Consulter nos archives / Consult our archives

La majorité des documents conservés par le Centre d'archives et de documentation de l'ACHF sont disponibles pour consultation.

Most of the documents kept by the ACHF Archives and Documentation Center are available for consultation.

Canadian Rail 337 1980

Lien vers le document

Canadian Rail 337 1980

Canadian Rail
No.337
FEBRUARY 1980

155N 0008 ­48.75
Cover: Light Rail Vehicle
(LRV) No. 4019
of the Toronto Transit Commission
i s pictured outbound on Lakeshore
Road in Mimico on October l, 1979.
Ted Wickson took this photo during the
first week of regular service for
Canada 1 s newest streetcars.
Opposite:
Hundreds of onlookers are crowded
at the ribbon cutting ceremony
at the Humber Loop for the intro­
duction into regular service of the
TTC s new LRVs. The date was
September 29, 1979 and Ted Wickson
took the picture.
…..~IAN
Published monthly by The Canadian Railroad Historical Association
P.O. Box 22, Station B Montreal
Quebec Canada H3B 3j5
EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
BUSINESS CAR: J. A. Beatty
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
CALGARY &SOUTH WESTERN
L. M. Unwin, Secretary60-6100 4th
Ave. NE
Calgary, Alberta T2A 5Z8
OTTAWA
D. E. Stoltz, Secretary
P. O. Box 141, Station A Ottawa,Ontario
K1N 8Vl
PACIFIC COAST
R. Keillor, Secretary
P. O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2Pl
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
C. K. Hatcher, ~ecretary
P. O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Alberta T5B 2NO
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
R. Ballard, Sr., Secretary
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor,
Onta ri 0 N9G 1A2
TORONTO &YORK DIVISION
J. C. Kyle, Secretary
P. O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto
Ontario
M5W lP3
NIAGARA DIVISION
Peter Warwick, Secretary
P.O. Box 593
St. Catharines, Ontario
L2R 6W8
CA
Cover: Light Rail Vehicle
(LRV) No. 4019
of the Toronto Transit Commission
is pictured outbound on Lakeshore
Road in Mimico on October 1, 1979.
Ted Wickson took this photo during the
first week of regular service for Canadas newest
streetcars.
Opposite:
Hundreds of onlookers are crowded
at the ribbon cutting ceremony
at the Humber Loop for the intro­
duction into regular service of the
TTC s new LRVs. The date was
September 29, 1979 a nd Ted Wi ckson took the
picture.
……………… IAN
~IL
ISSN 0008 -48.75
Published monthly by The Canadian Railroad Historical Association
P.O. Box 22, Station B Montreal
Quebec Canada H3B 3jS
EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
BUSINESS CAR: J. A. Beatty
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germani uk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN
L. M. Unwin, Secretary 60-6100 4th
Ave. NE
Calgary, Alberta T2A SZ8
OTTAWA
D. E. Stoltz, Secretary
P. O. Box 141, Station A Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8Vl
PACIFIC COAST
R. Keillor, Secretary
P. O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2Pl
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
C. K. Hatcher, ~ecretary
P. O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Alberta TSB 2NO
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
R. Ballard, Sr., Secretary
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor, Ontario
N9G lA2
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
J. C. Kyle, Secretary
P. O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto
Ontario
M5W lP3
NIAGARA DIVISION
Peter Warwick, Secretary
P.O. Box 593
St. Catharines, Ontario
L2R 6W8

,.
Park where thi-s photo lilas taken byTedWickson,;
FoJ.lbwing the CLRV unyéilirig ceremonyat Rllncelivales· Carhouse
three gene.rat;io.ns of TTC trolleys represénteef byPeterWitt
2894,P.CC4546 and LRV 4000 macLe (> high speed runto -litlmber
L<:l0p. A-photb stop was briefly maâe at the.Queenswoy near High
., .
Foilow.ing the CLRV unveilirig.ceremonyat Ro~ce$vales Carho-use
three gene.raHo.n.s o·f rT:C;l;rolleys rep·re.sent·ed qy PeterWitt
,2,894;PCG.4546 and LRV 4000 mode o.·hi·gh &peed run to l-jtlmbe; .
t9.op. A photo stopwas bri·efly made at. the·.Gueenswoy near High
Pork where this photo was token by Ted .Wicksoni
;,
.
,
.. ~
TORONTOS NEW LRVS
ENTER REVENUE SERVICE
and other tid bits
by TedHickson.
After months of delays, Torontos new LRVs were finally
introduced to the public on Saturday, September 29th. Brief
ceremonies were held at Roncesvalles Carhouse (the present home
for TTC c growing LRV fleet) and at Humber Loop. Forming a
backdrop for the ceremonies were Peter Witt 2894, PCC 4546 and
LRV 4000 -representing the three generations of streetcars in
the Commission s 58-year history. Following appropriate remarks
by TTC officials and other platform guests, about 400 members of
the public and rail fan community were invited to board the Witt,
PCC of LRVs for a trip west to Humber Loop.
Except for a planned photo stop on TheUueensway opposite
Grenadier Pond, the procession of cors enjoyed non-stop travel to
The Humber courtesy of motorcycle police who escorted the parade
and protected 011 intersections normally controlled by traffic
lights. During this event, the regular QUEEN service was short­
turned at Sunnyside Loop and a shuttle bus service was set up
between The Humber and Roncesvalles. The Humber Loop property
was a seo of people os onlookers crowded a ribbon cutting ceremony
(The Mayor of Etobicoke doing the honours) which symbolized
the introduction of LRV service on SOl-LONG BRANCH. Again, the
public was invited to ride a light rail vehicle on a token trip
west to 18th St. Loop or return to Roncesvalles and downtown
aboard the new cors.
TORONTOS NEW LRVS
ENTER REVENUE SERVICE
and other tid bits
by Ted Hickson.
After months of delays, Torontos new LRVs were finally
introduced to the public on Saturday, September 29th. Brief
ceremonies were held at Roncesvalles Carhouse (the present home
for TTC c growing LRV fleet) and at Humber Loop. Forming a
backdrop for the ceremonies were Peter Witt 2894, PCC 4546 and
LRV 4000 -representing the three generations of streetcars in
the Commissions 58-year history. FOllowing appropriate remarks
by TTC officials and other platform guests, about 400 members of
the public and rail fan community were invited to board the Witt,
pec of LRVs for a trip west to Humber Loop.
Except for a planned photo stop on TheUueensway opposite
Grenadier Pond, the procession of cars enjoyed non-stop travel to
The Humber courtesy of motorcycle police who escorted the parade
and protected all intersections normally controlled by traffic
lights. During this event, the regular QUEEN service was short­
turned at Sunnyside Loop and a shuttle bus service was set up
between The Humber and Roncesvalles. The Humber Loop property
was a sea of people as onlookers crowded a ribbon cutting ceremony
(The Mayor of Etobicoke doing the honours) which symbolized
the introduction of LRV service on 50l-LONG BRANCH. Again, the
public was invited to ride a light rail vehicle on a token trip
west to 18th St. Loop or return to Roncesvalles and downtown
aboard the new cars.
CANADIAN RAI L
39
Inside and out, photos of the first Canadian -built streetcar 1n
nearly 30 years~ Hawker-Siddeley L-2 class LRV No. 4010 was first
of the production ~odel~ delivered in late April, 1979. These
photos of 4010 were taken inside the St. Clair Carhouse by Ted
Wickson.
CANADIAN
39
R A I L
/
Inside and out, photos of the first Canadian -built streetcar 1n
nearly 30 years~ Hawker-Siddeley L-2 class LRV No. 4010 was first
of the production ~odel~ delivered in late April, 1979. These
photos of 4010 were taken inside the St. Clair Carhouse by Ted
Wickson.
1
CANADIAN
40
RAI L
The following morning, September 30th, all service on LONG
BRANCH was provided by four new LRVs running on a 12-minute
headway. This route had been chosen because the necessary
modifications had been made to the overhead section insulators,a
maximum of only eight cars is required for rush hour service (14
LRVs had been accepted at the time) and the track and specialwork
over the route is in good condition.
Public reaction to the new cars has been very favourable;
however, the real test will occur in the wermer months next year
wh en the forced air ventilation system proves itself. The ride
quality of the CLRV is excellent–somewhat softer than that on
the Boeing LRV. The air suspension truly gives one a floating
sensation with accompanying slight pitching and rolling. Night
photographers will be frustrated in their attempts to photograph
stationary LRVs; the new cars tend to keep rocking long after
coming to a stop.
The most serious problems with the CLRVs that have delayed
their acceptance by TTC and subsequent entry to service have been
in the propulsion system (Garrett chopper) and in the trucks.
In fact, in mid-1978 it seemed that for every retro fit completed
a new problem cropped up. The six SIG-built prototype LRVs (nos.
4000-4005) underwent several thousand km of test operation over
the streets of Toronto in 1978-79 and almost 200 retrofits, minor
to major, were needed. Not all retrofits were incorporated l~to
the new Hawker-Siddeley cars (the first car, No. 4010, arrived at
Hillcrest Shop April 25/79) and much time consuming work had to
be done on these Canadian-built cars by Toronto-based Hawker­
Siddeley and Urban Transportation Development Corporation staff.
With memories of the H-5 subway car order (also arrett choppers
and motors) still fresh in their minds, TTC Equipment Department
staff were understandably reluctant to cut any corners in ~e CLRV
acceptance procedure. Cars 4004 and 4005 were hurriedly given
provisional acceptance the last week in September, 1978 so that
the TTC and UTDC could offer a short CLRV tour for visiting APTA
delegates.
The only major visual difference between the SIG and Hawker­
Siddeley cars is in the seating plan. The angled seating in the
prototypes has been unpopular and the more traditional 2 and 1
transverse seating was specified for the Canadian-built series.
By mid-October, .31 LRVs were on TTC property–only half of them
accepted for service. Deliveries have been at the slow rate of
about 1 car a week since the arrival of 4010 in April. Hawker­
Siddeley hopes to speed up deliveries to four cars a week once
the backlog of retrofitting early production cars at UTDC s St.
Clair carhouse facility is completed. The 190-car Hawker-Siddeley
order will likely be completed early in 1981.
The busy BATHURST and ST. CLAIR routes will be the next to
see LRV operation. Rather than beirig a wholesale conversion (as
with LONG BRANCH), the LRVs will replace PCC runs as they become
available. The new cars should begin appearing on the BATHURST
line in November. The moratorium on LRV charters for enthusiosts
is expected to be li fted by year s end.
The appearance of the LRVs on LONG BRANCH has marked another
milestone in route identification–the use of route numbers. All
the PCC route and destination blinds will be changed soon to reflect
this new designation.
CANADIAN
40
R A I L
The following morning, September 30th, all service on LONG
BRANCH was provided by four new LRVs running on a 12-minute
headway. This route had been chosen because the necessary
modifications had been made to the overhead section insulators,a
maximum of only eight cars is required for rush hour service (14
LRVs had been accepted at the time) and the track and specialwork
over the route is in good condition.
Public reaction to the new cars has been very favourable;
however, the real test will occur in the warmer months next year
when the forced air ventilation system proves itself. The ride
quality of the CLRV is excellent–somewhat softer than that on
the Boeing LRV. The air suspension truly gives one a floating
sensation with accompanying slight pitching and rolling. Night
photographers will be frustrated in their attempts to photograph
stationary LRVs; the new cars tend to keep rocking long after
coming to a stop.
The most serious problems with the CLRVs that have delayed
their acceptance by TTC and subsequent entry to service have been
in the propulsion system (Garrett chopper) and in the trucks.
In fact, in mid-1978 it seemed that for every retrofit completed
a new problem cropped up. The six SIG-built prototype LRVs (nos.
4000-4005) underwent several thousand km of test operation over
the streets of Toronto in 1978-79 and almost 200 retrofits, minor
to major, were needed. Not all retrofits were incorporated l~to
the new Hawker-Siddeley cars (the first car, No. 4010, arrived at
Hillcrest Shop April 25/79) and much time consuming work had to
be done on these Canadian-built cars by Toronto-based Hawker­
Siddeley and Urban Transportation Development Corporation staff.
With memories of the H-5 subway car order (also arrett choppers
and motors) still fresh in their minds, TTC Equipment Department
staff were understandably reluctant to cut any corners in ~e CLRV
acceptance procedure. Cars 4004 and 4005 were hurriedly given
provisional acceptance the last week in September, 1978 so that
the TTC and UTDC could offer a short CLRV tour for visiting APTA
delegates.
The only major visual difference between the SIG arid Hawker­
Siddeley cars is in the seating plan. The angled seating in the
prototypes has been unpopular and the more traditional 2 and 1
transverse seating was specified for the Canadian-built series.
By mid-October, .31 LRVs were on TTC property–only half of them
accepted for service. Deliveries have been at the slow rate of
about 1 car a week since the arrival of 4010 in April. Hawker­
Siddeley hopes to speed up deliveries to four cars a week once
the backlog of retrofitting early production cars at UTDC sSt.
Clair carhouse facility is completed. The 190-car Hawker-Siddeley
order will likely be completed early in 1981.
The busy BATHURST and ST. CLAIR routes will be the next to
see LRV operation. Rather than being a wholesale conversion (as
with LONG BRANCH), the LRVs will replace PCC runs as they become
available. The new cars should begin appearing on the BATHURST
line in November. The moratorium on LRV charters for enthusiasts
is expected to be li fted by years end.
The appearance of the LRVs on LONG BRANCH has marked another
milestone in route identification–the use of route numbers. All
the PCC route and destination blinds will be changed soon to reflect
this new designation.
CANADIAN 41 RAI L
At its meeting of October 2nd, the Toronto Transit Commission
approved placing ads in world trade magazines advertising the sale
of up to 200 surplus PCC cars in 1980. The active PCC fleet now
totals 335 of which 173 have been rebuilt. The present schedules
calI for a total of 231 streetcars in rush hour operation over aIl
routes. The number of rebuilt PCCs remaining on roster in the 1980s
will be determined by how many LRVs are to be reassigned to the
Scarborough LRT Line and by the levels of ridership on the carlines
in the years to come.
CANADIAN 41 R A I L
At its meeting of October 2nd, the Toronto Transit Commission
approved placing ads in world trade magazines advertising the sale
of up to 200 surplus PCC cars in 1980. The active PCC fleet now
totals 335 of which 173 have been rebuilt. The present schedules
call for a total of 231 streetcars in rush hour operation over all
routes. The number of rebuilt PCCs remaining on roster in the 1980s
will be determined by how many LRVs are to be reassigned to the
Scarborough LRT Line and by the levels of ridership on the carlines
in the years to come.
CANADIAN RAI L
42
During the first week of service .Ted caught 4019 inbound on Lakeshore
Road in Mimico on the 507 Long Branch route.
CANADIAN
42
R A I L
During the first week of service .Ted caught 4019 inbound on Lakeshore
Road in Mimico on the 507 Long Branch route.
CANADIAN RAI L
43
On a foggy Sunday morning, the first day of regular LRV service
TTC 4011 lays over on the Long Branch Loop. The date was September
30, Ted Wickson took the photo.
CANADIAN
43
R A I L
On a foggy Sunday morning, the first day of regular LRV service
TTe 4011 lays over on the Long Branch Loop. The date was September
30, Ted Wickson took the photo.
CANADIAN
44
RAI L
CANADIAN ARTICULATED LIGHT RAIL VEHICLE (ALRV) TO BE A REALITY
At the opening ceremonies of the Urban Transportation
Development Corporation s Test Centre at Kingston (230 km east
of Toronto) in September of 1978, it was announced that the
Provinces of Ontario and Quebec would undertake the design,
construction and testing of at least one prototype articulated
light rail vehicle .•• . On May 28,1979, the two governments
signed an agreement under which the UTDC would design the
prototype and Bombardier/MLW of Montreal would manufocture it.
The 6-axle, 75 car will be a derivative of the Conodian Light
Rail Vehicle (CLRV). Of the $4.4-million estimated cost of
development, the Ontorio Government would pay obout $2.4-million
directly and about $1.4-milion through the provinciolly-owned
UTDC. The Quebec Government would pay obout $600,000.
Delivery of the ALRV had been expected by October of 1980
but the project has been delayed by problems in the design of
the articulation unit (similar problems led to the concellation
of the contract with SIG to build the original ALRV) and the
fact that key staff were temporarily assigned to the CLRV program
to ensure the smooth introduction of the new cars by the TTC in
late September. UTDC now gives March of 1981 as the completion
date for the prototype articulated LRV.
As
of mid-October, no major sub-contracts had been awarded
ond it still remains uncleor where the demonstration of the ALRV
will take place. Funding for the proposed 7km light rail test
track at Kingston hos not materialized. Should the track be
built, the car would be built to standard gouge; if not, the car
would be built to TTC gouge and some orrongement would be made
with the TTC to store ond demonstrate it in Toronto.
UTDC hopes that sales prospects for their 6-axle orticulated
cor will not be as bleak as their experience with the 4-axle CLRV.
Years ag~ the TTC ruled out an articulated car for three basic
reasons: 1. An articulated car could not be accommodoted in its
major shop facility -Hillcrest. 2. Dwell times at stops would
increase, especially with wider headways, with an ALRV. 3. The
safe use of the rear door on such a car could not be properly
monitored by the motorman.
Other properties probably wouldn t share TTC s objections to
the ALRV. All other feotures aside, UTDC expects the main selling
point to be the vehicle s better crew to passenger rotio.
SCARBOROUGH LRT LINE: FINAL DECISIONS AND START OF CONSTRUCTION
The first contract on the $97-miliion, 7km Scarborough
Light Rail Line was recently awarded. Work involves construction
of the LRT ramps to the looding platform at Kennedy Subway Terminal.
With the Toronto Transit Commission s decision on June 26th
ta reject accessibility for the handicapped (at a saving of $2.2­
million), final design work is now being done on the line s 8
stations. The target opening date is August, 1982.
CANADIAN
44
R A I L
CANADIAN ARTICULATED LIGHT RAIL VEHICLE (ALRV) TO BE A REALITY
At the opening ceremonies of the Urban Transportation
Development Corporations Test Centre at Kingston (230 km east
of Toronto) in September of 1978, it was announced that the
Provinces of Ontario and Quebec would undertake the design,
construction and testing of at least one prototype articulated
light rail vehicle .•• . On May 28,1979, the two governments
signed an agreement under which the UTDC would design the
pratatype and Bombardier/MLW af Montreal would manufacture it.
The 6-axle, 75 car will be a derivative of the Canadian Light
Rail Vehicle (CLRV). Of the $4.4-million estimated cost af
development, the Ontario Government would pay about $2.4-million
directly and about $1.4-milion through the provincially-owned
UTDC. The Quebec Government would pay about $600,000.
Delivery of the ALRV had been expected by October of 1980
but the project has been delayed by problems in the design of
the articulation unit (similar problems led to the cancellation
of the contract with SIG to build the original ALRV) and the
fact that key staff were temporarily assigned to the CLRV program
to ensure the smooth introduction of the new cars by the TTC in
late September. UTDC now gives March of 1981 as the completion
date for the prototype articulated LRV.
As
of mid-October, no major sub-contracts had been awarded
and it still remains unclear where the demonstration of the ALRV
will take place. Funding for the proposed 7km light rail test
track at Kingston has not materialized. Should the track be
built, the car would be built to standard gauge; if not, the car
would be built to TTC gauge and some arrangement would be made
with the TTC to store and demonstrate it in Toronto.
UTDC hopes that sales prospects for their 6-axle articulated
car will not be as bleak as their experience with the 4-axle CLRV.
Years ag~ the TTC ruled out an articulated car for three basic
reasons: 1. An articulated car could not be accommodated in its
major shop facility -Hillcrest. 2. Dwell times at stops would
increase, especially with wider headways, with an ALRV. 3. The
safe use of the rear door on such a car could not be properly
monitored by the motorman.
Other properties probably wouldnt share TTC s objections to
the ALRV. All other features aside, UTDC expects the main selling
point to be the vehicles better crew to passenger ratio.
SCARBOROUGH LRT LINE: FINAL DECISIONS AND START OF CONSTRUCTION
The first contract on the $97-miliion, 7km Scarborough
Light Rail Line was recently awarded. Work involves construction
of the LRT ramps to the loading platform at Kennedy Subway Terminal.
With the Toronto Transit Commissions decision on June 26th
to reject accessibility for the handicapped (at a saving of $2.2-
million), final design work is now being done on the lines
8 stations. The target opening date is August, 1982.
CANADIAN
45
RAI L
1 SC:AR8OflOUGHj
MIOlAHO TOWN ŒNTM
ElLESMERE McCOWAN
El Rd.
LAWRENCE
LawTenCe IW.
LEGEND
_ ~inTun…1
…. ~in Open eut
Light Rail
KENNEDY
-e::::.-Stations
o
A 9km extension of the Scarborough LRT Line north-east
from the Town Centre to the Malvern Town site (in extreme north­
east Scarborough) is a closer step to reality. In June, the
Metropolitan Toronto Planning Board approved protecting the option
of such an extension. Over the heated objections of Toronto Mayor
John Sewell, a decision was made to preserve lands required for
the right-of-way in case the line becomes necessary in the future.
Mayor Sewell favoured the use of existing streets if such a line
were to be built. The extension, if built today in the sel~cted
corridor, would cost about $12.7-million. The line would have
nine stations and more that 70% of the RjWay would be at grade.
The TTC is confident that Metro Council will eventually approve
the extension. With this in mind, a shop and carhouse facility
for the Scarborough LRVs is now planned adjacent to the terminal
station at Malvern. Servicing of the LRVs during operation of the
first stage of the line -Kennedy to Town Centre-should not present
a serious problem. A temporary yard and carhouse north of Lawrence
Avenue will provide storage and liqht running maintena~ce. Should
major work be required, trucks and/or motors could be removed and
transported to Hillcrest or Greenwood where proper facilities exist.


CANADIAN
45
KENNEDY
R A I L
MIDlAHO
i
f
e
j
SC:AftIlOl«X.1GHI
TOWN aHT1l£
LEGEND
_ ~inTun … 1
…. ~ in Open Cut
Light Rail
-cJ -Stations
o
A 9km extension of the Scarborough LRT Line north-east
from the Town Centre to the Malvern Town site (in extreme north­
east Scarborough) is a closer step to reality. In June, the
Metropolitan Toronto Planning Board approved protecting the option
of such an extension. Over the heated objections of Toronto Moyor
John Sewell, a decision was made to preserve lands required for
the right-of-way in case the line becomes necessary in the future.
Mayor Sewell favoured the use of existing streets if such a line
were to be built. The extension, iT built today in the selpcted
corridor, would cost about $12.7-million. The line would have
nine stations and more that 70% of the R/Way would be at grade.
The TTC is confident that Metro Council will eventually approve
the extension. With this in mind, a shop and carhouse facility
for the Scarborough LRVs is now planned adjacent to the terminal
station at Malvern. Servicing of the LRVs during operation of the
first stage of the line -Kennedy to Town Centre-should not present
a serious problem. A temporary yard and carhouse narth of Lawrence
Avenue will provide storage and liqht running maintena~ce. Should
major work be required, trucks and/or motors could be removed and
transported to Hillcrest or Greenwood where proper facilities exist.
CANADIAN
46
RAI L
In September, Metro Council quietly voted to abandon
Metroplan as the official plan. The City (former Borough) of
North York had raised the loudest objections to the plan since
the first draft was released early in 1978. Most politicians
were simply in favour of using the document as a guideline for
future growth and development. The transportation package envisaged
in Metroplan 2001 may llot come to be. In particular, the proposed
LRT network that was to have followed on the heels of the model
Scarborough Line(s) will probably be subject to much scrutiny.
Metropolitan Toronto s population peaked at about 2.15 million two
years ago and is now in decline. Today, only the booming Borough
of Scarborough is registering population growth – a factor which
should ensure the complet ion of the entire LRT line serving that
borough.
SPADINA STREETCARS?
In 1975, the TTC studied the possibility of restoring
streetcar operation on Spadina Avenue from Bloor to Front Street.
Public meetings were held and there was a general feeling that
local residents welcomed the idea. However, the limited number
of possible sites for the southern terminus met with such opposition
that the whole matter was finally shelved. The Commission suggested
that the ~uestion llot be brought up again until after the Spadina
Subway line opened (January, 1978) when ridership on the SPALHNA-77
diesel bus route could be re-assessed.
Late this year, the City Planning Board will unveil a new
masterplan for the streetscape of Spadina Avenue. Among the
concept s features to improve traffic flow and parking is the
provision of a transit malI with streetcars. TTC reaction to the
plan is expected to be favourable. Unlike the 1975 route, the new
plan suggests that the line also serve Harbourfront Park on Torontos
waterfront. Streetcars would run south from Bloor (Spadina
Station) to Lakeshore, east along Queen s Quay and north again to
a loop in the vicinity of Union Station. Little or no opposition
is expected from City Council or local residents. A TTC recommen­
dation will come after a new feasibility study but hopefully in
1980 a decision will made to ge ahead with the plan.
EAST-WEST SUBWAY EXTENSIONS NEAR COMPLETION
The 2.5km, $91-million eastern extension on the Bloor­
Danforth Subway to Kennedy and Eglinton and the 1.5km, $49­
million western extension to Kipling are now both expected to
open late in 1980. The east and west extensions had originally
been scheduled to open in June and October of 1980. The delay
is blamed on slow work being done on the signal contracts. AlI
other contracts are on or ahead of schedule.
Kennedy Station, now virtually finished, was recently the
subject of much attention in the Borough of Scarborough offices.
In a classic example of putting the cart before the horse, .
Scarborough has now refused to issue a building permit for the
structure claiming it has insufficient exits and lacks certain
precautions in case of fire. No other stations on the subway
system have been subject to local building permits. An accommo­
dation, no doubt, will be worked out.
CANADIAN
46
R A I L
In September, Metro Council quietly voted to abandon
Metroplan as the official plan. The City (former Borough) of
North York had raised the loudest objections to the plan since
the first draft was released early in 1978. Most politicians
were simply in favour of using the document as a guideline for
future growth and development. The transportation package envisaged
in Metroplan 2001 may not come to be. In particular, the proposed
LRT network that was to have followed on the heels of the model
Scarborough Line(s) will probably be subject to much scrutiny.
Metropolitan Torontos population peaked at about 2.15 million two
years ago and is now in decline. Today, only the booming Borough
of Scarborough is registering population growth – a factor which
should ensure the completion of the entire LRT line serving that
borough.
SPADINA STREETCARS?
In 1975, the TTC studied the possibility of restoring
streetcar operation on Spadina Avenue from Bloor to Front Street.
Public meetings were held and there was a general feeling that
local residents welcomed the idea. However, the limited number
of possible sites for the southern terminus met with such opposition
that the whole matter was finally shelved. The Commission suggested
that the ~uestion not be brought up again until after the Spadina
Subway line opened (January, 1978) when ridership on .the SPADINA-77
diesel bus route could be re-assessed.
Late this year, the City Planning Board will unveil a new
masterplan for the streetscape of Spadina Avenue. Among the
concepts features to improve traffic flow and parking is the
provision of a transit mall with streetcars. TTC reaction to the
plan is expected to be favourable. Unlike the 1975 route, the new
plan suggests that the line also serve Harbourfront Park on Torontos
waterfront. Streetcars would run south from Bloor (Spadina
Station) to Lakeshore, east along Queens Quay and north again to
a loop in the vicinity of Union Station. Little or no opposition
is expected from City Councilor local residents. A TTC recommen­
dation will come after a new feasibility study but hopefully in
1980 a decision will made to ge ahead with the plan.
EAST-WEST SUBWAY EXTENSIONS NEAR COMPLETION
The 2.5km, $91-million eastern extension on the Bloor­
Danforth Subway to Kennedy and Eglinton and the 1. 5km, $49-
million western extension to Kipling are now both expected to
open late in 1980. The east and west extensions had originally
been scheduled to open in June and October of 1980. The delay
is blamed on slow work being done on the signal contracts. All
other contracts are on or ahead of schedule.
Kennedy Station, now virtually finished, was recently the
subject of much attention in the Borough of Scarborough offices.
In a classic example of putting the cart before the horse, .
Scarborough has now refused t·o issue a building permit for the
structure claiming it has insufficient exits and lacks certain
precautions in case of fire. No other stations on the subway
system have been subject to local building permits. An accommo­
dation, no doubt, will be worked out.
CANADIAN 47
RAI L
CANADIAN FIRMS VIE FOR BOSTON LRV ORDER
Following the departure of Boeing-Vertol from the cor-building
field and the abandonment of its contract to supply the MBTA with
175 light rail vehicles, transit officiaIs in, Boston have invited
the UTDC and Bombardier-MLW ,,(among others) to bid on 75 cors still
needed te fill their reouirements. Boeing will carry out retrofits
to the existing fleet of its LRVs in Boston to ensure the 100 cars
remain in service.
Early in 1980, before the winter snows have gone, UTDC will ship
three CLRVs to Boston for demonstration purposes. Arrangements ore
now being mode to borrow cors from TTCs active LRV fleet. Included
in the multiple-unit triols will be the demonstration of a train
comprising Boeing and UTDC cors (1). UTDC is anxious to get a foothold
in the U.S. LRV market and is now worried by the U.S Federal Buy
America Act, on extension of the Transportation Act that reauires
51% of the components be mode in the U.S. Many of the ports and
sub-systems of the CLRV ore either manufactured in the U.S. or mode
under licence in Canada. The Boston order could be worth os much
as $32-million (about U.S. $27.5 million) to the UTDC. As soles
prospects south of the border look better, UTDC is pressing for fund­
ing of its off-again on-again LRT test track at Kingston.
Bombardier recently acnuired the North American rights to
manufacture and sell the PCC tramcar design of the Belgian firm,
BN (formerly LaBrugeoise et Nivelles; now known os Spoorwegmaterieel
en Metaalconstructies). One of the 8-axle articulated cors of BN
manufacture will be loaned to Bombardier (in turn borrowed from
the Brussels system) and will be brought to Boston to be demonstrated.
Last spring s agreement between Ontario and Quebec to develop
on articulated light rail vehicle is now in question. UTDC was
to have carried out design work and Bombardier was to have built the
prototype unit. But the Quebec firm has since opted f9r the BN
design, perhaps in anticipation of the soles opportunity in Boston.
UTDC insists that the bi-la teral agreementbetween the two provinces
is not dead; if so, another ~uebec firm(Canadair?) would have to
fill the void.
TTC TRACK REHABILITATION CONTINUES IN 1980
As port of its ongoing surface track maintenance program, the
TOTonto Transit Commission ha~ budgeted $1.9 million for trackwork
in 1980. A summary of the work is os follows: ,
Ton
ent Track (total of 4.8 miles of double track ­a
urs reet un os to ster; a es ore • (26th to 2nd);
Church St. (Dundas to Genard); College Street (Clinton to Grace);
Genard St. (Broadview to Logan); King St. W. (Bathurst to Strachan).
Queen St. W. (John to Portland); Dufferin St. (King to Queen);
and the Queensway (Claude to Humer Loop -011 PRW).
l
nte r sect ions ­
Uueen/Bathurst; Dundas/Parliament; Dundas/McCaul; St. Clair/
Lansdowne; St. ClairfSt. Clair Station entrance; and McCaul/
McCaul Loop entrance and exit.
CANADIAN
47
R A I L
CANADIAN FIRMS VIE FOR BOSTON LRV ORDER
Following the departure of Boeing-Vertol from the car-building
field and the abandonment of its contract to supply the MBTA with
175 light rail vehicles, transit officials in, Boston have invited
the UTDC and Bombardier-MLW ,,(among others) to bid on 75 cars still
needed to fill their reouirements. Boeing will carry out retrofits
to the existing fleet of its LRVs in Boston to ensure the 100 cars
remain in service.
Early in 1980, before the winter snows have gone, UTDC will ship
three CLRVs to Boston for demonstration purposes. Arrangements are
now being made to borrow cars from TTCs active LRV fleet. Included
in the mUltiple-unit trials will be the demonstration of a train
comprising Boeing and UTDC cars (1). UTDC is anxious to get a foothold
in the U.S. LRV market and is now worried by the U.S Federal Buy
America Act, an extension of the Transportation Act that reauires
51% of the components be made in the U.S. Many of the parts and
sub-systems of the CLRV are either manufactured in the U.S. or made
under licence in Canada. The Boston order could be worth as much
as $32-million (about U.S. $27.5 million) to the UTDC. As sales
prospects south of the border look better, UTDC is pressing for fund­
ing of its off-again on-again LRT test track at Kingston.
Bombardier recently acnuired the North American rights to
manufacture and sell the p·CC tramcar design of the Belgian firm, .
BN (formerly LaBrugeoise et Nivelles; now known as Spoorwegmaterieel
en Metaalconstructies). One of the. 8-axle articulated cars of BN
manufacture will be loaned to Bombardier (in turn borrowed from
the Brussels system) and will be brought to Boston to be demonstrated.
Last springs agreement between Ontario and Quebec to develop
an articulated light rail ~ehicle is now in question. UTDC was
to have carried out design work and Bombardier was to have built the
prototype unit. But the Quebec firm has since opted f9r the BN
design, perhaps in anticipation of the sales opportunity in Boston.
UTDC insists that the bi-la teral agreement between the two provinces
is not dead; if so, another ~uebec firm (Canadair?) would have to
fill the void.
TTC TRACK REHABILITATION CONTINUES IN 1980
As part of its ongoing surface track maintenance program, the
Toronto Transit Commission has budgeted $1.9 million for trackwork
in 1980. A summary of the work is as follows: ,
Tan ent Track (total of 4.8 miles of double track -a
urs reet un as to s er; a es ore • (26th to 2nd);
Church St. (Dundas to Gerrard); College Street (Clinton to Grace);
Gerrard St. (Broadview to Logan); King St. W. (Bathurst to Strachan).
Queen St. W. (John to Portland); Dufferin St. (King to Queen);
and the Queensway (Claude to Humer Loop -all PRW).
Intersections –
Queen/Bathurst; Dundas/Parliament; Dundas/McCaul;
Lansdowne; St. Clair(S t. Clair Station entrance;
McCaul Loop entrance and exit.
St. Clair/
and McCaul/
CANADIAN 48 RAI L
Wherever possible, TTC trock projects ore scheduled to coincide
with City Public Works or Metro Toronto Dept. of Roads paving projects.
In these joint cases, the cost of excavating and repaving the track
allowance is borne entirely by the appropriate municipality.
Another major track project announced recently but not expected
to be underway until 1981 is the relocation of Keele Loop (western
terminus of the ST. CLAIR carline). Work on the Highway 400
extension south to meet Weston Road near Rogers Road will require
major improvements in the surface road system in the Weston Rd/Keele/
St. Clair area. As a result, the new streetcar loop will be located
at St. Clair and Maybank Avenue, about 1000 west of Keele. The
Province will pay aIl costs associated with this TTC work.
MAJOR SHOP PLANNED FOR TTC
The Toronto Transit Commission plans to build a major new shop
facility to handle work on aIl types of vehicles, sometime in the
1980s. Hillcrest, the Commission s major shop, is now 55 years old
and has proved to be a very weIl designed complex. Millions of
dollars have been spent in renovations (the latest, an LRV Stores
section) over the years but overcrowding remains a problem. Parkdale
Shop, the ma jor bus and truck overhaul garage, has always been a
makeshift facility; before TTC occupied the.building in 19.47, it
was the old Dominion Bridge steel fabrication shop. Two parcels of
land are being considered: a site immediately west of the present
Hillcrest Shop; and the old General Electric plant on Lansdowne
Avenue north of Dupont. CP Rail s North Toronto subdivision serves
both sites and street car access can be afforded with a minimum of
new surface trackwork. The Commission s 5 year capital budget pro­
jections estimate land aquisition will cost $3 millian.
TTC SUBWAY USERS GET SMOOTHER QUIETER RIDE
A quieter and smoother ride is now being experienced by
thousands of Torontonians who use the subway daily. And it is
mainly due to the development of a unique electronic Vibration
Monitor System (VMS) which instantaneously detects problems on
the subway cars steel wheels.
The system was developed over a five-year period by the To­
rOnto Transit Commission working with Bruel & Kjaer Canada Ltd.,
specialists in vibration, sound and data analysis instrumentation.
It uses standard B & K precision instruments to zero in on wheel
problems causing excessive noise and vibration on the 29 to 43
subway trains operating on the Yonge-University-Spadina line.
Problems on the steel wheels such as fIat spots, spalling
and shelling are caused by such diverse troubles as wheel/rail
sliding and wheel tread metal fatigue. They do not endanger the
operation of the subway trains in any way but cause considerable
vibration and noise.
This new method of detecting wheel problems provides a much more
ideal, objective technique than the previous procedure,
whereby TTC maintenance personnel had to ride the subway or
listen to the noise of a passing subway train to determine the
cars with wheel problems.
CANADIAN 48 R A I L
Wherever possible, TTC trock projects ore scheduled to coincide
with City Public Works or Metro Toronto Dept. of Roads paving projects.
In these joint cases, the cost of excavating and repaving the track
allowance is borne entirely by the appropriate municipality.
Another major track project announced recently but not expected
to be underway until 1981 is the relocation of Keele Loop (western
terminus of the ST. CLAIR carline). Work on the Highway 400
extension south to meet Weston Road near Rogers Road will require
major improvements in the surface rood system in the Weston Rd/Keele/
St. Clair area. As a result, the new streetcar loop will be located
at St. Clair and Maybank Avenue, about 1000 west of Keele. The
Province will pay all costs associated with this TTC work.
MAJOR SHOP PLANNED FOR TTC
The Toronto Transit Commission plans to build a major new shop
facility to handle work on all types of vehicles, sometime in the
1980s. Hillcrest, the Commissions major shop, is now 55 years old
and has proved to be a very well designed complex. Millions of
dollars have been spent in renovations (the latest, on LRV Stores
section) over the years but overcrowding remains a problem. Parkdale
Shop, the ma jor bus and truck overhaul garage, has always been a ,
makeshi ft facility; before TTC occupied the .. building in 19A·7 , it
was the old Dominion Bridge steel fabrication shop. Two parcels of
land are being considered: a site immediately west of the present
Hillcrest Shop; and the old General Electric plant on Lansdowne
Avenue north of Dupont. CP Rails North Toronto subdivision serves
both sites and street car access can be afforded with a minimum of
new surface trackwork. The Commissions 5 year capital budget pro­
jections estimate land aquisition will cost $3 million.
TTC SUBWAY USERS GET SMOOTHER QUIETER RIDE
A quieter and smoother ride is now being experienced by
thousands of Torontonians who use the subway daily. And it is
mainly due to the development of a unique electronic Vibration
Monitor System (VMS) which instantaneously detects problems on
the subway cars steel wheels.
The system was developed over a five-year period by the To­
ronto Transit Commission working with Bruel & Kjaer Canada Ltd.,
specialists in vibration, sound and data analysis instrumentation.
It uses standard B & K precision instruments to zero in on wheel
problems causing excessive noise and vibration on the 29 to 43
subway trains operating on the Yonge-University-Spadina line.
Problems on the steel wheels such as flat spots, spalling
and shelling are caused by such diverse troubles as wheel/roil
sliding and wheel tread metal fatigue. They do not endanger the
operation of the subway trains in any way but cause considerable
vibration and noise.
This new method of detecting wheel problems provides a much more
ideal, objective technique than the previous procedure,
whereby TTC maintenance personnel had to ride the subway or
listen to the noise of a passing subway train to determine the
cars with wheel problems.
Over – aIl view of the Bruel & Kja e,r. cent ra).manitor i n9 unit in the
Davisville Carhouse, which automatically detects and identifies
problem wheels on TTC subway trains. Electronic equipment connected
to the tracks on the Yonge Street line picks up vibrations from
passing trains and transmits data to the central monitor. The oper­
ator can identify not only the train but also the precise wheel or
wheels with problems and how bad the damage is.
~TWO
ALA~

…..: BAD
LEVEL
WHEELS

..
~~

~

ft

~

When a subway train with wheel problems is detected by the TTC s
vibration monitoring system, a graph like this is automatically
printed by electronic equipment. At the same time, a red light·
and a chime alert the operator who can then quickly identify the
train that triggered the alarm. Both photos courtesy of Bruel &
Kjaer Ltd.
o v e r – a 11 vie w 0 f the B rue 1 & Kia !l,r, c e n t r a) .. m 0 n i to r i n gun it in the
Davisville Carhouse, which automatically detects and ide~tifies
problem wheels on TTC subway trains. Electronic equipment connected
to the tracks on the Yonge Street line picks up vibrations from
passing trains and transmits data to the central monitor. The oper­
ator can identify not only the train but also the precise wheel or
wheels with problems and how bad the damage is.
~TWO
ALA~
~ BAD
-LEVEL
~
WHEEL s
I
..
~~

..
When a subway train with wheel problems is detected by the TTC s
vibration monitoring system, a graph like this is automatically
printed by electronic equipment. At the same time, a red light­
and a chime alert the operator who can then quickly identify the
train that triggered the alarm. Both photos courtesy of Bruel &
Kjaer Ltd.
CANADIAN 50
RAI L
The VMS consists bosicolly of four units: 0 Bruel & Kjaer
multipurpose Type 5500 monitoring unit, installed at the Davisville
Carhouse, plus two Type 2626 vibration pickup ampli fiers and two
Type 5674 accelerometers -one on the southbound and one on the
northbound track -in the tunnel structure between Lawrence and
Eglinton stotions.
The VMS is designed so that either the southbound or north­
bound troins can be monitored, or both directions can be monitored
with the first train arriving at the accelerometer location being
monitored.
Each time 0 train passes the accelerometer and pickup amplifier,
vibration signaIs are transmitted electronically to the monitoring
unit and to a graphie level recorder at Davisville. The monitor
is set to determine two vibration signal levels, minimum and alarm.
The minimum vibration level triggers a green light and indicates
the presence of 0 train. An olarm level signal triggers a red
light and a chime alarm, indicating a train with bad wheel conditions.
The graphie level recorder (B & K Type 2307) is activated
by the subway signal system. When 0 train enters 0 specifie signal
track circuit the recorder paper feed is switched on and a vibra­
tion graph of the passing train is obtained. Separate impulses
appear on the graphical plot for the passage of eoch wheeljaxle
unit past the accelerometer. The mognitude of the impulses will
increase as the severity of the wheel problem increases.
An operator sitting ~n front of a Train Indicator Ponel in
the Davisville Carhouse can determine the identity of the train
being monitored. The panel, located with the ~onitoring unit and
graphie level recorder, displays that part of the subway system
from the location of the accelerometersjamplifiers to Davisville
Corhouse. Using the ponel and availoble schedule informotion,
the operator is able to identify the train that triggered the
alarm.
The TTC is pleased with the system becouse of its effective­
ness in detecting wheel problems, and in providing an excellent
daily graphical plot of traininduced vibration on the Yonge­
University-Spadina Line and the associated impact on the adjacent
environment. Because of the VMS effectiveness, the TTC is consi­
dering the installation of a similar system on the east-west
Bloor-Danforth subway line.
YONGE SUBWAY SILVER ANNIVERSARY -FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 1979
On Friday, March 30, a commemorotive ceremony to mark
the twenty-fifth onniversory of Canado s First Subway was held
at 11:30 a.m. at Trinity Way, Toronto Eaton Centre. Current
Metro and Comission officiaIs, construction contractors, union
representotives ond members of the business community along the
original Yonge subway corridor were in ottendance. Metro and
TTC officiaIs and staff who were present at the March 30, 1954
Yonge Subway Opening were also invited to attend.
At 11:10 a.m., the officiol party and invited guests
departed from Davisville subway station en route to Dundas
subway station via a special train, consisting of the first
CANADIAN 50
R A I L
The VMS consists bosically of four units: a Bruel & Kjaer
mUltipurpose Type 5500 monitoring unit, installed at the Davisville
Carhouse, plus two Type 2626 vibration pickup amplifiers and two
Type 5674 accelerometers -one on the southbound and one on the
northbound track -in the tunnel structure between Lawrence and
Eglinton stations.
The VMS is designed so that either the southbound or north­
bound trains can be monitored, or both directions can be monitored
with the first train arriving at the accelerometer location being
monitored.
Each time a train passes the accelerometer and pickup amplifier,
vibration signals are transmitted electronically to the monitoring
unit and to a graphic level recorder at Davisville. The monitor
is set to determine two vibration signal levels, minimum and alarm.
The minimum vibration level triggers a green light and indicates
the presence of a train. An alarm level signal triggers a red
light and a chime alarm, indicating a train with bad wheel conditions.
The graphic level recorder (B & K Type. 2307) is activated
by the subway signal system. When 0 train enters a specific signal
track circuit the recorder paper feed is switched on and a vibra­
tion graph of the passing train is obtained. Separate impulses
appear on the graphical plot for the passage of each wheel/axle
unit past the accelerometer. The magnitude of the impulses will
increase as the severity of the wheel problem increases.
An operator sitting ~n front of a Train Indicator Panel in
the Davisville Carhouse can determine the identity of the train
being monitored. The panel, located with the ~onitoring unit and
graphic level recorder, displays that part of the subway system
from the location of the accelerometers/amplifiers to Davisville
Carhouse. Using the panel and available schedule information,
the operator is able to identify the train that triggered the
alarm.
The TTC is pleased with the system because of its effective­
ness in detecting wheel problems, and in providing an excellent
daily graphical plot of traininduced vibration on the Yonge­
University-Spadina Line and the associated impact on the adjacent
environment. Because of the VMS effectiveness, the TTC is consi­
dering the installation of a similar system on the east-west
Bloor-Danforth subway line.
YONGE SUBWAY SILVER ANNIVERSARY -FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 1979
On Friday, March 30, a commemorative ceremony to mark
the twenty-fifth anniversary of Canadas First Subway was held
at 11:30 a.m. at Trinity Way, Toronto Eaton Centre. Current
Metro and Comission officials, construction contractors, union
representatives and members of the business community along the
original Yonge subway corridor were in attendance. Metro and
TTC officials and staff who were present at the March 30, 1954
Yonge Subway Opening were also invited to attend.
At 11:10 a.m., the official party and invited guests
departed from Davisville subway station en route to Dundas
subway station via a special train, consisting of the first
CANADIAN 51 RAI L
Wall to wall streetcars, typical pre-subway rush hour conditions on Yonge
Street looking south to College St. Photo courtesy TTC.
CANADIAN 51 R A I L
…­
~1I.~~4 • ~~ .. -r I I}
Wall to wall streetcars, typical pre-subway rush hour conditions on Yonge
Street looking south to College St. Photo courtesy TTC.
CANADIAN RAI L
The start of excavation work for the Yonge Street Subway, circa 1950.
Lots of hand work was involved because the exact location of services
was unknown. Photo courtesy TTC.
CANADIAN R A I L
The start of excavation work for the Yonge Street Subway, Cl.rca 1950.
Lots of hand work was involved because the exact location of services
was unknown. Photo courtesy TTC.
CANADIAN
53
RAI L
CNR switcher # 8418 eases the first of the then new G-2 series alum­
1n1um bodied cars through the TTC fence at the Davisville Shops.
Photo Courtesy TTC.
CANADIAN
53
R A I L
CNR switcher # 8418 eases the first of the then new G-2 series alum­
inium bodied cars through the TTC fence at the Davisville Shops.
Photo Courtesy TTC.
CANADIAN
54
RAI L
Yonge Street, looking north to Davisville in 1955, TTC Photo.
~-
Ceremonial cars 5092 and 5099 pose at the Davisville Station prior
to the March 30, 1979 anniversary ceremony. Ted Wickson Photo.
CANADIAN
54
R A I L
Yonge Street, looking north to Davisville in 1955, TTC Photo.
Ceremonial cars 5092 and 5099 pose at the Davisville Station prior
to the March 30, 1979 anniversary ceremony. Ted Wickson Photo.
CANADIAN 55
RAI L
Gloucester (red) subway cars. Mr. Finlay McLeod, former TTC
Supervisor and one of the original motormen on the 1954 ceremonial
train, was at the controls.
Since the 1954 opening of Canada s first subway, TTC
subway trains have corried over three billion passengers. But
the benefits which resulted from the introduction and subsequent
expansion of subway service in Metro extend far beyond those
received by transit customers. Spectacular property developments
followed the subway, creating tremendous new tax revenues. To
the vital downtown business core, the subway proved to be an
anchor that brought a sense of permanence and stability du ring a
period when the downtown areas of many North American cities were
on a downhill slide.
The transit/business relationship is mutually-beneficial,
and nowhere is this more evident than along the original Yonge
Street subway corridor between Union and Eglinton Stations.
Mammoth retail, commercial, institutional and residential complexes
are located adjacent to almost every station. Underground
connection and malls link the Yonge Subway to many of these
developments providing easy and convenient access to a virtual
tidal wave of people daily. The hundreds of stores, restaurants,
theatres, boutiques, hotels and shops which blanket the Yonge
Subway corridor are, for thousands of Metro residents, the
places to go. And the Yonge Subway is the way to get there.
This long-standing ttansit-business partnership is also
being recognized. Members of the Downtown Business Council,
Yonge-Bloor-Bay Businessmen s Association, Yonge-Eglinton Centre
and major retailers such as Eaton s, Simpsons and the Bay, have
became actively involved in marking the occasion through a
variety of advertising, promotion and display activities.
LATE MINUTE UP-DATE
WINTER SNOWS CRIPPLE TORONTO LRVs
Two and a half months of relatively trouble-free operations
ended abruptly December 19th when Toronto s LRVs encountered the
season s first heavy snowfall. Despite an accumulation of about
10 (20 cm) of snow, the new cars had performed well at the height
of the storm; however, as the street became well salted and snow
turned to slush, disaster struck. Three LRVs suffered massive
short circuits as salt water under the car penetrated the main 600
volt traction current connection. The Etobicoke Fire Department
was summoned to look ofter one smoldering LRV parked on the spore
track at Long Branch Loop. The circuitry in the treadle-operated
rear door on one car was also shorted out. The Toronto Transit
Commission Equipment Department suspects poor workmanship and the
choice of insulation by the manufacturer, Hawker-Siddeley Canada
Limited. The cars designer, Urban Transportation Development
Corporation, is footing the bill for the S3,OOO-a-car wiring
modifications. Although only Canadian-built LRVs were affected
by the electrical faults, the SIG cars will also undergo the wiring
retrofits. A few LRVs returned to service again on route 507
(LONG BRANCH) December 28th but were withdrawn on January 2nd
when additional retrofits were ordered by UTDC.
CANADIAN
55
R A I L
Gloucester (red) subway cars. Mr. Finlay McLeod, former TTC
Supervisor and one of the original motormen on the 1954 ceremonial
train, was at the controls.
Since the 1954 opening of Canadas first subway, TTC
subway trains have corried over three billion passengers. But
the benefits which resulted from the introduction and subsequent
expansion of subway service in Metro extend far beyond those
received by tronsit customers. Spectacular property developments
followed the subway, creating tremendous new tax revenues. To
the vital downtown business core, the subway proved to be an
anchor that brought a sense of permanence and stability during a
period when the downtown areas of many North American cities were
on a downhill slide.
The transit/business relationship is mutually-beneficial,
and nowhere is this more evident than olong the original Yonge
Street subway corridor between Union and Eglinton Stations.
Mammoth retail, commercial, institutional and residential complexes
are located adjacent to almost every stotion. Underground
connection and malls link the Yonge Subway to many of these
developments providing easy and convenient access to a virtual
tidal wave of people daily. The hundreds of stores, restaurants,
theatres, boutiques, hotels and shops which blanket the Yonge
Subway corridor are, for thousands of Metro residents, the
places to go. And the Yonge Subway is the way to get there.
This long-standing ttansit-business partnership is also
being recognized. Members of the Downtown Business Council,
Yonge-Bloor-Bay Businessmens Association, Yonge-Eglinton Centre
and major retailers such as Eatons, Simpsons and the Bay, have
became actively involved in marking the occasion through a
variety of advertising, promotion and display activities.
LATE MINUTE UP-DATE
WINTER SNOWS CRIPPLE TORONTO LRVs
Two and a half months of relatively trouble-free operations
ended abruptly December 19th when Torontos LRVs encountered the
seasons first heavy snowfall. Despite an accumulation of about
10 (20 cm) of snow, the new cars had performed well at the height
of the storm; however, as the street became well salted and snow
turned to slush, disaster struck. Three LRVs suffered massive
short circuits as salt water under the cor penetrated the main 600
volt traction current connection. The Etobicoke Fire Department
was summoned to look after one smoldering LRV parked on the spare
track at Long Branch Loop. The circuitry in the treadle-operated
rear door on one car was also shorted out. The Toronto Transit
Commission Equipment Department suspects poor workmanship and the
choice of insulation by the manufacturer, Hawker-Siddeley Canada
Limited. The cars designer, Urban Transportation Development
Corporation, is footing the bill for the S3,OOO-a-car wiring
modifications. Although only Canadian-built LRVs were affected
by the electrical faults, the SIG cars will also undergo the wiring
retrofits. A few LRVs returned to service again on route 507
(LONG BRANCH) December 28th but were withdrawn on January 2nd
when additional retrofits were ordered by UTDC.
CANADIAN RAI L
56
At time of writing, aIl LRVs remain out of service. The LRV
fleet now totals 57 of which 17 have been accepted. Route 507
has been the only line seeing LRV service. The TTC expects the
withdrawal of LRVs to be of short duration and the reintroduction
to occur sometime in February.
In other LRV developments, the Commission s 5 year capital
budget projections for1980-84 indicate a total of 277 LRVs will be
required to replace aIl PCCs on the existing surface routes, plus
22 cars needed for service on the new Scarborough LRT line scheduled
to open in August, 1982. With the current order with Hawker-Siddeley
bringing the total to only 196, an additional order for 103 LRVs
will be placed in the early 1980s. The 71 LRVs owned outright by
the Ontario Ministry df Transportation and Communications (purchased
as a demonstration project for this new technology and to financially
assist Metropolitan Toronto in its share of the original cost of the
196 car order) will be acauired by the TTC, at cost, after 5 years.
TTC ITEMS WORTH NOTING
1979 saw an expansion of the summer Peter Witt sightseeing
tours of downtown Toronto. Niagara Tours, in a charter arrangement
with the TTC, offered three different afternoon tours Monday
through Saturday. Tours originated at the Sheraton Centre Hotel
(Vork and Queen Streets) and were operated from May until October.
The popular King Edward Hotel tours returned on Sundays but,
sadly, ended on September 23 when the hotel was closed for
renovations A ma jor expansion of Union Subway Station is
underway. The mezzanine and platform areas will be tripled in
size and the addition of two tracks will permit the Vonge and
University subways to be operated independently. In August,
GO Transit opened its new concourse in Union Station. GO Train
patrons, mony of whom transfer to the subway system, have increosed
from 15,000 a day in 1967 to over 40,000 now ln September,
the joint Metro/TTC Transit Policy Committee, set up earlier this
year, releosed its report recommending a number of policy changes
and innovations. Among the ideas proposed were the use of
articulated buses, introduction in 19800f a $26 monthly pass,
expansion of the Communications and Information System, signal
priority for transit vehicles, and emphasis on transit-oriented
redevelopment in Metro TTC s subsidiary, Gray Coach Lines,
showed a healthy profit of $1. 1-million for the year ended 1978
(up 500% over 1977). The Toronto Gray Line sightseeing and other
tour business accounted for much of the rosy picture. In January
1980 , Gray Coach vacates its venerable Sherbourne Garage facility
(once the motor repair shops of the Toronto Railway Company) in
favour of its new Lakeshore Garage located near the bottom of the
Don Valley Parkway and finnaly, major structural rehabilitation
is underway an TTC s trolley coach fleet which is nearing the half­
way mark (8 years) in its life-span.
1980 streetcar charter rates have been increased substantially
by the TTC; PCC cars -$40.00/hour (up from $36.00); Peter Witt cars ­
$48.75 (up from $36.00); LRVs -not available for charter in 1980.
Maintenance costs for the Witt cars have been steadily increasing
as these vehicles have seen more and more private charter use since
1975, the last year the TTC ran its summer Tour Tram service.
Commisiion-owned Peter Witt # 2766 is presently in Hillcrest Shop
for much needed body, paint and electrical work. Toronto Trolley
CANADIAN
56
R A I L
At time of writing, all LRVs remain out of service. The LRV
fleet now totals 57 of which 17 have been accepted. Route 507
has been the only line seeing LRV service. The TTC expects the
withdrawal of LRVs to be of short duration and the reintroduction
to occur sometime in February.
In other LRV developments, the Commissions 5 year capital
budget projections for1980-84 indicate a total of 277 LRVs will be
required to replace all PCCs on the existing surface routes, plus
22 cars needed for service on the new Scarborough LRT line scheduled
to open in August, 1982. With the current order with Hawker-Siddeley
bringing the total to only 196, an additional order for 103 LRVs
will be placed in the early 1980s. The 71 LRVs owned outright by
the Ontario Ministry of Transportation and Communications (purchased
as a demonstration project for this new technology and to financially
assist Metropolitan Toronto in its share of the original cost of the
196 car order) will be acauired by the TTC, at cost, after 5 years.
TTC ITEMS WORTH NOTING
1979 saw an expansion of the summer Peter Witt sightseeing
tours of downtown Toronto. Niagara Tours, in a charter arrangement
with the TTC, offered three different afternoon tours Monday
through Saturday. Tours originated at the Sheraton Centre Hotel
(York and Queen Streets) and were operated from May until October.
The popular King Edward Hotel tours returned on Sundays but,
sadly, ended on September 23 when the hotel was closed for
renovations …… A ma jor expansion of Union Subway Station is
underway. The mezzanine and platform areas will be tripled in
size and the addition of two tracks will permit the Yonge and
University subways to be operated independently. In August,
GO Transit opened its new concourse in Union Station. GO Train
patrons, many of whom transfer to the subway system, have increosed
from 15,000 a day in 1967 to over 40,000 now …… In September,
the joint Metro/TTC Transit Policy Committee, set up earlier this
year, releosed its report recommending a number of policy chonges
and innovations. Among the ideas proposed were the use of
articulated buses, introduction in 19800f a $26 monthly pass,
expansion of the Communications and Information System, signal
priority for transit vehicles, and emphasis on transit-oriented
redevelopment in Metro …… TTC s subsidiary, Gray Coach Lines,
showed a healthy profit of $1. 1-million for the year ended 1978
(up 500% over 1977). The Toronto Gray Line sightseeing and other
tour business accounted for much of the rosy picture. In January
1980 , Gray Coach vacates its venerable Sherbourne Garage facility
(once the motor repair shops of the Toronto Railway Company) in
favour of its new Lakeshore Garage located near the bottom of the
Don Valley Parkway …… and finnaly, major structural rehabilitation
is underway on TTCs trolley coach fleet which is nearing the half­
way mark (8 years) in its life-span.
1980 streetcar charter rates have been increased substantially
by the TTC; PCC cars -$40.00/hour (up from $36.00); Peter Witt cars –
$48.75 (up from $36.00); LRVs -not available for charter in 1980.
Maintenance costs for the Witt cars have been steadily increasing
as these vehicles have seen more and more private charter use since
1975, the last year the TTC ran its summer Tour Tram service.
Commisiion-owned Peter Witt # 2766 is presently in Hillcrest Shop
for much needed body, paint and electrical work. Toronto Trolley
CANADIAN
57
RAI L
Tours has again planned a busy season of Peter Witt tours in 1980.
As a result of their big charter contract with the TTC, a special
rate of $44.00 per hour (described as the breakeven point) has been
negotiated. These tours are expected to account for over 50% of the
Witt charters in 1980….. PCC retirements prompted by the arrivaI
of new LRVs are to be determined simply in the order the cars break­
down. To date, 40 cars have been set a&ide and 15 sold for scrap.
Many of the scrapped PCCs have been non-rebuilt class A-8 m.u. cars.
Included in the retirements is car 4444 which has been acquired by
the C.R.H.A. Canadian Railway Museum, Toronto. By mid-January, the
active PCC fleet total had declined to 302 units ••.. February 4th
was selected as route number day for PCC cars. AlI 173 rebuilt
PCCs (will) now display route number and destination on the two front
blinds and number only on the side linen …•• TTCs order for 138 H-5
subway cars was completed early in 1979 but it has been a long struggle
to complete the acceptance program. At year end, 14 cars still awaited
final acceptance ….Good news for Ontario taxpayers~ the estimated
co st of the Kipling and Kennedy extensions to the Bloor-Danforth
Subway has been revised downward from $140 million to $110 million.
Completion is scheduled for lote November, 1980. Similarly, the
Scarborough LRT line is now estimated to cost $96.5 million, down
from $108.7 million.
The
business
.
car�
CN HAS SOLD 100 STEEL-FRAMED CARS FROM THE NEWFOUNDLAND OPERATION
to a Costa Rican railway, according to the SRS NEWS (Nov/
Dec/79). The cars range in age from 30 to 50 years, and
had been scheduled to be scrapped.
AMTRAK PETITIONS FOR MONTREALER CHANGE –IF CENTRAL VERMONT
and AMTRAK have their way, the Montrealer will travel
thraugh Palmer and Amherst, Moss., instead of via East
Deerfield over the Boston & Maine. AMTRAK has applied to the
New England Regional Commission for financial help in the plan
to use the CV between Palmer and Brattleboro which would enable it
to serve Amherst, a big college town. -The Coll Board, Jan/80
CANADIAN
57
R A I L
Tours has again planned a busy season of Peter Witt tours in 1980.
As a result of their big charter contract with the TTC, a special
rate of $44.00 per hour (described as the breakeven point) has been
negotiated. These tours are expected to account for over 50% of the
Witt charters in 1980 ….. PCC retirements prompted by the arrival
of new LRVs are to be determined simply in the order the cars break­
down. To date, 40 cars have been set a&ide and 15 sold for scrap.
Many of the scrapped PCCs have been non-rebuilt class A-8 m.U. cars.
Included in the retirements is car 4444 which has been acquired by
the C.R.H.A. Canadian Railway Museum, Toronto. By mid-January, the
active PCC fleet total had declined to 302 units ••.. February 4th
was selected as route number day for PCC cars. All 173 rebuilt
PCCs (will) now display route number and destination on the two front
blinds and number only on the side linen …•• TTCs order for 138 H-5
subway cars was completed early in 1979 but it has been a long struggle
to complete the acceptance program. At year end, 14 cars still awaited
final acceptance …. Good news for Ontario taxpayers~ the estimated
cost of the Kipling and Kennedy extensions to the Bloor-Danforth
Subway has been revised downward from $140 million to $110 million.
Completion is scheduled for late November, 1980. Similarly, the
Scarborough LRT line is now estimated to cost $96.5 million, down
from $108.7 million.
The . . .~ ..
business car
CN HAS SOLD 100 STEEL-FRAMED CARS FROM THE NEWFOUNDLAND OPERATION
to a Costa Rican railway, according to the SRS NEWS (Nov/
Dec/79). The cars range in age from 30 to 50 years, and
had been scheduled to be scrapped.
AMTRAK PETITIONS FOR MONTREALER CHANGE –IF CENTRAL VERMONT
and AMTRAK have their way, the Mont realer will travel
through Palmer and Amherst, Mass., instead of via East
Deerfield over the Boston & Maine. AMTRAK has applied to the
New England Regional Commission for financial help in the plan
to use the CV between Palmer and Brattleboro which would enable it
to serve Amherst, a big college town. -The Call Board, Jan/80
CANADIAN
58
RAI L
CANADAS RAIL FREIGHT VOLUME FOR 1979, AS REPORTED SY STATISTICS
Canada, totalled 261,618,521 tons, up 8.5 per cent from the
previous year when activity was reduced because of lengthy
strikes at Iron ore mines in Quebec and Newfoundland. Cars
loaded: 3,889,148, up 4.1 per cent from 3,736,613 the year before.
U.S.A.S ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY HAS DEFERRED FINAL
action on rules it proposed last April (1979) to put
general limits on noise from railroad yards. (The EPA
is under a court order to produce national noise standards. )
Meantime, the agency has issued final limits on noise from four
specifie sources within rail yards. In car-coupling operations,
cars may be coupled at up to eight (8) miles an houri (the previous
limit was four mph). Noise from retarders would be limited to 83
decibels as measured on property adjacent to the operation.
Switching locomotives in yards with general noise levels of more
than 65 decibels must emit 90 decibels or less measured 100 feet
away while they are moving. While stationary, they can t emit
more than 70 to 87 decibels of noise, measured at 100 feet,
depending on the throttle setting. Locomotives built after 1979
arent covered by these limits. And, a noise limit of 78 decibels,
measured 100 feet away, is imposed on load cell test stands
(testing devices for locomotives).
-Wall Street Journal, Jan. 11/80
;/
CP Rail has been using GO Diesels on weekends (and sometimes week­
days) in the Wood stock Area for haulage purposes. Here we see CP
Train 52 switching with GO F40PH sand GP40-2(W). Photo courtes)l
Mr. Burt Van Rees.
CANADIAN
58
R A I L
CANADAS RAIL FREIGHT VOLUME FOR 1979, AS REPORTED BY STATISTICS
Canada, totalled 261,618,521 tons, up 8.5 per cent from the
previous year when activity was reduced because of lengthy
strikes at iron ore mines in Quebec and Newfoundland. Cars
loaded: 3,889,148, up 4.1 per cent from 3,736,613 the year before.
U.S.A.S ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY HAS DEFERRED FINAL
action on rules it proposed last April (1979) to put
general limits on noise from railroad yards. (The EPA
is under a court order to produce national noise standards. )
Meantime, the agency has issued final limits on noise from four
specific sources within rail yards. In car-coupling operations,
cars may be coupled at up to eight (8) miles an hour; (the previous
limit was four mph). Noise from retarders would be limited to 83
decibels as measured on property adjacent to the operation.
Switching locomotives in yards with general noise levels of more
than 65 decibels must emit 90 decibels or less measured 100 feet
away while they are moving. While stationary, they cant emit
more than 70 to 87 decibels of noise, measured at 100 feet,
depending on the throttle setting. Locomotives built after 1979
arent covered by these limits. And, a noise limit of 78 decibels,
measured 100 feet away, is imposed on load cell test stands
(testing devices for locomotives).
-Wall Street Journal, Jan. 11/80
CP Rail has been using GO Diesels on weekends (and sometimes week­
days) in the Woodstock Area for haulage purposes. Here we see CP
Train 52 switching with GO F40PH sand GP40-2(W). Photo courtesy
Mr. Burt Van Rees.
CANADIAN RAI L
59
YOU MIGHT THINK THAT THIS ELECTRIC CAR WAS AN ANTIQUE DATING FROM
the last century. In fact, it is a unit on the Nyon-St-Cergue
Morez Railway in Switzerland, which was opened to St. Cergue in 1916 and
to Morez (France) in 1921. Part of this line still operates,
but its future is uncertain. M. J-M.Leclercq took this picture at
La Givrine (Switzerland) in February 1979.
CANADIAN
59
R A I L
YOU MIGHT THINK THAT THIS ELECTRIC CAR WAS AN ANTIQUE DATING FROM
the last century. In fact, it is a unit on the Nyon-St-Cergue
Morez Railway in Switzerland, which was opened to St. Cergue in 1916
and to Morez (France) in 1921. Part of this line still operates,
but its future is uncertain. M. J-M.Leclercq took this picture at
La Givrine (Switzerland) in February 1979.
CANADIAN
60
RAI L
THE OTTAWA-BARRYS BAY (MOUNT MADAWASKA) SNOW TRAIN HAS BEEN
derailed before the announced start of Feb. 1/80 because
VIA s weekly charge has been raised to $15,800 from
$6,400, according to a Canadian Press report. The trip co­
ordinator, offered, as an alternative, chartered bus service
but the customers didnt buy, indicating that the train ride was a main
element in the package.
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA A $40,000 FEDERAL-PROVINCIAL GRANT HAS BEEN
made to study the feasibility of keeping the Kettle Valley
Railway line operating as a tourist attraction. CP Rail
abandoned the line and had planned to rip it up until the provin­
cial government ordered the tracks left in place until June 30/80
to allow for a study. -Globe & Mail, Jan. 29/80
IN EDMONTON, PLANS FOR EXTENSION OF THE LRT TO SOUTH SIDE HAVE
been criticized for faulty planning, according to reports
forwarded by Lon Marsh. The plan calls for the line to be
routed to Mill Woods along the CP Rail right-of-way. Critics say
that most of the 14-kilometre line, costing a minimum of $119­
million, would be through an industrial area weIl removed from
residential centres. They say the proposed line may become usable
or practical wi th the redevelopment of CP Rail s southside yards
but relocating the yards could cost $30.$100 million.-An altern­
ative being advanced would be aline leaving the south end of the
High Level Bridge and running above ground through Garneau and
the university campus, head south using 114th, 113th and 111th
Streets, turn east near 29th Avenue, cross highway 2 via an
overpass, run through the Parsons Industrial area and into Mill
Woods via 28th Ave. This line would have 14 stations compared
with six in th~ city s current plan.
WAS THIS A FIRST (IN PEACETIME)? SPECIAL TORONTO-HALIFAX PASSENGER
service, leaving each city Dec. 22/80, is mentioned in the
Turnout (CRHA Toronto & York Division) of Oct./79. These
trains would make pick-ups Toronto-Dorval but not run into Montreal s
Central Station. Return train would be provided. Can any
Canadian Rail reader give The Editor more details and report
whether or not such through service has been provided before in
peacetime?
BY THE TIME YOU RE AD THIS THE 1980 (THE FIRST 19801) ELECTION
will be over. 50 watch for implementation of politicians
promises in the rail area. For example, the LiberaIs
promised to double track the CN from Winnipeg to Vancouver. The
NDP leader promised to electrify the railway (he did not say which
one) From Thunder Bay to Winnipeq. Montreal-area Conservative
candidates promised to lobby the federal government to help pay
for provincial plans for an integrated public transit system on
the island of Montreal, announc~ May/79 with a priee tag of
$982-million, and to back construction of a rapid transit line
to Mirabel airport. Canadian Press quoted Trudeau as saying (in
Montmartre, Sask., Jan. 17/80): The Canadian National Railways,
as a Crown corporation, would be directed by our government to use
their earnings -to use their borrowings -in order to double­
track those 1,500 miles of track between Winnipeg and Vancouver.
CANADIAN
60
R A I L
THE OTTAWA-BARRYS BAY (MOUNT MADAWASKA) SNOW TRAIN HAS BEEN
derailed before the announced start of Feb. 1/80 because
VIAs weekly charge has been raised to $15,800 from
$6,400, according to a Canadian Press report. The trip co­
ordinator, offered, as an alternative, chartered bus service
but the customers didnt buy, indicating that the train ride was a main
element in the package.
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA A $40,000 FEDERAL-PROVINCIAL GRANT HAS BEEN
made to study the feasibility of keeping the Kettle Valley
Railway line operating as a tourist attraction. CP Rail
abandoned the line and had planned to rip it up until the provin­
cial government ordered the tracks left in place until June 30/80
to allow for a study. -Globe & Mail, Jan. 29/80
IN EDMONTON, PLANS FOR EXTENSION OF THE LRT TO SOUTH SIDE HAVE
been criticized for faulty planning, according to reports
forwarded by Lon Marsh. The plan calls for the line to be
routed to Mill Woods along the CP Rail right-of-way. Critics say
that most of the 14-kilometre line, costing a minimum of $119-
million, would be through an industrial area well removed from
residential centres. They say the proposed line may become usable
or practical with the redevelopment of CP Rails southside yards
but relocating the yards could cost $30.$100 million.-An altern­
ative being advanced would be a line leaving the south end of the
High Level Bridge and running above ground through Garneau and
the university campus, head south using 114th, 113th and 111th
Streets, turn east near 29th Avenue, cross highway 2 via an
overpass, run through the Parsons Industrial area and into Mill
Woods via 28th Ave. This line would have 14 stations compared
with six in the citys current plan.
WAS THIS A FIRST (IN PEACETIME)? SPECIAL TORONTO-HALIFAX PASSENGER
service, leaving each city Dec. 22/80, is mentioned in the
Turnout (CRHA Toronto & York Division) of Oct./79. These
trains would make pick-ups Toronto-Dorval but not run into Montreals
Central Station. Return train would be provided. Can any
Canadian Rail reader give The Editor more details and report
whether or not such through service has been provided before in
peacetime?
BY THE TIME YOU READ THIS THE 1980 (THE FIRST 19801) ELECTION
will be over. So watch for implementation of politicians
promises in the rail area. For example, the Liberals
promised to double track the CN from Winnipeg to Vancouver. The
NDP leader promised to electrify the railway (he did not say which
one) from Thunder Bay to Winnipeq. Montreal-area Conservative
candidates promised to lobby the federal government to help pay
for provincial plans for an integrated public transit system on
the island of Montreal, announc~ May/79 with a price tag of
$982-million, and to back construction of a rapid transit line
to Mirabel airport. Canadian Press quoted Trudeau as saying (in
Montmartre, Sask., Jan. 17/80): The Canadian National Railways,
as a Crown corporation, would be directed by our government to use
their earnings -to use their borrowings -in order to double­
track those 1,500 miles of track between Winnipeg and Vancouver.
CANADIAN 61 RAI L CANADIAN 61 R A L
Mr. I.C.Platt was kind enough to send along the following three
photos for presentation to readers of Canadian Rail. The first two
photos are of Burlington Northern # 8079 out for its first power
run on GMDs test track which is parallel to CP Rail s line in
London, Ontario. The date was 30 July 1979. Next we see the old
col ors or should we say no colors of CP Rail 8471 which was engag­
ed in track work at London, Ontario on 16 May 1979.
CP wrecker helping out one of its own kind in trouble at Putnam,Ont.
on September 24, 1979. Photo courtest Burt Van Rees.
Mr. I.C.Platt was kind enough to send along the following three
photos for presentation to readers of Canadian Rail. The first two
photos are of Burlington Northern # 8079 out for its first power
run on GMDs test track which is parallel to CP Rails line in
London, Ontario. The date was 30 July 1979. Next we see the old
colors or should we say no colors of CP Rail 8471 which was engag­
ed in track work at London, Ontario on 16 May 1979.
CP wrecker helping out one of its own kind in trouble at Putnam,Ont.
on September 24, 1979. Photo courtest Burt Van Rees.
AMTRAKS SUNSET LIMITED (NEW ORLEANS-LOS ANGELES) DID NOT
finish 0 single ~un on ti •• during the four ~onths JulY­
October 1979 because Southern Pacific repeatedly ron slow
(reights ahead of the passenger train. Result: the U.S. Justice
Deport.ant il suing 5P, chorging violation of the Roil Passenger
Service Act of 1971. Host of the (reight interference occurs on
the New Orleans-Houston link of 364 .i1es. During the first two
weeks of Dece~ber, the Sunset consistently arrived at least four
hours behind schedule. On fovr tripI, the trqin arrived ~ore than
nine hours late. For AMTRAK overall, in fiscal 1979, 42.8 per
cent of lons-distonce and short-houl troins were late.
-Chicogo 5un-Tilllel, Dec. 21/79
CONTRAST CANADIAN CAR BUILDING ACTIVITY WITH AUSTRAlIAS CURRENT
controcts as of mid_su~~et 1979, which include 837 urban
roil tron5it cars (or which 200 are double deckers) and
36 co~muter corso For use in different territories, COfS ore
bl:ling mode in three seporote gouges (1067, 1435 and 1600 mm).
-Australian Railway Historical Society Bulletin
ALSO FROM DOWN UNDER -PROSPECTIVE PASSENGERS ARE LINING UP FOR
the final run of The Ghon, through central Australia On
a route pionl:!ered by come! drivers fro~ Af~honiston, from
Adelaide to Alice Springs. The Afghan Express started in 1877
ocros. what was then believed to be a drought area but turned out
to be one of the most flood-prone regions in Australia. A new line
will reduce the historic 60-hour trip to 22 hours, effective
Nov./aO. -Ottowa Citizen, Jon.5/aO
THE ONTARIO GOVERNMENT HAS ESTABLISHED A TASK FORCE ON PROVINCIAL
roil policy whose modote includes 0 study of the potentiol
for electrifying GO Transit Lines. The nine_member task
force also will exomine the Nov. 10/79 derailment of a CP Roil
freight train ot Hississougo; 0 federol,inquiry is now investigot­
ing the deroilment. Both passenger and freight transport will be
reviewed Clnd the task force will be provided with two other roil­
reloted reviews now being conducted by the Hinistry of Tronsportati
and Communication~: a study of the Toronto Area Tronsit Operating
Authority and a study of the potential for electrifying ports of
the GO $yste~. The task force will do on inventory of the roil
lines and rolling stock of the four companies in the province __
CP Roil, eN, Ontorio Northland ond Algoma Central. It 0150 plans
to study the potential for integroting into present gridl the
futuristic intermediate capocity tronsit systems and light-roil
vehicle syste~ developed by the Urban Transportation Develop~ent
Corp., 0 provincial Crown ogency.
_Toronto GLOBE & MAIL, Jon. 30/80
BACK COVER:
This is the introduction of the ROC to Conodo, BUDD Co. Oemonstrot
unit operating on thl:! then CN electrified trackage at Turcat Cent(
Quebec. The date was January 1951 and the photo is fro .. the CRHA
Archives, E.A.Toohey Collection.
!

Demande en ligne