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Canadian Rail 340 1980

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Canadian Rail 340 1980

Canadian Rail
No.340
MAY 1980
,

C4N …….. -­
IAN
Published monthly by The Canadian Railroad
Historical Association
P.O. Gox 22, Station G Montreal
Quebec Canada H3B 3J5
EDITOR Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR M. Peter Murphy
BUSINESS CAR Dave J. Scott
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: Willian A.
Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
FRONT COVER
The first track installed on
Anticosti (1898). The Decauville
Rai lroad, which was l lH gauge, photographed
at Baie Ste.Claire.
The flat cars were horse-drawn. Collection, Lionel Lejeune.
OPPOSITE
Anticosti Rail~ay locomotive No.1,
built by ~1.L.W. in 1910, serial
number 48736.
~IL
ISSN 0008 -4 875
CALGARY & SOUTH HESTERN
L. M. Unwin, Secretary 60-6100 4th
Ave. NE
Calgary, Alberta T2A 5Z8
OTTAWA
By town Railway Society,
Mr. Bruce Kerr, Secretary ·P.
O. Box 141, Station A Ottawa, Ontario
KIN 8Vl
New Brunswi ck Di vi s ion c/o I·lr.
John Pollard 2
Ma 1 i see t Dri ve,
Sagamore Poi n t
Fairvale, N.B. EOr, lSO
PACIFIC COAST
R. Keillor, Secretary
P. O. Box 1006, Station A. Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2Pl
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
C. K. Hatcher, Secretary
P. O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
A I ber ta T 5B 2 NO
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
R. Ballard, Sr., Secretary,
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor Ontario
N9G IA2
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
Mr. Ho 11 i e LO~Iry, Secretary
P.O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto Ontario
M5W lP3
NIAGARA DIVISION
Peter Warwick, Secretary
P.O. Box 593
St. Catharines, Ontario
L2R 618
ST. LAWRENCE VALLEY DIVISION
J. P. Chartrand, Secretary P.
O. Box 99
Ste. Dorothee, Quebec H7X 2T4

This photo
of the Anticosti
Railway
appeared
in the January
1942
issue
of the National
Geographic
Magazine.
Carriages
met the train
to take passengers
to the chateau,
there
were only two automobiles
on the island
at that time.
Photo
courtesy
National
Geographic.
ROBERT SAMSON
The Island of Anticosti lies in the Gulf of St-Lawrence at 45
miles north-east from the Gaspe peninsula Que., at its nearest point
and 22 miles south from the north coast at its nearest point. It
is a low island of 137 miles long and .. 35 miles across at its widest
points. This island has been given to the explorer Louis Joliet
by the King of France Louis the XIV in 1680. After Louis Joliet
and his descendants, the island had many owners until bought in
1895 by M. Henri Menier of France. After his death in 1913, his
brother Gaston, a french senator became the owner. In 1926 the
island was sold to a new pulp and paper company called Anticosti
Corporation which became in 1931, Consolidated Paper Corporation
Locomotive No.1 built by M.L.W. in 1910. The four wheels under the
tender w.re replaced by two regular 4-wheel trucks in 1912 at the
same time that the engine was converted from wood to coal-burning.
No.1 was in service until the end of 1936, and was scrapped in the
Fall of 1939. Collection, Lionel Lejeune.
CANADIAN
135
R A I L
Locomotive No.2, a Heisler 4 – 4 weighing 90,000 Ibs. In this view
at Port Menier, No.2 was almost new in 1912 or 1913. Iri service
until the end of 1930, this locomotive was scrapped in the Fall of
1939. Collection, Lionel Lejeune.
Locomotive No.3 was also a Heisler 4 – 4 and weighed 100 000 Ibs.
It arrived,pt Port Menier in 1912 or 1913 (more likely 19f2), and
was in service until the end of 1934, being scrapped in the Fall of
1939. Collection, Lionel Lejeune.
CANADIAN 136 R A I L
Ltd., and again in 1967, Consolidated-Bathurst Ltd. Finally the
Uuebec Provincial Government bought the island in 1974. Today,
the only village is Port Menier with a population of about 150
permanent residents.
When M. Menri Menier became the owner, 2 little villages
already existed on the island, one at Fox Bay located at the north­
east end of the island with 16 families living in shacks. This
little village has completely desappeared in 1900. Anse-Aux-Fraises
located at the sauth-west end, very close the west end, had a
population of 26 families living in comfortable houses.
M. Menier commenced in the spring of 1896 to built his main
village at Baie Ste.Claire (Formerly English Bay) located at the
west end completely, and where already 6 or 7 fishermen were
established with their families, constructed a saw-mill, his main
office, houses, warehouse, a farm etc. A wharf of 300 feet long
was also built in the bay and the first railroad on Anticosti
Island was built from the end of that wharf going to the farm with
a branch to the warehouse and another branch to the saw-mill for a
total length of one mile. This was a Decauville narrow gauge railroad
(1 11t) brought from France by M. Menier in 1896 or 1897. The
little flat cars were horse-drawn.
In 1899 M. Menier noted that the Baie Ste.Claire did not
offer a good shelter for ships, and decided to move his main village
to Baie Gamache (Later Port Menier) which was located deep enough
Locomotive No.4, a 4-6-0 built by Baldwin in 1913 arrived at Port
Menier the some year. It weighed 140,000 lbs. and was in service
until December 1930, being scrapped in the Fall of 1939.
Collection, Lionel Lejeune.
r
CANADIAN 137 R A I L
Anticosti Railway locomotive No.5.
The Anticosti Railway steam shovel at work in 1912. It was built
by Alco (Rogers) in 1911, serial number 48414, and arrived in
Anticosti the same year. Retired in 1920, and dismantled in 1939,
the pieces being shipped out by boat that Fall.
Collection, Lionel Lejeune.
CANADIAN 138 R A I L
The engine shed and engine repair shop of the Anticosti Railway
about 1920. Collection, Lionel Lejeune.
inside the Bay Ellis and considered as a good shelter for ships
from all kinds of winds, except may be the south-east winds which
are never seriously strong. The distance between Baie Ste. Claire
to Baie Gamache (Port Menier) is 8t by the road. In the fall of
that year already 900 feet of wharf had been done on a total length
of 3500 feet which was completed the next year. Later 300 more feet
and a breakwater were added. Another little Decauville narrow gauge
railroad was used in the construction of that long wharf. The flat
cars were also horse-drawn.
In 1904 arrived on the island the first steam locomotive. A
Decauville narrow gauge (Approx. 30 inches) tank type. Arrived with
her some flat cars and new tracks. The purpose of that railroad
was to carry goods from the end of that long wharf to different
places in the village and for general purposes. This narrow gauge
railroad was replaced with standard gauge in 1910-11. This had
been rendered necessary due to M. Meniers intentions to make some
logging operations. A total of 38 miles of tracks including
sidings were laid from the end of the wharf to 27 miles in the
wood, 8 miles of branches also in the wood and 1t miles in the
village of Port Menier.
Around 1919 almost all the families which were living in the
villages of Baie Ste.Claire and Anse-Aux-Fraises had moved to Port
Menier.
CANADIAN 139
R A I L
ANTICOSTI RAILWAY ROSTER
NARROW GAUGE: (Approx. 30 inches)
Decauville tank locomotive 0-4-0 built by The Decauville Works,
Petitbourg, France in 1904. In active service at Port Menier
from 1904 until the end of 1910. Stored from that date in the
basement of the club-room at Port Menier. In 1944 or 1945 the
two water tanks were removed from the locomotive and used as
diesel oil tanks in the powerhouse. In 1949 she was scrapped,
dismantled and shipped by boat late in the same year.
STANDARD GAUGE:
Road Year Serial Wheel Engine Steam
number Builder built nu.niber arran!i!t wei!i!ht Eressure Note
MLW 1910 48736 2-4-0 44,OOOlbs 150
2
Heisler 4 + 4 90,000 150 2
3
Heisler 4 + 4 100,000 160 3
4
Baldwin 1913 4-6-0 140,000 170 4
5 2-6-0 150,000 150 5
none
Gas-mator locomotive
Btl
26,000 120 HP 6
Mechanical with side rods
none Alco 1911 48414 Steam shovel 7
none Industrial 1927 Bay
City
Michigan USA
Steam crane Capacity
33,000 Ibs 8
Note 1.-Arrived new at Port Menier late in the fall of 1910. Had
only 4 wheels under the tender and was wood burning. In
1912 she was converted to coal burning and 2 regular 4
wheels trucks replaced the former 4 wheels under the tender.
Work was done at Port Menier locomotive repair shop. Was
in active service until 1936 and mainly used as switcher
in Port Menier village. Scrapped, dismantled in 1939 and
shipped by boat in December of the same year.
Note 2.-That engine arrived not new but nearly new at Port Menier
in 1912 or 1913. (more likely in 1912) Was in active
service until end of 1921. Stored from end of 1921 until
1926. In active service again from 1926 to the end of
1930. Scrapped, dismantled at Port Menier in 1939 and
shipped by boat in December of the same year.
Note 3.-Arrived new at Port Menier in 1912 or 1913. (more likely
in 1912) was in active service until 1923. Stored from
1923 to 1926. In service again from 1926 until 1934.
Scrapped, dismantled at Port Menier in 1939 and shipped
by boat in December of the same year.
CANADIAN 140 R A I L
The tracks at the end of the wharf and on the breakwater about 1922.
Collection, Roger Samson.
Engine No.1 ready to push the passenger car about 1925. The man
in uniform is chief policeman Francois Vezina. Inside the car is
Georges Menier (one of the two sons of Gaston Menier) with his wife,
four children and the nurse. Collection, Lionel Lejeune.
CANADIAN 141 R A I L
Note 4.-Arrived new at Port Menier in 1913 and was in service
until December 1919. Stored from December 1919 until
1926. In active service again from 1926 until to the
end of 1930. Scrapped, dismantled at Port Menier in 1939
and shipped by boat in December of the same year.
Note 5.-That locomotive was the former number 14 bought from the
Quebec and Lake St. John Railroad and she was assigned
on passenger trains between Quebec City and Lake St. John
Que., while on that railroad. The size of her cylinders was
17 X 26 and the height of her drivers was not less
than 65 inches. Arrived at Port Menier in 1917 in poor
condition. After boiler repairs she was in active service
until the end of 1918. Stored until 1926. After heavy
boiler repairs and a new cylinder built at Port Menier
locomotive repair shop in 1926, she returned in active
service until end of 1930. Scrapped, dismantled at Port
Menier in 1939 and shipped by boat in December of the same
year.
Note 6.-Arrived second-hand at Port Menier from E.B. Eddy Co.,
of Hull Que., in 1929 or 1930. Had a gas-motor of 120
HP, but one year later the motor got out of service and
was replaced with another gas-motor of 100 HP. Was in
active service until fall of 1947. Scrapped, dismantled at
Port Menier in 1949 and shipped by boat the same year.
A steam crane of the Anticosti Railway lifting a seaplane in the early
1930 s. Collection, Lionel Lejeune.
CANADIAN R A I L
The Anticosti Railway steam crane lying on its side after falling
into the Port Menier canal in 1946. It was built By Industrial of
Bay City Michigan, U.S.A. in 1927, and had a capacity of 33,000 Ibs.
After this accident it was dismantled, and the parts were shipped
out by boat in 1949. Collection, Lionel Lejeune.
A general view of Port Menier around 1935. Some points of interest
are indicated on the photo by numbers: 1 Power House. 2 Companys
office. 3 Car Shed. 4 Roman Catholic church. 5 General Store.
6 Meat market and cold storage. Track passed underneath snow shed.
7 Main warehouse. 8 Hotel. 9 Club room. 10 Village water tower.
11 Engine house and engine repair shop. 12 Convent. 13 Port Menier
conal (man made).
CANADIAN
143 R A I L
Note 7.-Arrived new at Port Menier in 1911 and was in active service
until 1920. Scrapped, dismantled at Port Menier in 1939
and shipped by boat in December of the same yeor.
Note 8.-Arrived new at Port Menier in
service until she fell on her
Menier in the summer of 1946.
the canal and shipped by boat
1927 and was in active
side in the canal of Port
Scrapped and dismantled in
in 1949.
above
metal
cars,
for a
In 1939 were also scrapped, dismantled and shipped with the
listed locomotives and steam shovel, the followings; The
of 60 wooden flat cars, 5 steel flat cars, 10 pulpwood dump 10
gravel dump cars and a length of about 27 miles of rails
total of 4000 tons of scrap metal.
The remainder of the rolling stock comprising the gas-motor
locomotive, the steam crane, 10 steel flat cars and the little
passenger car (home-made at Port Menier) have been kept in active
service until the fall of 1947. (Except for the crane wrecked in
the summer of 1946) The construction ofa wide gravelled road which
commenced in the summer of 1946 gradually replaced the tracks until
completed in the fall of 1947, putting to a end of the Anticosti
Railway.
In 1949 all the_rollin~ stock has been scrapped, dismantled
and shipped by boat the same year together with the rails and the
french Decauville narrow gauge locomotive.
The only keepsakes left on the Island from the railways are
the 2 water tanks removed from the Decauville locomotive and now
in the powerhouse, and the old scrapped cylinder from engine number
5 which lies at the foot of the little hill back of the Port Menier
village and is almost out of sight, no doubt left there because
unseen or forgotten by the dealer in scrap.
The gas-engine locomotive of the Anticosti railway with a passenger
car and steel flat car in 1945. This locomotive was a type B with
side rods, and was purchased second-hand from the E.B. Eddy Co. of
Hull Que. in 1929 or 1930. In service until the Fall of 1947, it
was scrapped in 1949. Collection, Roger Samson.
eights
by Kenneth AWGansel
This is the story of two wayfreights on the Canadian National,
one which operates in Northern New Brunswick and the other in La
Have river valley of Nova Scotia.
The first wayfreight is known as the St. Quentin Turn, and oper­
ates Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday from Edmunston, N.B. to
Campbellton in the Eastbound direction and returns to Edmunston on
Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The day I chose was the Saturday,
and it was a typical late April morning, with fog and light rain.
I had checked with car-control the night before and was told ~at
the train would depart at 06:00. Well it being a Saturday and the
crew anxious to get home, the train left at 0515. Well with a
mad dash up the Trans-Canada to St. Leonard and then East on the
road to St. Quentin. On arriving at St. Quentin, and after care­
ful examination of the tracks, one came to the conclusion that the
train was not by, so the waiting game starts. During the 30 mins.
of waiting, I looked over the employees time table and top maps
for any interesting locations, then decided to go on East to
Kedgewick.
There
is a spot between St. Quentin and Kedgewick called St.
Martin-de-Restigouche where the line looks like a large snake.
However, the roads were closed to other than a 4-wheel drive jeep.
To Kedgewick the drive from St. Quentin takes 15 min. by car and
50 min. by train, from this you can see that the rail line is
tortuous.
At 0940, the St. Quentin Turn comes by the station at Kedgewick,
just to the Ea~t is a large lumber and pulp plant, and if there
is work to be done then the train will stop. This mill and the
one at St. Quentin are the mainstay of the line. Today there is
no work, and the train passes up the mill. So our train of 4 RSC-
13s (1706, 1721, 1703, 1710) pushes on through White Brooks, St.
Jean-Baptiste-de-Restigouche and Menneval. At Menneval the rail
line swings away from the highway. The next good location is
Upsalquitch, turn off at Robinsonville. The line has been de­
scending from Menneval along the Grog Brook and comes down to
water level at Upsalquitch, crosses the Upsalquitch River and works
its way up the Christopher Brook to Tide Head and the main
line into Campbellton.
The line is again away from the highway until it reaches Glencoe
and crosses the highway 4 miles from Tide Head. The highway
climbs a bluff and a good shot can be had looking down on the
train.
CANADIAN 145 R A I L
Canadian National at Kedgwick, N.B. passing the station, note the
old order board. The photograph was taken on 26 of April, 1975.
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St.
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BRUNSWICK
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Sf.
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ENTIN
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Redrawn
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CANADIAN 147
R A I L
Tide Head is reached by 1130 and is the junction between the
St. Quentin Sub-Division and the Mont Joli Sub-Division (main
line between Campbellton and Montreal). Here the train stops
and the dispatcher in Campbellton is notified that the train
wants the signal for the last 5 miles into Campbellton.
The train has come some 135 miles in 6 hours; when there is
work along the line it will take about 8 hours or more. There
are two open order offices on the line, St. Quentin and Kedgewick,
they are not open on Saturday. The line offers some fantastic
scenery and with weight restrictions ONLY MLW RSC-13s (1700s)
can run which makes it a worthwhile trip.
Canadian National west of Tide Head, N.B. Locomotives 1706, 1721,
1703,1710 work their way to Cambellton on April 26,1975. All
locomotives are MLW, RSC-13 s.
The other wayfreight of interest runs from Bridgewater to Middleton,
Nova Scotia, it also operates with very unusual power. That being
RSC-24s also built by MLH, there areonly three left out of the
four which were built in 1959 (no: 1800, 1801, 1803). The eN op­
erates from Bridgewater to Middleton and returns on Monday, Wednesday and
Friday, and on Thursday to Caledonia, and Tuesday to
Lunenburg. He will only deal with the run to Middleton (note
that due to weather, I photographed this line on two Fridays,
which will account for the different unit numbers).
CANADIAN 148 R A I L
Dominion Atlantic Railway -Middletown, Nova Scotia the eN train is
working its way through the town. All photos courtesy of the Author.
CANADIAN
149
R A I L
The Middleton train is ordered for 0700 at Bridgewater and gets
under way by about 0720, the train will have about 12 cars, which
are waiting in the yard having been made up the evening before by
the yard crew. The train will take the East bank of the La Have
River and the highway (#10) the West bank for about 5 miles ~t
which time the highway comes alongside of the railway. Union
Square, Wentzell Lake offer some good photo locations to capture
this train working its way to New Germany. There is no work done
along the line until it reaches New Germany, also the junction for
the Caledonia line, there is still an operator at New Germany but
he tells us that the station will soon be closed.
There is quite a grade into New Germany and the train roars by at
8 MPH. New Germany is reached by 0810 and the engine sets out
to pick up a car from the feed mill. And after 10 mins. at New
Germany the train is off for Middleton. Some of the rail used on
the Middleton Sub is 6G lbs., (c. 1887) and for that reason the
RSC-24s are used, eN is in the process of replacing some of this
rail with 100 lbs.
After Springfield, the line leaves the highway and runs through
the bush for some 20 miles. Then comes alongside of the highway
at Nictaux Falls, and here an excellent photograph can be had.
From Nictaux Falls to Middleton is only 5 miles and the line is
rather flat but does cross the Annapolis River over a double span
truss bri dge.
Middleton is reached by. 1030 and the train will spend an hour or
so switching the various business cars here. On some days the
train will proceed to Bridgetown 13 miles Southeast of Middleton.
However, money making is in Middleton. And also CPR cars are left
for the OAR (those for DAR points). The train is on its way back
to Bridgewater by 1200 or so. If one is a visitor to Nova Scotia,
the Middleton Sub offers, unusual motive power, great scenery, and
typical branch line operation.
CN-New Germany, Nova Scotia coming by the station on the 2nd. of
May 1975.
010
by
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CANADIAN 151 R A I L
As an aid to people interested in following any of these two
wayfreights the following topographic maps will be an asset, they
are for:
St. Quentin Turn:
Middleton, N.S. :
and
are available at:
CAI1PBELLTON 1:250,000 No: 21-0
ANNAPOLIS 1:250,000 No: 2l-A
Information Canada,
or Canada Map Office
615 Booth Street
Ottawa, Ontario
add $0.50 when ordering from Ottawa for handing charge.
$1 .50
$1.50
CN-Nictaux Falls, Nova Scotia, XN 1801 an RSC-24 photographed
by the Author on the 2nd. of May 1975.
The . …~.
business car
RAILWAY PART MAKERS ASK FOR TRADE SYSTEM SIMILAR TO THE CURRENT
auto pact. Canadian manufacturers -Hawker-Siddeley Canada
Ltd. of Thunder Bay; Bombardier Inc. of .Montreal; and
Vickers Canada Ltd of Montreal feel they are being discriminated
against by the United States Buy American rule. The U.S. Sur­
face Transportation Assistance Act of 1978 requires that passenger
rolling stock purchased with U.S. federal aid must have at least
50% U.S. content and that final assembly be done in the U.S.A.
The Chicago cars manufactured by Bombardier have 78% U.S. content
which is no problem; however the final assembly clause will foster
inefficiency and create increased costs. The companies would be
willing to have Canada drop its tariff in the field if the United
States will waive its so-called Buy American rules. The compan­
ies have threatened to cut the U.S. content down to the 50% level
if the U.S. government refuses to budge. (Globe and Mail).
PROVINCES RAIL SYSTEM UNDER REVIEW. A nine-member task force
headed by former Cabinet Minister Mrs. Margaret Scrivener
(M.P.P. St. Davids) was announced Jan 30th to study the fut­
ure role of rail in Ontarios integrared transportation system.
The goal is to provide a provincial perspective on rail transpor­
tation in the province, and to examine the existing system, ident­
ifying changes required for the effective movement of people and
goods as a means of enhancing the social and economic development
of Ontario. Questions to be answered include: the railway role,
existing railway inventory, railway technology, energy, financial,
environmental, jurisdictional and others. (O.T.F. on P.R.P.).
The ministry of transportation and communications is currently
studying: (1) Toronto Area Transit Operating Authority (TATOA)
including GO TRANSIT train extension to Oshawa, and (2) a study
of the potential for electrifying parts of the GO TRANSIT system.
These two studies will also be provided to the Scrivener Task Force.
(Globe and Mail).
CANADIAN
153
R A I L
THE ENGINE ON THE STAMP – -FOLLOW UP
Sad to say, gremlins got into our type and changed the
meaning of the conclusion of the article The Engine On The
Stamp in the January issue. On page 18, line 40, the words:
unlikely to have been one of the two of 1854 should read:
unlikely to have been one of the four later engines, but was
probably one of the two of 1854. The editor regrets any con­
fusion that this error may have caused.
Since the article appeared, our member Mr. Andrew P.
Nimmo has sent the above picture of a rare U.S. envelope.
While no date is visible, the stamp is of the issue of 1851
which was demonitised at the start of the Civil War in 1861.
The great similarity of the engine on the envelope to that on
the 1860 New Brunswick stamp is too great to be a coincidence.
Possibility they were both based on an earlier engraving such
as one by Currier and Ives, in which case the engine would not
be Canadian. So pending further data turning up the question
is still open.
CANADIAN LIGHT RAIL VEHICLES (C.L.R.V.) went south of the border
March 3rd. (rather 2 on the 3rd. and one several days later)
for demonstration and evaluation by the Massachusetts Bay
Transportation Authority (MBTA) in Boston for a 90-day period for
which Urban Transportation Development Corp. Ltd. (UTDC) will rec­
eive $500,000. These cars will be in revenue service on MBTAs
system. Hopefully these demonstrations will prove satisfactory and
lead to an early order for CLRVs. (UTDC).
CANADIAN 154
R A I L
C.T.C. WITHHOLDS APPROVAL OF A BID BY CONRAIL TO TAKE OVER PROP­ERTIES: The
properties are: Canada Southern Railway, The
Detroit River Tunnel Co., The Niagara River Bridge Co. all
located in Southwestern Ontario; and the St. Lawrence and Adiron­
dack Railway in Quebec, all presently held by the trustees of the
bankrupt Penn Central Transportation Co. and the Michi~an Central
Railroad. The Consolidated Rail Corp. of Philadelphia ~CONRAIL)
applied to the Railway Transport Committee of the Canadian Transport
Commission (R. T. C. -C. T. C.) in 1976 to acquire the four properties
and hearings were held in March 1977 in Toronto and Ottawa.
The C.T.C. in withholding approval suggests that CONRAIL has
not behaved as a good corporate citizen since it took over the op­
eration on an interim basis in 1976. The C.T.C. indicated that CON­
RAIL has been divirting trains from Canada Southern lines to CONRAIL
lines in the U.S. at the expense of the Canadian operations and
Canadian rail workers (53 have lost their jobs). The C.T.C. suges­
ted that this action could be the prelude to abandonment of the 225-
mile double-tracked line -also questioned was CONRAILs financial
reporting. The C.T.C. directed CONRAIL to: (1) continue to operate
the properties in the public interest on an interim basis, but under
C.T.C. surveillance; and (2) directed CONRAIL to file a plan within
90 days on how it intends to improve the operations of these proper­
ties. The ruling in effect directs CONRAIL to operate more trains
over the Canada Southern which currently runs only a local daily
freight train. Also the C.T.C. stated that CONRAIL is not supplying
adeouate service to Southern Ontario grain farmers.
The traffic diversion has also had a deleterious effect on the
viability of the Canada Southern, and C.T.C. investigation has showed
that the Canadian companies are profitable, except for the Canada
Southern which might also be profitable were it not for the traffic
diversion. The 3.2 mile Detroit River Tunnel connects CONRAILs U.S.
lines to Canada Southern at Windsor; also it is an important gateway
for Canada -U.S. rail traffic used also by C.P Rail, C. & 0.,
G.T.W., and D.T. & I. who pay $22.00 per rail car for moving through
the tunnel, versus $60.00 per car for floating by rail barge.
The Niagara River Bridge Co. is an international bridge between Nia­
gara Falls N.Y. and Niagara Falls Onto and provides CONRAIL and
C. & O. with access to Buffalo. The St. Lawrence and Adirondack
operates 57 miles of owned or leased track between Malone and Massena
N.Y. and Adirondack Jct. Que. near Montreal which is reached by track­
age rights over C.P. Rail. The Chesapeake and Ohio (C. & 0.) has
operating rights over the Canada Southern for up to 6 trains a week
between St. Thomas and Niagara Falls, and over a six-mile section
east of Windsor.
The C.T.C. also refused an application by minority sharehold­
ers of Canada Southern to order cancellation of the 999-year lease
to Michigan Central and for restitution and damages, because C.T.C.
lacked jurisdiction, and it was a matter for civil suit.
(Globe and Mail).
OSCILLATING AND STROBE LIGHTS on any Canadian locomotive or RDC etc.
have been ordered, by the Canadian Transport Commission, to
be removed immediately. This reversal, after 27 years, is
because it was found that rotating lights and flashers as used on RDCs by
C.P. and C.N. have a hypnotic effect on those running
these units. (The Marker -A.P.R.A.).
CANADIAN 155 R A I L
CALGARY POWER JOINED THE RANKS OF COMPANIES WHICH OWN SPECIALTY
cars when it took delivery, in December 1979, of CAPX 1001.
This car, built by National Steel Car Co. in Hamilton has
36 wheels and will be used to transport large and heave generators
and turbines. Calgary Power Co. Ltd. is an investor-owned electric
utility which serves much of alberta, except Calgary and Edmonton.
At each end of the car is a conventional heavy 4-wheel truck,
a buckeye 6-wheel truck, and two more 4-wheel trucks for a total
of 18 axles -36 wheels, each 36 inches in diameter instead of the
standard 33-inch. The car also has an operator cabin with controls.
SPECS: Capacity
Load Lmt.
Lt. Wto
792,000 lbs.
792,000 lbs.
391,500 Lbs.
Length 141 6
Width 10 8
Incidently, the rival Alberta Power Company used the car to
transport a generator from Vancouver to Edmanton. Home point for
the car is Calgary Power Ltd. Sundance Steam Plant, Wabamum,
Alberta C.N.R. Delivery. (The Marker -A.P.R.A.).
Mr. I.C.Platt of Ingersoll, Ontario was kind enough to submit this
interesting photo of Toronto Hamilton and Buffalo No. 402 switching
at Goderich, Ontario on 18 July 1979.
CANADIAN
156
R A I L
Gord Taylor submitted these three photos taken at Waubuno Creek
Bridge which is double tracked on March 15, 1980. First we see
VIA no. 74 eastbound, then freight No. 422 westbound, note the
specially equipped F unit for snowplow service in the lask-up.
Last in this series is CN No. 400 eastbound headed up by 9535.
M
I
.,
t
i
CA NAD IAN
157
R A I L
Canadian Nationals only operating steam locomotive 6060 will be
heading West for a yet-to-be determined future. Here we see the
famed twin sixties roaring towards the Madoc Road Crossing during
railway week celebrations at Belleville, Ontario on May 24, 1978.
Photo courtesy of Mr. I.C.Platt of Sydenham, Ontario.
CANADIAN 158 R A I L
February 9, 1980 saw CP 5560 heading a drag through Chatham, Ontario
one car of which contained a high steel load for a bridge under con­
struction at Tilbury, Ontario. Next we see the local CN switcher at
London, Ontario, note that the unit has one Can-Car and one Dofasco
truck. Our thanks for Gord Taylor for remembering Canadian Rail
in his travels.
BACK COVER
Todoy this locotion consists af 0 single track eN siding beneath
o ~as5ivc a~to interchange commonly known 05 spaghetti junction
Bock in the carly 1950 s when Allan Toohey was bu~y photographing
railway action in ond around Montreal he captured a westbound Ro
ute 91 Lochine streetcar, on eastbound C~ commuter train complete
with tonk engine and wooden coaches 05 well as the westbound main_
line freight just for effect. Th~ location is Ville St. Pierre,
Quebec, how ti,.,es have changed.
MANUSCRIPTS REQUESTED
The Editors file is bAcoflling just a little
thin and your help is requested. As you know
011 articles that appear in CANADIAN RAIL are
submitted by the me~bers for the enjoyment of al
l. If you have a favorite tapic be it
steam, diesel or electric, or a particular
line that you are researching why not drop
us a line. Photos should be black and white
and 5 X 7 or larger if at 011 possible. B&W
prints ~ade from color slides sho~ld be av­
oided if possible. Hay we take thi~ opportu­
ity to thank all those who contribute on a r
egular basis ond we invite you to join in
the fun of contributin9 to Canadian Rail.
reed Angus
E
ditor.

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