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Canadian Rail 349 1981

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Canadian Rail 349 1981


Canadian Rail

No.349
FEBRUARY 1981

Published J:lOntllly by The Canadian Railroad Historical Association
P.O. Box 22, Station G Montreal,Quebec,
Canada H3B 3J5
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
BUSINESS CAR: Dave J. Scott
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
FRONT COVER:
A BALLAST TRAIN DURING CONSTRUC­
TION OF THE PACIFIC SECTION of
the C.P.R. by Andrew Onderdonk.
-The locomotive is No.4. SAVONA
which had formerly been No. 5
CARSON of the Virginia and
Truckee. This 2-6-0 survived until
1926 when, as C.N.R. 7083.
it ~as scrapped. Coll ection of
Orner Lavall~e.
OPPOSITE:
C.P.R. LOCOMOTIVE tO. 150 is
shown on the Pic River Bridge during the construction days of the 1880s. This engine
had been
bui It by DUbs in Sco tl and in 1873
and. before being purchased by
C.P. in 1883, had been used on
the construction of the govern­ment-buil t section
west of
Thunder Bay. It was scrapped in
1895. Note the temporary construction of the bridge,
soon
to be repl aced by better quality
work. Collection of Orner
Laval1~e.
…….. ~IAN
55N 0008 -4875
CALGARY & SOOTH WESTERN DIVISION
60-6100 4th Ave. NE
Calgary, Alberta T2A 5Z8
OTTAWA
BYTOWN RAILWAY SOCIETY
P.O. Box 141, Station A
Otta~a, Ontario Kl N 8Vl
NEW BRUNSWICK DIVISION
P.O. Box 1162
Saint John,
Ne~ Brun swi c k E 2L 4G 7
CROWSNEST AND KEHLE-VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 400
Cranbrook, British Columbia
V1C 4H9
PACIFIC COAST DIVISION
P.O. Box 1006, Station A. Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2Pl
ROCKY MOUNTAIN DIVISION
P.O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Alberta T5B 2NO
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor
Ontario N9G lA2
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
P;O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto Ontario
M5W lP3
NIAGARA DIVISION
P.O. Box 593
St.Catharines, Ontario
L2R 6W8
ST. LAWRENCE VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 99
Ste. Doroth~e, Quebec H7X 2T4
CANADIAN
36
R A I L
canadian Pacific
IN COMMEMORATION OF THE CENTENNIAL OF THE FOUNDING OF
THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY (NOW CANADIAN PACIFIC
LIMITED) THE CANADIAN RAIL COMMITTEE IS PLEASED TO PUBLISH
TWO ISSUES DEVOTED TO THIS SUBJECT.
THE FEBRUARY 1981 CANADIAN RAIL CONTAINS AN ARTICLE
ON THE INCORPORATION OF THE COMPANY, AS WELL AS ONE ABOUT
THE LOCOMOTIVES USED BY THE CONTRACTORS ON THE PARTS OF
THE LINE BUILT BY THE GOVERNMENT BEFORE THE COMPANY TOOK
THEM OVER.
NEXT MONTH WE WILL PRESENT A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LAST
HUNDRED YEARS OF THE COMPANY, A SYNOPTIC HISTORY OF THE RAIL
OPERATIONS OF THE C.P.R. FROM 1881 TO 1927, AS WELL AS A
SELECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHS OF C.P.R. LOCOMOTIVES AND TRAINS
TAKEN DURING THE ERA OF STEAM.
WE HOPE YOU WILL ENJOY THESE TWO SPECIAL ISSUES.
THE CANADIAN RAIL COMMITTEE.
FEBRUARY 1981.
~ ••
Canadian Canadien
Pacific Pacifique
100 Years 100 ans
Yesterday
Hier
Today and aujourdhui
Tomorrow et demain
THIS SYMBOLIC LOGO is being used by Canadian Pacific to
commemorate the centennial of the company. It will be used
on Canadian Pacific stationery during 1981, and is shown
here by special permission of Canadian Pacific.
PUNCH, OR THE LONDON OHARIVARL-OcTOBKR 15, 1887.
THE NEW NORTH-VEST PASSAGE.
B,U·UInfll. .. NOW. FROM MY WESTERN CLIFFS THAT FRONT THE DEEP
TO WHERE THE WARM PAClFIC WATE&9 SWEEP
AnOUND CATHAY AND OLD Z[PANGUB BHORE,
MY COURSE IS CLEAR. WHAT CAN I WISH FOR MOREf
CARTOON BY JOHN TENNIEL WHICH APPEARED IN PUNCH IN 1887
depicting the recently-completed C.P.R. as an imperial link.
Note the locomotive appearing as an 0-8-0 ~
The
IncorPQration
of the Company
BY FRED ANGUS
One hundred years ago, on February 16 1881, the Canadian Pacific
Railway Company was incorporated by letters patent under the Great
Seal of Canada. The incorporation had been authorized by an act of the
Canadian Parliament entitled An Act Respecting The Canadian Pacific
Railway Company, and this act had received royal assent only the day
before. The task facing this new company was formidible by any stand­
ards, but to the fourteen-year-old Dominion of Canada of 100 years ago
it appeared almost impossible. It was, simply stated, to build a railway
from Eastern Canada to the Pacific coast, entirely through Canadian
territory, to complete this job in ten years, and to operate the railway
thereafter. Although certain sections had been built or were under con­
struction, the majority of the line, including 1000 miles across the
Canadian shield, 800 miles across the prairies, and 500 miles through
the mountains, had not been started. Not only that, but much of the land
which was eventually traversed was uninhabited and not even fully
explored.
Incorporation of the company came only after a ten-year political
struggle which had begun in 1871 when British Columbia had joined the
Canadian confederation. Part of the deal was that a railway would be
built connecting B.C. with Eastern Canada within ten years, but by 1880
the time was almost up and the job was scarcely begun. The first attempt
had ended with the Pacific Scandal and defeat of the government in
1873, followed by the slow and not-so-sure piecemeal construction by the
federal government. By 1880 it was evident that a private company was
best qualified to build the line, and on October 21 of that year a con­
tract was signed between the government and The Syndicate as it was
popularly called at the time.
The syndicate which was to become the Canadian Pacific Railway
Company was headed by George Stephen who had been born in Duff town,
Banffshire, Scotland in 1829, had come to Canada in 1850, and had made a
fortune in the drygoods business. From 1876 to 1881 he was
president of the Bank of Montreal, from which position he resigned
in 1881 to become the first president of the C.P.R. After retiring from
the C.P.R. in 1888, he went to live in England, became Lord Mount
Stephen in 1891, and died there in 1921 at the age of 92.
Duncan McIntyre was born at Callander, Perthshire, Scotland
about 1815, came to Canada in 1849, and also became successful in the
CANADIAN 40 R A L
drygoods business. He had purchased controlling interest in the Canada
Central Railway which extended from Brockville to Sand Point in the
Ottawa valley. In 1870, the C.C. Ry. had opened the line from Carleton
Place to Ottawa, and at that time the International Railway and Steam
Navigation Guide printed this prophetic statement: The completion of
this first link in the great chain of railways destined, we trust, at
44 VICfORIA.
CHAP, I,
An Ad respecting the Caundinn Pacific R-ftilway.
(Assellted to 1:;1 Fcbrllar y, 1881.J
l-X7 BEREAS by th~ tenus lind conditions of the admission. Prumblo.
VV oflhilish ColufIlbi; into Union wilh the Dominion
of Canmlo., tho Gocrull1cnt of thl DOlninion has assumed
tho ohlignlion or cl\lsillg a HnilwllY to bo cOllstrnctcd,
connecting the seo.boanl of TIriti:;h Columbin with the
Hailway systum of Call ada ; –
And whcrl!os the P:lItinml:Jlt of Canada has repeatedly Pnlmoco or
declared, a preference for I,he ?Ollstluction allli opcmli<>,11 of ~~t~~~~~~~ct_
!H1ch Hnilway hy mCllUS 01 tin II1corporaled COlupnuy Sided 100 Ly a com­
by grallts of money ment., lUU certain tHntnte8 have betm pllssed to ella-ble that
eomso to blJ followed, but the enBctments therein containcd
have not heen efledn:ll for that purpose;
And whereas certain sections of the said R-ailwny hove Gruter pin
been cOli~truetcd b.r tho Government, aJl~ others aro ~n ::~l~C~:.J~II­
course 01 constructIOn, bl1t tho grcl er portIon of tho roam
line thereof I,as not yet been commellct!d or placcd undcr
contract, l)ud it is necessary for the dcvelopmcnt of tho
iorth-Vest Tl.lrritory nnd for thu preservation of tho.good
faith of tho Govcrlunent in thu performance of its obliga-
tiOIlS, that immediate sleps should be taken to complete oud
operate the wholo ot the snid Uailway ;
And whereas, in conformity with the exprcssed desiro of UOlllrlcl tn­
Porliament-, a. contract has been cntered into for the con-tercd 11110.
stmction of thu said portion of the main line of said
Railwny, and for thIJ permauant workin! of the whole lillo
thcJcof, which contlllct with thl;} schednle annexed has be,m
I:.tid Ldore Parliamcllt for its npproval and 8 copy thereof iM
Ippeuded herIJlo, uud it it> IJlpe(jient to npprovlJ And ralify
ths said COil tract, and to make provision for the carrying
out of tho same;
Letters Patent nnder the Grent Sen I of Canadn hMe m!cn
bhoi~n~~r i8~n1ed ill accordance with the foregoing Qnll!r in
Dated I~th Fcbrnnry, 1881.
JOliN OCONNOR,
Secreillr/Iof Slule.
Lottors Patont inoorporating the Canadian Paoiflc Railway Company,
GOVBUNMIlNl HOnSE,
OITAWA, 16th day of February, 1881.
Prcsent:
HIS EXOELLENCY THE QOVERNOR GENERAL IN COUNOIL.
O
N the recommcndation of tho Right Honorable Sir John
A. Macdonald, ntld in nccorduHcu with the Act of Par­
liament of Cnnodu, passed oulhe 15th dnyor February, 1881,
intil.uled: An Act respecting lho Cnnadinn Pacific Jtailway
Company,-
His Excellency has been pleased to order and it is hereby
ordered, that I.. he issued incorporating 1I1ho Canadian Pacific Railway
tompany,-such J~llcrs PI ent to bu as follows:-
CANADA.
VICTORIA, by the Groce oj God of lhe United KilllJdmn 01
Greal Britain (Jnd Ireland, Queen De/clltiu oj lhe Fail,
etc., etc.
To flU to whom thcse presents shnll comc, or whom tho same
roay in a1ywisu COlleerll,
GRBETINO:
WHEREAS, George Stephen, of thu City of Montreal, in
. thu Proince of QnebIJc and Domillion of Canada,
EsquIre; Duncan McIntyro, of the snme place, Morchant;
John S. Kennedy, of the City of New York, in the Stato of
New York, one 01 the United Stal~s of America; Richard n.
Angus, of thc· City of St. Paul, in lhe Stnto of Minnesota, ona
of lhe United States of America; and James J. Hill, of tho
sa.mc place; tho. firm of Morton, RO!e and Company, of the
CIty of London, tn Ellglon(l, .Merchants, Alltlthelirm of Kuhn
Reinsch and Company, of the City of Puris, in France,
Dankers,ou or· ahonl. the twenty-first dny of October, in the
year of Our ~rd 0110 thousand eight hundr~d and .eigbty,
duly eulore<1 mto a contract and 8gr~ement With Us
111« wh~r~a:s Ihe ~aid pt-ll!HJJS hIHU pruY(d for: chrtl.!r
fo I hI.! pnrpo~~~ ;di.msaiJ ;
J. Now K;..ow YF:, that, oy and with t1w aJvicl of OHr
rri,.y Counci} 101 CUII,,~IIt, Rnd HIHIIJf the authority of Ow
hereJlli?efol1J
In part rC~IIl!d Act, and of nlly o!her power and
authonly whllisocer III Us vestl!d in this behall: ,V}; ])0,
by thc~u our L~ttel~ ratent, grallt,olcier, decl:ne all(j provide
that the said. Gl!orgc SlIJphell, Dnncon MeIlttyr~ .. Johll S.
Kl!Hllec.ly,
nlchard D. Aligns, J:tlnes J. Hill, the finn or
MorloD, nose & Company, Dud the finn of Kohli, Rdllach
& Company; withnll~uch otherpersollsand lorporaiions n~
6hall h.ecolne shareholders in the Company h~rcbf illcor­
])oroted,
~halJ he. ~Jtd !h~y nro here],) cOltljlitnllt1 a body
corporute and puhtlC, by IIIIJ name or the C,llt;Jdian Pa,;ific
Hnilwuy Compnu).
PORTIONS OF THE ACT OF INCORPORATION AND THE LETTERS PATENT issued
on February 16 1881. This document, one of the most historic in
Canadian history, was printed by the government printer in 1882 for
sale to interested members of the public.
CANADIAN
41
R A I L
no distant day to connect the great oceans of the East and West,
reflects much credit on the enterprising projectors. McIntyre
remained a C.P.R. director until his resignation in 188~.
Richard B. Angus was yet another Scot, having been born at
Bathgate, near Edinburgh, in 1831. His career had been in banking,
working first at a bank in Manchester England, then coming to Canada
in 1857 at the request of the Bank of Montreal and entering their
service as a clerk. By 1869 he was General Manager of the B. of M., and he
retained this position until 1879 when he resigned to devote
himself to the St. Paul railway project, He was a C.P.R. director
for the remainder of his life, and it is interesting that, as late
as 1910, at the age of 79, he returned to the Bank of Montreal as
president, retaining the post until 1913. When he died in 1922, he was
the last survivor of the original C.P.R. Syndicate.
James J. Hill was born at Rockwood, Ontario, near Guelph in 1838.
He had gone to St. Paul Minnesota in 1856 and worked for a steamboat
company on the Mississippi river. Later he promoted the Red River
Transportation Line. He also obtained control of the St. Paul and
Pacific Railroad, which in 1879 became the St. Paul Minneapolis and
Manitoba R.R. He was a C.P.R. director until 1883 when he resigned to
concentrate on the St. P. M. & M., which soon became the Great Northern.
Long before Hills death in 1916, the Great Northern had reached the
Pacific coast, and today, as the Burlington Northern, is the largest
railway in America, extending from Washington state to Florida.
The remaining members of the syndicate were the banking firms of
John S. Kennedy in New York, Morton, Rose and Co. of London England,
and Kohn, Reinach and Company of Paris France. Kennedy was a director
until 1883 when he resigned at the same time as Hill, and Baron Reinach
was also a director in the early 1880s.
Another associate was Donald Smith who, for political reasons,
could not be officially a member of the syndicate, since he had not
sUEPorted Sir John A. MacDonald at the time of the Pacific scandal in
1873. Smith, also a Scot, was born at Forres, Morayshire in 1820,
and had entered the Hudsons Bay Company in 1838, &pending much of
his career in the North. He was a cousin of George Stephen, and a
great supporter of the C.P.R. project. It was Smith who drove the last
spike completing the transcontinental main line in 1885, and he also
became president of the Bank of Montreal. In 1896 he was made Lord
Strathcona, and, as Canadian HighCommissioner to England, took up
residence in London where he died in 1914. This, briefly, was the
group of persons who signed the contract, in October 1880, to build a
railway almost three thousand miles long.
The formation of the syndicate had come about almost by chance.
In September, 1877 George Stephen and R.B. Angus (then president and
General Manager, respectively, of the Bank of Montreal) were in Chicago
on business connected with the bank. During this time they had several
days free, and it is said that they decided by the toss of a coin to go
to St. Paul and visit James J. Hill. As a result of this meeting with
Hill, both Stephen and Angus decided to join forces with him, and Angus
resigned from the bank and moved to St. Paul in 1879, becoming Vice­
President of the reorganized railway. He remained in St. Paul until 1881 when he
returned to Montreal at the formation of the C.P.R. In 1879 the
CANADIAN
42
R A I L
Donald Smith
George Stephen
James J. Hill
FIVE OF THE PERSONS WHO WERE VERY ACTIVE IN THE FOUNDING OF THE C.P.R.
Although Donald Smith was not mentioned in the incorporating document,
he did much for the company and, five years later, drove the last spike.
—-
~ —.,-.. —:==:>
~-?
-==—-
~2~
A CARTOON OF 1881 SHOWING THREE MEMBERS OF THE C.P.R. SYNDICATE
holding the contract to build the railway. From left to right they
are: McIntyre, Stephen, Angus. All are shown wearing Scottish costume~
VOL. TUR SIX rt;V-HTlT, No. 11.
/
!I!
t
GRIP.
~.I.ll,.;IID.Y, HlTU rElnUAMI, t~Bl.
THE CONTRACT SNALLOWED.
SIR JOHN.-YES, ITS DOWN SURE ENOUGII, BUT JJIf /lFRAIn iT IVONT DiGEST!
THE SATURDAY AFTER THE PASSAGE OF THE ACT AUTHORIZING THE INCORP­
ORATION OF THE C.P.R. this humourous cartoon was published by Grip
magazine. Sir John A. MacDonald is shown as having forced the bill
down the throat of a reluctant parliament by strength of a majority
of his party.
CANADIAN 45
R A I L
semi-moribund St. Paul and Pacific was transformed into the St. Paul
Minneapolis and Manitoba, and the line prospered as settlers moved,into
the new territory following the end of a plague of grasshoppers WhlCh had
ravaged the country for several years. By 1880 this railway was a
going concern and the promoters began to consider the possibility of
negotiating f~r the construction of the Canadian Pacific since ?y this
time it was obvious that the recently-reelected government of Slr John
A. MacDonald was seeking a private group to build the railway.
In April 1880 the syndicate, through Duncan McIntyre, approached
the government and, after much negotiating, the contract was signed on
October 21 1880. The chief terms of the contract were that the government
would turn over to the company the portions of the line already built
or under construction, as well as 25,000,000 acres of land and $25,000,000
payable as the line was constructedo In addition, no other railway South
of the C.P.R. was to be built in Western Canada for 20 years unless such
railway ran West of South-West and did not come within fifteen miles of
the United States border. In return for these considerations, the syn­
dicate agreed to complete the railway, and to operate it in perpetuity.
When the proposal was submitted to Parliament, in the form of a bill,
on December 10 1880, there was much heated discussion and debate which
occupies hundreds of pages of the Parliamentary record of the time.
Finally, however, the bill passed the House of Commons on third reading
on February 1 1881, soon passed the Senate, and was given Royal assent
by the Governor-General, Lord Lorn~on February 15. The following day,
February 16 1881, the Canadian Pacific Railway Company came into being.
As is well known, the company completed the construction in
barely half the allowed time, and on June 28 1886 the first through
transcontinental train left Montreal for the Pacific coost which it
reached six days later. Since that time the CoP.R., and, more recently,
Canadian Pacific Limited, has grown with Canada, and today it is a huge
widely diversified corporation as it completes its first century of
existance.
CONTRAC : S
ENGINES IN THE
CONSTRUCTION
OF THE C.P. R.
By: Harvey Elson.
During the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway in the
early 1880s the contractors who were building the railway used an
interesting collection of second-hand and new steam locomotives to
work the trains up and down the line. Typical of these engines were
those used by Joseph Whitehead on his contract between Winnipeg and
Rat Portage {Kenora), those used on the government-built section
from Fort William to Rat Portage, and those em~loyed by John Ryan
on his contract for the first hundred miles west of Winnipeg. Of
equal interest were the engines used by Andrew Onderdonk on the
213 miles of railway from Port Moody to Savonas Ferry on Kamloops
Lake in British Columbia, and later on to Craigellachie.
The building of the various sections of the C.P.R. has been
told and retold over the years, but it is remarkable that so little
information has been published about the engines that played such
an important part in the completion of what is justifiably famous as
one of the worlds greatest railways.
The best known of these contractors engines were those usJLCl-_ by
Joseph Whitehead on his contract. They were:
No. 1. Countess of Dufferin.
No. 2. Joseph Whitehead (also called 5 tar) •
No.
3. James McKay •
No.
4. James M. Rowan.
No.
5. Empress of India •
No.
6. Sitting Bull •
No.
7. Joseph Brophy.
No. 8. H. Nuttall.
Without doubt the most famous of this antique octet is No.1,
Countess of Dufferin, which arrived at St. Boniface, across the Red
River from Winnipeg, on October 9 1877. The Countess was built by
the Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1872 for the Northern Pacific Railway.
Whitehead purchased the engine for $6800. in 1877, and used her until
1883 when he sold her to the Canadian Pacific where she became number 151
(not No.1 as is often erroneously reported). The Countess worked
CANADIAN 47 R A I L
in the Winnipeg area and further west until 1897 when she was sold
to the Columbia River Lumber Company of Golden B.C., where she cont­
inued to work until being retired prior to 1910. The story goes that
the mayor of Winnipeg was returning by train from Vancouver when he saw
the veteran engine on a siding at Golden. Upon inquiring about
the history of the derelict he was astonished to be told that this
antique was indeed the first steam locomotive to operate out of Winn­
ipeg. No further stimulus was needed. At the urging of the mayor the
Countess was resurrected, rehabilitated, and placed in Sir William
Whyte Park near the C.P.R. station in Winnipeg. She remained there
from 1910 to 1942 in which year she was re-located in a spot just in
front of the C.P.R. passenger station. In 1970 the Countess was
restored as much as possible to her original 1877 appearance as when
she arrived at Winnipeg, and she was moved to a small park on Main
street not far from the Manitoba Museum of Man and Nature.
Not as much is known about the other Whitehead locomotives,
but we do know that numbers 2, 3, 4, and 5 were purchased from the
Baldwin locomotive works in 1878 (No.2) and 1879 (Nos. 3,4,5).
Number 6 was purchased from the United States Rolling Stack Company a few
months after delivery by the Pittsburg Locomotive Works as
number 356. The history of No.7 Joseph Brophy was similar; she
was built by Baldwin in 1878 and was also purchased from the United
States Rolling Stack Comp.any. Number 8 H. Nuttall was built new in
1880 by the Canadian Locomotive Company •
…….. .. -:
,;~.~,:, :::1;i~~1;l~~~~.
THE ARRIVAL OF THE COUNTESS OF DUFFERIN at St. Boniface Manitoba
on October 9 1877. This was the first locomotive in Western Canada.
Photo: Canadian Pacific archives.
THIS VERY RARE PHOTOGRAPH IS THE EARLIEST KNOWN SHOWING A. LOCOMOTIVE
LETTERED CANADIAN PACIFIC. Taken at Richmond, near Haiifax, N.S. in
1876, it d~picts one of the foui former broad~~a~g~pngine. of the
Windsor and Annapolis Railway. Traded to the Intercolonial in 1875
when the gauge was changed; these engines were standard-gayged in 1876 and
~erit to Thuhder Btiy to start work on the government-built section.
This was ~ore thari a year.BEFORE th~ COUN!E~S OF DUFF~RINIwhichis
often cla~med to be the f~rst Canad~an Pac~f~clocomot~ve. .
BuiJ:t by·Fox Walker in Bristol England in 1869, as W. & A. No 2,
GABRIEI.:, this. engine became C.P.R. 2016 and was scrapped in 1906.
photo: C.R.H.A. archives, Van Horne Collection.
, .
—-
, .
. ……..
CANADIAN 50
R A I L
With the completion of the contract Joseph Whitehead is thought
to have sold these eight engines to the government which then sold
them to the C.P.R. in 1883. Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,6,7,8 became C.P.R.
numbers 151,144,145,146,147,95,148,71 respectively. Number 148,
formerly No.7, Joseph Brophy, made history when, on November 7 1885,
it pulled the train to the driving of the last spike at Craigellachie
B.C. New numbers were assigned to these engines in the general renumber­
ing of motive power devised in 1905, but by then there were only four
of them left in service. Sitting Bull No.6 was scrapped in 1896,
James M. Rowan, No.4 in 1898, and Joseph Whitehead No.2 in 1902.
In the 1905 renumbering, engines 145 James McKay, 148 Joseph Brophy
and 71 H. Nuttall were renumbered 19,21,28 respectively. Number 147
retained this number until it was sold to the Orford Mountain Railway
in 1909.
But these engines did not last long. Number 21 was scrapped in
1907, number 19 in 1909, and number 28 in 1910. Number 147, formerly
Whiteheads No.5, Empress of India was sent East and was for some
time in service out of Montreal on the C.P.Ros short line to Sher­
brooke. She was sold to the Orford Mountain Railway, which connected
with the C.P.R. at Eastray about 30 miles west of Sherbrooke, in 1909.
The Orford Mountain worked the former Empress for only one year and
then scrapped her in 1910.
On the Thunder Bay section, much of the rolling stock used in
construction was leased from the Intercolonial Railway and brought to
Port Arthur in 1876. Four of the locomotives were former broad gauge
(5 6) engines of the Windsor and Annapolis Railway in Nova Scotia.
They were No.1 Evangeline, No.2 Gabriel, No.3 Hiawatha, and
No.4 Blomidon. They had been built in 1869 by Fox Walker of Bristol
England and were rebuilt to standard gauge in 1876 at the Richmond
(Halifax) shops of the Intercolonial. Eventually they were purchased
by the C.P.R. in 1882 and given numbers 152 to 155. Number 155 was
scrapped in 1902, while 152 to 154 were renumbered 2015 to 2017 in
1903, and were scrapped in 1907,1906, and 1906 respectively. All
four had been converted from 4-4-0 to 0-6-0 tender engines in 1887
to make continuing use of their excellent boilers.
The other engines used during the construction of the Thunder
Bay section were noteworthy because their numbers were duplicated,
so that there were two numbers 1, 2, 4, 5. Numbers 1 and 2 were del­
ivered to the contractor by the Canadian Locomotive Company of King­
ston Ontario in 1879 and 1880 respectively. They eventually became
Canadian Pacific numbers 68 and 17 and remained on the roster until
1 902 and 1 901. The 0 the r eng in e s are tho ugh t to h a ve bee n fro m the
Intercolonial Railway. Their former numbers are unknown but Nos. 6 and 7
may have originated as numbers 12 and 7 of the former Nova
Scotia Railway. Curiously construction engines 9 and 35 were not
purchased by the C.P.R. being either wrecked or scrapped. Number
4, first 5, second 5, 6, 7 were purchased by the C.P.R. in 1883 and
were numbered 149, 150, 18, 19, 7. C.P.R. 8 and 9 were not contractors
engines but were of uncertain origin and bought second-hand by the
C.P.R. in 1881. Numbers 149 and 150 were scrapped in 1895, number 7
in 1896, 19 in 1897, and 18 in 1898.
The building of the railway west of Winnipeg had been awarded
in part to John Ryan who was to build the first 100 miles. For this
contract a new locomotive was purchased from the Baldwin Locomotive
Works, named J .G. Haggart, and numbered 1 0 During the winter of 1879
THE JOSEPH WHITEHEAD, the second engine on the Manitoba section, is
shown when new about 1878. This locomotive was also called STAR from
the star on the front number plate. In later years it was C.P.R. 144
and was scrapped in 1902.
Photo: Canadian Pacific.
CANADIAN
52 R A I L
the rails were laid across the Red river on the ice, and on Christmas
Eve the J.G. Haggart ran over from St. Boniface to Winnipeg. The
C.P.R. purchased this locomotive in 1883, and numbered it 143. It was
renumbered 18 in 1906 and was scrapped in 1910.
With both the Whitehead and Ryan contracts completed the engines
they had used were taken over by the government of Canada for use on
the Thunder Bay section. Subsequently they were purchased by the C.P.R.
but disputes arose over the purchase price for them. Five were out of
service and of little value, while the price offered for the ones in
operation was considered by the government to be too low. Peter Clarke
the mechanical superintendant of the Northern andNorth Western Railway
in central Ontario was appointed arbitrator and, in August 1883, he
went to Fort William to inspect the engineso Mr. Clarke made a thorough
examination and on September 15 presented his report and evaluation of
the motive power. This evaluation was slightly higher than the offer
made by W.C. Van Horne, General Manager of the Canadian Pacific.
The construction locomotives on Andrew Onderdonks contract
through the mountains, the Pacific section, are of paramount interest.
When the C.P.R. took over the line from the government of Canada in
1886 these locomotives were said to be unacceptable and no longer of
any value. The Canadian government therefore had them shipped east
where, ironically, they ran for almost forty years more~ Originally
most of these engines came from the Virginia and Truckee Railroad in
the state of Neva~a U.S.A. Darius Ogden Mills, who had a financial
interest in the V. & T. as well as the Onderdonk contract in British
Columbia, brought these engines north for use in building this portion
of the C.P:R.
C.P.R. 147 AT CALGARY IN 1884 less than a year after the arrival of the
first train. This engine had formerly been Whiteheads No.5, EMPRESS
OF INDIA, and it was destined to end its days in 1910 on the Orford
Mountain Railway in Quebecs Eastern Townships.
Canadian Pacific archives.
CANADIAN
53
R A I L
The first of these engines, No.1 Yale, was formerly No.3
Storey of the V. & T. When the C.P.R. was completed, No.1 was sold
to the Intercolonial Railway and renumbered 188. She was renumbered 1023
in 1912, and the following year was transferred to Canadian Government
Railways, re!aining !he same number. She.was rebuilt considerably in
1914, and, hnally, H 1920 became Canadlan National No. 7082, being
scrapped a few months later.
Onderdonks Number 2 Emory, otherwise known as Curly, was and
is probably the best known of these construction engines. An 0-4-0T
with tender, Number 2 was built in 1879 by Marschuetts and Cantrell of
San Francisco California, where it is thought to have been used in the
construction of the sea-wall before being shipped north to B.C. in the
S pring of 1881. On arrival Emory was in poor condition and was re­
built extensively under the supervision of E.E. Austin. Emory remained
in service until 1888, when it was sold to the Hastings Saw Mill Co.
which operated it until 1926. It was then retired and returned to the
care of the Canadian Pacific. Restored by the C.P.R. and renumbered
2 Curly/ it was placed on exhibition at Hastings Park, Exhibition
Grounds, Vancouver.
::.P.R. NUMBER 148 at work in a gravel pit at Keefers B.C. in 1886. The
previous November 7 this locomotive had made history by hauling the
train at the famous driving of the last spike at Craigellachie. It had
originaly been Whiteheads No.7 JOSEPH BROPHY and it survived on the
C • P • u n ti I 1 907 •
Collection of Omer Lavallee.
CANADIAN
54
R A I L
Number 3 New Westminster, No.4 Savona and No.5 Lytton
also came from the Virginia and Truckee, while No.6 Nicola,
No.7 Kamloops, No.8 Shuswap, and No.9 Columbia were purchased
new from the Baldwin Locomotive works in 1884. These engines were sold
to the Intercolonial Railway in 1887, becoming I.C.R. engines 189,190,
191, 184, 185, 186, 187 respectively. No. 190 was rebuilt in 1910 to
an 0-6-0 but retained the same number. In 1912 they we~ renumbered
1024, 1025, 1026, 1119, 1078, 1079, 1080. Numbers 1078 and 1080 were
scrapped in 1914, while the others became Canadian Government Railways
engines, with the same numbers, in 1913. Their final disposition was
as follows: 1079 (former Shuswap) was sold in 1915 to Kirk and Cook
the contractors building the Saint John Valley Railway in New Brunswick.
1026 (former Lytton)and 1024 (former New Westminster) were sold for
scrap to the Canadian Car and Foundry Co. in Amherst Nova Scotia in
1917 and 1918. Number 1025 (former Savona) and 1119 (former Nicola)
were taken into the roster of Canadian National Railways in 1920 where
they became numbers 7083 and 236. No. 236 was scrapped in 1925, while
7083 was a shunter in Nova Scotia until she was scrapped in 1926.
The retirement of the last of these survivors brought to a close
the career of the contractors engines of the C.P.R., a career which
had spanned a period of just over half a century.
THE NEWEST OF THE WHITEHEAD ENGINES, No.8 H. NUTTALL
is depicted here before it was sold to Canadian Pacific
where it became second number 71.
Collection of Harvey Elson.
THE FIRST LOCOMOTIVE USED ON THE PACIFIC SECTION OF THE CANADIAN
PACIFIC, No.1 YALE was imported by Andrew Onderdonk in 1880.
Formerly No.3 Storey of the Virginia and Truckee, it survived
until 1920, being, in its last days, C.N.R. No. 7082.
Canadian Pacific archives.
ONDERDONKS SECOND ENGINE No.2, EMORY also called CURLY is seen
in 1881 soon after its arrival in B.C. This engine has been preserved.
Collection of Orner Lavallee.
L 0
COM
0 T I V E S
o
F
THE
T
HUN
D E R
BAY
CON
T R
ACT
S
NUMBER
BUILDER
DATE
ACQUIRED
FROM
LATER
DATE
BUILT
AND
DATE
HISTORY
SCRAPPED
First
1.
Fox
Walker
1869
ICR
(1876)
CPR
152
~
1883~
Ex.
W&A
1
(EV4NGELINE)
CPR
2015 1902 1907
0 l>
First
2.
Fox
Walker
1869
ICR
(1876)
CPR
1
53
~
1883~
2
Ex.
W&A
2
(GABRIEL)
CPR
2016 1902 1906
l> 0 –
First
3.
Fox
Walker
1869
ICR
(1876)
CPR
1 54
~
1883~
l>
Ex.
W&A
3
(HIAWATHA)
CPR
2017 1902 1906
2
First
4.
Fox
Walker
1869
ICR
(1876)
CPR
155 ( 1883) 1902
IIII
Ex.
W&A
4
(BLOMIDON)
Second 1
0
Canadian
1879
NEW
( 1879)
CPR
68 ( 1883) 1902
01
(Kingston)
(j.)
Second
2.
Canadian
1880
NEW
( 1880)
CPR
17 (1883)
1901
1111
(Kingston)
Second
4.
Dubs 1873
Possibly
ICR
(1880)
CPR
149 ( 1883) 1895
First
5.
DUbs
1873
Possibly
ICR
(1880)
CPR
150 ( 1883) 1895
II:
Second
5.
Canadian
1877
Possibly
ICR
(1880)
CPR
18
(1883) 1898
(Kingston)
II
r
6.
Portland
#99
1858
Possibly
ICR
(1880)
CPR
19
( 1883) 1897
7.
Neilson
1858
Possibly
ICR
(1880)
c.1883
9.
Portland
#131 1868
Possibly
ICR
(1880)
c.1883
35.
Fleming
& Humbert 1860
Possibly
ICR
(1880)
c.1883
CANADIAN
57
R A I L
THE NICOLA was No.6 of the Pacific section and was built new in 1884.
As C.N.R. 236 it lasted until 1925. Note the makeshift tender replacing
the regular one which had been wrecked.
Canadian Pacific archives.
KAMLOOPS, number 7 was photographed ay Yale B.C. in 1885.
Photo: Canadian Pacific.
L 0
COM
0 T I V E S
o
F
THE
W
HIT
E H E A D
CON
T R
ACT
S
BUILDER
AND
YEAR
AC-IUIRED
FROM
LATER
DATE
NUMBER
AND
NAME
SERIAL
BUILT
AND
DATE
HISTORY
SCRAPPED
NUMBER
1.
Baldwin
#2660
1872
N.P.
(
1877)
CPR
151
~1883~
II
~
COUNTESS
OF
DUFFERIN
C.R.L.C.
1897
****
Winnipeg
1910
0 –
2.
II
~
JOSEPH WHITEHEAD
Baldwin
#4319
1878
NEW
(
1878)
CPR
144
( 1
883)
1902
, ,
3.
Baldwin
#4516
1879
NEW
(
1879)
CPR
145
~
1883~
IIIII
JAMES
MC.KAY
CPR
19
1905 1909
CJl 00
4.
Baldwin
#4624
JAMES M.
ROWAN
1879
NEW
( 1
879)
CPR
146
(1883)
1898
III
II
5.
Baldwin
#4714
1879
NEW
(
1879)
CPR
147
~1883~
EMPRESS
OF
INDIA
O.M.Ry.
1909
1910
II
I I
l>
6.
Pi
ttsburg
#247
1879
USRS
#356
CPR
95
(1883)
1896
SITTING
BULL (
1879)
II
r
7.
Baldwin
1878
USRS
(
1880)
CPR
148
~
1
883~
JOSEPH
BROPHY
CPR
21
1905
1907
8.
Canadian
1880
NEW
(
1880)
CPR
71
~
1883~
H.
NUTTALL
(Kingston)
CPR
28
1905
1910
SHUSWAP was No.8 of the Pacific section, and is depicted at Keefers
B.C. in 1885. Many years later, this engine was used in the construction
of the Valley Railway in New Brunswick~
Photo: Canadian Pacific.
L 0
COM
0 T I V E S
o
F
THE
o
N D E R
DON
K
CON
T R
ACT
S BUILDER
AND
YEAR
ACQUIRED
FROM
LATER
DATE
NUMBER
AND
NAME
SERIAL
BUILT
AND
DATE HISTORY SCRAPPED
NUMBER
1.
U.I.W.
#13
1869
V&T 3 (STOREY)
IeR
188
r
887l
YALE
(1880)
ICR
1023 1912
CGR
1023
1913
CNR
7082
1920
1920
2.
M.&
C.
1879
?
(
1881)
H.S.M
,
(1888)
II
~
EMORY
(CURLY)
Vancouver
(1926)
****
2
3.
Baldwin
#2198
1870
V&T 8 (HUMBOLDT)
ICR
189
~1887~
l> 0
NEW
WESTMINSTER
(1881
)
ICR
1024
1912
-l>
CGR
1024
1913
1918
2
4.
Baldwin
#1947
1869
V&T 5 (CARSON)
IeR
190
r
887l
I
II
SAVONA
(1881
)
ICR
1025
1912
CGR
1025
1913
CNR
7083
1920
1926
m 0
5.
Baldwin
#2200
1870
V&T 7 (NEVADA)
ICR
191
~1887~
II
II
LYTTON
(1881
)
ICR
1026
1912
CGR
1026
1913
1917
6,
Baldwin
#7273
1884
NEW
(
1884)
IeR
184
l
887l
NICOLA
ICR
1119 1912
II:
CGR
1119
1913
CNR
236
·
1920
1925
7.
Baldwin
#7274
1884
NEW
(
1884)
ICR
185
~1887~
II
r
KAMLOOPS
ICR
1078
1912
1914
8.
SHUSWAP
Baldwin
#7498
1884
NEW
(
1884)
IeR
186
r
887l
ICR
1079
1912
CGR
1079
1913)
K.
&
C.
1915)
c.1920
9.
Baldwin
#7501
1884
NEW
(1884)
ICR
187
~
1
887~
COLUMBIA
ICR
1080 1912
1914
NUMBER 9 COLUMBIA was the last of Onderdonks engines, dating from 1884.
It was destined to survive until 1914 as I.C.R. 1080.
Photo: Canadian Pacific.
L 0
COM
0 T I V E
o
F
THE
R Y A N
CON
T R
ACT
NUMBER
AND
NAME
1.
J.G.
HAGGART
BUILDER
AND
SERIAL NUMBER
YEAR BUILT
AcQUIRED
FROM
AND
DATE
Baldwin
#4860
1879
NEW
(
1879)
CPR ICR CGR CNR V&T H.S
oM.
NOT
E S
FOR
ALL
TABLES
Canadian
Pacific
Railway
Co.
Intercolonial
Railway
of
Canada.
Canadian
Government
Railways.
Canadian
National
Railways.
Virginia
and
Truckee
RRo
Hastings
Saw
Mill
Company.
K.
&
C.
Kirk
and Cook.
U.I.W. 11.&
C.
W&A USRS
Union
Iron
Works.
Marschuetts
and
Cantrell.
Windsor and
Annapolis
Railway.
United
States
Rolling
Stock
Co.
C.R.L.C.
Columbia
River
Lumber Co.
O.M.Ry.
Orford
Mountain
Railway.
LATER
HISTORY
CPR
143
CPR
18
(1883) (
1905)
DATE
SCRAPPED
1910
() l> Z l> o l> Z III 0) ~ III
::u l> r

,
..,
~
~



..,.,


rill

THE VETERAN LOCOMOTIVE COUNTESS OF DUFFERIN 05 sht
appeared on August 6 1950 ~tondin9 outside the C.P.R.
station at WinnipQg.
Toohey Collection, C.R.H.A.
BACK COVER
BY 1892 THE C.P.R. was well on the way to being the widely
diver.ified corporation it is today. President Von Horne sits
atop the all absorbing sponge in thi~ cortoon of 1892.
Allo visible are Donald Smith, George Stepho, R.B. Angus,
ond Tho~o$ Shaughnessy.

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