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Canadian Rail 327 1979

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Canadian Rail 327 1979

Canadian Rail a
No. 327
APRIL 1979

I~
,
I
COVER PHOTO:
The first regular C.P.R. passen­ger
train posed on a trestle in
Rogers Pass at about 11:30 A.M.
on July 3, 1886. By then it was
five days since the train left
Montreal, but in another day it
would be in Port Moody B.C. The
passengers and crew on the rear
platform of sleeping car
HONOLULU were well aware that
this was an historic occasion.
Photo courtesy of the Public Archives
of Canada PA 66579.
OPPOS I TE:
At 12 noon on July 4,1886, this
historic first transcontinental
train journey came to an end as
engine 371 and train pulled into
the station at Port Moody B.C.
Fifteen years of effort and
adventure had at last been succ­essful
and a passenger service
had been inaugurated which would
continue under Canadian Pacific
Management for 93 years. Photo
by T.S.Gore from the collection
of the Author.
IAN
Published monthly by The Canadian Railroad Historical Association P.
O. Box 22, Station B Montreal
Quebec Canada H3B 3J5
EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
BUS INESS CAR; J. A. Beatty
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germaniuk
LAY OUT: M i c he 1 P a u 1 e t
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN
L. M. Unwin, Secretary
60-6100 4th Ave. NE
Calgary, Alberta T2A 5Z8
OTTAWA
D. E. Stoltz, Secretary
P. O. Box 141, Station A, Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8Vl
PACIFIC COAST
R. Keillor, Secretary
P. O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2P1
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
C. K. Hatcher, ~ecretary
P. O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Al berta T5B 2NO
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
J. C. Kyle, Secretary
P. O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto Ontario
M5W lP3
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
R. Ballard, Sr., Secretary
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor,
Ontario N9G lA2
TIIeBailie
The PACIFIC EXPRESS as it dpp.eared about 1890 at the Station
in North Bend B.C. The reorcar .is named MONTREAL and is the
former HONbLULU which is pictured ~n ~ur ~ov~r. Note the upen
observation car, third from the rear •. Photo courtesy Public
Archives of Canada PA 25047.

04DDAS
TBAlISOOlTllllTAL
PASSIIOIB TBAIIS
1888 and 1978
by Fred Angus
The integration of Canadas transcontinental passenger
train service under VIA Rail Canada is the latest development
in the history of a service which dates back to 1886 when the
Canadian Pacific Railway inaugurated its first through
passenger train from Montreal to the Pacific coast. At this
time it is fitting to recall this pioneer service and contrast
it with the VIA trains of today.
In the mid eighties of the last century construction
of the Canadian Pacific Railway was rapidly approaching com­
pletionand the dream of a rail line from coast to coast was
about to be realised. The famous last spike was driven at
Craigellachie, B.C. on November 7, 1885, but at that time the
line was by no means yet fit for service and the coming of
winter prevented extensive work on the mountain sections until
the snow melted. However in the spring of 1886 the line was
finally completed and new passenger enuipment was delivered
from the builders. Some of the passenger cars had exotic
dames like Yokohama, Honolulu, 5 ydney and Hong Kong,
vivid reminders that the C.P.R. would serve as the new route
to the orient. As the finishing touches were being placed
on the railway it was announced that the inaugural train would
depart from Montreal at 8;00 p.m. on Monday, June 28, 1886.
When the history of the Dominion comes to be written
in the future, the 28th of June 1886 will be recorded as a
memorable day in the progress of Canada. So wrote the
reporter for the Montreal Gazette in describing the events of
that day as the ten-car train started from the old Dalhousie
Snuare station in downtown Montreal for its six-day trip to
Port Moody, British Columbia, a continent away. Certainly
the event was of great historical importance. In those days
the railway was the only practical means of travel for long
distances over land, and of course air travel was far in the
future. Prior to the building of the railway a trip from
Eastern Canada to the Pacific entirely through Canadian terri­
tory was a dangerous adventure occupying many months and few
persons had ever attempted it. Suddenly this trip was reduced
to only six days and the accommodation was second to none any­
where. The exterior of the first class passenger cars were
finished in polished mahogany, while their interiors had every
known luxury including baths, stained glass clerestory windows,
heavy cu rtains, elaborate wOJdwork, thick carpets, and even
CANADIAN
103
R A I L
electric bells to call the porter. More important than the
comforts was the fact that the cars were of strong construction
and had the Miller platforms and couplers, as well as full
automatic air brakes to insure safety under all conditions.
Train length increased considerably between 1886 and 1890, here
we see a nine car train being assisted up the grade by a pusher
engine. The location is the origional Stony Creek Bridge on the
climb to Rogers Pass. Photo courtesy Public Archives of Canada
PA 25056
CANADIAN
104
R A I L
The C.P.R s transcontinental in Rogers Pass about 1890, notice
the extra observation car in the siding. Public Archives of
Conada PA 25053
CANADIAN
105
R A L
CANADIAN
106
R A I L
Thus the traveller setting out on what was then the longest
rail journey on Earth could be sure of a8 safe and comfor­
table a trip as could be found anywhere in the nineteenth
century world.
The ten cars which left Montreal on June 28 were not all
destined for Port Moody. Some were only going as far as
Toronto and were cut off the train at Carleton Place. Others
terminated at intermediate stations while still others were
added along the line. It was a six-car train, hauled by
engine 371, which reached Port Moody exactly on time at noon
on Sunday, July 4, 1886. Interestingly, one of these six
cars still exists. Official car 78, added to the train at
North Bend, later became car No. 1 and remained in service
until 1960. Today it is one of the prized exhibits at the
Canadian Railway Museum, the last survivor of a train that
made history. Although Port Moody was the end of the line,
already the new city of Vancouver was recognized as the
eventual terminus, and less than a year later the first train
pulled into Vancouver.
In 1902, C.P. put its first dome observation cars into service.
This rare view shows one on the rear end of a transcontinental
train. By now newer, larger cars were replacing the cars of 1886
and most cars now had vestibuled platforms. Public Archives of
Canada PA 21900
CANADIAN
107
R A I L
By 1910 the MOUNT class observation cars were in use and some would
continue until the 1950s. Although this train, shown on
the new Stoney Creek Bridge is still wooden, many improvements
had been made and the pioneer days were definitely over. Photo
courtesy Public Archives of Canada C 37479;
CANADIAN
108
R A L
THE TRANSCONTINENTAL LINE.
OPEXI:;IG OF
NEW ROUTE BETWEEN EASTERN AND WESTERN CANADA
VIA
Grand Trunk Railway S)ltem to North Bay. Onto
Temltkamln .. & NorJhern Ontario Railway to Cochran~, Onto
Ganadlan Co •• , ment RYI. (Tranlcontlnen tal Railway) to WlnnJpeK.· Man_
Commencing TucsdllY. July 13th, 1915.1rom Toronto. and on eB(b Tues BDd SBlurdny thCrC:l.rtcr. nod Suooay. July 18th. 1915, Irom YIDClocg, and on each Sunday,
Tuesday and Thursda) Lherea1ter. through pQ.::l..Scoger train servIce wlll be o;.ern.ted as follows:
WESTBOUND i Tl~1E DAYS
Hall f 8X •••••••••• ] R. C …. . L . :;;, -;;. T.-c-·~ .00. m:::-II-M-:o::n::dC:.::y—-·cuo. ,,=u::y:-rFC:rO:ld;-:~::y:–
Quebeo ..•.•….. U.T.Ry Sys. U IB.T. 7.GOpm
Portl.nd…. ….. .. .. lET a.DOpm
Bo.ton ……….. B & 11.RR. 11:.T 8.00pm
Montreal …….. C.T.Ry. S}8 … ET. lO.15am
Ottawa.. . .. . .. £.T S ,30am
New York,vla Butraio .L.V.R.R. F. T.· :2 .00am
Wuhlngton n & 0 H..R E: T. 6.00pm 1.Jondu}· Wldncsdnr
Philadelphia P & R H RET .-;;2c . .]o.=:m:;-,_,;-,·u,,,,S,,,uU,:::–r-,;,;;·bursdnr
Toronto ….. ~ .. G.T.Hy. Sys .. L .!E:i·~ 10.4Sl.lLD Tutsd3r Thursday
North Ba),,,. 1:.. .. Ar.IE.T. .00300 Tl(I~(sdnr Frld~y
North Da),,,. 2 .. T. &. ~.O.Ry.L,·.IE.T. 7.15nm
Tuesday
Cochran •…. ~.. .. Ar.iL::.T. 4.2Spm
Saturday
Frida)
H:lI urday
$utUrdar
Sunday
Cochrane …. Z .. T.C·~r· .L,~.II?.T. 4 .4Spro
Graham….. .. II.~.T. 9 .10am Thur .. sday So.tu~da)· ?Jonday
Mlnskl …… ~.. .. G.T. 12.30pm
.¥! Inn I peg. . . . …. . . A r . Ie …. T…:. .. -.;3-i;S. Op,,,m::c r.,,·h;:.:::,S~].=;;,:: +,1,,0,-,1 u,-,r,=.dC!,Y_!–;:.~,,1 o,,~::;~:=.,,Y_
Winnipeg …….. G.T.P. H)· …. Lv. C.T. 6. DOpro TlIu~~duy SUlUrday ~Iloud:l)
Rivers.. . . .. .. . . .. Ar. C.T. 10.4Spm
Melville. . . . . . . . . : .T. 3 .45aw Frid~y
Regina………. .. ~I.T ~ .U[)nm
Watroul. :,1.T. 7.35am
Saskatoon. ~I.T. 9.38om
Biggar… ;·I,T. It .b9nm
Wainwright…… :1.T. 5.00pm
Edmonton……. Ar. :1.T 10.00pm
Edmonton……. .. LI:I T 10.3Spm
[dlon … ….. Ar :1.T -1. )Qam
Jaap.r.. . .1 ~l.T 8.50o.m
Prlnoe c..org. .. /,I /,I P.T 8.00pm
Smlth.rs… …. /,I .. jP T. 7 .50o.m Mon~ay
Prine. Rupert.. .. Ar ,P.T 6.1Spm
Prlnc. Rupert … C.T.P.B.B.Co L, PT. 10 .OOam Tu~day
~~e~:~~aY .• ~: : : : .: : W ~~:!~:i: 1ri: ~~g: \ ed~es S.ettle………. Ar.iP.T. 0 .OOo..m. Thursday
Mon~.y
TueS~ay
Tu(sday
\fdnesdny
Tbu,;,day
wedneSd.;1 Frld~y
Thur:day Saturday
Frld~} Sunday
Salurda) J onday
DAYS EASTBOUND I TI~lE
So a tt Ie ………. C. T. P . 5.5. Co. Lv. cp, Tr.,-u. 3>io;;;a-;;m;+iTu::e::Sd:O;a::Y:-Tibhur;;;:;;~a;:-y–;-S:::al u~;:-d;:a::y-
Vlctorl.. . .. .. . . . W P.T. 3. 30pm
Vancouver……. .. P.T. 12 .00m· t
Prince Rup.rt… Ar. P.T. G.30am
Prince Rupert … C.T.P. Ry … L. P.T. 10 .30am
Smltherl. .. P.T. 9.0Spm
PrlncD c.eorge… P.T. 8.45am
Juj:ler……….. ::1.T. 10.05pm
Edlon. W ,!I.T. 2.25nm
Edmonton.. Ar.·:I.T. 8.00nm
Edmonton……. Lv.:I.T. 8.30am
:::~~;~I~.h … : : : : : :~~:i:1 ~ :~~~~
S.lkatoon……. !!·I.T.1 8.30pro
W.trou… . . . . .. . ·!1.T . 10 .45pID
Regln.. ·M.T .10 .30pm
Frld~y
Sat.urday
Saturday
Melville. . . . . . … ~!I.T. 4.45nm Suod.,nY Tue5,?8Y
Rlverl …. … . . :C.T. 9 .45am
WI n n I peg. . . . A r .C.T. -2-.~2S~po:m=-r-ifu:.:n:.:d.:! __ i_,T,,c,sd:;:Ic..· _
Wlnnlp.g …. ; .. T.C.Ry …… Lv .. C.r S.15pm SUndllY TueS~ay
TllfSday
Tbu,;,UnY
Thurltday
Tb~r.,sday
~::~:!;,: :::: ~:: : .. :~:i: ~ ~~~:;: l oD~ay
Coohr.n •…. =:.. • Ar.E.T. 6.10pm
\ cdnesda) Frld~y
COchren •…. z .. T.&. N.O.RY .. Lv-:B.T. 6.3Spm
North Bay … w . . .. Ar .·F,.T. 3,45am
North B.y .. , ,. G.T,Ry Bya, .L,·E.T, 3 .W.rn
To ro n to ….. ~ . . .. A r . :E,. T;-1-;:;,12,…o,s;;:n~ no r..;T,U:::,;d:;:R=:Y=:i-;T;;,h:;-U:;:r8=-daY–I-::f,;;,l u,r,;;d:::8,y_
Montre.I …….. a.T.Ry.Bye .. Ar .. E.T. 7 .30am Ved~esday Frld~y tiund,!lY
Otuwa………. .. Ar.;E.T. 11,45aID
Quebea………. .. .E.T. 2.40pm ………..
Portland…. •. ••• .. iE.T. 6.S0pm
.
Bo.ton ………. B.&: l1:.R.R … II :E.T. 7.0Spm
~h:!~~~~~:~. Vt:B~~~O~~:,~ : i~:i: 1~ :~~~:
New York • L.V.R.R ….. • :E.T. 7.57am
Hef ••.•…….. 1.R.C …….. Ar.IA.T. 2.0Dpm Thunlday Saturday Tueo CANADIAN 109
R A I L
For olmost thirty years the Canadian Pacific trains
were the only ones to cross Canada. During this period the
Pacific Exprass of 1886 was expanded and upgraded. Later
a second daily transcontinental train was added, and names
like the Imperial Limited, Trans Canada Limited, and
Dominion became known to all in the West. Completion of
the Canadian Northern and Grand Trunk Pacific lines in 1915
saw additional fine trains inaugurated on these new routes,
and the amalgamation of the latter companies into the Canadian
National Railways completed the passenger network which con­
tinued until this year. By the early 1920 s steel cars had
replaced wooden ones and new improvements were made over the
years. Even in the post-World War II era whan automabile and
air competition became more and more significant, the passenger
trains kept up with the times. In 1955 the inauguration of the
Canadian by Canadian Pacific, and the Super Continental by
Can~dian National was the greatest step forward since 1886.
Canadas railways still maintained first uality service even
as other countries downgraded or eliminated their trains.
However it could not last forever! Air and road competition,
inflation, and public apathy took their toll, and the once­
great trains were in danger extinction. With the formation
of VIA Rail Canada, the operation of the transcontinental
passenger service has passed to the new corporation, and on
October 28, 1978 the last runs were made of the Canadian
as a C.P. train, and the Super Continental as C.N. Thus
92 years of service by Canadian Pacific and 63 years by
Canadian National and its predecessors has ended. While a
long, honourable era going back almost a century has come to
an end, the new era of VIA has begun.
Robert F.Legget was also on hand to photograph the last CANADIAN
as she pulled into the new Ottawa Union Station, on October 28,
1978, three locomotives and six stainless steel cars brought C.P.
transcontinental rail service to an end.
While changes have been made and some duplicate service
has been droQped, the new service is one of which Canada can
be proud. While the inlaid wood, carpets, and baths of 1886
have gone, the present day traveller has such conv3nience as
air conditioning, dome cars, private ronms, reclining dayniter
seats, and stainless steel cars. The time of travel is about
three days, this is half of what it was in 1886. The time is
no longer competitive with air travel, but for shorter runs,
as well as vacation travel where time is not of as much object
the train still offers the finest service, certainly far
superior to the automobile or bus. Today, mor~ than in the
past, trains are economical. In 1886 the one-way coach fare
from Montreal to Vancouver via Port Moody was $92.00, while
torlay the same fare is $120.00, this represnets only a 30%
increase in 92 years! Even though the lower-berth sleeper
fare has risen from $22.00 to $66.00, one must remember that
the dollar of 1886 was far different than that of 1978, and
in terms of purchasing power transcontinental travel is the
cheapest in history.
It remains to be seen whether October 29, 1978 will be
recorded in history as a memorable day to compare with June
28, 1886. Given the present-day attitude towards train
travel, and the presence of alternative means of trans­
portation, this date will probably not be so recorded.
Nevertheless October 29, 1978 is also the beginning of a
new era in Canadian travel, an era which may see the
renaissance of passenger train service as we approach the
start of the second century of travel by train from sea to
sea.
24 April 1955 saw the inaugurat~on of another era in Canadian
Pacifics transcontinental history with the introduction of
the CANADIAN. Our distinguished member from Ottawa Mr. R.F.
legget photographed the first Canadian westbound as she left
the old Ottawa Union Station with the C.N s Chateau laurier
Hotel in the background. In the rear right can be seen the
East Block of the Parliment Buildings, while in the center
are the entrance locks to the Rideau Canal from the Ottawa
River which were built between 1826-1832.
by Mark Paul
While the inauguration of VIAs integrated
passenger service in Eastern Canada has
already been reported in Canadian Rail, I
thought our readers would be interested in
the arrival of the VIA era at Vancouver, the
western terminus of the CANADIAN and SUPER
CONTINENT AL •
Sunday, October 29, 1978 marked the beginning of a new
operating entity in the history of Canadian railroading.
VIA RAIL CANADA began ope~tionof its first passenger trains.
Already 5 months late, the new integrated western trans­
continental services were begun with a minimum of publicity
and fanfare. A single newspaper interview and radio inter­
view with Frank Roberts, president of VIA who was visiting
in Vancouver, was the only indication that I had that there
would indeed be changes made on Sunday, October 29. A phone
call to VIA a few days previous informed me that The Canadian
would leave at 4:05 p.m. instead of 4:00, and that THE Super
Continental would leave at 11:30 a.m. instead of 8:55 p.m.
I then knew that the long awaited integration of services
was to begin.
VIA Rail Canada, in its short existence, has been both
praised and damned; praised for being a forward but belated
step in forming an integrated and realistic transport system,
and damned for being suspect of dismantling Canadas remaining
passenger trains. All of this comment came at a time when the
new corporation had done nothing but paint a few CN passenger
cars and put its name on diner menus and sugar packets. If
one listened to VIAs officers, great things were in store.
If one listened to some consumer groups, the end of passenger
trains was near. I must admit, that I am optimistic. One
only had to venture down to the CP station in Vancouver since
June 15, when the new VIA fares were introduced, to see the
crowds waiting to board the Canadian. This was more than
just the summer rush, this was an expanded Canadian; and the
expanded consist carried over until the last run of the CP
operated train on Saturday, October 28. Yes, things were
certainly better.
CANADIAN 112 R A I L
I waited with keen anticipation for October 29. However,
I was also determined to observe the last runs from Vancouver
of the CN and CP operated trains. A fortunate stop at the CN
station on Friday, October 27 led to my discovery that there
would be no Super Continental departure on Saturday because
of the implementation of the new schedule. I rushed home to
get my camera and then returned to the station, because
Fridays departure would be the last. The train standing in
the station had the following consist:
Diesel Units
Baggage Car
Coaches
Cafe Lounge
Dayniters
Sleepers
Dome Lounge
Di·~·er
Sleepers
Crew Sleeper
Sleepers
~~~~ ~ g~~
6613 ~VIA)
9644 CN)
5495 VIA)
5517 CN)
5576 CN)
762 VIA)
5711 VIA)
5723 CN)
E nt w is tl e ~ CN)
E rnestown VIA)
Yellowhead CN)
1360 (VIA)IVIA~
Emperor
Elliston VIA
Ingonish VIA
Erickson VIA, Deadhead)
Ennishore VIA, Deadhead)
The last C.N.Super Continental waits at CNs Vancouver Station
for its 8:55 PM departure, there are 3 locomotives and 16 cars.
CANADIAN
113
R A I L
This is the first VIA integrated~Super Continental stonding in the
CN terminal at Vancouver on October 28 waiting for the next days
departure. The train consists of 3 locomotives and 11 cars, the
October 30th. departure consisted of 2 units and 10 CQ·rs.
As I
noted this long train, I was wondering if 18 cor
consists, so common for this train, would still be common
after the VIA takeover. The Super had always been, for me,
the symbol of the impressive passenger train. The fact that
its schedule had been embarrassingly slowed over the Past
few years didnt seem to matter. Just the length and variety
of accommodations made it for me the outstanding North American
passenger train.
Saturday, October 28 I ventured down·to the CP station
to see the last CP Canadian depart. The station was jammed
with passengers, more than usual. I suddenly realized that.
this was the only train operating today, and it wa~ carrying
passengers who might have been on the Super Continental. An
extra sleeper for this time of year indicated the heavy load.
The last consist was:
Diesel Units
Baggage Car
Coaches
Dome Coffee Shop
Diner
Sleepers
Dome Observation
Unknown (3)
613
101
110
504
York
Fraser Manor
Chateau Iberville
Chateau Radison
Rogers Manor
Tremblant Park
CANADIAN
114
R A I L
As I watched this rather impressive looking Canadian, I
remembered how this train came closest to being the only tra­
ditional passenger train left in North America. It was opera­
ting with the same enuipment that it had when inaugurated in
April, 1955. And I was also aware of how it had come close to
being discontinued; and at this time last year it had operated
with only seven cars~ Why, it was like turning back the clock
20 years to see it now~
Over at the CN station, the Super Continental that was
to be departing on Sunday was being made up. I knew things
had changed when I saw a lineup of CP stainless steel sleepers
sitting on Track 3. So, I was able to get a day preview of
VIAs first Super Continental. The consist is as follows:
Diesel Units
Baggage Car
Crew Sleeper
Coaches
Cafe Lounge
Dayniter
Sleepers
Dome Lounge
Diner
Sleeper
6504
6612
6604
9613
Inwood
5603
5499
765
VIA)
CN)
~~ll
VIA VIA
VIA
CN)
5703 VIA
Elgin VIA)
Escuminiac (VIA)
Fraser (CN)
1377 (VIA)
Chateau Maisoneuve (CP Rail)
I was somewhat disappointed not to see a consist in all
VIA cars and colours, but that last car gave it all away.
Integration had begun, since this car would be interchanged
with the Canadian at Winnipeg. Subsenuent departures of the
Super during the next week indicated a shorter consist; 2
diesel units instead of three, and only one through sleeper
instead of two.
Sunday, October 29. After a drive out to Burnaby to
photograph the first VIA Super Continental on route, I went
to the CP station in Vancouver to see the first VIA Canadian.
For the time being, VIA will continue using both the CN and
CP stations in Vancouver until a decision is reached on which
station will be the terminus. At first glance, the Canadian
appeared little different than the previous days train. But,
after a auick survey I saw it was a different train; the
appearance of a VIA dayniter coach, and a different ordering
of the consist. The first consist included:
Diesel Units
Baggage Car
Crew Sleeper
Dayni ter
Coaches
Dome Coffee Shop
Sleeper
Diner
Sleepers
Dome Observation
Unknown (2)
606
Hunter Manor
5740 (VIA)
2292
108
509
Carleton Manor
Frontenac
Chateau Montcalm
Cornwall Manor
Kootenay Park
On October 29, 1978 the first VIA CANADIAN ~s ready for departure
from the C.P. station in Vancouve=. The only hint that this is no
ordinary Canadian is the VIA dayniter coach which is three cars
back. All photos courtesy of the Author.
VIAs first Super Continental in integrated service is 30 minutes
out of Vancouver in Burnaby B.C.,the C.P.Rail sleeper on the rear
end is a new sight indeed.
CANADIAN
116
R A I L
The inclusion of coach 2292 was interesting. This older
car, predating in age the Budd consist, was in rather poor
condition with peeling paint. It was a contrast to the shining
VIA blue Dayniter car next to it. Subsenuent departures during
the week indicated no change in the above consists except the
absence of the CP Rail-Canadian tail-signs from the rear of the
train. This happened as consists from the east arrived in
Vancouver.
The new pattern of service is pretty routine now. VIA
sends two trains out of Vancouver every day for eastern Canada.
The amount of revenue space in both trains is very similar,
except the Canadian has one more sleeper than the Super. I
imagine the next few months will see some changes, particularly
more VIA identified enuipment. Next summer will see the first
integrated summer consists. For now, there is a born again
Canadian and a somewhat smaller Super Continental. Whats
happening makes good sense. Im going to try the new service
come December. Im looking forward to it just as much as the
numerous times Ive looked forward to riding CN and CP trains.
from our
collection
c.l.B.IS717
by M. Peter Murphy
In the closing months of 1978 the CRHA was very pleased
to accept the donation of C.N.R. oil electric trailer car 15767
from the Lakeshore Model Railroaders Association, of Toronto.
No. 15767 was built in 1926 by the J.G.Brill Co. of Philadelphia
as a coach-baggage combination car for the Central Vermont Ry.
and was numbered 151. It was first used in branch line service
between the towns of Montpelier, Montpelier Jct. and Borre Vt.
It was later used on other New England branch lines and mode its
final run in that region between New London, Conn. and East North­
field,Mass.
CANADIAN
117
R A I L
In 1941 it was sold to the Canadian National Railway and
converted to a passenger-postal trailer in late February of that
year. It was then assigned to the Atlantic Region and attached
to various oil electric cars, meanwhile it was given its present
number, 15767. It served on various branch lines in the region
and ended up on the Cambell ton -Mont Joli run.
In August 1957 she was taken to the Montreal car shops
for an overhaul and then transferred to the Central Region for
service on trains Nos. 603 -604 between Lindsay and Midland, Onto
In June 1959 she was put into service on the Milton Subdivision
between Hamilton, Allandale and Meaford. She was removed from
active service in July 1959 then was stored at Lindsay until bro­
ught to Toronto for inspection and subse~uent purchase by the
Lakeshore Model Railroaders.
The Lakeshore Model Railroaders had been formed in 1954
and regular meetings were held in members homes until September
1956 at which time permission was received by the club to meet
in the Mimico Beach House Recreation Centre. In 1958 persisting
rumours that the beach house was to be demolished prompted the club
to seek new nuarters, this time in a room donated by the CN in
their Rip Track Administration Building. In 1960 after a lengthy
discussion the club decided to approach the C.N.R. about the poss­
ibility of obtaining a suitable car which would then become the
clubs permanent address.
Walter Bedbrook took this photograph of 15767 as she is being
lifted off the cut-off track on which she had sat for almost
20 years in Toronto. The gentleman in the white hard hat with
his hands on his hips is the Late Doug Phillips of our Toronto
Division who was stricken witha heart attack weeks after this
photo was taken.
CANADIAN
118
R A I L
Two photos of 15767 after her safe delivery to the Canadian Rail­
way Museum in St. Constant as photographed by Stephen Wray. We
wish to express our sincere gratitude to CN in their help of
accomodating the move from Toronto to Montreal off its wheels,
on a flatcar with trucks shipped separately.
CANADIAN 119 R A I L
In addition to obtaining the car, the Lakeshore Club
obtained a 99 year lease from the C.N.R. for a car-length of
dis-connected track at the Willowbrook rail yard on which to store
the car. As is usual in such cases the lease could be terminated
by two weeks written notice by either party, in June 1978 CN exer­
cised that option as the space was renuired for other purposes.
After checking into alternate locations the Lakeshore Model Rail­
roaders decided to donate the car to the CRHA and revert back to
a more conventional albeit less atnospheric meeting room.
It was with great pleasure that the CRHA accepted this
generous donation, not only did it represent a fine example of
branch -line rolling stock, but it also represented probably
the last chance to obtain an authentic oil-electric trailer to
mate with our 15824. In past seasons 15824 has operated with a
caboose but this lacked the desired passenger carrying capacity.
15767 is alive and well and living at the Canadian Rail­
way Museum in St. Constant and we invite all members of the Lake­
shore Model Railroaders Association to join our own members for
a ride in 15767 during the 1979 operating season.
Our thanks to Dave Scott and Walter Bedbrooke of our
Toronto and York Division, as well as Stephen Wray for photos
and information regarding the above acnuisition. Above all our
generous thanks to the Lakeshore Model Railroaders of Toronto,
Ontario for donating the car to the Canadian Railway Museum.
SOME VITAL STATISTICS
CNR 15767 Built by J.G.Brill 1926
Length overall 50 10
Width 9 6
Height 12 1
Weight 58,900 Ibs.
Journals 4 X t X 8 SKF
Heating hot water
Wheels 36
Seating capacity 22
The ·m
business car
YOU NEED A SENSE OF HUMOUR THESE DAYS! IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
they have a Royal Commission looking into the B.C.
Railway -local wags refer to it as the Royal
Comotion on Locomotion.
(D.L. Davies and Vancouver Sun)
CP RAIL UNITS PURCHASED BY VIA HAVE BEEN RENUMBERED 1422-
1425 from 4066-4069; similarly, Units 1931-1935
were formerly CP 4473-4478. In all cases, the
units are being re-geared to 89 mph from 65 mph.
(SRS News)
USERS OF MASS TRANSIT IN THE BAY STATE WILL GET 10% DISCOUNTS
on their car insurance if they have transit passes
for at least 11 months of 1979. The plan by the
Massachusetts Insurance Commission was pushed by MBTA, the
transit autho~ity in the Boston area. The MBTA said that
transit riders have been unwittingly subsidizing the
insurance payments of automobile users.
(RTN via The 470)
JUST HOW ACCURATE IS THE INFORMATION WE ACQUIRE? READ ON.
The Connaught Tunnel at Rog~rs Pass on Canadian
Pacific Railway …. is a double-track tunnel,
operated electrically .••• . The underscoring is mine. No,
it didnt appear ~n some pseudo-scientific journal, nor from some
misinformed railfan. It is contained in the 1959 Edition
(p.562 Vol. 22) of the Encyclopaedia Britannica~
CANADIAN 121 R A I L
OUR MEMBER, MR. BARRIE MCLEOD OF SYDNEY, N.S., BRINGS US UP
to date on activities on Isle Royale. The Cape
Breton Steam Ry. had the best season ever, however
1979 will see only one locomotive in operation, No. 42. The
Repton No. 926 was to go back to Steamtown in November 1978
as her lease was up. Devco Railway purchased two MoPac cabooses,
and Four new diesels have been ordered from GMD. Canadian
National have received permission to close the station at
Grand Narrows; Oran~edale will be the anly office left open
between North Sydney/Sydney Mines and Port Hawkesbury on the
trans-Cape Breton Island line.
CANADIAN
122
R A I L
Barry Macleod of Sydney sent along these three photos of C.B.S.Ry
locomotive # 42 at and departing from Port Morien Nova Scotia in
August of 1978.
CANADIAN 123 R A I L
While the C.N.R. station at Iverness is still standing it serves as
a Miners Museum. Photo courtesy Barry Macleod.
Another interesting visitor to the Cape Breton region last August was
the Discovery Train which is pictured here at Sidney, N.S.
THE COST OF TRANSPORTING NEWSPRINT BY RAIL FROM CANADIAN
mills to U.S. publishers could increase in the
future. Todays bigger presses are capable of
using newsprint rolls larger than the standard 40-inch rolls.
The larger sizes reduce the carrying capacity of each box
car between 18% and 33%. The move in the U.S. to larger
rolls would require an investment of $18 million by CNR for
an additional 500 box cars to handle present newsprint traffic.
(Editor and Publisher)
CANADIAN
124
R A I L
THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, PURSUANT TO THE RAILWAY ACT, HAS
issued an Order (No. 14) prohibiting the abondon­
ment of certain branch lines in Manitoba,
Saskatchewan and Alberta until at least Jan. 1st, 2000.
These amount to 412.9 miles on CP and 224.4 on CN.
(Canada Gazette)
THE U.S. FEDERAL GOVERNMENT IS TAKING A NEW LOOK AT THE
subsidies it pays to keep rail lines going.
Officials are convinced that some states have
been wasting money on lines that will never turn a profit,
and recently won congressional approval of a plan to shift
the emphasis of the aid program from operating subsidies to
one-shot rehabilitation grants. By rehabilitating branch
lines that might ultimately be profitable, better service
may be provided and additional traffic could be generated.
Operating subsidies on the other hand, are never-ending and
allow government to take a more active role in rail operations.
(Business Week)
YOU CANT PLEASE EM ALL DEPT. STEAM, DIESEL AND TRACTION
all have their followers. Low people on the totem
pole must be connected with Maintenance of Way and
Structures. Regarding the Quebec Bridge article, a reader
comments that your last September 1978 issue has nothing of
interest to Railroading. Perhaps he does not realize that,
without the bridge, the National Transcontinental Railway would
not have been completed, the Quebec Central could not operate
from Sherbrooke to Quebec, nor could the present Montreal –
St. Foy Rapido service exist.
No doubt bridges may be uninteresting to some, but
without the Lethbridge Viaduct and the High Level Bridge in
Edmonton, what would be the status of CP Rails service in
those areas? I suppose the reader has the same regard for
Tunnels, but without the Connaught, Cascade, Moffatt and
Raton Tunnels (to name a few) what would transcontinental
servi.ce be like. Or, to come east, how would the through
service between Montreal and Washington operate in and out
of Penn Station.
OUR MEMBER, Mr. E.F. DOWNARD, REPORTS SEEING AN EASTWARD
CP Rail freight train passing Dorval, Que. station,
hauled by four GO Transit diesels. Likewise,
GO Transit units have been hauling CP trains between Toronto
and Windsor, as reported in the journals of our Divisions
in Ontario. When youre short of power, you grab them
wherever and whenever you can~
CANADIAN
125
R A I L
IN ITS WAYBILLS COLUMN OF SEPTEMBER 1974, CANADIAN RAIL
carried an account of the driving of the last
spike on the Grand Trunk Pacific on April 7,1914.
While there was some doubt as to the precise location of the
event, Mr. V.A. Montaldi of Burns Lake, B.C., has passed on some
additional information through our member Mr. R.F. Legget.
Mr. Montaldi states: You may be interested to know that the
last spike on the GTP was driven about a quarter of a mile
east of Fort Fraser, which is 56 miles east of her and 94
miles west of Prince George. Mr. Geoffrey Woodall, of Burns
Lake, who worked for the GTP and the CN for many years, was
present at the linking up of steel on the GTP and vouches
for the date and place. On the 60th anniversary of the event,
the CN stationed a freshly painted caboose in a siding at
Fort Fraser, with several enlarged photos of the last spike
ceremony displayed inside..
FOR THE THIRD YEAR IN A ROW, BANGOR AND AROOSTOOK RAN THEIR
turkey train special over the system, giving
out Christmas turkeys to employees and pensioners.
(The 470)
THE URBAN TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT CORP. LTD. HAS OPENED
Canadas first centre dedicated solely to the devel­
opment of new urban transportation equipment and
systems. The 480 acre site, 14 miles west of Kingston, Ont.,
included engineering, laboratory, office, maintenance and
computer facilities •.• It also includes a 2,500 metre track
on UTDC will develop and test its advanced technology
intermediate capacity transit system.
CANADIAN
126
R A I L
UTDCs 2500 metre track far testing its advanced ,technology inter­
mediate capacity transit system consists of a continuously re-inforced
concrete pad on which running rails, power rail and LIM reoction rail
are mounted. In this photo the LIM reaction rail is being installed.
Photo courtesy Urban Transportation Development Corporation.
This is test vehicle # 1 on UTDCs test track at Millhaven, Ontario.
Photo courtesy of Ted Wickson, Toronto.
A SCANT 70 HILES SOUTH OF VANCOUVER, 8.C., ONE CAN JOURNEY BACK 30
years to when steolll was plentifu.l on the Northe·ro Pacific
Railway, 00 Saturday, Dece .. ber 2, 1978 John Hafflll.ister caught
the Lake Whoteo .. Railways annual Santo Claus excursion at Wiekersha~.
Washington. Powered by the for~er Northern Pacific Railway L-9 ClOIS,
U_6_0, II 1070, (Monchester Works 1907 serial 41879), the special con­
sisted of three NP steel coaches plus NP official cor MADISON RIVER The
Lake Whatea .. Railway has since 1972 utilized the foriller Northern
Pacific Belli1gholll branch between Pork and Wickersha .. , a line ~ade
reduldant by the 8N .. erge. of March 2, 1970. The line tastefully
retains NP colors and heraldry and operates passenger service in the
summer. Visitors heading across the border can reach this scenic line
by taking interstate 5 south of Bellingham and then the Alger exit
which tokes you to Pork, 9 miles further. No. 1070 was last used in
1958 when leasod by th~ NP to the Silllpson Timber Company at McCleary, Wn.,
after which she 10105 purchased by owner Fronk Culp.
John Hoffilleister
On May 28, 1949, Allan Toohey caught this C.N.R. oil electric No. 15840
and wooden trailer at New Glasgow N.S. ready to deport on a local run.
It w~s in such similar service that our recent acquisition # 15767
pent the bulk of her yftors in vorious ports of the country. Photo fro_
the CRHA Archives, [.A.Toohey Collection No. 49_294.

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