits at the TH&B/Conrail station at WeIland for
5 minutes to allow the crews to call the Conrail dispatcher in
St. Thomas for permission to cross over and run to Fort Erie.
The most spectacular part of the trip is the climb of the
Niagara Escarpment. The Escarpment is the same height as Niagara
Falls. The TH&B line clings to the side and climbs from the base
in the East end of Hamilton to the top at Vinemount. In the dist­
ance of 3 miles the train has climbed 200ft. The view of the coun­
try-side with its vineyards and view of Lake Ontario was worth
the trip. On a clear day one can see the CN Tower and most of
the Toronto skyline.
The TH&B will always be remembered by the local farmers as
the horn blows at 10:20AM and the RDCs slow to see if there are
any passengers to board at Fenwick, NO, not today as the TH&B
passes through for the last time. The end of an era has passed
and gone for ever, as the community slumbers in the mid morning
sun.
April 25, 1981 this is the trainboard tor the last run of train 182
as posted in TH&Bs Hamilton, Ontario station.
Photo courtesy Kenneth A.W.Gansel.
(
Tomorrow a new era ~n passenger service will be started with
the MAPLE LEAF. A name which was used on the CN and Lehigh Valley
for the joint passenger train which ran during the 50s between
New York City and Toronto.
The last train consisted of three R.D.C.s packed mostly with rail
enthusiasts along to enjoy the end of an era. The date was April
25, 1981 and the place was Hamilton, Ontario.
Photo courtesy of the Author.
~
Amtrak …. ===
J
VIII
THE GREAT CIRCLE TRIP
$IOI.·u.s.
MONTREAL
TORONTO
NIAGARA FALLS
NEW YORK
Make the round anyway you like.
Faites Ie tour II ifl}porte COlllll/ellt.
Ticket is (Joocl for 29 clays.
29 lours IIIi/ximum.
No back trackin(J.
Pas de chililgemellt de direction.
Travel may be via Ottawa.
PerllllS de voyager via Ottawa.
Goocl on 110th Amtrak trains between Montreal
and New York.
Les deux traills dAmtrak pell veil t etre utilises
elltre Montreal et New York.
-Valid till 30 October 1981.
En viglleur jus(lua1l30 oClolNe 1981.
Fare is in USS and subject to chan~JP. without
no
tice.
Le ti/of illdi(lud est ell SUS et SUjet ii chililgemellt
salis prei:l vis.
– For more information call your travel aCJent or
AllltrClk i1t 1800263·8130. Toll free.
POllr plus (Ie rellselgnefl}ellts, appelez votre agell(
ele vo Yilge au Am(ri/k a 1·800·263·8130 salis frilis.
Passengers boarding the first MAPLE LEAF at CNs Niagara Falls,Ont.
station on Sunday, April 26, 1981. The train operates as AMTRAK train
number 98.
Photo courtesy Kenneth Gansel.
TIle ·
business car
THE MT WASHINGTON COG RAILWAY IS FOR SALE:: THE MANCHESTER
Union Leader March 25, 1981 announced that the Teague family
is selling the venerable railroad and tourist attraction. The
asking price, while not disclosed, is about $3 million dollars.
Owner Ellen Teague is giving first refusal to the State of NH,
but a spokesman for the State said it would rather see the railway
CANADIAN
238
R A I L
stay as private enterprise and there is no interest by the state
in owning the railroad. Mrs. Teague cites as reasons for the sale
her desire to retire, and her sgn Charles, after four years as
General Manager wishes to pursue other interests. Mrs. Teague
plans to continue to maintain a residence in New Hampshire.
THE 470
JOINT
SERVICE -VIA RAIL CANADA AND AMTRAK ARE REPORTED READY TO
beg~n a Joint service between Toronto and New York via Niagara
Falls, to replace the TH&B Toronto-Buffalo Dayliner. The CTC
must approve the service, and the Dayliner discontinuance. AMTRAK
equipment will be used, but while in Canada the train will operate
as a VIA train. Startup is to be April 26 for the 480-mile, 12-
hour trip. One-way fare is expected to be $58. Toronto departure
will be 9:05am, with an 8:45pm New York arrival. New York departure
will be 8:45am, to arrive in Toronto at 8:35pm. Consist is to be two Amcoaches
Amdinette, baggage and one locomotive.
THE 470
BRITISH
COLUMBIA RAILWAY REDUCED THE FREQUENCY OF ITS PASSENGER
serv~ce as of Feb. 16. North Vancouver-Prince George service
is reduced from tri-weekly to weekly, departing North Vancouver
on Monday and Prince George on Sunday. North Vancouver-Lillooet
service is trimmed from daily to four times weekly. Northbound
departures are on Sat., Sun., Mon. and Wed., as are southbound
trips. Local service between DArcy and Lillooet continue daily.
Meal stops are made at Lillooet and Williams Lake, as the train
carries no food. The condition of the Dayliners makes necessary
the reduction in service, BCR said. Discussions are underway on
the future of the runs.
THE 470
UTDC SYSTEM RECOMMENDED FOR LOS ANGELES
DOWNTOWN PEOPLE MOVER (DPM) TRANSIT PROJECT
(TORONTO) -THE LOS ANGELES DOWNTOWN PEOPLE MOVER AUTHORITY
yesterday made a staff recommendation to its Board of Directors
recommending that the Urban Transportation Development Corporation
(CTDC) of Toronto be the supplier of the technology for LAs 2.9
mile downtown people mover transit project. The stoff recommend­
ation will require ratification by the Board and approval by the
L.A. City Council and the Urban Mass Transportation Administration
(UMTA) before a final contract is entered into with UTDC as the
prime contractor responsible for complete system design, construc­
tion and operation of L.A. s automated downtown transit system.
Mr. Kirk Foley, UTDC President has indicated that final accept­
ance of the UTDC system is by no means certain but that our
technology and our price indicate that we are exceedingly compet­
itive in this intermediate capacity transit market.
CANADIAN
239
R A I L
UTDC was judged to be first in technical performance which
included safety, reliability and maintainability. UTDCs proposal
was also first in financial content both in immediate costs and
life cycle costs. In addition, UTDCs proposal was judged first
for its adherence to minority business requirements.
The Los Angeles Downtown People Mover is the downtown distrib­
ution element of the Los Angeles Transit System, and will provide
regional accessibility to the Down town activity centres through
an efficient, comfortable, fUlly-automated transit system. The
DPM will service downtown bus terminals, freeway parking interchan­
ges, and will eventually connect with the proposed Wilshire rapid
t ran si t li net 0 be b u il tin the mid 1 980 s •
The
technology proposed by UTDC for the DPM is a compact, quiet
train which operates on lightweight elevated guideways. This
system was developed in Canada for a wide range of rapid transit
applications of this technology in Canadian cities is in progress.
A project is now planned and work is proceeding on a Hamilton
downtown-suburban link and a Vancouver project was recently author­
ized by the Government of B.C.
In May 1980, the U.S. Urban Mass Transportation Administration
(UMTA) conducted a comprehensive 30-day supplier assessment and
operational evaluation of the complete UTDC system at the companys
Transit Development Centre in Kingston, Ontario to ensure that all
the performance capabilities and environmental requirements of the
UMTA DPM program were satisfied by this technology.
UTDC competitors in Los Angeles include the Vought Corporation,
Westinghouse, and Otis-Matra. UTDCs price proposal was the lowest
price of all compe~itors.
UTDC PRESS RELEASE
ONTARIO TRANSIT TECHNOLOGY SELECTED FOR VANCOUVER
TORONTO THE ADVANCED LIGHT RAPID TRANSIT SYSTEM DEVELOPED BY
the Urban Transportation Development Corporation ltd. (UTDC)
has been selected to serve Greater Vancouver. The first
priority line will run from downtown Vancouver to new Westminster
with branches to Surrey and Coquitlam.
B.C. Municipal Affairs Minister, the Honourable 8ill Vander
Zalm, announced in Vancouver on Saturday that his government
has selected the Canadian-developed transit system and has author­
ized the provinces Urban Transit Authority to begin work immedi­
ately on the first phase of the $290 million project. The line is
scheduled for completion in time for Transpo 86, on international
transportation exposition which will be hosted by Vancouver.
Mr. Vander Zalm indicated that funding for the project will
follow the recent agreement between the province and municipality
and that the province is negotiating with Ottowa to secure a
federal contribution toward the project.
He said the transit system developed by the Ontario-owned
Urban Transportation Development Corporation is an innovative
CANADIAN 240 R A I L
Canadian Technology which has been developed ond tested over the
past seven years by the Ontario government. I am convinced that
it is possible to utilize this new technology to serve both Vancou­
vers downtown core and the regional municipalities.
Concluded the Minister, I am extremely pround, as a Canadian,
that the commitment made today, is to a Canadian product developed
by Canadians not only for Canadians, but for countries around the
world that are looking for innovative ways to develop rapid transit.
UTDC designed and tested the new rapid transit technology under
its $60 million program to develop an Intermediate Capacity Transit
System (ICTS), which is the basis af the Vancouver Light Rapid
Transit project. It is aimed at providing cities with a low-cost
alternative to subways. ICTS (or ALRT in Vancouver) uses compact,
steel-wheel trains on slender, elevated guideways. These guideways
are cheaper to build than subway tunnels yet avoid interference with
street traffic. Special technology was developed to made ICTS the
quietest rapid transit system available. Automatic train operation
can allow trains to operate at one-minute intervals to reduce
waiting time at stations.
UTDC President, Kirk W. Foley, says the decision is a vote of
confidence in Canadian urban transit capability by one of the
nations most important cities.
I think the Government of British Columbia and the Urban
Transit Authority have taken a decisive step toward solving the
very real transportation problems facing Greater Vancouver, he
says. They will be installing the most advanced and economical
transit system available in the world. We have spent a significant
amount of money to develop and test this technology at our Transit
Development Centre near Kingston, so we know it is a proven, reli­
able system.
Also, our commitment to community sensitivities in the design
and construction phases of this project will result in a rapid
transit system in which British Columbia can take great pride.
UTDC is also proposing the system for Miami, Los Angeles and
Detroit for application in their downtown people mover programs.
These negotiations are presently underway.
UTDC expects to be forming its Vancouver team immediately so
design and constructian can begin as soon as possible to meet the
schedule.
Mr. Foley also notes that the decision will provide subst­
antial industrial benefits to both B.C. and Ontario, and that the
two provinces could jointly develop the export market for this
technology which is now sought after by many cities.
The ICTS system is being applied in Hamilton, Ontario to provide
a rapid transit connection between the downtown and communities
on Hamilton Mountain. A pre-implementation program by the Regional
Municipality of Hamilton-Wentworth is currently underway to define
an exact alignment, study environmental impacts, complete the pre­
liminary design of the system and prequalify suppliers. The regi­
onal government will base its final decision to proceed with ICTS
CANADIAN 241 R A I L
on the bosis of information obtained from the current program.
This program is expected to proceed to construction in the autumn
of 1981.
UTDC PRESS RELEASE
CP RAIL IS TAKING THE FAMILIAR CLICKETY-CLACK SOUND OUT OF TRAIN
rides along GO Transits new commuter corridor being developed
between Toronto and Milton.
Its the result of a ma jor rail upgrading programme, now in the
final phase, being carried out by CP along its right-of-way under
contract to GO Transit.
Work crews started in late fall to replace most of the existing
conventional jointed rail throughout the corridor with modern
continuous welded rail and the entire GO Train route has now
been completed.
The welded rail, weighing 136 paunds per yard, comes in quaiter­
mile lengths compared to the standard 39-foot lengths of conventional
rail. And when two lengths of welded rail are joined, theyre welded
instead of bolted, creating a continuous track surface instead of
the normal joint with a small space between rail ends. As a result,
theres no more clickety-clack sound as train wheels pass over
these joints.
Of course, there are other advantages in using welded rail. Con­
ventional rails tend to take their worst beating at the joints and
therefore require heavy maintenance at these points. And joints
are the most frequent area of fault when service disruptions
attributable to tracks occur. So the elimination of the joints
provides for a more reliable service standard as there are fewer
potential trouble spots on the line.
CP has recently completed a major reballasting programme on
the new Milton GO line as well. It is also modifying the existing
signal network and installing a sophisticated centralized traffic
control system to handle the commuter trains.
Cost of the entire upgrading of the CP Rail plant is estimated
at $32 million with the money coming from the Province of Ontario.
The 50-kilometre commuter route will be GOs fourth roil line and
will have seven stations, with Union Station as the terminal point
in Toronto. The stations are: Milton, Meadowvale, Streetsville,
Erindale, Cooksville, Dixie and Kipling.
Construction on the first phose of six of the stations was comp­
leted late this fall. Contracts for remaining work on these stations
will be awarded next spring. The seventh, Erindale, will be built
entirely in 1981 when work on a grade separation at that location
is finished.
So for, all aspects of construction on the project are on sched­
ule and barring any major delays, the new line will be in operation
in the fall of 1981. CP, under contract to GO, will run the day-to­
day operations.
GO TRANSIT
CPs rail changeout machine lifts out the old rail and lays,
levels and aligns new track along GOs new Toronto/Milton
commuter corridor.
CANADIAN 243 R A I L
CN RAIL HAS PURCHASED A CUSTOM-BUILT, 12-AXLE, DEPRESSED-CENTRE
flat car from Davie Shipbuilding Ltd. in Lauzon, Que.
This car, which is already being used for the movement of
oversized or very heavy loads, is the first Canadian railway­
owned car of this size.
. It weighs 153 tons and has a capacity of 241 tons. It is 121
feet long and its depressed-centre deck is 35 feet long by eight
feet wide. The car is also equipped with movable side extension
brackets to accommodate wider loads.
EIGHT-AXLE WAS TOPS
Until now, the largest piece of equipment CN Rail had for the
transportation of dimensional loads was the eight-axle depressed­
centre flat car. For loads requiring larger size cars
i
the division
drew on cars pooled by members of the Association of American
Railroads, explained Frank Dziedzic, coordinator, dimensional
loads.
Resorting to that pool is practical when dimensional equipment
is not in constant use by anyone railway. But availability has
become a problem since the demand for transportation of such items
as transformers, reactors and bridge components is steadily incres­
ing.
~Besides, the cars we acquire from the pool are not necessarily
buiLt: according to CN Rails track and bridge standards so thei·r
use is restricted on some of our lines and bridges, he said.
That is why CN Rail decided to not only purchase its own car,
but to have it custom-built as well. The 12-axle car has an axle
spacing larger than other similar cars. This provides better
weight distribution, which in turn means less restrictive use of
the equipment. It is also the first high-capacity car which has
standard truck components, allowing for faster maintenance and
repair work.
The 12-axle car cost approximately half a million dollars.
CN Rail Research Center performed loading tests to make sure
the wheels behaved well on curves and did not skip tracks. The
tests proved successful and on August 6, the 12-axles first assign­
ment consisted of moving a 203-ton transformer from the Westingh­
ouse plant in Hamilton, Ont., to Alberta Power Limited in Battle
River, near Edmonton.
SEEKING HUGE TRAFFIC
There was a time when railways looked upon dimensional loads
as a nuisance. But that has changed and CN Rail is actively seeking
that type of traffic and providing the best equipment and service
to handle it.
Peter Cole, national manager, ores, minerals, metals, machinery
a ~d ma~ufactured products, said that true, equipment for moving
dlmenslonal loads is big and expensive; true, such movements
CANADIAN 244 R A I L
require long range and extremely precise planning; and true, it is
not that convenient to have to clear adjacent tracks, tilt switch
stands and track signals and sometimes have one of the rails
slightly raised.
But, on the other hand, we are operating in a very lucrative
market which is rapidly expanding.
There is also another advantage. Having the ability to provide
such a service to a client is an asset to eN Rail when recruiting
new clients or when seeking more business from existing ones.
Finally, eN Rail is fulfilling a promise made to the industry
several years ago. If the demand for dimensional loads were to
increase, the division intended to meet it. Demand is indeed
much higher, so eN Rail is living up to its promise.
KEEPING TRACK
GORDON R. TAYLOR HAS BEEN BUSY PHOTOGRAPHING RAILWAY ACTION IN AND
around London, Ontario. Gordon has kindly submitted the following
photos of newly outs hopped units from General Motors Diesel Div­
ision.
ONE OF FOUR NEW units built for Devco. by G.M. is number 221, shown
at London Ontario on March 10 1981. The units are waiting for
clearance to be shipped by regular C.N. train.
CANADIAN 245 R A I L
NEWLY-BUILT UNITS 200 and 201 at C.N.s engine terminal area at London
Ontario on April 24 1981. These units are en route to the Algoma Central.
CANADIAN 246 R A I L
CANADIAN
247
R A I L
SIX NEW GP38-2 UNITS for Algoma Central are numbered 200 to 205.
200 and 201 were photographed on April 24 1981, while 202 and 203
are shown on April 29. For the record, 204 and 205 (not shown)
were delivered on the evening of April 30.
CANADIAN 248
R A I L
WINNIPEG -IN THE CROP YEAR ENDED JULY 31, 204,018 CARLOADS OF
grain transported by CN Rail were unloaded at terminal elevators
in Western Canada, the highest count since the 1971-72 crop year
when smaller cars were the norm.
A record 62,386 CN carloads of grain were unloaded at Vancouver
despite the loss of the Second Narrows Bridge there for 144 days
last winter.
Another record, 21,104 carloads, was set at Prince Rupert. At
Thunder Bay the count was 110,410 while Churchills figure was
10,118.
In addition, CN hauled 4,721 cars of grain from Thunder Bay to
the eastern seaboard in 52 unit trains during the winter freeze-
up of the St. lawrence Seaway, to expedite record export shipments.
KEEPING TRACK
eNS NEWEST CORPORATE TELEVISION COMMERCIALS BEGAN APPEARING IN
mid-S eptember.
One of the commercials, filmed in the majestic Rockies near
Jasper, points out the vital role CN Rail plays in the transport­
ation of Canadas raw materials.
The finished product belies the amount of planning and co­
operation that went into the production of the 60-second commercial.
COSTl Y Fl YING
Conceived by Maclaren Advertising in Montreal, the commercials
story line called for both ground and aerial photography of grain,
coal SUlphur, lumber and potash trains.
Faced with helicopter rental charges in excess of $350 per
hour, unsettled weather and significant production crew costs, the
advertising agencys production representatives came to Edmonton
to meet with Mountain Region transportation and public affairs
staff to map out a filming schedule.
While there is no shortage of bulk commodity trains on CN Rails
lines in western Canado, the prospect of getting all five types of
trains in the right spot at precisely the right time seemed remote.
SPECIAL TRAIN
It became apparent to Ken Mason, senior transportation control
officer, Edmonton, that the most economical solution would be to
provide a special train that would include groups of cars with all
five commodities.
Through the magic of photography, each commodity group could
be made to appear to be a complete train~
In mid-August the 29-car train, dubbed TV Special, was mar­
shalled in the Jasper yard and, powered by two shiny, new 3,000
h.p. locomotives, was moved in the early morning, pre-dawn hours
to Hinton, 40 miles east of Jasper.
CANADIAN
249
R A I L
At the same time a helicopter was being fitted with a special
camera mount that would allow a camera to be suspended outside the
helicopter, free of any vibration, while being operated remotely
by the cameraman inside the helicopter.
RENDEZ VOUS
With locomotive engineer Ed Chilton at the controls, train
TV Special moved out of the Hinton lard toward Jasper to begin
a series of pre-determined rendezvous with the helicopter.
Maclaren Advertisings art ~irector rode in the locomotive
cab and was able to talk with the cameraman aboard the helicopter
by means of portable radio.
With the ability to stop, go forward and reverse the train on command,
the entire shooting schedule took less that five hours.
Mr. Chilton recalled a number of unusual experiences that hed
encountered while piloting trains in the Jasper area but he admitted
the sight of.a helicopter darting alongside, above and in front
of a moving locomotive has to rank near the top of the list.
With its aerial photography complete, the production crew
moved on to a location near Winnipeg, where, with the help of a
second special train provided by the Prairie Region transportation
department, they completed the ground shots required to finish the
commercial.
KEEPING TRACK
CN RAILS PLANT EXPANSION PROGRAM, WHICH WIll SEE THE DOUBLE –
tracking of the 310 miles from Edmonton to Valemount by 1988,
will soon be in evidence in the Edson area.
Clearing work will get under way next week on a 14-mile section
of double track from a point 7 miles east of Edson to a point 7
miles west of the town. There will be no work undertaken within
the town limits.
Tenders have been invited for grading and drainage work and
contracts will be awarded in early April. The Mork will be under­
way by mid-April and is expected to be completed by December.
Next year, CN Rail crews will move in to lay the trackties,
rail and ballast, and install railway signalling.
In preparation for the work, CN Rail has rented a 1,600
square-foot trailer to house four of the 20 engineering personnel
who will be involved with the project. The remainder will be
housed in hotels and motels in the Edso~ area.
The railway has also rented office space on the second floor
of the Royal Bank Building in Edson.
It is anticipated that between 80 and 90 people will be working
on the project at any given time. To be completed by the end of
1982, the 14-mile section will cost 514 million.
CANADIAN 250
R A I L
CNs plant ~xpansion program is being undertaken to cope with
the tremendous ~ncreases in rail traffic that have been occuring
in the west over the past few years and that is forecast to continue
well into the future.
In comparison to the CN Rail system as a whole, rail traffic in
the west is growing at a phenomenal rate. In 1978-80, the Mountain
Region (which encompasses Alberta and B.C. and part of western
Saskatchewan) growth rate approximated nine percent annually compared
to six percent forthe total system.
Beyond 1980, the regions growth will depend on economic cond­
itions and the rate of resource development in Alberta and B.C.
One of the best indicators of the Mountain Regions future is
the measure of traffic on the Edson subdivision, CN Rails main
line between Edmonton and Jasper. This line carries all CN Rails
traffic to t~ Pacific coast and also coal and forest products to
eastern Canada and the United States. The 1978 tonnage on this
segment was 43 million gross ton miles a mile and is expected to
grow to 66 million gross tons a mile by 1985, a 54 percent increase.
Traffic levels on this line are now at a level where double
track is warranted.
A start was made on the double track program last year with two
sections between Carvel and Wabamun, a distance of 11 miles; and
between Henry House and Jasper, an eight mile stretch.
Construction also commenced last year on a nine and a half mile
connection between Tete Jaune on CN Rails B.C. North line to
Prince Rupert, and Swift Creek on the B.C. South line to Vancouver.
When completed in 1983 this connection will produce the effect of
having 29 miles of double track west of Red Pass Junction.
The two sections of double track started last year will be
completed in 1981 and a start will be made on five more sections of
double track, including the Edson section, totalling 48.5 miles.
Each section of double track will take two years to complete,
with the clearing, grading and drainage work being carried out
the first year and the track and signals installed the follow­
ing year.
The cost of double tracking the 310 miles from Edmonton to
Valemount will be about $450 million.
EDSON LEADER
WHILE EDMONTONS PROOF OF PAYMENT (POP) FARE SYSTEM IS A NORTH
American first, it will soon be joined by other similar systems
in the U.S. and Canada, and it is based in part on successful
~ropean concepts in use for over a decade.
Two cities which have nearly completed LRT lines, San Diego
and Calgary, plan to introduce POP fares when their rail services
begin in the summer, 1981. In addition, managers for bus systems
in Portland, Oregon and other U.S. cities are considering setting
up similar arrangements.
CANADIAN 251 R A I L
The POP concept (also known os self serve fares) evolved in
Europe to meet specific needs. While conductors were once used to
collect transit fares in Canada and the U.S., the trend toward low
capaci ty buses led to the use of one-man, pay-as-you-enter, fare
collection systems. Europeans cont~ed to rely on conductors, as
they moved toward higher capacity articulated buses, streetcor
trains, or double deck buses, because a single operotor could not
keep track of several entry doors. When the economic boom of the
1960s and 1970 s came to Europe, labour shortages threatened to
disrupt staffing of utilities like Transit. At the same time,
suburban areas were growing rapidly, with transit lines being
pushed out beyond the old central cities.
European transit operators needed a method of carrying more
people with less staff, through more complex metropolitan tariff
boundaries.
The POP concept resulted from this need. Passengers were given
the job of issuing their own tickets, with random spotchecks by
fare inspectors to ensure compliance. Just as in Edmonton, a
majority of passengers had switched to the convenience of pass
travel, so these passengers received a further incentive. Under
the POP system, they could bypass ticket booths and walk right onto
the train platforms without a second lost, since their pass was
their praof of payment. POP lowered costs and provided faster ser­
vice.
As the Europeans developed their self-serve fare systems,
several additional advantages became evident. Some were of a
technical nature, while others were of interest to the public.
Under the old pav-as-you-enter system on rail lines, a person who
CANADIAN 252 R A I L
is inside the gates is assumed to have paid a fare. This is an
incentive for the occasional individual who is willing to try
sneaking over or under a turnstile, or climbing onto a platform
from the tracks. Such illegal and sometimes dangerous behaviour
is pointless on a POP system, because the person involved still has
not obtained a fare receipt. In turn, this allows LRT stations
to be built on streets in residential areas without elaborate
facilities designed to funnel patrons through fare collection gates.
Another major advantage was the added flexibility in designing
transit tariffs. The pay-as-you-enter system restricts the number
and types of fares which can be charged, since a bus driver or a
fare booth attendant is faced with the need to distinguish between
a blurring stream of cash fares, transfers, and a variety of passes.
Any fare which requires rechecking, such as a distance-based zone
fare, slows down the service for all passengers. The only altern­
atives are to tolerate a high possibility of fraud, or a great
deal of unfairness in the setting of simple zone fares. Other
factors will still restrain the types of fares charged, but exp­
erience has shown that the POP system can cope with trips sold for
any combination of time or distance. This can be done without
slowing up the service, since the fare agents work can be done in
waiting areas or on vehicles which are underway.
As Edmonton gains experience with the POP syste~ it will
be possible to explore type of fares which allow for more precise
rnroKeting of its services. This could eventually free Transit from
its link with the rigid coin fare systems of the past, just as has
hoppened with other utilities.
EDMONTON TRANSIT
AMID THE SNAKING ROADS AND INTERSECTING OVERPASSES IN SOUTHWEST
Calgary stands a monument to another age.
The vintage Selkirk steam locomotive has made its home behind
the Mewata Armories for about 21 years.
Feb. 22 it will make one last trip when it is moved from its
6th Avenue location to Heritage Park.
Although the locomotive has seen some hard times since it
was retired by CP Rail in about 1960, it looks spanking new and
ready to hit the rails once again.
And the key to the old steamers youthful looks is a man named Doug
Davidson.
For the past seven years Davidson has nursed the grand old dame
along through rust, tarnish and broken water pipes.
He speaks fondly of his attempts to patch up the rare old
machine and points out there are only two of the 2-10-4 Selkirk
locomotives left.
CANADIAN
253
R A I L
His ties to the Selkirk go back seven years when he formed the
Selkirk Preservation Society and was na.ed guardian of the locomo­
tive, with the citys blessing.
Its a partnership that will remain intact.
Heritage Park officials told him this week they want him to
help with the locomotive when it reaches its new home.
Laurie Reiffenatein, assistant manager of Heritage Park, said
preparations are under way to move the locomotive from its location
at the Calgary Tourist and Convention Association office at 1300
6th Ave. S.W.
If everything goes to plan, the Selkirk will be moving down a
set of portable tracks on 9th Avenue Feb. 22.
From 9th Avenue the locomotive will be put onto a CP Rail
spur line and taken to 82nd Avenue S.W., near Heritage Station,
from where it will later be moved into the park.
The park eventually wants to add a transportati.on museum to its
list of attractions and the old steam engine will fit right in.
Reiffenstein said officials felt more tourists would 5ee the
locomotive at Heritage Park than at its present location.
People of all ages come from allover Canada and as far away
as Japan to take a look at that locomotive, Davidson said.
He explains there was a reason wh~ city council decreed in
1966 that the train sit at that particular spot and face a westward
direction.
Thats where it belonged, in the west facing the mountains
because thats where it worked, he said.
Former Herald columnist Ken Liddell cooked up the idea of
buying the train in 1965, said Davidson, and through public fund­
raising a decision was made a year after a local radio announcer
publicized the issue.
About $15,000 came in and the city put up the balance of the
locomotives price tag of $20,000 to $25,000.
Davidson said his fascination with steam locomotive started
when he was three years old.
Throughout his life he enjoyed various trips on the passenger
steam trains, but he stopped riding trains when steam stopped.
When youre in a little station when that locomotive came through
it hod a smell all of its own of steam and oil. And when it stopped
the engine would pant, just like it was alive.
CALGARY HE RALD
CN Rail is currently taking delivery of 500 gondola cars from
National Steel Car of Hamilton, Ontario, at a rate of six per
day. The more than 25 million dollar contract covers 100-ton
capacity units to carry iron and steel in the form of coils,
beams, plates and bars. Above, two Hamilton inspectors check
the steel sub-structure before assembling the heavy-duty floor.
Some of the completed cars can be seen in the background.
CN Press Release.
-!,i~COJli:1!:
by 00
Hut
ment.
THE HIGH-Tt:HNOlOGV, f::Of-l[ ;:OVER TRAINS [!::/ElOPED
Ontario Ga¥erflllllHlt Crown lila jar ind;pendent buyer in H.t British CalulJbia Govern.,
The B,C. Cabinet has agreed with its transit advisers and chasen
the untried Ontario trains for a S650-mil1ian transit system for
Greater Vancouver, A money_bac~ guarantee from Ontario helped
clinch the deal.
Co_muters are to b~ riding the trains by 1986 _ in time to
disploy the technology to the world when Vancouver celebrates its
centennial with on international tranlportotion exposition,
Victorias decision coincided with tile end of three doys of
snow lost week that sow hopelessly ill equipped Vancouver slowly
strongl. in traffic and obondan any pretense at keeping bu,
,elledules.
Now all that stands between long-suffering West Caa.t camlJut.rs
and quiet, co.fortable and rapid rid,s to downtown _ whirring above
ond beneath the snarled .treet, -is a deficit-shoring agreement
between Victario and the municipalities that compri,e the Greater
Vancouver Regional District.
Municipal endorsement is considered to be a formality -de.~ite
the reservations of new Vancouver HClyor Michael HClrcourt, worriad
obout a Montreal OlYlflpics type. of disaster. Municipal Affairs
Minister Williolll Vander Zalrl onnoun!;ed on Saturday that he wonts
an ogreeaent by Feb. 1.
A measure of the significance Victoria places on its decision,
and of the political !eturns it t:)(pects, is Hr, Vander Zolr1,
as.ertion: Its the biggest thing .ince (fortler Premier) Ii.A.C.
Bennett 10105 oble to annoo)nCII the Peace and Colufl1bia J)ower J)rojects.
Beating aut West Gllrmon trains for the B.C. tronsit plum .. os
a breakthrough for the Ontario Government and its Urban Transit
Development Corporotion.
·I~ pretty eloted, UTDC president Kil~ Foley soid This is
very ilJPortont. Now we have a big construction job oheod of us,
building a 27_kilolJetre line,
Ont.rio to.poyels have cIa •• to a S100_million stoke in the
UTDC venture, It begon as a revolutionary, ~agnetic cushion train
that wouldnt work, It was given wheels, and has been running
around a 2.5-lo:ilall.tre test track near Kingston for thr.I!! years –
long on pro~is. and short on buyers.
GLOBE & MAIL
BACK COVER
This advanced light rapid transit system developed by the Urbon
Transportati.on Oevelopment Corporgtion ltd., hOi!> been selecled for
use on a 22.4 Kill route between d(ll{ntawn Vancouver and ,.jel{
hestminister. ork on the first phO~F of ;:11 proie~i: is IIch,·du.!:cc
to begin imawdioL, y
~TDC Press Reloos0

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