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Canadian Rail 332 1979

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Canadian Rail 332 1979

Canadian Rail
-No332
SEP I EMBER 1979

COVER:
Coal train en route to Roberts
Bank where it will
be unload.
OPPOSITE:
General view showing Conveyor, delivery tube,
and ship being loaded.
….. ~IAN
ISSN 0008 -4875
Published monthly by The Canadian Railroad Historical Association
P.O. Box 22, Station B
f40ntrea 1 Quebec Canada H3B 3J5
EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
BUSINESS CAR: J. A. Beatty
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Michel PaU1et
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN
L. M. Unwin, Secretary
60-6100 4th Ave. NE
Calgary, Alberta T2A 5Z8
OTTAWA
D. E. Stoltz, Secretary P.
O. Box 141, Station A, Ottawa, Ontario
K1 N 8V1
PACIFIC COAST
R. Keillor, Secretary
P. O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2P1
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
C. K. Hatcher, Secretary
P. O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Alberta T5B 2ND
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
R. Ballard, Sr., Secretary
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor,
Onta ri 0 N9G 1 A2
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
J. C. Kyle, Secretary
P. O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto Ontario
M5W 1P3
NIAGARA DIVISION
Peter Warwick, Secretary
P.O. Box 593
St. Catharines, Ontario
L2R 6W8
·
ROSERTS ·8AnK
..
. . . . .
, .. .
. .
~
. .
.
.. . ,.
by H.E.rTlcGatty
For more than 50 years, old established coal mines in
the Crowsnest Pass area of Southeastern British Columbia supplied
a ready market to railroad steam locomotives and coal stoves for
home heating across Canada. When the use of steam was completely
overwhelmed by development of the diesel-electric, and home heat­
ing went through several technological changes, coal mining was
almost phased out as a major industry.
In the mid-60s the Japanese steel industry began a
world-wide quest for a market that could supply vast quantities
of metallurgical coal. The coal industry was about to be revived,
and in 1967 Kaiser Resources became established in British Columbia
and began development of mining and processing facilities at
Sparwood, northeast of Cranbrook. A surface mining operation uses
enormous stripping and loading equipment, including 15 and 25 yard
shovels and 100 and 200 ton haul trucks. Overburden is hauled to
disposal areas set aside for future planned reclamation and coal
is hauled to an 8,000 foot conveyor belt passing through a 5,000
foot tunnel to a preparation plant.
Clean coal produced by the plant is ready for transport­
ing by unit train over a 700 mile route to Roberts Bank Superport
bulk loading facility south of Vancouver. The National Harbours
Board built an island and causeway costing approximately $5 million
and Westshore Terminals (a division of Kaiser Resources) leases the
land, and spent $15 million building the loading and storage facility
which operates 24 hours ddily and employs 75 people. The area is
large enough to stockpile one million tons and handle ships of
150,000 tons capacity. Between 6 to 7t million tons is handled
annually, roughly amounting to over 100 ships per year destined
for Japan and Pacific Rim countries.
CP Rail uses 100-ton solid bottom gondolas with swivel
couplings designed for automated rotary dumping. Inbound train
crews leave their train at the entrance where a remote controlled
indexing arm takes over the process of forward movement and position­
ing. An operator controls the tipping and dumping, and in less than
110 seconds the next car is moving into position.
A circular rail line travels the perimeter ot the i.land,
with the exit returning to a position parallel to the single entry
track, which then becomes the route back across the three mile
causeway to the mainland and subsequently retracing the 700 miles
back to the mine. The complete trip outlined briefly begins on
CP Rails Kootenay Division at Sparwood, through the junction of
the Fording River Subdivision # 17, on to Cranbrook Sub. # 16 5-Mile
CANADIAN ·263 R A I L
swan wooster —————————-;
1.~CII.~II~-~IIil,.~0 •• ~~~10~iii–~2? MilES
10 0
FIGURE 4 Southern Potential Bulk Terminal Sites
6
CANADIAN
264
R A I L
This is CN-Hydro
Junction looking
east, the CP Rail
unit trains west­
bound leave the CN
mainline towards
the right center in
the photo,
(All photos
courtesy
of the Author)
Here we see the three mid-train 5D40s along with their robot control
unit •
CANADIAN 265 R A I L
through Fort Steele and junction with the Windermere Sub. # 13,
where it continues north to Golden on the Revelstoke Div. mainline,
through the Selkirk Mountains and Connaught 5-mile Tunnel to
Revelstoke, Kamloops, the Thompson and Fraser River Canyons and
Fraser Valley to Mission City, 42 rail miles east of Vancouver.
The # 6 Sub. starts with a branch line heading south on a rail
bridge crossing the Fraser River to the south shore, crosses the
CN mainline, continuing on to Huntingdon/Sumas on the u.S. border
where it meets Burlington Northern for interchange traffic. ..
When Roberts Bank Superport was established in 1967, it
was necessary to build a direct route for coal unit trains using
existing rights-of-way where feasible, and filling the gaps between
to make it easily accessible to heavy tonnage mainline eauipment.
To go from CP Rails mainline at Mission City in the
generol direction of the superport, reauires going to the south
shore of the Fraser River, and this was achieved easily because
of the existing bridge. South of the bridge was an ideal location
to build a Y, making an east-west transfer that was proven advan­
tageous when either line is blocked by adverse weather conditions
in the Fraser Canyon, or by other traffic problems. Unit trains
enter onto CN tracks and continue on mostly double track for approxi­
mately 16 m. to a point one mile east of Fort Langley. Now, the
general direction requires another deviation from the existing rail
route, and because of favourable terrain and a relatively narrow
gap of 31 miles between CN and BC Hydro, a line was built to merge
where Hydro turns sharply west toward Langley City.
This is the entrance where semi-automatic unloading begins, train
crews leave the train and a pick-up service takes them to rest
quarters located at the causeway entrance, three miles from the
un-loading area.
CANADIAN
266
R A I L
The former BC Electric line served the Lower Fraser
Valley with interurban and freight service until 1962, and is now
the Provincially owned British Columbia Hydro Railway, still a
thriving freight service line, Continuing west through Cloverdale,
that lin~ turns northwest, as shown on map. New trackage was laid
westward, crossing the Burlington Northern Seattle/Vancouver
mainline, and reaching the superport in approximotely 23 miles.
Regular CN traffic and CP unit trains combined, makes
the 16 miles between Page and Livingstone on CN (mostly double
track) into a heavy volume line at times, and progress is controlled
by both CP North Bend and Mission City dispatchers, and CN main
control centre dispatch at North Kamloops, plus further intergration
with BC Hydro scheduling on the portion of the route controlled by
BCH. As a result of numerous inauiries being received about further
bulk handling facilities, the Port of Vancouver commissioned an
Enviromental Impact Study, the terms of reference being developed
by a Federal/Provincial review panel and a team of professional
consultants. The objectives were to determine present handling
capacity, the feasibility of a proposed expansion program and its
economic, environmental and social impact on the area. Interested
or concerned individuals and groups were invited to submit briefs
and attend public hearings and discussions.
Solid bottom gondolas with swivel couplings, usually 105 gondolas
to a train allow rotary dumping without uncoupling and permit con­
tinuous movement of the whole train.
CANADIAN 267 R A I L
The convey~r gantry and delivery tube is shown in position above
open hatchway of ocean carrier.
CANADIAN
268
R A I L
The second half of the rail loop around perimeter of island.
Assortment of conveyor systems within the stockpiling area. Coal
arriving from a unit train can be distributed to anyone of four
stockpiling areas, or directly to the shiploading system. Hopper
and delivery systems are flexible and allow changes in stockpiling
requirements.
(
CANADIAN
269 R A I L
At the end of 1978, the vast Quantities of oral and
written submissions had been assembled into a comprehensive report
to be filed with the Federal Minister of the Environment. If the
expansion proposal is approved and construction of the larger
facility begins, there will be an increase of unit train traffic
on the route, and it may be necessary to make some sections of
single line into double track. Economically and socially it will
mean more jobs for people, and an increase in Canadas export
markets for bulk commodities, all Money in the Bank.
Mid train helpers with robot control unit.
With unloading in process, lead engine units appear and slowly creep
towards end of loop. Double track provides sufficient length on exit
for engine units to clear tail-end and caboose still in-bound on the
approach track. ( All photographs courtesy of the Author)
BY ALLAN GRAHAM
Prince Edward Island has never been noted for its
flamboyancy. Of the 120 railway stations built on the Island
only two were outstanding architecturally. These boulder
stations were built in 1904-05 as replacements for earlier
wooden ones. Kinsingtonand Alberton are the two towns graced
by these buildings.
The term boulder station is quite descriptive of
what happened. Retreating glaciers were quite generous to the
western part of P.E.I leaving behind fields of boulders of
, .
/
Picture of P.E.I.R. train at the Alberton wye somewhere around
1905. Phto copied and enlarged by Margaret Mallett. Original
in collection of P.E.I. Heritage Foundation.
• J
I
/1
CANADIAN 271 R A I L
various sizes and shapes, but mainly composed of granite. These
boulders were gathered and along with rock that came to Summerside
as ballast in sailing ships these structures were built. The
ballast originated in Nova Scotia. The boulders and ballast
were placed at random in cement creating a really esthetic job.
The kensington station is the more elaborate of the
two. It is still being used by the Canadian Natianal as an
agency. Designed by C.R. Chappell and officially opened on
December 20, 1905 it cost approximately $5,000. The contractors
were M.F. Schurman and Company of Kensington. Speeches were
the order of the day when this station opened with fourteen of
the local politicians and residents each taking their alloted
time to compliment the new edifice. The station agent, G.H. McMahon was
presented with an elegant smoking set. A banquet followed
at the Clarke Hotel .
The most distinctive architectural feature of the
Kensington station other than the boulders is the roof extensions
which proceed outwards at the western and eastern ends of the
building. These provided passengers with protection from the
sun and rain. This resulted in a 68 foot length tracks ide and a
depth of only 16 feet. The agents office is sheathed in
North Carolina pine and ash. The floors throughout are hardwood.
Taken in 1905 before the old station ttrainshed visible behind)
had been totally torn down. Train heading toward Northport
Wharf. Picture in collection of P.E.I. Heritage Foundation,
copied and enlarged by Margaret Mallett.

Copy of an old postcard showing the Alberton Station shortly
after it was built with the water tower which was positioned
on the actual point of the wye so both tracks could be serviced.
Photo made from postcard by Margaret Mallett. Original in
possession of P.E.I. Heritage Foundation.
CANADIAN
274
R A I L
Photo of Alberton Station taken in 1972 before it had been
donated to the town. Photo by Margaret Mallett.
Another view of Alberton in 1972 taken by Margaret Mallett.
CANADIAN 275 R A I L
A view of Kensington Station taken while the third rail was
beinQ used; a narrow gauge train is coming ea.tward on the
mainline. Photo copied by Margaret Mallett; original in
possession of P.E.I. Heritage Foundation.
There were two waiting rooms but the west one is now used for
express. The station is not visited by passenger trains any
more but the C.N. bus to Amherst calls here.
For many years a flower garden containing the town
name in concrete letters was admired by all travellers but this
has been totally eliminated.
The Alberton station is similar to the Kensington one
but it lacks the roof extensions. A large arched window in the
agents office creates a beauty in the Alberton one. The official
opening in Alberton received no newspaper coverage at all (versus
reams on the Kensington edifice). The Alberton one was opened
with a party and dance with guest singers. The Alberton Station
is no longer used by the C.N. although it is still at trackside
and trains often back in beside it. It is located on a wye
which used to continue to Northport Wharf a mile away but now
stops at the station house. In 1973 the station was donated to
the town of Alberton. In the winter craft courses and travelling
exhibits use its rooms. In the summer the P.E.I. Tourist Department
rents the agents office as a regional tourist bureau and the
local Handicraft Guild uses the waiting rooms as a sales outlet
for local crafts.
Alberton and Kensington were always very important
spots on the Prince Edward Island Railway. In fact, the railway
was originally planned to end at Alberton (then called Cascumpeque)
CANADIAN
276
R A I L
but was extended a year later to Tignish. When the railway was
being built a huge detour adding at least five miles of track to
the total was constructed so that Kensington would be on line.
Kensington still handles a lot of railway business but Alberton
seldom has a boxcor on the tracks for very long any more.
Although other Island communities such as Mt. Stewart
(in 1911) requested similar stationhouses, no more were built.
An unknown P.E.I.R. official had given two Island communities
buildings for which they would be ever proud.
Photo taken by Margaret Mallett of Kensington Station in 1972.
The· ~.
business car
THE SAGA OF PASSENGER TRAIN SERVICE IN CANADA CONTINUES TO
unfold as the time for rationalization and implemen­
tation of the Final Plan approaches.
At the Fall Change of Time, October 28, through service between
Capreol and Winnipeg via the CN route will cease. The Canadian
Trains 1 – 2 will continue to operate on the present route
between Montreal and Vancouver, except that the CN Station will
be used in Vancouver. A section of that train, Nos. 5 -6, will
operate between Toronto and Sudbury, consolidating at the latter
point with Noa. 1 -2, and providing through car service between
Toronto and Vancouver via Calgary. While full service will be
available, the Park series dome-lounge sleeper will only operate
between Winnipeg and Vancouver.
A local train, Nos. 7 – 8 with coach, sleeper and
feeding service will operate tri-weekly between Capreol and
Winnipeg.
The Supercontinental will continue to operate between
Winnipeg and Vancouver via Edmonton. All schedules will be
similar to those now in effect.
At the same time as these changes on the Western
Transcontinental service come into effect, a general reconstruc­
tion of the Eastern Transcontinental service will take place,
between Montreal and all points in the Maritimes.
On the CN side, the Scotian will disappear. The Ocean,
Trains 14 -15, will operate with full service between Montreal
and Halfifax, generally on the schedule of the present Scotian.
A local service will be operated between Matapedia and Gaspe.
The program calls for RDC equipment, but conventional operation
is envisaged until sufficient RDC cars can be made available.
Bus connections will be available between Amherst and Charlottetown.
Local trains will be operated between Montreal and Mont Joli,
Edmundston and Moncton, and Campbellton-Moncton.
Great changes are in store on the State of Maine route.
The Atlantic will use Central instead of Windsor Station in
CANADIAN
278
R A I L
Montreal, and use CN rails between Montreal and Lennoxville,
then CP to Saint John, and CN to Moncton and Halifax. It will be
designated as Nos. 12 and 11, and times at Montreal and Saint
John will be similar as those for Nos. 40 and 41. The Atlantic
will provide connections for Charlottetown, Sydney and Newfoundland.
It is understood that some thought is being given to providing
a new passenger terminal in downtown Saint John, which would
certainly be an improvement over the present situation with two
stations on opposite sides of town with a five or six mile taxi
ride between them.
THIS YEAR ALSO SEES THE CELEBRATION OF THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF
the Los Angeles Passenger Terminal, otherwise known
as Union Station. Activities included, on the station
tracks, a display of new Amtrak equipment, and in front of the
station, a display of vintage and contemporary urban transportation
vehicles. To cap it off, the Fiesta Express excursion train
operated to San Bernardino and return.
TWO PRODUCTS OF MONTREAL LOCOMOTIVE WORKS SEPARATED BY ALMOST
half a century, B.C.P.M. 1077-& B.C.R. 644 rire seen
here at the head of British Columbias Good Times
79 Express as it crosses the largest remaining trestle on
Esquimalt & Nanaimos Port Alberni subdivision. Trestle at
Mile 14.6 is 450 feet in length and 110 feet deep. B.C.P.M.
1077 was built in December 1923 for Cathels & Sorensen and used
at their Port Renfrew logging operations on the West Coast of
Vancouver Island before being traded to Victoria Lumber Company
of Chemainus for a high geared Climax, V.L. No.7. The 2-6-2
then became Victoria Lumbers second No.7 and was later
renumbered into the McMillan Bloedel series as 1077 when they
purchased Victoria Lumber & Manufacturings mill & logging
show at Chemainus. M & B 1077 moved north to their Nanaimo
River logging camp and for many years trundled log trains down
to the Esquimalt & Nanaimo interchange at Velco north of Ladysmith,
for transport to Chemainus log dump and mill. More recently
she was purchased by the Provincial Museum to handle their
travelling exhibit when on Vancouver Island and weight restricted
trackage in the Fraser Valley. Good Times Express is in this
photo nearing the end of an almost two month journey to most
sections of B.C., parts of Alberta and the States of Washington
and Idaho, headed on the mainland by Royal Hudson No. 2860
assisted by M420, B.C.R. 644.
Loco data B.C.P.M. 1077, 62t tons built December 1923
Builders No. 65337 M.L.W.
B.C.R. No. 644, built October 1973,
Order M6068-05 M.L.W./W.
Photo: Time & Date 7.43 A.M., May 15, 1979 -weather showery
Photographer: Michael Wilkie, 595 Leaside Ave., Victoria, V8l 2K9
CANADIAN 279 R A r L
CANADIAN
280
R A I L
FRIEND OF THE ASSOCIATION AND SOMETIME CORRESPONDENT,
M. Sebastien Jacobi, writes from Neuchatel, Switzerland
to point out that years in the last several decades
ending in 7 have marked contacts between Switzerland and Canada.
In 1947 , Montreal Locomotive Works delivered a group
of 2-8-2 steam locomotives to the French National Railways. One
of these, BIN W7503, SNCF No. 141 R 1244, this year powered one
very successful excursion in northeastern Switzerland, before
going to the Transport Museum at Lucerne for exhibition. In
1957, the Trans-Europe Express RAM trainsets, destined to be
sora to the Ontario Northland Railway in 1977, were placed in
service between Basel and Amsterdam, Hollana: Finally, in 1977 ,
the Canadian Light Rail Vehicle prototypes, being manufacturea-in
Switzerland for use in Toronto,and possibly in other Canadian
cities, were being tested on the Orbe-Chavronay Railway in south­
western Switzerland.
Mr. Jacobi sends the accompanying picture of ex-SNCF Number 141 R
1244 (MLW W 7503) at St. Gallen, beside the Amor
E~press of the Bodensee-Toggenberg Railway, powered by BTB
locomotive Number 9, class Eb 3/5, a 4-6-0 built by Maffei
of Munich, West Germany in 1910.
We are grateful to M. Jacobi for the information and
photograph.

CANADIAN
281
R A I L
.. -….
THE NAR IS CELEBRATING ITS 50TH ANNIVERSARY THIS YEAR, AND THE
Company has repainted a coach in a golden colour. The
car is laden with historical displays, literature and
film, and will tour the NAR Line and stop at fairs and public
gatherings. The railway is also planning something new -naming
its fleet of diesel locomotives. We understand that the names
will be those of historical figures connected with Alberta and
B.C., as well as towns and rivers.
(The Marker & SRS News)
OUR CORRESPONDING MEMBER FROM BEACHVILLE ONTARIO MR. BURT VAN
Rees was kind enough to send along the following four
photos of 1978 rail action in ada around the Woodstock,
Ontario area. First we see two CP diesels, an RS-10 and an RS-3
heading up a freight in Woodstock on July 1, 1978. Next CN 2006
at Ingersoll West on the CN. Burt caught this CP-NW drag rattling
over the CN-CP diamond in Woodstock on August 16, 1978. This
extra was called into interchange service due to the strike of
clerks on the NW which was in effect at the time. And lastly
we see Sperry Rail Service car 139 on an inspection run at Beach­
ville, Ontario for CP in August of 1978.
CANADIAN
282
R A I L
CANADIAN
, A

.. I
\.\ .
,
,

-1
~,
283 R A I L
Ted Wickson of Toronto, Ontario photographed this Richmond Hill
GO Train at Wynford Park in Torontos Don Valley on May 10, 1978.
Our thanks to Ted for submitting the photo for publication in
Canadian Rail.
L oke Huron
– L E G END –
Win dsor
18 Dullon
33 Weiland
2 P ell a n 19 8 X (crossing wilh C.N.R)
34 C.P P hilli ps
3 Essex 20 SI. Thomas (crossing
35 CP Feeder E asl
4 MCGregor wilh C.80. ,C.P.R.) (crossing wil h C.N.R.;
21
,
8011
36
C.p. 8 ro okf ied (c ross i n g 5
Quarries
6
22 Yarmouth (crossing with wi I h
CN.R)
Amheslburg
C. N. R)
37 : C. p. Lincoln
7 Ruscomb 23 Alymer 38 C.P. Fraser
8 Com ber 24 , Springfield 39
,
Montrose
9 Leamington 25 Tillsonburg (crossing 40 Fall s View
10 Til bury wilh C.PR., C.NR.)
41 Niagara Falls (connecls
II Forgo (crossi n g with
26 LaSalelle
with C.NR)
C.80)
27 Wa ler ford ( crossing 42 C.P. P e II i I
wi I h 1: H8 8.l
43 Fori Er ie
12 , Mull 28 : Hagersville ( crossing
13 : Ridgelown with C.N.R.)
29 Canfield Jcl. (crossing
14 : Highgale
with C.N.R.) 15 :
Mulrki rk 30 8 X (crossing wilh
16 Rodney
E80,TH88)
17 Wesl Lorne
31 Pe rry
32 , C.P
Hewitt (crossing
with T.H. 8 8.)
NRAILS CANADA DIVISION –
27
28
24
or I e
UR OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER MR. WILLIAM GERMANIUK OF THUNDER BAY,
Ontario really burnt the midnight oil to produce a
most excellent map to go along with Ken Gansels CONRAIL
rticle which was presented recently. Unfortunately due to a
late-burning error the map which appeared on pages 140-141 of
ur May issue No.328 was repeated and in-complete. We are pleased
o present here the corrected version and wish to take this opp­
rtunity to express our sincere thanks to Bill Germaniuk for all
is help over the past several issues.
Ted Wickson of Toronto, Ontario photographed this Richmond Hill
GO Train at Wynford Park in Torontos Don Valley on May 10, 1978.
Our thanks to Ted for submitting the photo for publication in
Canadian Rail.
Our friend, ~e*b.r ond often contributor Mr. Ji. Hope of British
Colu~bio .ent along this intere.ting photo of the Nelson, B.C.
yord 01 it lookod on April 3, 1953. We find two rH, C-liners
No •• 4054 and 4056, as well o. steo~erl 5251 (2-8-2) and 3663
(2-8-0). Our thank. to Jim Hope for sending this shot olong to
u. for pre.entotion.

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