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Canadian Rail 348 1981

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Canadian Rail 348 1981

Canadian Rail ;:
No. 348
JANUARY 1981
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Published monthly by The Canadian Railroad·
Historical Association
P.O. Box 22, Station B Montreal ,Quebec,Canada
H3B 3J5
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
BUSINESS CAR: Dave J. Scott
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germani uk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
FRONT COVER:
ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVE No. 114 of
the INCO Railway at Copper Cliff
Ontario is pulling a slag train
from the shelter. This is the deepest point in the
plant,
built 1926. Note the stone work.
Engine No. 114 was built in
1942 by General Electric.
Kenneth A.W.Gansel.
OPPOSITE:
G.E. 65-ton locomotive No. 110,
bu i lt in 1 936, i s pi c tu r ed i n the
shop area of the INCO
Railway in January 1980.
IAN
ISSN 0008 -4875
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN DIVISION
60-6100 4th Ave. NE
Calgary, Al berta T2A 5Z8
OTTAWA
BYTOWN RAILWAY SOCIETY
P.O. Box 141, Station A Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8Vl
NEW BRUNSWICK DIVISIOtl
P.O. Box 1162
Saint John,
New Brunswick E2L 4G7
CROWSNEST AND KETTLE-VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 400
Cranbrook, British Columbia
V1C 4H9
PACIFIC COAST DIVISION
P.O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2Pl
ROCKY MOUNTAIN DIVISION
P.O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Alberta T5B 2ND
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor
Ontario N9G lA2
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
P.O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto Ontario
M5W lP3
NIAGARA DIVISIOO
P.O. Box 593
St.Catharines,
Ontario L2R 6W8
ST. LAWRENCE VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 99
Ste. Doroth~e, Quebec H7X 2T4
INoo
ELECTRIC
RAILWAY
!helke_and BrimstoneRollte
By Kenneth A. W. Gansel All photos by the author.
June 1980 marked the 50th Anniversary of the INCO
smelter at Copper Clief, Ontario. The smelter is located
about 6km west of down town Sudbury. It is the worlds
largest nickel-copper smelting complex and as such plays
a vital role in the Canadian economy.
Construction of the smelter was begun in 1928 and was
completed in the Spring of 1930. The first molten metal
being produced on June 11, 1930. To serve the smelter,
an electric railway was also constructed. It operated
within the plant and to adjacent mine sites. The railway
is also celebrating its 50th Anniversary this year.
The INCO smelter in Sudbury is best known for the
famous SUPERSTACK which is 381m tall (1250 ft). The giant
stack overshadows the whole area. Just a note of interest,
the stack is about 5ft thick at the base and the base is
about 200 ft in diameter, there is a road through the base.
However, at the top the stack is only 3 thick and has tapered
to a diameter of 10ft.
The electric railway operates on 600v DC using a variety
of General Electric locomotives and a few old Westinghouse electric
locomotives from 1919. The railway operates as an in plant switching
service, and there are about 125 miles of track in the plant and out
to the mines. One of the railways functions is to haul slag from
the smelters to the slag dump, an operation which has been going
on since the smelter first opened in 1930. Molten slag is hauled
from the deep insides of the plant about 3 miles to the slag dump
and poured down the hill. The slag ranges in temperature from 1,200
0
F
for Nickel slag to 1,600
0
F for Cobolt slag. The trains of slag
are about 10 cars long and are pushed by a second locomotive up and
out of the plant and up the long hill to the dump site. Most
of the slag is now being reclaimed, almost as soon as it is dumped
and is being sold to the various Canadian railways as balast.
The slag is considered as the best material for railway roadbeds
and i sam u c h sou g h t aft e r pr 0 d u ct.
CANADIAN R A I L
INCO Railway No. 118 at the head of a train from which molten slag
is being poured at a temperature of 1600 degrees Farenheit. One
can feel the heat from 100 feet away.
No. 114 moving slag cars. Date is January 1980.
CANADIAN
6
R A I L
The INCO electric railway has a complete shop for the
repair of its locomotive fleet. A fleet of 26 electric locomotives
and one diesel locomotive to handle the movement of an out af
service electric. The majority of the aectrics were purchased
by INCO and the rest were purchased second hand from such lines
as the NS&T (CNs NIAGARA, ST .CATHARINES AND TORONTO). One electric
came from the Eastern Michigan Railway in 1936. The EMR operated
from Detroit West to Battle Creek during the 1920 sand 1930 s.
Most of the electrics which were acquired in 1926 and 1930, the
original group (#101-109), are no longer in service and are stored
in an old building which is no longer in use. The building served
as an ore dump building. These old electrics are still painted m
the orange and brown, INCOs original colours. The current paint
scheme is yellow with black INCO logo.
The railway is in operation 24 hrs a day, and makes a trip
to the slag dump about every 2 to 3 hrs. The dump cars with the
two buckets are dumped by electricity. There is a thick layer
on the top of the molton slag this is called a skull and when
this falls out of the bucket it makes for a bright sight as it
rolls down the hill.
Now that the BUTTE, ANACONDA & PACIFIC RAILWAY has terminated
electric operations, INCO becomes the largest user of electric
locomotiveso Not including AMTRAK or CONRAIL.
INCO Railway Noo 125, a G.E. 85-ton electric locomotive built in 1950.
CANADIAN
7
R A I L
NOW OUT OF SERVICE, No. 109, a 50-tonner built by Westinghouse in 1919
is depicted in the old colours of the INCO Railway.
THREE GENERATIONS IF INCO RAILWAY LOCOMOTIVES are shown in the shop
at Copper Cliff Ontatio in January 1980. From left to right we see
No. 101 (Westinghouse 50-ton 1919), No. 113 (G.E. 100-ton 1938) and
No. 119 (G.E. 100-ton 1953).
PULLING SLAG CARS FROM THE SHELTER at the INCO plant at Copper Cliff.
The locomotive in the building is No. 118.
CANADIAN 9 R A I L
A PAIR OF G.E. 85-TONNERS built in 1950, Nos. 124 and 126 set out
to the mine.
BERMUDAB RATTLE
AND SHAKE RAILWAY
By: DAVID E. STEPHENS Curator, Musquodoboit Railway Museum,
It cost more per mile to construct than almost any rail­
way line in the world; its operation was one of the most care­
free; it was out-done by the automobile; and its lost is still
mourned by those who loved her. That was the old Rattle and Shake
railway of Bermuda.
The British Colony of Bermuda is a group of self-govern­
ing islands in the western North Atlantic, about 600 miles from North America. Because
of the warming influence of the Gulf
Stream, Bermuda has just two basic seasons -summer and not-quite­
summer. The Colony is only 21 miles long and has an average
width of one mile.
Prior to the end of the Second World War, the only means
of public transportation on land, other than bikes and horse-drawn
vehicles, was a motor bus known as the Scarlet Runner, which poked
along between St. Georges and Hamilton. Even though it
operated with the permission of the government, the machine had
such a bad effect on horses that the experiment in public transit
soon ended.
In 1924, the House of Assembly took up the issue of a
railway. As the government wanted to keep Bernuda unhurried,
it was argued that a railway would aid in keeping out the auto­
mobile. On the other hand, some felt that such a venture would have
financial and esthetic side effects. One critic of the rail­
way said it would be like placing an iron serpent in the Garden
of Eden. Eventually the idea for a railway won support, and
construction began in 1926.
Investors from England put up over ~750,OOO for con­
struction and equipment. Although the total cost of the line was
never known for sure, estimates run close to a million pounds
(about $3 million). It had the repution of being one of the most
expensive railways per mile to build.
The Bermuda Railway was officially opened on October
31st (Halloween), 1931, when the western half from Hamiltaon to
Somerset was completed. Travelling in the primrose yellow
coaches was the Governor, His Excellency Sir Thomas Astley
Cubitt, KCB, CMG, OSO, as well as about 150 other noteables.
Leaving Hamilton for the twelve mile trip, the small gasoline­
driven cars couldnt make a steep grade and most of the passengers
had to detrain and walk up the hill. The inaugural run of twelve
miles took over an hour to complete.
When it was finally completed, 25 miles of narrow-gauge
track had been laid. One of the problems related to construction
costs was the fact that over two miles of track was constructed on
22 steel bridges and 34 wooden trestles. The line crossed sections
of open ocean nine times, with the longest bridge across the span
of water from Coney Island to Ferry Point, at the entrance to
Castle Harbour.
CANADIAN
BERMUDA RAILWAY
1931 -1947
Scale: 1 .. c. 3mi.
11
N
MAP DRAWN BY THE AUTHOR
R A I L
ge
Atlantic Ocean
While it may have been one of the most expensive lines,
it also was one of the most beautiful. Skirting the coral shore
line, dipping through limestone cuts, hedging large estates, and banded
by miles of flowers, it provided locals and visitors alike
a rare and fantastic view of the islands. On a windy day, the
little cars would sway their way across open trestles, with the
sea licking up into waves below. If the day provided a little
rain, passengers might have to jump off and toss a few handfulls
of sand under the slipping wheels. Schedules were printed, but
seldom adheared to, and once in a while the train would develop
a sort of galloping paralysis and it wasnt uncommon for it to
just stop altogether. While this didnt exactly please all the
passengers, it wasnt considered too great of a disaster. In
those days, in Bermuda, no one really was in a hurry anyway, so what
to some was a delay, to most was just a chance to relax.
I~ith 45 scheduled stops (stops were called Halts), the trip
from St. Georges to Somerset took two hours, if no problems were
encountered.
CA NAD I AN 12 R A I L
One trip is recounted as the day the driver fell out of
the cab, leaving the train without an englneer. Using great will­
power, the superintendent caught up to the train, by chasing it on
foot, as it slowed down on an upgrade. Jumping on board, he was
able to safely complete the trip for the driver. There seems to
be little wonder that it became known as Old Rattle and Shake.
While the line did pay operating costs, there wasnt a
cent left over to cover depreciation of equipment, let alone a
profit for the investors. When the government decided, after the
war, to allow one automobile per family, the days were numbered
for the little railway. The Bermuda government purchased, in
1945, the failing line for 115,000 and attempted to operate it for
a short period. While efforts were made through public opinion
to maintain the railway, progress finally won out and the line
was sold to the old British Guiana government for 06,000.
At midnight, the 31st of December, 1947, the last
spike was the first one to be removed by railway officials and a small group
of interested citizens.
ONE OF THE CARS OF THE BERMUDA RAILWAY heads into the capital
ci t Y 0 f Ham i It 0 n d uri n g the ear 1 y 1 940 s. 0 pen e din 1 931, and
closed in 1947, the railway gave way to the age of the automobile.
Bermuda News Bureau photo.
CANADIAN·
13
R A I L
During a decade and a half of service, the tiny line of
25 miles had carried over 14 million passengers over 3 million
mj 1 e s.
An old friend of writer Ronald C. Mahnke once told him,
It dnnt make no sense to me, tearin ope rad. Now ahm got
tboard e bus and ride to town all cramped op. Boy dont tell
me that old railroad didnt make money! Just look at those uni­
forms e conductors weah! They look like b100min generals, with
all at brass and khaki n stuff. l1ake no error bout it mate,
it was de worse thing they cou1da did. And there are still many
people in Bermuda who even today, 30 years later, still wish that
the railway was back again and that cars and trucks were no more
on their island.
Today, mucll of the old right-of-way can still be found.
While all that remains of many of the bridges are hugh stone
pillars, most of the line of land has been retained as walking
trails, bicycle paths and horse riding trails. From the former
roadbed can still be seen some of t:,e most bealltiful scenery on
the islands. So if you plan a trip to this Garden of the Atlantic,
ue sure to retrace one of the most ronlantic raih!ays in the world.
THE BERMUDA RAILWAY when it made its first trip into the capital
city of Hamilton in 1931, drew a huge crowd of spectators.
The railway lasted only sixteen years.
Bermuda News Bureau photo.
I
By Mervyn T. Green.
People have always dreamed up nicknames for the things
about which they feel strongly, and railroads have been no except­
ion. From the very early days in England, men have been inventing
names for rail companies, usually reflecting that companys hopes
and failures. One of the earliest such names was applied to the
Great Western Railway, which provided a route from London to
Plymouth by way of Bristol. Built by BruneI (and now the scene of
Britrails Inter-City 125 trains), this route was known as The
Great Way Round, until new cutoffs were built at Westbury and Frome,
so reducing the Paddington-Exeter-Plymouth-Penzance
distance via Newbury by 20.4 miles. Subse~uently, pride in the
GWR was shown. by many of its employees, who would refer to their
line as Gods Wonderful Railway. An amusing nickname was also
used on the Manchester, South Junction and Altrincham Railway
(a commuter line, shorter than its cumbersome title): Many
Short Journeys and Absolute Reliabili ty-_~
Canada s~on adopted s~milar hp!>~ts, with ni~-knarnes foro_J1l.01l~. __
of the local l~nes planned ~n the last cerilwr-y~,~I.A. B.C., the
main target of such names has been the British ColUiifbia Railway
(Bennetts Crummy Rip-off), particularly when it was known as the
Pacific Great Eastern and development was stalled, with construct-
ion only completed between Snuamish and Quesnel. It has been
variously known as:
Premiers GreatEadache
Prince George Eventually
Patience, Guts and Endurance
Past Gods Endurance
Please Go Easy
Provincial Government Expense
Pretty Good Effort
Provinces Great Enterprize
In other provinces, similar efforts hCLye been made_ to char-
acterize rail lines. A selection follows: . -.–.-.~–=-
Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Rly
Brockville, Westport & Sault
Ste.Marie
All Cu r ve;-a nd ROrd—&ltntp s
All Curves, Hills and
Bumps
Bad Wages, Seldom See
Money
CANADIAN
15
Kingston and Pembroke Railway
Lake Erie and Northern Railway
London and Port Stanley Railway
Northern Alberta Railways
Ontario, Simcoe and Huron Union RR
Pontiac, Pacific and Junction Rly
Port Arthur, Duluth and Western
Rly
~uebec, Montreal and Southern Rly
Temiskaming and Northern Ontario
Rly
Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Rly
R A I L
Kick and Push
Late Every Night
Lose Each New Rail
Liverwurst and Pork
Sausage
Lost and Presumed Sunk
Late and Poor Service
Lousy and Poverty-
Stricken
Not Always Running
Never All Right
Nights Are Rotten
Oats, Straw and Hay
Push, Pull and Jerk
Proverty, Agony,
Distress and Want
~uel Maudit Service
(What Damn Service)
Time No Object
Truly No Ope
To Hell and Back
Tired, Hungry and Broke
Taken Home (to) Bed
Tramps, Hobos and Bums
We would appreciate help from our readers to add to these
samples, so that we can publish a further selection in a future
issue.
Sources
Dodson, Nick, ON THE MSJ&A~ Railway Magazine, Nov/78, p. 546.
Liddell, Ken, Ill Take the Train. Saskatoon: Western Producer
Prairie Books, 1966, p. 162.
Lowry, Hollie, Some Canadian Railway Monikers. Turnout (CRHA
Toronto and York Division), 1978, p. 8.
Ramsey, Bruce, PGE: Railway to the North. Vancouver: Mitchell
Press, 1962, 265 pp.
Willmot, Elizabeth, Meet Me At the Station. Toronto: Gage,
1976, p. 44.
e
oeomo Iva
Our member Dale Wilson of Sudbury Ontario sent this photo
with the suggestion that someone might be able to identify this
locomotive.
Some years ago it seems as if someone thought it was an Algoma
Central locomotive. However)1r. Wilson says that Nothing
Ive been able to dig up even BEGtNS to suggest that this loco­
motive, or anything like it, ever saw the ACR.
There are some unique features that make the loco stand
out: The number 216 is clearly in place by the headlight and on
the cab; the doghouse on the tender wasnt used by too many
roads; the extra air tank on the top of the boiler.
Our guess is that the machine belonged to one of the iron
ore carriers, probably in the Lake Superior country in the United
States.
Any information as to the identity of this engine will be
very welcome.
Jhe ….
business car
ON APRIL 27, THE DEPARTMENT IMPLEMENTED A ONE YEAR EXPERIMENTAL
transit-taxi service in the Riverdale community.
Tbe Riverdale Transit-Taxi service will test the idea of
a fixed schedule and fixed route type of subsidized taxicab
service. This transit-taxi service will replace th~ regular bus
service in Riverdale at night, on Sundays and on statutory holidays.
For two years, Edmonton Transit has examined various methods
of providing a functional level of transit service for the River­
dale community (outside of regular service hours) which would not
contribute a significant loss to the Departments revenue. A study
conducted by Edmonton Transit in 1979 showed that after 6:00 p.m.
and on Sundays and holidays, the transit service provided to
Riverdale was under-utilized. The cost of operating a conventional
transit vehicle in this area was inefficient and therefore the
Transit-Taxi service will reduce the cost of the service to the
City and still provide the necessary and desired transit service
in Riverdale. A brochure providing complete details about the
Riverdale Transit-Taxi service is available from the dispatch office
at the various garages.
At an age which would be ,past re,tirement ,for most, a new
worker has applied to join Edmonton TransLt. ,The LRT construction
project is to be aided by an electric locomotive purchased from
British Columbia Hydro, its second owner. The engine was build in
1912 for the Oregon Electric Railway, which in the days when railways
and locomotives were built sound as a dollar operated a network
of passenger and freight lines south from Portland.
The new employee is at Cromdale, where she is being given
a physical. If hired, a training program will follow.
(EDMONTON TRANSIT NEWS)
CANADIAN
18
R A I L
FIFTY-FIVE YEARS AGO THIS YEAR, A FAST TRAIN BEARING A SPECIAL
cargo of silk from Japan steamed out of Vancouver on a 74-
hour run to the east-coast hosiery mills and manufacturers.
This first CN silk train carried about $6 million worth of
silk and the heavy insurance costs, based on elapsed time in transit,
made it imperative the train cover the distance in as little time
as possible.
Another reason for the fast run was that silk deteriorates
if not kept dry and the bales and their contents were easily dam­
aged. Silk was also sold on the east coast on a commodity market
and it was important to deliver it for sale before prices changed.
As a result, silk trains ran at top speed and had priority
over all other traffic. While regular passenger traffic took 107
hours to operate between Vancouver and New York via Toronto and
Buffalo, the silk trains barrelled through the run in an average
74 hours with all other traffic obliged to make way.
Upon arrival, the silk was sold to manufacturers for making
into ribbons, neckties, wall hangings, ball gowns and most import­
ant of all, silk stockings for the ladies.
The bales of silk worm cocoons which arrived on swift ships
from the Orient were moved in special cars lined with varnished
wood, sheathed in paper, airtight and sealed so that neither moist­
ure nor thieves could attack the cargo.
During the years between 1925 and 1932, CN operated more
than 100 silk trains. Also in the silk train business were some
American railways and the Canadian Pacific.
However, the advent of synthetics and nylons instead of
silk stockings and the Depression brought this great era to a
close in the mid-thirties. The Second World War put a final end
to silk imports from the east and the silk trains passed into
railroading memory.
KEEPING TRACK
TWO DECADES AFTER OFFICIALLY STRIKING STEAM LOCOMOTIVE SERVICE FROM
the engine roster across Canada, CN Rail is retiring Mount­
ain-Type 6060 from special duties.
While locomotive 6060 is retiring from the CN Rail roundhouse,
she is returning west to be turned over to the province of Alberta,
possibly to playa role in the provinces 75th anniversary celebrat­
ions.
Known to her fans as Bullet-Nosed Betty, 6060 was built at
Montreal Locomotive Works in 1944, as the last new steam engine
desi~n for the CNR. She was designed for fast passenger train
serv~ce on the Montreal-Toronto and Montreal-Ottawa lines.
I
<1
CANADIAN
19
R A I L
SENT WEST IN 55
Then in 1955, when diesel-electric passenger locomotives
took over, 6060 was sent out west with an oil-burner conversion,
making her ideal for a territory where oil was readily available.
But her days were again numbered. In 1944, when she was
built, CNR had 2,524 steam locomotives on the roster. By the end
of 1959, only 965 steam locomotives remained, with many of those
only on standby duty.
On December 31, 1960, that fateful two decades ago, all
remaining steam power was struck from the books and most of them
faced the cutting torch and the scrap pile.
SOME WERE SAVED
Some, however, were given new stationary homes near railway
stations, with rail museums and in historical collections.
And so it was that 6060 was placed on a pedestal, a concrete
slab, to be exact, at the CN station at Jasper, Alberta.
She rested there from 1962 to 1972 when she was recalled to
special duties as a CN steam excursion locomotive.
Weve given 6060 a good shot since 1972 when she was taken
from that concrete display platform, recalled Howard Easton,
general manager, passenger, CN Rail.
Most of her excursion running has been out of Toronto and
Montreal and her last live operation under CN Rail auspices was
scheduled for Toronto on July 26.
LAST EXCURSION ENGINE
Although steam ended officially on CN lines at the end of
1960, locomotive 6060 was ~e last of various steam locomotives
which CN maintained over the last 20 years for steam excursion
purposes. Oldtimers, and some not so old, will remember engines
6153, 6167 and the famous 6218.
The transfer of locomotive 6060 to the province of Alberta,
which in turn is placing 6060 in trust with the Alberta Pioneer
Rail Association, also brings her closer to an old and steady friend
named Harry Home.
Harry, a CN Rail locomotive engineer, admitted in an inter­
view; Im biased towards the old girl.
I looked after he_~ JoIhen she was on_the cQ-AcretEi—sIab and I
–rnTn k s he s ti U-:i1ii 5:20. ~5i€-O~s f e lTTi, lie r •
—=–. ..;;;;..
~O;-.-.
HIS ENGINE RETURNS
As far as Im concerned, Im getting my engine back. I came
down east on my own tim0 to help bring her back west from
Toronto.
CANADIAN
20
R A I L
The 47-year-old locomotive engineer is local chairman of the
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, Jasper school board-chairman
and thus the towns unofficial mayor, and a member of the board
of directors of the Alberta Resources Railway, the first employee
and union man to be given a seat on a railways board of directors.
Still to be decided for 6060 are an extension of her boiler
certificate, due to expire in September, and eventual retubing, a
major and costly steam locomotive repair task.
But whatever happens, 6060 is back home in the west again,
an oil burner in Canadas oil province.
KEEPING TRACK
IN 1980, CN RAIL WILL BUY ABOUT 30bMILLION GALLONS OF FUEL TO MEET
transportation and heating needs.
Keeping in mind rising fuel costs and eventual oil scarcity,
CN Rail has launched a special fuel conversation campaign which
is aimed in particular at locomotive engineers.
Studies made by the CN Rail technical research centre here
and a one-year testing program on the Prairie Region have demon­
strated that it is possible to reduce fuel use by a new locomotive­
handling procedure.
The procedure consists of placing locomotive throttles at
a lower level or position and avoiding braking action, if possible.
If braking is necessary, then brakes are applied as lightly as
possible while reducing the throttle position even further.
Through this program now being initiated, CN Rail hopes
to reduce its fuel consumption per gross ton-mile by at least one
per cent, which would mean a savings of $1 million.
To achieve this saving, CN Rail is counting on the co­
operation of locomotive engineers and master mechanics.
As part of the goal of selling the concept to train person­
nel, Paul Branson, regional rna ster mechanic, has criss-crossed the
St. Lawrence Region in his travels since March 1.
He invited locomotive engineers to attend an information
session at their home base, a session which included a slide­
sound presentation explaining the new operating methods. There
was a general discussion following each slide presentation.
Mr. Branson said he was delighted that so many locomotive
engineers had attended the sessions and that they had become active
participants in the program.
The reaction of the locomotive engineers is positive. I
believe they are more and more conscious of their role in energy
conservation.
Its principally on them that we are counting to attain
our objective, because the success of our program wouldnt be
assured without their co-operation.
CANADIAN
21
R A I L
He explained that during the period when the railway bought
fuel for 13 cents a gallon, CN didnt trouble itself too much
about saving fuel. At that time, the operating procedure was
to have the throttle in the highest position and apply maximum
braking as re~uired.
Studies have shown that trains can be operated with lower
throttle settings and moderate brake application and still meet
schedules and avoid excessive train slack action.
The program includes other fuel conservation measures such
as using automatic stop-valves when filling locomotive fuel tanks
checking locomotive fuel purchases and ~sage more closely and also
heating railway buildings with natural gas instead of oil.
(KEEPING TRACK)
THANKS TO A JOINT MARKETING CAMPAIGN WORKED OUT BY CN AND A NUMBER
of U.S. railways, fruits and vegetables from south of the
border are moving in greater volume at a lower unit cost
to the Ontario market.
This means lower consumer prices for f~esh produce, said
Al Burns, CN Rails regional freight sales manager;
California growers can ship large volumes of cabbages,
citrus fruits and grapes to food terminals at a lower unit cost
by rail than they can by road.
This means a real saving for the family grocery buyer,
said Mr. Burni.
The metropolitan area alone received more that 365 mechan­
ically refrigerated cars a month from CN Rail at the height of
last years import season. The largest increase was in grape
shipments which went up 125 per cent over the previous year.
The key to this latest push to capture more of the perish­
ables business is the priority given to this through traffic from
California -some of it destined as far away as the Atlantic
Provinces.
This allows us to provide freshness and dependable service,
said Gus Cosentino, U.S. general sales manager for CN Rail, who
negotiated the interline arrangements.
The specially handled produce is brought more than 4,000
miles through the international gateway at Sarnia where the cars
are inspected and switched into eastbound CN Rail freight trains.
Trucks, which transported much of the perishables traffic
in the seventies, are now only slightly faster than railways –
California tomatoes take four days to get here by truck and six
days by rail, due to the interchange connections the trains must
make.
CANADIAN
22
R A I L
But, Mr. Burns explained, the trains ability to move
bulk loads compensates for the speed advantage of the truck.
However, trucks dont always compete with the railway.
Occasionally they complement each other. CN Rail is experimenting
with piggyback service to carry fresh produce. Ramp-to-ramp time
is cut to five days by shippers who move their own truck trailers
on rail flat cars.
We are having some success with California oranges trans­
ported this way to Toronto, said Mr. Cosentino.
The basic service, which calls upon the combined resources
of major U.S. railroads, with over 10,000 refrigerated cars,
extends to other produce along the route.
For instance, the U.S. railroads may pick up onions in
Oregon, he added.
Larger volumes also mean less fuel consumption. The
growing cost of keeping trucks on the road underlines the energy
efficiency of the railways.
Trains move twice the freight that trucks do when all
commodities are considered -yet they use half the amount of fuel.
Soon that will make a real difference in the cost of each
tomato or orange, said Mr. Burns.
A key connection for CN is its U.S. subsidiary, the Grand
Trunk Western, which operates in the U.S. midwest. GTW, in turn,
is linked to a wide variety of railways.
Some are tluite large, such as the Southern Pacific and
the Union Pacific which have an excellent reputation for a service
they call the Salad Bowl Express, said Mr. Burns.
The other major route starts with tho Santa Fe railway.
It is perhaps a sign of our energy conscious times that
distribution costs are bec6ming such a large portion of the
total price charged for consumer good~.
Mr. Burns said he believes this new rail service will
help keep produce prices from climbing out of reach of the
consumer.
(KEEPING TRACK)
CP RAIL TO MALONE: CANADIAN PACIFIC HAS BEEN ACTIVELY NEGOTIATING
with Conrail to acquire its subsidiary, St. Lawrence &
Adirondack which CR wants to drop account difficulty
with Canadian and 6uebec regulations. CP wants in to growing
industrial areas at Valleyfield and Beauharnois. The original
charter was for service Malone to Montreal, thus CP would
acquire operations right into Malone, NY. A CP hi-rail has
olready been observed covering the entire line. (Northern RR Ass n)
(VIA
THE 470)
ON THE NORTH SHORE OF LAKE SUPERIOR{ at Canadian Pacifics Mink
tunnel (Mileage 79.2 Heron Bay Sub.) on Monday June 2 1980.
Tnis view shows 4702 and 4741 just emerging from the tunnel, at
tne head end of a long freight train. This tunnel is in a very
remote location, and is a three-mile walk from the occess ot Caldwell.
Kenneth A.W. Gensel.
CANADIAN
24 R A I L
ROBERT BANDEEN, CN PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, TOLD
a newg conference held by Transport Minister Jean-Luc
Pepin that the next phase of CN development is a majar
building program almost as large in scope as the original building
of the transcontinental railway.
Mr. Bandeen said CN believes it has successfully extended
its existing capacity about as far as possible with the existing
plant, and that the next step involves double-tracking those
areas which represent the priority needs -mainly main-line
sections in western Canada.
Our traffic projections show that the rna jor traffic
growth will continue to be in the west and primarily west of
Edmonton. We are, therefore, concentrating ou: energies and
available capital where it is most needed and where it will do the
most good.
and Red
route.
done.
The key area is the so-called throat
Pass Junction where there is at present
The first 20 miles west of Edmonton has
Another 10-mile section is under way.
between Edmonton no
alternate
already been
Work has begun on parts of a 70-mile section east of Red
Pass, and this is scheduled for completion by 1985, and we expect
to have to complete the balance in this throat by 1988.
Construction has started on a 12-mile link between
Valemount and Tete Jaune which will provide a dual connection
between the B.C. north and B.C. south lines. This project, in
effect, gives 28 miles of double track common to both lines.
On the B.C. north line to Prince Rupert, our annual
traffic is some 10 million gross ton miles at present and we feel
that, without extensive ad justments, this level can be doubled.
Beyond that, there would need to be heavy spending on track
foundation and centralized traffic aontrol systems.
West of Valemount to Vancouver, we are studying double­
tracking alternatives and a $3 million feasibility study is now
being conducted.
East of Edmonton to Winnipeg, the existence of the
prairie north line offers some relief, particularly for traffic
which is not time-sensitive. With the siding program and the
building of selected small sections of double track, we feel
we can increase the traffi! carried on this stretch without
embarking on a major double-tracking program at this stage.
But study on this and otherprojects is a continuing
exercise for the railway.
Mr. Bandeen added that no discussion of traffic growth
would be complete without specific reference to the movement of
grain.
This is already a rna jor part of our operation, in that
35 per cent of the trains we operate west of Edmonton, and 26
per cent of our total gross ton miles, are devoted to grain.
But as Ive pointed out many times, less than four per cent of our
revenues come from grain.
CA NAD IAN
25
R A I L
This whole plant expansion program is based on our ability
to provide most of the necessary capital out of retained earnings.
You can see, therefore, that it is essential that we are paid
commercial rates for any commodity -and especially one which
represents about a nuorter of our workload.
We need commercial rates for hauling grain so that this
important commodity -for CN and for Canada -will contribute to
the generation of the capital which is vital, not just to the
building of the necessary double track, but to its continuing
maintenance.
(KEEPING TRACK)
WELCOME TO NORTH COUNTRY RR: THE NORTH COUNTRY RAILROAD CORP. WHICH
began operat~ng on April 3, between headnuarters Ogdensburg
NY and Conrail, 20 miles, to DeKalb Jct, NY, using an Alco
1000HP, ex PRR #4828, their #100, painted yellow and green, similar
to MeC. They are operating Mon-Fri to Dekalb plus switching St.
Lawrence Pulp & Paper Corp. mill on weekends. The line is still
owned by Penn Central, although St. Lawrence County is preparing
to buy the property. NCRC is enually owned by Genesee & Wyoming
Industries, (owner of G&WRR) and ATE Management and Service Co.
NCRC has already approached the Northern RR Ass n concerning
their SOO line coaches, account being interested in running
excursions with them this summer. (Nor. RR Assn)
(VIA HE 470)
ST.
LAWRENCE SERVING OTTAWA: THE ST. L. HAS NOT ACQUIRED THE OLD
CP car ferry and rail line across the seaway, but E.B.
Eddy Co, the Canadian Paper manufacturer, located in Hull
~uebec, has found that international freight rates are so much
higher than interstate rates, that it is cheaper to truck paper
across to Ogdensburg NY and trans-load them in box cars for U.S.
destinations. (Nor. RR. Assn)
(VIA
THE 470)
CONRAILS 4 SMALL CANADIAN LINES: CANADIAN TRANSPORT COMMISSION
has approved CRt s cont~nued operation of the DETROIT
RIVER TUNNEL CO., CANADA SOUTHERN RAILWAY CO., NIAGARA
RIVER BRIDGE CO. and the ST. LAWRENCE ADIRONDACK RL Y CO., but
they must await a final decision from C.T.C. after CR has laid
out a plan to correct operational deficiences before they can
acquire bankrupt Penn Centrals interests in the roads, which
they sought to do in 1980. (WHK)
(VIA THE 470)
ONTARIO NORTHLAND FP7-A No. 1515 on C.N. train THE NORTHLAND
at Kapuskasing, Ontario in July 1978, awaiting the return trip
to Toronto.
Scott B. Anderson.
CANADIAN
27
R A I L
A GIANT DOOR HAS BEEN OPENED TO SOUTHERN UNITED STATES FREIGHT
traffic with the Grand Trunk Westerns stock purchase of the
Detroit, Toledo and Ironton Railroad for $25.2 million.
GTW president John Burdakin said: The successful consolidation
will be good for the public and a boost for rail transportation.
We have the potential of increasing greatly the traffic now
moving via the DT&I through the Cincinnati gateway.
The last hurdle for GTW, a subsidiary of Grand Trunk Corporation,
a wholly-owned subsidiary of Canadian National, is Interstate Commerce
Commission approval of the purchase agreement.
The ICC gave us approval to negotiate a purchase of the DT&I
last December 3. The commission will now review the purchase
agreement to ensure that it is within their approved guidelines,
Mr. Burdakin explained.
Adding the 588 miles of DT&I trackage, which includes a mainline
route between Detroit and Cincinnati, brings total GTW mileage to
1,517 miles.
GTW has had friendly connections with the DT&I that have worked
for years, with both railroads competing with the larger eastern
carriers.
The combined system will increase efficiency, provide better
service and produce greater financial return than the two railroads
in independent operation.
As a modest railroad system, we will have greater economic
resources and provide more formidable competition in the market
dominated by the N&W, Chessie and ConRail, Mr. Burdakin said.
The DT&I is being purchased from the Pennsylvania Company, a
subsidiary of the Penn Central Company.
Mr.
Burdakin said the DT&I operated independently of the Penn
Central and that the DT&I property has been well-maintained but
we plan on eventually spending $12 million to further improve track
and signal equipment.
We also are acquiring 12 diesel locomotives -some with less
than 100,000 miles of service -and 700 freight cars from the Rock
Island railroad. This helps us meet our over-all anticipated enuip­
ment needs over the new few years, Mr. Burdakin said.
We think the consolidated operation will help us weather traffic
fluctuations, such as we are expenriencing currently with the cuts
in production in the automotive industry, he added.
The ICCs approval last December confirmed an initial decision
in July by the ICC administrative judge favoring control by GTW
rather than joint control by the Chessie System and Norfol and
Western.
The commission, in its December ruling, viewed the GTW end-to­
end merger as preferable and would result in maintaining competition
in the Detroit-Cincinnati corridor. It also said it considered the
CANADIAN
28
R A I L
Chessie-N&W proposal anti-competitive, a claim made by GTW in its
argument before the ICC.
The battle for control of the Detroit, Toledo and Ironton
Railroad began in October, 1977, when Chessie and the N&W offered
to buy the railroad for $23.6 million, plus advances and interest to
consummation, bringing the total now to $30 million.
GTW immediately challenged the move as detrimental to compet­
ition and to the financial future of smaller railroads. It countered
with its own proposal to merge the DT&I with GTW.
The GTW merger position gained powerful support from the anti­
trust division of the U.S. Department of Justice. Ford Motor Company,
Procter and Gamble Company, Rail Public Counsel and other ••
In approving the GTW proposal, the ICC made ruling concerning
labor protection. Barring severe decline in traffic, the agreement
does not allow any reduction of the work force, except by retirement,
death, and discharge for cause. It also includes various employee
benefits involving retraining, relocation and reimbursemJnts.
GTW has already reached agreements with labor unions representing
all employees on both railroads.
Absent from the ICC ruling were traffic protective conditions,
normally included in any merger approvals.
In its ruling, the commission said ••• we see no need to impose
traffic protective conditions on small and geographically limited
carriers here for the protection of large, operationally competitive
and financially healthy carriers.
Mr. Burdakin summed up GTW s feeling about the merger by saying:
This is a great moment for us.
(KEEPING TRACK)
CP RAIL INTERMODAL-PHASE II: A $20 MILLION APPROPRIATION TO
cover 525 containers, 175 cars with cushioned couplers
and 3 container handlers, is a second phase of intermodal exp­
ansion by CP Rail. The new containers are 44 3 long, enuipped
with new type rubber door seals, extra strong doors with 4 lock­
rods and cams, two porthole windows on each side for increased
visibility, interior plywood, logistics tracks and snuare-load
restraining bars line both wolls and ceilings. The new units
provide increased train capacity, with a mile long train handling
114 containers, as against 92 trailers, up 24%. The new con-
tainer handlers have the advantage of the so-called trombone or
telescopis chassis, which can adjust to handle containers from 20
up to the new 44 3 units, thus handling any container in use world
wide. Eventually CP Rail will be experimenting with a whole new
range of container, stake and rack (now being tested in proto-
type), heated, refrigerated, even types to carry linuid and dry
bulks. This expansion will eventually provide service coast to
coast. (CRRail News)
(VIA
THE 470)
CONSTRUCTION HAS STARTED ON THE NEXT PHASE OF EDMONTONS LIGHT
rail transit (LRT) line, extending the LRT westward
beneath Jasper Avenue from Central Transit Station to 107
Street.
Work is underway at the west end (101 Street) of Central
Station wherecrews are erecting a series of walls at the mezzanine
and platform levels. These walls will act as noise and dust
buffers separating the construction area from the public access
area.
Disruption to the public and to adjacent businesses
will be minimal. Jasper Avenue traffic and pedestrian movement
in the area will not be affected at this time, says Garry E.
Weese, manager of engineering for the Department.
The work taking place now, explains Mr. Weese, is to
prepare the west end of Central Transit Station fo the arrival
of the mole, a huge excavation machine which will bore the twin
tunnels from Central Station underground to 107 Street. It is
anticipated that this excavation work will commence in the next
few months.
Edmonton City Council approved this $70 million extension
in November 1979. Edmonton Transits LRT extension project will
take several years to complete. It is projected that LRT service
will be operating to the 107 Street area by early 1984.
(EDMONTON TRANSIT NEWS)
RS-10 locomotives Nos. 8475, 8587, 8750,lead units of C.P. freight
No. 911 at a service stop in Webbwood Ontario in June 1977. Number
8125, aSW1200RS, handles switching chores in the Webbwood, Espanola
area.
Scott B. Anderson.
CANADIAN 30
R A I L
UTDC AWARDED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACT BY LONDON TRANSPORT.
London Transport, one m the worlds largest and most
respected urban transit operators, has awarded a contract
to the Urban Transportation Development Corporation Ltd. (UTDC)
to develop technical designs for a steerable, rapid transit
suspension system for use on the London underground system.
This contract comprises the first of a three-phase London
Transport program aimed at reducing noise and wheel/rail wear
problems on the underground. Later phases will include prototype
testing and design work for production eouipment for use in
revenue service.
The current phase involves a contract of approximately
$200,000. Later phases are expected to entail several million
dollars of engineering work.
Commenting on the agreement, UTDC President, Kirk Foley,
says: We are pleased to have been awarded the contract because
it indicates the increasing international recognition and confid­
ence in Canadian expertise in this field.
London Transport is one of the worlds largest urban transit
operators with a network serving 630 sauare miles and a staff of
60,000 to manage, maintain and operate 6,700 buses and 4,300 subway
cars.
A steerable suspension system, or truck permits vehicles
to negotiate tight corners without producing a high degree of
friction thus reducing noise and wear on rails and wheels. This
reduction of wear contributes to significant savings in mainten­
ance costs.
UTDC is a pioneer in the field of steerable suspension
systems and has conducted. work for the U.S., Canadian and Ontario
governments. During its program to develop an advanced technology
Intermediate Capacity Transit System (ICTS), the corporation gained
a leading position in the research and development of steerable
trucks.
UTDC Press Release
1
THE NORTHLAND in Kopuskolin9. Ontario in July 1978, awaiting the
return trip to Toronto. FP9-A No. 6528 is followed by FPA_4 No. 6772.
Scott B. Anderson.
SACK COVER
THE SAME PLACE, THE SAME TRAIN, but now it is Winter, Morch 1978
to be exact, 01 FP9-A No. 6529 and FPA-4 No. 6776 ore waiting to
houl the NORTHLAND on it. return trip to Toronto.
Scott B. Anderson.
j

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