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Canadian Rail 324 1979

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Canadian Rail 324 1979

Canadian Rail ….


No. 324
JANUARY 1979
I
J
I
I
C4
COVER:
This photo tells it all. Taken
just outside of Regina, Sask­
atchewan in 1948, thousands of
pounds of tractive effort bite
the rails while both the snow­
plow and locomotive remain
hidden behind flying snow,
steam and smoke. Note the shovels resting
on the tele­
graph crossbar. Photo courtesy
Canadian Pacific #P2626-3 from
the collection of the author.
OPPOSITE:
The scene suits its name very
well as two powerful steamers drive a
CP standard wedge plow
into the drifts at OUTLOOK
Saskatchewan in February, 1947.
Photo courtesy of Canadian
Pacific, from the collection of the author.
R4ll
ISSN 0008 -48.75
Published monthly by The Canadian
Railroad Historical Association
P.O. Box 22, Station B
Montreal Quebec Canada H3B 3JS
EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
EDITOR EMERITUS: S. S. Worthen
BUSINESS CAR: J. A. Beatty
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN
L. M. Unwin, Secretary
60-6100 4th Ave. NE
Ca 1 ga ry, Alberta T2A SZ8
OTTAWA
D. E. Stoltz, Secretary
P. O. Box 141, Station A, Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8Vl
PACIFIC COAST
R. Keillor, Secretary P. O.
Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2Pl
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
C. K. HatCher, :ecretary P.
O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Al berta TSB 2NO
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
J. C. Kyle, Secretary P.
O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto Ontario
MS.W 1 P3
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
R. Ballard, Sr., Secretary
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor,
Ontario N9G lA2
by George Moore

ncou rportl
A BRIEF GLIMPSE INTO CANADIAN PACIFICS
CONTINUING BATTLE WITH THE ELEMENTS
By George A. Moore
Do you suppose the uninue Canadian winter and all this
season entails was treated with more than casual lip service as
the dreams of our first transcontinental railway builders turned
to reality? Or do you sometimes wonder as I do, in the midst of
one of our famous winter storms, whether that august body of
gentlemen known as The Syndicate, ever gave the Canadian winter
more than a passing thought? Perhaps it is not unreasonable to
assume that had any of these brave men been blessed with the
ability to look into the future and see what was in store while
sensible plants and animals hibernated in this country, perhaps
we would still be dreaming of a transcontinental railway.
Despite the vertical plancked wooden snow fence visible at right the
line is not only thoroughly plugged, but Plow 400762 is firmly
stuck as well. The locale was the Outlook Branch northwest of Moose
Jaw, Sasketchewan in February 1947. Photo courtesy CP Rail, Winnipeg.
CA NAD I AN
7 R A I L
Its true of course, that railways in Eastern Canada had
been coping with the problems of winter for sometime prior to
the advent of the transcontinental, however as the rigors of
prairie and mountain roilroading were soon to demonstrate, the
railwayman had much to learn about his special place in the
Canadian winter environment.
We all know what snow is and are enually aware of the
various forms that innocuous white element can assume, de­
pending on the whims of temperature and wind. Canodian Pacifics
battle with the white stuff has continued without abatement
since the halcyon days of the opulent Atlantic and Pacific
Express, The Loop, Glacier House and Sir William Van Horre,
through to these hypertensive days of megolithic corporate
structure. Some of the more infamous of these encounters are
examined in brief form as follows. We also take a look at the
various structures and eauipment devised over the years to put
Canadian Pacific on 0 firm footing with the winter challenge.
Some winters will live forever in the minds of the men
who prevailed and much to their credit, had the foresight to
record their experiences for posterity. Such a winter wos the
one of 1882-83 which provided the fledgling Canadian Pacific,
still very much under construction, with its first real test.
Temperatures plunged to 50 degrees below zero Fahrenheit on the
prairies and eauipment, including locomotives built essentially
to southern hemispheric standards, froze fast to the rails.
European immigrants, many from Southern Italy, experiencing
their first winter while working on railway construction gangs,
were seen carrying large red umbrellas to ward off the bitter
First passenger train through following the monumental clean -up
subseauent to the epic storm of 1947 in Sasketchewan was this single
coach and van hauled by 1211. Photo courtesy CP Rail, Winnipeg.
CANADIAN 8 R A I L
Meanwhile back East the winter of 49 was playing havoc as well. In
Smiths Falls, Ontario 1500 urgently reauired boxcars had to be freed
by any means possible. This included both rail and non-rail eouip­
ment as well as sheer manual labour. Snow was loaded onto anything
that would move then hauled away and dumped. Both photos courtesy
CP Rail, Winnipeg.
CANADIAN
9
R A I L
winds. The majority were ill-enuipped to say the least when it
came to proper cold weather clothing and footwear. All this
combined with heavy snowfalls to set the stage for a long and
very expensive match between Canadian Pacific and good old Mother
Nature.
The problems inherent in severe snowfall were manifest in
the Rocky Mountains with Rogers Pass bearing the brunt of the
action. Snowfall in the famous Pass is legendary, with snow
depths in the mid-1880s measured at from 35 to 40 feet over the
rails. As a consequence, avalanches wiped out great sections of
early trackage and the line was simply abandoned to the elements
for the duration of the winter. The line obviously reauired
some form of protection and a study conducted during the winter
of 1885-86 saw to the design of several types of timber snow sheds
for erection at selected locations over mainline trackage. The
project was an enormous undertaking for the struggling, budget­
weary transcontinental, however at a cost in excess of one
million dollars, some thirty-one separate snowsheds, some mea­
suring up to 2000 feet in length, were constructed during 1886-87.
Winter operations through the Pass became a reality, albeit
occasionally interrupted to this day by the inevitable snow slides
at unprotected locations.
Other methods of protection were also introduced including
board snow fences along exposed and troublesome areas of prairie
trackage. As any seasoned prairie plow operator will tell you,
there is no harder snow on earth than that two feet or so of
prairie drift which cements itself along miles of exposed
track; srrow whipped rock ,hard by c winds. Modern methods of protection also include propane heated
switch point~ which eliminate many hours of tedious exposed
labour for trackmen.
The real battle is fought each year by the men and
machines to whom the task falls to keep all lines open and
trains running as close to schedule as the Dispatcher desires.
As the accompanying illustrations show, the machinery adopted
over the years has assumed many forms, one obvious exception
however, being the ubiquitous wedge snowplow. Familiar to all,
this simple tool of the railroader is still performing yeoman
service for Canadian Pacific. Many of these plows have seen in
excess of fifty years continuous service and are still going
strong after, in many cases, having seen no more modification
than a new headlight or coat of red visibility paint on their
plow blades. They have obviously withstood the test of time and
are a definite credit to the mechanical staffs who designed and
built them in Canadian Pacific shops. Their near cousins have
included the flangers, spreaders, rotary plows, snowmel ters and
present-day track cleaners.
While the winter of 1882-83 succeeded in getting things
off to a grand start, todays oldtimers choose to recall the
infamous wartime winter of 1942-43 which was recorded by the
Company as being the most vicious winter since transcontinental
operations had commenced; the ultimate test of mans courage
and determination against the elements.
CANADIAN
10
R A I L
To complicate matters, wartime traffic had reached massive
proportions and never had there been such pressure on the Company
to maintain a viable rail operation. I suppose that if the same
set of circumstances were to exist today, we would find a way of
accusing our enemies of tampering with the weather as an offensive
effort. The 1942-43 winter struck hardest at Eastern Canada but
was by no mea~s confined to that half of the country. Stories came
in from everywhere on the system ranging from tales of sectionmen
working with pick, axe and shovel, their clothing covered with a
rime of ice caused by sleet storms in the East, or of Western
trainmen floundering for miles through waist deep snow to report
stalled freight trains. As everyone knows, other forms of trans­
portation bow out of the picture long before railways when the
elements are concerned, and the crucial wartime winter of 1942-43
demanded nothing less than full operation. The cost of full
operation in human effort was incalculable. Coal froze solid in
the chutes;water froze solid in tower spouts and pipes; locomotives
arrived at their destinations enclosed in a complete envelope of
ice; blue ice, a phenomenon caused by heavy snow followed by
sleet then more heavy snow, literally immobilized switch points
at hundreds of locations in the East; and as they often are today,
plow operators and enginemen were forced to lean out open cab
windows to compensate for poor visibility caused by freezing
temperatures and blowing snow. It was not uncommon to see four
locomotives pushing a single plow through mountainous s~owdrifts.
It was reported that in January 1943, a total of 83,000 miles of
As if the winter of 1947 wasnt enough, look at what the winds of
50 dumped on Southern Alberta. In the first photo the line had
been cleared but yet two powerful steamers became bogged down and
within minutes the line behind them drifted in stranding the duo.
CANADIAN
11
R A I L
Stuck again, Mike 5110 spins her drivers and goes nowhere, so out
with the shovels boys. CP Rail, Winnipeg photo.
track was cleared of snow by CPR snowplows, 60,723 miles of which
was located east of the Lakehead, 7,821 miles on the prairies and
14,456 in the mountains. The total cost of snow removal for the
system was unprecedented.
One of the more interesting tales to emerge from this
terrible winter was the story of Train 753, a passenger bound from
Orangeville to Teeswater, Ontario on the Bruce Division;
miraculously one of the very few trains actually marooned by
record snowfalls. Marc McNeil, the Companys Press Relations
Officer at Ottawa during this time, wrote in Men Against the
Storm an article published in CANADIAN PACIFIC FACTS AND
FIGURES (Montreal 1946), that train 753 was •••
brought to a standstill only two miles from its desti­
nation ••• nowhere were the publics understanding and
tolerance more evident then in the case of the snow­
bound Train 753. The passengers took their unscheduled
17 hour stopover in good spirits and rather enjoyed
the novelty of the situation.
Word of the trains plight was despatched by the conductor
who braved the blinding snows and waist deep drifts to
reach a farmhouse to summon aid from Teeswater. It came
by way of toboggan and snowshoe the next day.
In the meantime, Donald Cox, son of the Companys Agent
at Teeswater brought a tobaggan load of wood to keep the
coach fires burning. Food was procured from nearby farm-
CANADIAN
12
R A I L
Her mainline days over for good CP SERVICE # 2 sits her days out in
hope of yet one more chance to challenge old man winter, if only on
the La Salle Loop line and in Cote St.Paul yard of the Montreal Ter­
minal. This wooden single track plow and others like it were the
backbone of CP s snowfighting equipment_in the early . .d.ays. Photo
~~rom the CRHA Archives, 5.S.Worthen Collection, date unknown •
. ~ -..
Normally assigned ta the mountains this huge rotary was brought in
to help in the massive cleanup operation. The rotary extra is wait­
ing for instructions at Pincher, Alberta in February of 1950.
CANADIAN
13 R A I L
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{,m.1Amched Ot.If r,ckd (>411 Punmid oul Punc!J~d oul OiJc.J Pund/d f1~ IUI.IJ )(.u~rr
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TRACK SIGNS
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CANADIAN
14
R A I L
houses. With the arrival of the Relief Expedition, the
passengers off the stranded train were transported to
Teeswater by toboggan. One lady expressed herself as
tickled pink over the novel CPR toboggan service which
brought her home.
The storm which saw to the stranding of Train 753 in
January 1943 produced a demand for twenty additional locomotives
just to power snowplows over the clogged Bruce Division. During
cleanup operations, it was a common occurrence for 70 ton
spreaders to be lifted from the rails by snow resistance and
many plows derailed. As can be imagined, when a storm of this
magnitude strikes, enuipment of all types and sizes is con­
scripted for snow removal and may include boxcars, flats,
gondolas and a host of non-rail enuipment as well. Never in
the previous thirty-years of operation on the Bruce Division
had there been so many snowplows in use at the same time.
Natives of Southern Ontario will know that the Bruce Peninsula
is notorious for excessive average snowfalls, so that the winter
of 1942-43 must have truly been a season to reckon with. This
record would tumble within four years.
Once again the superlatives flowed free as the worst
winter storm in living memory2 raged for three solid weeks
ending in a grand three day finale from February 5th to 8th,
1947. When it had ended, Canadian Pacific lines in Manitoba
and Saskatchewan had all but ceased to exist under mountainous
snowdrifts. Sixty mile per hour winds and 50 degrees below
zero temperatures (F) entombed the Companys tracks. Twenty
foot snowdrifts over bald, flat prairie were not uncommon. As
:~:,,! … O: .u~
–.!.(, …. .
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
·.·IE~C:HAiC_L.. DepT
:>tl s 1903
The double track version of the wing Snow Plow
in the days of wood construction.
77
CANADIAN
15
R A I L
the storm raged, men battled to erect temporary snow fences
stop the mounting drifts, but the tide could not be stemmed
and for the first time in the history of Canadian Pacific3,
trains ceased to operate over prairie mainline trackage.
Canadian Pacific Airlines was assigned to pick up stranded
rail passengers from trains frozen in the drifts. using ski­
eouipped aircraft. Over 2000 miles of track in Saskatchewan
ond 1000 in Manitoba would have to be freed of snow and to
complicote matters, urgently needed locomotives were themselves
stalled and stranded allover the prairies owaiting rescue
efforts. A local fuel shortage loomed, adding to the chagrin
of Company officials but despite the numerous handicaps, all
available plows, bulldozers, steamshovels, flangers and spreaders
were pressed into service, clearing all clogged main ond branch
lines within the unbelievable space of one week. A contigency
plan to shift the huge mountain rotary plows to aid in the massive
task did not have to be implemented.
Eastern Canada was to bear its shore of grief during the
memorable winter of 1947. A thirty inch snowfall struck the
Eastern Ontario community of Smiths Falls where 1500 urgently
needed boxcars hod to literally be dug out by hand. One hundred
and thirty men worked around the clock to free this important
A fine example of a wooden flanger immediately after construction at
Angus Shops, Montreal in 1913. Two sets of flangers beneath the
cor permit double ended operation.

An as~:huilt view of CP, Rotary 300811 courtesy of,Mr., J.S.Fisher 0f
Winnipeg, Manitoba. Thes~ units~ere not self propel~ed but had
a fQTmidable bQil~r to drive the rotar-y pparot-us. While the, actual
date ~f,the photo ,is un~l~ar it,i. somst me-in, the 1930
r
••
Built alsa in 1926, CP 400794 is an example of a double track plow.
The interior view laaking farward of CP snowplow 400675 shows the
operators seaf on the right along with the air controls to operate
the flanger and wing (s). Nate the signal bells on the ceiling, the
unit is heated by the traditional coal fired stove at the rear of
the car.
In the 1920s the CP virtually standarized an twa types af steel
plaws, one for single and the other for double track situations.
Obviously.the single track plow is V shaped and throws the snow
in both directions while the double tracked version cuts through
and throws the snow only to the right. In the first photo we see
CP 400845 under construction at CPs Angus Shops in Montreal on
October 1926.
CANADIAN
20
R A I L
railway yard as solid testimony to the fact that pick and shovel
plus mans back will always prevail. The snow had to be man­
handled from around and under each of the 1500 cars, then loaded
on anything from horse-drawn sleighs to flatcars for removal from
the yard. In addition, eleven plows averaged more than 2500
miles per day for three days clearing seven foot snowdrifts from a
total of 646 miles of track on the Smiths Falls Division.
Do these tales of winters wrath impress you as being the
type only grandfathers recount to their offspring, a generation or
two removed, when boasting proudly of their days on the hi-iron?
Have you ever heard those same proud gentlemen proclaim we just
dont have storms like that anymore? Well, before we leave the
subject once and for all, perhaps you would like to share in the
experience of First 965 Snowplow at mileage 37.0 Maple Creek Sub­
division, two miles west of Gull Lake, Sasketchewan in February
1978. We will present part II of this saga next month.
The same unit shown later in service following some noticible mod­
ifications and a re-numbering suitably lettered SNOW SERVICE.
CA NAD I AN R A I L
Still later the same rotary has been converted to operate in the
Diesel era. Gone is the boiler and chuffing pistons, all to be
replaced by two traction motors which await connection into the
newly provided electrical panel.
In November 1950 CP built this snowmelter # 422027 which was used
for snowclearing operations in terminals and other congested areas
where disposal was a problem. The snow entered the front of the
unit only to emerge as water which was poured from the discharge
as the unit crept along. All preceeding equipment photos courtesy
CP Rail.
CANADIAN
22
R A I L
Another important unit in CPs winter roster is the Jordon Spreader
these dual service units (ballast in summer, snow in winter) are
used to clear industrial spurs and yards now that the snowmelter has
gone the way of the steamer which operated it. Burt Von Rees caught
this A unit and Spreader near Woodstock, Ontario in February 1978.
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from our
collection
M. S • R. No. 274
As recently published in the CRHA Communications, the Canadian
Railroad Historical Association and in particular our Canodian Railway
Museum has been designated as a Specialized Museum under the Museum
Assistance Programmes of the National Museums of Canada. Parallel with
this announcement the CRHA collection of railway rolling stock,the ~ulk
of which is located in St. Constant P.Q. becomes the national railway
collection. Additional CRHA pieces are located in Toronto, Ottawa, and Edmonton,
Alberta and these also become part of the national inventory.
A complete roster of CRHA equipment was published in the January 1978
issue of CANADIAN RAIL and this will be repeated as up-dated from time
to time.
How did it all start? Who were th.!;! fore~.ighted iodividuQ..!s who
years ago made the first efforts to preserve that which is today apprec­
iated more than ever before? We are pleased to present the first in a
continuing series entitled FROM OUR COLLECTION, providing some of the
answers to these questions and also keeping you abreast of new additions
to our ever growing roster.
It all started very innocently in the late 1940 s when the
Montreal Tramways Company werein the process of scrapping the last
remaining single truck work cars which years earlier had been the
backbone of passenger service on the Montreal Street Railway. Until
then the CRHA had been content to preserve small archival material and
exhibits, but now thoughts turned to the possible acauisition of a
streetcar. You can imagine the deliberations of the Board of Directors
as they pondered the possibility of requesting such a donation from the
MTC, after all if our reauest was indeed accepted, where would we put
the car?
Spearheaded by Anthony Clegg and with the example of the
newly established Seashore Trolley Museum to point to, it was decided
to proceed and request the donation of brine car 274 from the MTC.
Car 274 had been built in 1894 by the Newburyport Car Manufacturing Co.
and withdrawn from passenger service in 1912, at that time it was for­
tunately converted to a brine car. Part of an origional purchase order
for 10 cars, car 274 was the sole survivor of its class in 1951 when
the reouest for its donation was made.
Fortunately the CRHA was not without friends on the inside
of the Montreal Tramways organization in the person of Mr. Richard M.
Binns, an officer of the company and Mr. Andre St. Pierre the then
Public Relations Director for the MTC. These men were not only sympathetic
but instrumental in convincing the MTC to donate the car to the CRHA
on April 28, 1951
CANADIAN
25
R A I L
This is how Car 274 looked on the day it was acauired by the CRHA,
April 28, 1951. Brine bins inside, a drab grey paint scheme outside
typical of the Montreal Tramways work cars. Photos courtesy A.Clegg.
CANADIAN
26
R A I L
Restoration proceeds on car 274 on July 28, 1951. The brine bins have
been ripped out and the car has been re-painted yellow. Thats Tony
Clegg an the ladder, Allen Toohey under the car and Orner Lavallee
working on the lettering. Photo courtesy of A.Clegg.
This is the car outside St. Denis Barns on May 17, 1952. Orne~ Lavallee
is holding the switch iron, Tony Clegg, Ken Chivers in his T shirt and
Ernest Modler in shirt and tie. We could not identify the individual
on the car steps. Photo courtesy F.F.Angus.
CANADIAN
27
R A I L
The conditions were simple, the car would be donated to the
CRHA and any restoration would be performed by CRHA volunteers at
the CRHAs expense. The car would be housed by the MTC indoors but
was subject to re-location as space became available. And so it was
the CRHA had its first piece of rolling stock and the volunteers
set to work: Tony Clegg, Omer Lavallee, Ken Chivers, Ernest Modler,
Sandy Worthen, Allen Toohey and others literally dug in removing
years of paint, brine and dirt from 274.
Work progressed at a steady pace as time and funds permitted,
and true to their word the locale did vary, first St. Denis, then
Youville Shops, Cote St. Paul Barns, back to Youville, etc. Car 274
was the first Montreal Car to be restored* and was a living example
of the necessity to establish an acnuisition policy while such fine
examples of street railway technology were still in existance. It
wasnt fashionable to be preserving streetcars back in 1951, but
the acouisition of car 274 created an awareness that was to payoff
handsomely years later.
Car 274 was moved to the Canadian Railway Museum in 1963
along with the rest of the MTC collection that was subsenuently
acauired. Since then the car has been constantly kept indoors and
is today a credit to the fine restoration bestowed on it back in the
1950s by the CRHAs first restoration crew.
The car has been re-painted again and is here pictured at the back
of Youville Shops on October 3, 1953. Photo courtesy A.Clegg.
CANADIAN
28
R A I L
The CRHA and indeed all Canadians can be proud of our formid­
able collection whose very existance stems from the pioneering steps
taken by the CRHA Directors and members back in 1951.
* Car 350 THE ROCKET had been preserved by the MTC but only restored
in later years.
* Sincere thanks to Anthony Clegg, Fred Angus and S.S.Worthen for
photos and/or information relating to the above acquisition.
Restoration complete car 274 is seen operating in excursion service
on Notre Dame St. on June 23, 1957. These were the days when streetcar
excursions cost $ 5.00 per hour and mainline oil electrics could be had
for $ 3.00 per mile. Photo courtesy A.Clegg.
The·· ..
business car
CANADIAN NATIONAL WILL COOPERATE WITH THE TOWN OF PRESCOTT, ONT.,
to preserve its historic 123-year old station. In the early
days, it was an important junction point in Eastern Ontario
between the Grand Trunk and the By town and Prescott Railways.
CN are also upgrading service in Newfoundland. Three of the 22
Roadcruisers have been replaced with new enuipment. (Keeping Track)
THE DELAWARE AND HUDSON IS GREATLY PLEASED BY PASSAGE OF AN AMENDMENT
in the House of Representatives will have the effect of making
availoble continued funding to the D&H. Corresponding action
in the Senate is still renuired, however the D&H is most optimistic
that this action will be forthcoming. President Shoemaker said all
D&H operations are continuing on a normal basis and will continue to
do so. (D&H News Release)
THE CONNECTICUT ELECTRIC RY. REPORTS THAT WORK HAS BEGUN ON THE
restoration of Montreal Car No. 2600. Interior work is pro­
gressin~ on the ceiling and woodwork; when this is completed
the outside will be repainted. The car will then be placed in the
shop for necessary repairs to air-brake and electrical systems.
CP RAIL IS BUSY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA WITH IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMS,
including repair and replacement of bridges at Ruskin
and Mission, replacement of 209,000 ties and 61 miles of
rail at various locations. At the same time, Coquitlam Yard is
being expanded to increase handling capacity. One of the prime
torgets of the Company is to reduce grades in the region, notably
from Revelstoke to Clanwilliam (4.5miles) from 1.8% to 1.0%.
Preliminary studies are underway for the construction of an 8
mile tunnel under the existing Connaught Tunnel. (CP RAIL NEWS)
CANADIAN 30 R A I L
THE OLD LADY OF GRANVILLE STREET GETS A FACELIFT -WHILE THE FUTURE
of the CP Rail station in Vancouver as a terminal for Trans­
continental trains is in doubt, CP Rail and Marathon Realty
are giving it a complete overhaul. For the first step, the grand
concourse (18 x 60 metres) has had its terrazzo floors reground, a
new staircase from the adjoining Granville Sauare has been installed,
and new chandeliers reminiscent of earlier days put in place. Small
retail shops and a restaurant will eventually skirt the rim of the
concourse. Later on, it is expected that the station will become the
terminal for the rail commuter service being planned by the provincial
government, in addition to present duties as an interchange for the
Burrard ferry and bus systems. (The Vancouver Sun)
TTC SELLS PCCs TO CLEVELAND. AS A RESULT OF A DESPERATE APPEAL BY
the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority, the Toronto
Transit Commission on April 21st approved the sale of 9 surplus
PCC cars to that American property. The RTA had been hard pressed to
find equipment to meet the increase in ridership on the Shaker
Division since the absorption of the Shaker Rapid into the RTA and
the introduction of uniform (lower) fares. If the TTC had refused
to sell the cars, the RTA would have submitted tenders on surplus
Boston PCCs; The MBTA reauired the bids four days after the TTC
decision.
The nine PCCs are numbered as follows: 4630, 4648, 4651, 4652, 4655,
4656, 4662, 4663, and 4665. Alternate cars (in case of collision
damage to original selection) are 4626, 4639, 4642, 4659, and 4660.
All cars are from the TTC class A-II and were Pullman-built.
Ironically, TTC had acouired the cars from the Cleveland Transit
System in 1952 where they had been in oPQration for only 6 years.
Purchase price at that time was 517,500 per car but the 1978 sale of
the same vehicles brought a 520,000 unit price. On top of the
purchase price, the RTA will pay the TTC for regauging and loading
the cars, an additional estimated cost of 56,500. The 1952 purchase
of ex-CTS PCCs actually totalled 75 cars: 50 Pullman cars (TTC class
A-ll) and 25 St. Louis cars (TTC class A-12, the Louisvilles). On
arrival in Toronto they were eouipped for m.u. operation and spent
most of their lives on the BLOOR and QUEEN routes. Except for the
conversion of two A-II cars to a surface rail grinding train, the
sale of these nine A-II cars to Cleveland, and the retirement of 2
A-II cars, all other cars in the 1952 purchase remain in service.
When sufficient numbers of new LRVs enter service next year, the ex­
Cleveland Pullman cars will be the first to be retired.
THINGS ARE NOT TOO BRIGHT IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST EITHER. THE
Puget Sound Railway Historical Assn., Inc., have been somewhat
jolted by Puget Power, on whose property the PSRHA is located
at Snoaualmie, Wash. Puget Power would like it to relocate its
terminal and display yard elsewhere and, apparently, the sooner the
better. However, there may be light ahead as they are negotiating
with the Burlington-Northern for space in the nearby town of North
Bend. This would involve a long-term debt of the order of 5120,000.00,
much of which would be grantable by various state and federal
programs. (The Sounder)
GO TRANSIT REPORTS THAT HORE PEOPLE THAN EVER ARE GOING BY. GO TRANSIT
to the Canodian Notional Exhibition in Toronto. Their new
162_5eot bi_level cars (94 seats in a conventional coach)
greatly assisted in hondling the increased traffic. One day alone
a ccounted for 50,800 at Exhibition station, co.pored with nor.ol
weekday carrying of 31,500 for the entire Lakeshore line. CO is
employing a crew of handicapped adults to ~ointoin the 40 passenger
shelters on the North Yonge bus corridor. It is reporled that their
work is exe.plory, It is reported that the shelters ore kept so
cleon that on one occasion 0 coller telephoned GO to soy that one of
the structures hod all its windows knocked out. Upon checking. GO
stoff found that the windows were so clean they hod to touch the
g1a5s to make sure it was there …. Would commuters on any other
line core to ca •• ent?
SOUTHERN PACIFIC SEEMS TO 8E GETTING IT FROM ALL SIDES THESE DAYS.
By mid_July, only 1780 carloads went by roil this seaon a~t
of the Selinas Volley as against 21,556 loads by truck. An E
spee spokesman stated that if the trend continues that reefers will
not be available for crops in future years and that the growers will
hove to look for tr~cks ….. Isnt it evident that they hove already
done just that?
IN JULY, T
HE I.C.C. ORDERED SOUTHERN PACIFIC TO PAY 54.4 MILLION IN
penalties for failure to .ove freight cor. under ICC cor orders.
SOMe 15,717 violations were identified in June wherein cor. were
held mote than Z4 hours. Late action may reduce the penalties, but
SouPac has leased 15 Amtrak 10co~otive. to free engines in th~
Com.ut~r runs out of Son Francisco for freight service. They arc
G.E. P-30 type 3000 hp. diesels currently surplus pending receipt of
new Superliner eauipment schedulyd for delivery to Amtrak in November
f
or western and transcontinental trains. (Western Railroader)
IN A LETTER WRITTEN IN HID-AUGUST 1978, MR. J.M. LECLERCQ, THE
Associations representative ror Europe, 50id that heavy
rains in Switzerland hod resulted in SQVere flooding in the
Interlaken -Lake or Thon oreo and in the Ticina, Switzerlandl
canton on the south side of the ~ain chain of the Alps.
Hare than twenty people hove been killed by natvrul disasters
or drowning in S~iizerland and northern Italy.
The falllaus metre-gouge electric roilwoy between DOMadossola
(Italy) and Locorno (5 …. iherlond), the Truin des Centovolli _
officially La Societa Subolpino di I~prese ferroviarie (55 If) (Italy) and La
Ferrovie Autalinec Regianoli Ticinesi (FART) (Switzerland) _ hal been
cut in several ploces and through ~ervice over the 132 km
line …. i11 not be resumed for at least two y~als.
(5.S. Worthan)

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