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Canadian Rail 323 1978

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Canadian Rail 323 1978


Canadian Rail


No. 323
DECEMBER 1978

CA
FRONT COVER:
At precisely 9:59 AM, on the advertised, elephant-eared
D&H
Pacific 604 steps lightly through the interlocking
at Delson with
No. 34, the southbound Lauren­
tian. On the CPR, D&H passenger
trains carried CP train numbers
(No. 34 was CP 220), a practice
which lasted until D&H passenger servi
ce ceased (for the fi rs t time) in
1971. Note the vintage
rolling stock in 34s train,
parti cu1 a r1y the truss rodded
wooden baggage car.
OPPOSITE:
A winter sun highlights the ex­haust of
NJ 2-8-0 1089 as she
switches her train in the inter­
change yard at Delson. Note that
cupola-less buggy 31 has al­
ready been placed on the tail end
of 1089 s frei ght whi ch wi 11
leave De1son for Rouses Point on
block of No. 34, the southbound
day D&H passenger.
R4IL
ISSN 0008 -4875
Publ ished monthly by The Canadian
Railroad Historical Association
P.O. Box 22, Station B
Montreal Quebec Canada H3B 3J5
EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
EDITOR EMERITUS: S. S. Worthen
BUSINESS CAR: J. A. Beatty
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germani uk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN
L. M. Unwin, Secretary
60-6100 4th Ave. NE
Calgary, Alberta T2A 5Z8
OTTAWA
D. E. Stoltz, Secretary
P. O. Box 141, Station A, Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8V1
PACIFIC COAST
R. Keillor, Secretary
P. O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2P1
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
C. K. Hatcher, Secretary
P. O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
A1 berta T5B 2NO
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
J. C. Kyle, Secretary
P. O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto
Ontario M5W 1 P3
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
R. Ballard, Sr., Secretary
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor,
Onta ri 0 N9G 1 A2
.
.NapfervHl~ ,Junction Consol l089.displays her ob::rol:ls :P&H
h,eri tageexempli Hed by the Wooten Urebox, desig~e~~irithe
~o:ree years to burnqnthracite. c·o.a!:; imm:ense;.-cy.lind.ers .. .
(25 x 30), ·b,;t:ow mounted he9~1ight: cinc,!. Q cab.th h9ve been added as a)1 aJterth.ovght! NJ, 108~ be.gan life .as .,
D&H 1089 and was builtoy Aleo in 1914 •. She w{]sscr,apped .in
Co.nada in 1951. . , . ,.

In this phofoExtra 1089 So.~th:,is soJely, inthedear on the
stHI extant ,ID loop track wai ti:lg fo:r No.: 34 ,t(j p(J~.s.
·-,
• >
,>
.~ …. yo.. • , ~
–~ -c_o,.
;&~~ ~:..,.
:~~ .. :…—_ …
by S.J.Smaili Photography: E. A.Toohey
Delson is
of Canadian Rail
name DeIson wl.th
others correctly
American railway
a Canadian railway place name familiar to readers
and CRHA members everywhere. Many associate the
the Canadian Railway Museum near Montreal. Still
identify Delson with Delaware and Hudson, the
which gives the town its name. —
When the Napierville Junction Railway was built north of
Rouses Point, New York, the interchange point between the CPR and
NJ was named Delson Jct, in anticipation of a lively transfer of
carload freight between the two carriers. The Delaware and Hudson
y,q}ly acnuired the NJ outright in 1907. October I, 1917 saw ;.
pj{)lersion of D&H passenger trains from their Grand Trunk
:+,0;9 into Bonaventure Station to a more direct NJ-CP access
.: ·gL·:lj;he latter companys Windsor Station. NJ freight trains
~inued to terminate at Delson until 1950 when CPs then-new
St. Luc Yard was opened.
Delsons first line of railway was actually what is now
the present day Massena Subdivision of the Canadian National
Railways. Constructed in 1883 under the auspices of the Montreal
and Champlain Junction Railway, the line was later acauired by
the Grand Trunk. Since the Canadian Pacific was the second rail­
way to reach Delson (in 1887), responsibility for track and
signal maintenance at the diamond crossing is largely assumed by
CPo For years, an armstrong-levered, tower-controlled inter­
locking protected the diamond at Delson. This installation was
replaced in the forties by a small electric interlocker located
in the depot. Today, CPs Quebec Division dispatching office
controls Delson interlocking as part of the Adirondack Sub­
division CTC system.
Legions of rail fans have descended on Delson through the
years always in search of the unusual and the American. In 1939,
CRHA member Leonard Seton found the Royal Train highballing north­
bound at dawn behind double headed D&H Pacifics. Latter day fans
posed the famous D&H PAs on passenger no matter what the weather
and in 1949, Montreal rail fan Allan Toohey often visited Delson -by
train.
This month, Canadian Rail is pleased to feature a selec­
tion of photos from the E.A. Toohey collection which depict a
different Delson from today. On December 26, 1949, Toohey
journeyed to Delson from Montreal, probably on CPR No. 202, the
morning passenger to Sherbrooke. The resulting rail activity
which appeared before his erstwhile camera is engaging, to say
the least:
. !
I
CANADIAN
359
R A I L
E-8s are rare in Canada and diesels were rare anywhere in
1949. About to whallop the CNR diamond in brand new CP E-8
1801, northbound with No. 213, morning local from Newport,
Vermont. CP received three E-8s from EMD in December 1949
as part of the Vermont lines dieselization program. There­
fore, this photo is quite possibly one of the first rail fan
pix taken of the famous CPR E s.
1801 met an untimely fate in a head-on collision with a
freight train at Lachevrotiere, Quebec in 1969. Sister 1802
survives into the VIA era while 1800, the class leader,
faces an uncertain future on a St. Luc junk line.
Canadian
Nationals
single
track
Massena
Subdivision
traverses
the
double
track
Canadian
Pocific
Adirondack
Subdivision
at
an
interlocked
railway
crossing
at
grade.
In
this
photo,
CNR
H-6-d
class
4-6-0
1325
chuffs
southward
across
the
diamond,
likely
bound
for
Beauharnois.
As
long
ago
as
1949,
CNR
passenger
service
to
Beauharnois
was non
existant,
except
that
the
Official
Guide
admonished:
Passengers
will
be
handled
on
freight
trains
between
Ste.
Martine
and
Beauharnois

Freight
train
permits
not
required
Mr.
Toohey,
were
you
aware?
Ten-Wheeler
1325
was
renumbered
1533
(2nd)
in
the
mid
fifties
and
survives
today
as
an
operating
exhibit
on
the
New
Hope
and
Ivyland
Railroad
in
Pennsylvania.
.!.
~
Local
freight
traffic
between
Delson
and
Montreal
was
handled
I
II1
by
Del
son
turns
which
originated
in
CP s
Outremont
Yord
in
Montreal.
These
turns
were
necessary
to
switch
the
sizable
brick
yard
at
Delson
and
to
provide
a
transfer
service
for
freight
traffic
received
in
interchange
from
the
Napierville
Junction
Railway
and
.
the
CNR.
Here
we
see
CP
N-2
class
2-8-0
3751
about
to
commence a
daily
ritual
practised
for
years
at
Delson

that
of
switching
the
brick
yard.
3751
was
built
by
Canada
Foundry
of
Toronto
in
1913
and
features
an
enclosed
cab.
110
p z p o p z
III C.:l (j;) 1-0 III
:u p r
fJi#
}~

~1.~.
At
10:59,
a
melodius
chime
whistle
and
strident
exhaust
to
the
south
heralds
the
approach
of
First
39,
a
passenger
train
from
Saint
John,
N.B.
In
1949,
Canadian
Pacific
passenger
service
between
Montreal
and
Saint
John
consisted
of
two
daily
services.
Usually,
39
and
40
handled
the
local
work
while
41
and
42,
The
Atlantic
Limited
did
the
high-balling.
Maroon-trimmed
Pacific
2453
seems
to
have
her
eight
car
consist
well
in
hand
as
she
crosses
Rue
Principal,
green
flags
indicating
yet
more
to
come.

c.
P.
R.
To
Montreal
Not
to
Scale

,
<>

..
v
NopJervllJe
Jet.
Rly.
J
oOp
frack
..
~
0
<.
,,
….
~~
:Jii
..
CANAD
IAN
PACIFIC
-~
.~
<~
~(bl—-
R L
Y.
T
o
Farnhom~
DELSON
QUEBEC
WJG9-78
o ~ Z ~ o ~ z III c,j ~ c,j III
::u l> r
CPR
D-IOs
were
as
ubiouitous
in
the
steam
era
as
the
road­
switchers
which
would
replace
them
in
the
diesel
years.
However,
when
this
photo
was
token
diesels
were
distant
and
December
26,
1949
became
0-10
day
at
Oelson
as
No.
1020
arrived
from
Montreal
with
a
transfer
job.
Thats
sister
0-10
1031
fouling
the
interlocker
with
the
north
way
freight
from
Farnham.
The
Spans
the
World
lettering
on
the
boxcars
dotes
the
scene
as
the
familiar
Canadian
Pacific
Railway
billboard
lettering
was
applied
to

roTling
stock
only
Tn
the
early
fifties.
S
peaking
of
boxcars,
check
that
classic
ACL
watermelon
service
box
with
the
slatted
doors
on a
brickyard
siding~
o ~ Z ~ o ~ z
III Coj 0) 11>0 III ;0 l> r

The Locomotive
TOROITO of 18&3
by Fred Angus
…… ) ., :., ….. <.
-(;oroI110 -tirsl £LcOIl1,I;,,( built ill Cal1ada . , S53
One hundred and twenty five years ago this year Canadas
locomotive-building industry began when the locomotive Toronto
was outshopped from the Toronto Locomotive Works. This factory
was situated near the corner of Queen and Yonge streets in its
namesake city, and had been established by Mr. James Good in
October, 1852. The Toronto was ordered in February 1853 by the
Ontario Simcoe and Huron Railroad, later the Northern Railway ot
Canada, which was then building its pioneer line North from
Toronto. On April 16 the locomotive was completed and, as the
factory was not connected to the railway, it was moved down Yonge
street on temporary wooden rails made in sections. As the engine
was moved slowly along by crowbars, the section behind would be
lifted and placed in front; this whole process took five days!
On arrival it became O.S. & H. R.R. No.2, joining Portland-built
No.1, the Lady Elgin which had been in use on construction
duties since October 7, 1852. It was soon followed by the New
Jersey-built Josephine which became No.3. As is well known,
the Toronto achieved another claim to fame when, on May 16,
1853, it hauled the inaugural train of the 0.5. & H. This train
departed from the small temporary station on Front street near
Bay for its thirty mile run to Aurora, then the terminus of the
line. The Toronto was, therefore, the first locomotive to pull
a train in regular service anywhere in Ontario.
In this issue we present a scale drawing of this historic
locomotive as it appeared when new. The drawing was first
CANADIAN
367 R A I L
published in the Canadian Journal for October, 1853, and to
the best of our knowledge has not appeared since. It was drawn
by George A. Stewart and the lithography was the work of Hugh
Scobie. This must have been one of Scobies last works as he
jied on December 7, 1853, at the age of 42. Some of the dimensions
of the Toronto were as follows:
Cylinders: 16 inches in diameter by 22 inch stroke.
Driving wheels: 5 feet 6 inches in diameter.
Track gau~l;: 5 feet 6 inches.
Fire box ~inside dimensions): 4 feet 6 inches long,
3 feet 5 inches wide,
5 feet high.
Boil er: 150 tu bes, each 11 feet long and 2 inch es in
diameter.
Weight of engine alone: 25 tons.
Weight of engine and tender with wood and water: sot tons.
The Toronto was described at the time as certainly no beauty,
but it was well built and functional, and it gave many years of
good service.
Comparison of the drawing with the photograph reveals
several differences. This is understandable since the photo was
taken about 1880 just before the engine was scrapped, and modi­
fications had been made during its 27 years of service. Among
the changes one can see that the longitudinal frame member out­
side the wheels has been removed in the intervening time, and
the wooden boiler-jacket has been replaced by the more utilita­
rian sheet metal. It is interesting that the distinctive
spherical sand box was not originally present, and the bell was
mounted atop the front dome, the whistle being farther back.
In 1853 there was no large oil headlight to grace the fromt of
the Toronto, the one in the photo being a loter addition. This
is not surprising since at that time and into the 1860 s most
railways in Canada, even the Grand Trunk, carried only small
lamps, similar to those used in Britain. Another change, not
quite so obvious from the photograph, is the size of the driving
wheels. The drawing, as well as contemporary reports clearly
indicate 5 ft. 6 in. drivers. However, by 1858 these wheels had
been replaced by ones 4 ft. 6 in. in diameter, no doubt to obtain
greater tractive effort with lower speed more suited to the track
conditions. The smaller wheels were probably also made by Good
as they appear of similar design to those on the drawing, although
differing in some details besides their size.
The Toronto had a fairly long life by contemporary
standards. The Northern Railway did not convert its gauge from
5 ft. 6 in. to 4 ft. 8t in. until 1879, more than five years
after the Grand Trunk. The Toronto was never converted, and,
along with the Lady Elgin and Josephone was scrapped soon
ofter. It is unfortunate that this pioneer locomotive was not
preserved, but this is not to be wondered at since there was
little interest in saving such relics at that time. Fortunately,
all three were photographed before being cut up and the photo of
the Toronto has often been reproduced in the ensuring years,
sometimes with a caption incorrectly stating that this is how it
looked in 1853. In actual fact however its appearance in 1853
must have been nuite neat and smart in contrast to the tired old
veteran that is depicted in the photo. By consulting the 1853
drawing as well as the photo one can imagine how this historic
locomotive looked on that long ago day when its inaugurated the
era of the steam railway in Ontario.
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Canadian Journal: October 1853.
Report of Borad of Railway Commissioners of Canada
(S. Keefer) 1858-59.
JAlIES cooo To.orn
LOCOMOTIVE WORKS
II> P
Railway & Locomotive Historical Society Bulletin 25.
May 1931.
Canadian Railway Development (Thompson and Edgar) 1933.
C.R.H.A. News Report (now Canadian Rail) No. 45. May 1954.
-7
,
3 2 • J 6
Scale if Feec.
Hugh Scolntl Lith.. Toronto.
NOTES CONCERNING DRAWING
The drawing was published in October, 1853 to a scale of
3/8 in. to the foot (1/32 of actual size) but has been reduced
slightly to fit the page. The scale at the bottom will indicate
the size.
The inscription No.1 appearing above the cylinder
obviously refers to the builders number, since the road number
of the locomotive was No.2.
The
Toronto,
first
locomotive
built
in
Canada,
as
it
appeared
about
1880,
just
before
it
was
scrapped.
The
man
sitting
on
the
cowcatcher
is
W.H.
Adamson,
while
the
six
standing
are
(from
left
to
right)
John
Broughton,
Joseph
Benson,
Daniel
Sheehy,
James
Armitage,
John
Harvie,
Charles
Storey.
Looking
out
the
cab
window
is
Joshua
Metzler,
while
James
Phillips
stands
on
the
top
step.
John
Harvie
is
said
to
have
been
the
first
conductor
of
the
line.
Photo:
Canadian
National
Railways
No.
16257.
o ~ Z ~ o ~ z
III Ctj 1 o III
Al ~ r
THE CANMJIAN
end of an era
by Stephen Nray
Saturday, October 28,1978 will most definitely go
down
in history as a very sad occasion for Montreal and Ottawa
area railfans lor on that day the very last Canadian Pacific
train left for the west coast, servering a link which had
existed for over ninety years. As the time of departure loomed
closer for train number 3, The Canadian, many rail fans and
media people were in evidence to record on film the last depar­
ture of what had probably become Canadas most famous and loved
train.
The consist for the final run was really no different
than that which had Secome common for the train during the non­
tourist season in its last few years of operation out of Montreal.
There, sitting in Windsor Station, was a six car train consist­
ing of baggage-dormitory car 601, coach lOS, skyline 506, diner
Fairholme, sleeper Chateau Laval, and observation car
Prince Albert Park. Perhaps the only thing special about the
train was the motive power. CP Rail had given a new coat of
paint to lead FP-7, number 1412 and had an A-B-A lash up on the
head end consisting of the aforementioned 1412 followed by 4478
and 1432.
There were no CP Rail officials on hand to see the last
train off save the company photographer but what was lacking
in official ceremonies was made up by the large number of people
out all along the route to Ottawa to see the passing of an era.
On board the train coach 105 was nearly filled to capacity with
people making one last trip. Because it was the last departure
from Montreal many people went to eat in the dining car and still
others asked for and received permission to ride in the first
class lounge in Prince Albert Park where a toast was proposed
in honour of a great train and its continued success albeit
running only between Toronto and Vancouver.
VIAs takeover of transcontinental operations made for
some interesting movements in the last week or so of the west-
bound Canadian from Montreal. Due to the fact that The Canadian
would only be running out of Toronto following the change of
time on October 29th CP Rail had to have the bulk of its stain-
less steel fleet in that city for the commencement of service
under VIAs auspices, leaving only enough eouipment in Montreal
to cover the Montreal-Saint John Atlantic Limited. As a result
all westbound trains during the last week of service carried
several deadhead cars as far as Sudbury where they were sent south
to Toronto. Reports say that on successive days the train first
carried five deadhead dormitory-baggage cars, five 2200 series
coaches and four Park observation cars. Eauipment shuffles
were not limited to cars heading west from Montreal to Toronto
alone. Because The Canadian would only be serving Toronto
CANADIAN
372
R A I L
power and eouipment had to be found to operate the last few
eastbound Canadians into Montreal ending on October 31st
(it taking 3 days to get the final CP train from the west coast
to Montreal). To cope with the problem the final trains to
Montreal ran with an MLW RS-10 for power and a full baggage
car (2700 series) rather than the normal baggage-dormitory car.
This practice was typified by the October 28th eastbound train
which consisted of RS-10 8579, baggage 2766, coach 122, skyline
501, dining car Champlain, sleeper Chateau Dollard, and
observation Assiniboine Park. Very rarely under normal cir­
cumstances did The Canadian have MLW power on the head end
much less only a single unit from that manufacturer.
It might be added at this point that operational
problems did not only exist for CP Rail. Because CNs Super
Continental latterly had a four night three day schedule from
Montreal/Toronto to Vancouver and vice versa it was found that
to get the new VIA schedule working smoothly the train would
have to be cancelled in its entirety on October 28th. This
was due to the fact that under VIAs hand the Super has again
Just like your everyday CANADIAN, CP Rails 1412 along with 2 other
units and six stainless steel cars prepares to depart Montreals
Windsor Station for Winnipeg and Vancouver. This scene will be rep­
eated no more for this was the last Canadian Pacific Transcontinental
Passenger Train bringinq to an end a service which commenced on June
28, 1886 when the first CP train departed Montreal bound for Port
Moody B.C.
CANADIAN
373
R A I L
Station stop in Ottawa, the Nations Capital .•••• for the last time.
become a three day/three night affair albeit between Montreal
and Vancouver only. Notices to the effect that the train was
cancelled were posted everywhere -even at the CP Rail station
in Sudbury of all places.
Sunday, October 29th saw the dawning of a new era with
the introduction of VIAs Super Continental between Montreal
and Vancouver and The Canadian between Toronto and Vancouver.
Many people were on hand at VIAs Dorval Station to see the
arrival and departure of the first new train. Right as
advertised, VIA number 3, the Super Continental pulled into
the former CN station at Dorval, Quebec -three engines and
thirteen cars including CP Rail sleeper Alymer Manor, a real
surprise~ From engine back the train consisted of VIA CN
FP-9A 6516, VIA F-9B 6626, VIA F9-A 6524, VIA baggage 9660, VIA
sleeper Indigo CN coach 5548, VIA coach 5654, CN lounge 758,
VIA daynited 5735, VIA sleeper Elmsdale, VIA sleeper Elmira,
VIA sleeper Vogue, CN diner 1371, CP Rail sleeper Alymer Manor,
VIA sleeper Au Courant and VIA dayniter 5738. The only unfor­
tunate aspect was the the engines were not reversed with the
VIA locomotive leading. As it was rail fans had to make do with
a red CN lasy worm against VIA yellow on lead unit 6516.
The most interesting aspect of the entire operation is,
that to maintain passenger service over the CPs M&O Subdivision
to Ottawa, VIA backs the entire train over the old pool train
crossover onto the CP just east of CPs Dorval Station. Once onto
· I .
The final CANADIAN rounding a curve near Ottawa on October 28, 1978.
Sunday October 29, 1978 the dawning of a new era in Transcontinental
train travel, the VIA era. Train No.3 headed by VIA 6516 pulls into
CNs Dorval Station. The track immediately to the left of the train
is the old pool train crossover from CP to CN whereupon the Super
will back up on to attain the CP right of way which is further to the
left again. This track was designed to permit westbound 0001 trains
from CP to attain the CN line, the exact opposite of what is reauired
in the VIA operation. You can refer to the cover of your July 1977
issue of Canadian Rail to see a former pool train virtually in the
same location doinQ what the crossover was desiqned for.
—–~-=-========~-=—–==:::::::::::::::=====—–=—-=——-
375 CANADIAN R A L
VIA Rails No.3 on the crossover backing up from CN to CP right of way.
CA NAD I AN 376 R A I L
the CP main the Super picks up his orders on the fly and heads
towards Ottawa. The entire operation took upwards of twenty
minutes giving the Super Continental the longest run between
Montreal and Ottawa except that of the Railiner over CP Rail
lines through Lachute. It is too bad that a cross over between
the two lines does not exist for the right flow of traffic.
However, the old pool train crossover does involve an interest­
ing movement considering it was built for trains coming out of
CPs Windsor Station to switch to the CN at Dorval rather than
the present where the Super leaves CNs Central Station and
switches to the CP at Dorval. Rumour has it that a correct
crossover will be built at either St. Annes or Vaudreuil, further
west along Montreals lakeshore. At this point train travellers
and watchers should see a speed up in transcontinental scheduling.
Orders for
your train
are
CPRaiB
liii:J.J 19:a9
The next train ahead from this station left al-________________ _
Dispatoher
Dispatcher
~~~7r—-~~~~~_nD~I.pMa~
Ispatch,r
This is the last train order that will ever be issued for Train 3 THE
CANADIAN for her Montreal departure clearance. Collection
of Stephen Wray.
CANADIAN
377
R A I L
Now on the correct CP Roil track VIAs No.3 approaches CP Rails
Dorval Station which is used only as a commuter stop nowadays.
And off we go the first integrated Super Continental to Vancouver
under VIA Rail. Note the third car from the rear the Aylmer Manor
still lettered in its CP rail multimark. Our sincere thanks to
Stephen Wray for remembering to put in a roll of black and white
film in this the era of spectacular color.
[he. .
uuslness car
THE PIECES ARE FALLING INTO PLACE. THE NEW VIA RAIL TRANS­
continental service went into effect Oct. 29th. Essen­
tially, there will be two routes: a daily train (Nos. 3
and 4) between Montreal and Vancouver, and one (Nos. 1 and 2)
between Toronto and Vancouver. Trains 3 and 4 will use CN tracks
Montreal-Dorval, CP Dorval-North Bay and CN North Bay-Vancouver.
Trains 1 and 2 will use CN rails Toronto-Parry Sound via Barrie,
and CP lines Parry Sound-Vancouver, except that they will use
the CN station in Winnipeg. To accomplish thi~, Train 1 will
cross over to the CN at Norcran (about six miles east of Winnipeg,
proceed to the CN station, then use CN tracks to Portage 10
Prairie before returning to CPo Train 2 will do likewise in the
opposite direction.
Each train will carry a full complement of equipment, including
coaches, daynighters and sleeping cars between Montreal-Vancouver
and Toronto-Vancouver. In addition, to accommodate through
passengers travelling, for example, between Montreal and Calgary,
or Toronto and Edmonton, a sleeper will leave Montreal on Train
3 for Winnipeg, where it will be transferred to Train 1 for
Calgary and Vancouver. Likewise, a sleeper will leave Toronto
on Train 1 for Winnipeg, where it will be switched to Train 3
for Edmonton and Vancouver. Similar arrangements will apply in
the opposite direction on Trains 2 and 4. Coach passengers
from Toronto destined to CN points in Northern Ontario can
connect at North Bay with Trains 3 and 4 by using Trains 121-
122 between Toronto and North Bay. However, coach passengers
from Montreal and Ottawa proceeding to points such as Regina
or Calgary will have to change cars at Winnipeg, or travel to
Toronto to board through cars.
Schedules will generally be in line with those previously in
effect for The Canadian:
Train 3 Train 1 Train 4 Train 2
1030 Iv Montreal CN or 2215
1600 Iv Toronto CN or 1715
2130 2150 or Winnipeg CN Iv 0855 0900
2255 2310 Iv Winnipeg CN or 0730 0750
1510 or Vancouver CN Iv 1130
1135 or Vancouver CP Iv 1605
CANADIAN 379 R A I L
HOW BOSTONIANS DO IT -THE NATIONAL RAILWAY BULLETIN (NRHS) NOTES
that Boston & Maine service from North Station is still
all RDC and all service is suspended at 10:15 p.m. on
nights when the adjacent Boston Gardens schedules rock concerts.
EVEN THE PENN CENTRAL LOOKS GOOD COMPARED WITH THE RECENT
performance of Conrail, which was created in 1976 and
given $2 billion of the U.S. taxpayers money to replace
P-C and six other bankrupt lines in the Northeast. Conrail lost
$367 Million last year and $216 million more in the first three
months of 1978. Now Conrail has asked Congress for another
$1.3 billion. Meanwhile, reports of deteriorating service pile
up, shippers are moving elsewhere, and there is a continuing
decline in traffic base. For example, Sea-Land Service, Inc.,
the largest ship operator in the U.S., recently said it was
switching from Conrail to the D & H to move containers west fram
New York. (At about the same time, the D & H was reported head­
ing into bankruptcy ~).
(Business Week, July 10/78)
CN HAS THE GREEN LIGHT FROM THE CTC TO REMOVE STATIONS AND
depot agents at eleven places in central and northwest
British Columbia. Heated passenger shelters will replace
stations at Red Pass Jct., Upper Fraser, New Haielton, Giscome,
Telkwa and Kitwanga. Kitimat station will not be replaced with
a shelter because there is no passenger train service thraugh
the city. Agents will be removed at Vanderhoof, Houston, Burns
Lake and Penny. These changes are dependent upon CN introducing
a servo centre at Prince George to serve the area.
(Toronto Globe & Mail, Aug. 8/78)
CP RAIL HAS THE eTC OK TO CONSTRUCT A $10 MILLION, 8,8 KILOMETRE
second main track between Lake Louise, Alta., and Stephen
B.C. The route will follow basically the existing line
along the Bow River and Bath Creek. CP also has approval to
relocate a siding and special tracks for turning snowplows, from
Lake Louise to Eldon, Alta.
(Canadian Press, Aug. 8/78)
VIA RAIL CANADA HAS REACHED AGREEMENT WITH CN AND CP RAIL ON
the purchase of their passenger locomotives and coaches,
reported The Globe & Mail, Aug. 22/78. VIA will report­
edly pay CN $52 million for passenger equipment, including the
three Turbos. The price to be paid CP Rail will be made known
later.CP Rail has been seeking $250,000 each for the domed­
stainless steel cars used on its transcontinental trains, the
stary says. Inauguration of new transcontinental services
authorized by the CTC cannot take place until operating agree­
ments with the railways have been signed. Negotiations to this
end are said to be in the final stages.
CANADIAN
380
R A I L
REPORTED ACCIDENTS ON CANADAS RAILWAYS IN 1977 TOTALLED 4,285,
accarding to a report of the Canadian Transport Commission.
Here are comparable figures for previous years: 1976-
4,619; 1975-4,574; 1974-5,254; 1973-4,684; 1972-4,818. And
here is a breakdown by classification:
Collisions
Derailments
Crossing Accidents
Track Motor Accidents
Fires
Dangerous Commodities
Train Service Incidents
Personal Injuries
1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977
44 56 47 48 32 39
323
299 422 330 301 316
1175 1030 1074 982 923 877
76 72 72 52 41 63
460 520 492 534 63 37*
34 35 43 32 27 9
58 71 79 42
84 52
2621
2579 2990 2941 3148 2810
*
1977 figures does not include right-of~way fires
Collisions in 1977 were reported by CN (27), CP (10),
ACR (l)m, BN (1). Derailments on CN (190), CP (108), Conrail
(4), NAR (3), ACR (4), C&O (3), QNS & L (4).
NEW STEAM AT NIAGARA FALLS -THE MARINELAND AND GAME FARM OF
Niagara Falls, Onto has purchased two 0-6-0T locomotives
as part of a $75 million expansion program. According
to the Injector (Ontario Rail Association), June-July /78, and
the Toronto Star, July 12/78, the locomotives were bought from
the Yougoslavian State Railway and have been rebuilt by them.
Both are coal burners but will probably be converted to oil before
being put into service hauling sightseeing trains sometime in
1981. They may also be fitted with ballon stacks, cowcatchers,
etc. The In jector suggests that the original builder was
Henschel of Germa·ny, in 1939.
LRV UPDATE. ALL SIX PROTOTYPE CARS MANUFACTURED BY SIG HAVE BEEN
delivered to the TTC. Deliveries were as follows:
4002 Dec. 29/77
4003 Feb. 24/78
4004 May 5/78
4005 June 22/78
4001 July 4(78
4000 July 13/78
Exhaustive testing of the cars has been carried out since their
arrival in Toronto and LRVs 4002 and 4003 are expected to be accepted
by the TTC in September (in time to permit delegates to the Fall
American Passenger Transit Association to experience a tour of
Torontos downtown aboard the Canadian Light Rail Vehicle).
CANADIAN
381
R A I L
All predictions of the LRVs entering revenue service in the
near future have been dashed. It appears now that the cars will
not enter service until early 1979 at which time
-all 6 prototypes will have been accepted;
-sufficient operating and maintenance personnel will have
been trained;
-minor modifications to the overhead will have been made
(section insulators must be lengthened as a precaution
against a live LRV in a regenerative mode entering a
dead section where overhead crews may be working);
-some structural and way clearances will have been corrected
(the skirting will not clear some subway station platforms
and the cars greater height and length (over a PCC) has
presented some problems at underpasses);
-deliveries of the 190 production models from Hawker-Siddeley
will be underway.
The testing program carried out by TTC/UTDC has prompted several
retrofits but most are in the nature of tuning the vehicle for
optimum performance. The TTC has established an elaborate check
list of items to be gone over before final acceptance of each LRV.
The Commission is quite aware of the Boston experience with the Boeing
cars and it is not anxious to prematurely introduce them to riders.
Acceptance of the production models, as they arrive next year, should
not be nearly as prolonged.
C~anges in the LRV body livery and interior decor and seating
arrange~ant we~e decided by the TTC in late April but not before the
six prototypes had already been finished in Europ.e. The exterior
paint scheme will be modified so that the doors (originalLy painted
white for economy and safety reasons) will carry the four colours of
the body livery: red, black, white and grey. In addition, the black
area around the front destination window will be changed to white to
conform with the paint treatment around the rear destination window.
Toronto LRV 4002 on Queen Street near Neville Loop undergoing road
tests on August 1, 1978. Photo courtesy of Ted Wickson, TTC.
CANADIAN
382
R A I L
The angled seating .in the forward section of the car will be
abandoned in favour of the traditional 2 and 1 transverse seating.
Total seating capacity will therefore be 46, one less than the
combination angled and transverse arrangement originally proposed.
The interior decor on the prototypes is red and white; however, some
second thoughts arose as the predominance of red inside the car
became apparent. As part of the revisions, the seats will remain
red but the red stanchions will become stainless steel and the red
ceiling diffusers and other associated bracketry will be painted
white. Car 4000, the last LRV to be delivered (but the first to be
constructed), was painted and lettered correctly for its display at
this seasons Canadian National Exhibition which opened August 16th
in Toronto (see photos).
There is no news to report on the two 6-axle articulated cars.
A production contract has yet to be signed between the UTDC and SIG.
Design of a suitable articulation joint continues to be the prime
delaying factor. Besides, the UTDCs market opportunities for such
a vehicle are now slim indeed, what with so many transit properties
having ordered or already selected a competitors design.
(THE ASSOCIATIONS REPRESENTATIVE FOR EUROPE, M. JEAN-MICHEL LECLERCQ
of Divonne Les Bains, France, sends the following report on the
main line of the Swiss Federal Railways from Vallorbe to
Lausanne and the Simplon Tunnel.)
The Paris-Milan railway connection enters our country
(Switzerland) in crossing the Jura Mountains (Mont dOr Tunnel) at
Vallorbe and leaves it through the passage of the Alps (the Simplon
Tunnel) at Brigue. It is the responsibility of the French National
Railways to maintain the Mont dOr Tunnel as far as the Franco-Swiss
frontier, while the maintenance of the Simplon Tunnel -which is
really two parallel, single-track tunnels between Brigue and Iselle
and is the longest tunnel in the world, 19,823 meters -is the
responsibility of the Swiss Federal Railways as far as the entrance
to the station at Iselle.
The Simplon main line, the shortest railway connection between
Paris and Milan (819 km), can be considered as the backbone of the
First District of the Swiss Federal Railways (CFF). It is traversed
every day by 26 international trains, among which are the TEE trains
Cisalpine and Lema no • On the Sion-Brigue section, some 90 trains
pass daily. At Brigue, the important traffic of the Berne-Loetschberg­
Simplon (BLS) Railway joins that of the CFF to pass through the Simplon
Tunnel.
On the eve of the Second World War, 93% of the 214 km of this
route were double-tracked. The resumption of the international traffic
after the hostilities persuaded the CFF to proceed with the improve­
ment of this artery from 1957, notably by the reconstruction of the
station at Sion and the extension of the one at Sierre.
In fact, the work of double-tracking the line from Loeche to
Viege (20 km) went forward at a good speed. Begun in 1971, the work was
completed in 1979 (the section from Loeche to Tourtemagne will
be put in service on 13 June, next year). The right-of-way of the
existing line being suitable, it was possible for the first time
on the CFF network to plan a double-tracking project of which the
geometry would permit speeds of 160 km/hr.
It was necessary to redesign several curves of the previous
right-of-way, .astly located in the curves of the Rhone River. The co
mpletion of this double track necessitated the construction of
several bridges and the eli~ination of ten level crossings; it
required, in addition, considerable modifications to the station
at Yiege and the holt at Ga.pel Steg, where press representatives,
recently invited by the management of the First District of the CFF, were able
to /lake their own, on-the-spot, evaluations.
T
his presentation 0150 included information on the E~osson
hydroelectric COlllple)(, as well as 0 paper by H. Roger Desponds,
Chairman of the Boord of the CFr, on the total concept of transport.
RAIL-WATER ROUTES FOR THE ECONOMICAL SHIPMENT OF GRAIN ARE NOT
confined to tho St. Lawrence Seaway. The Milwaukee Rood h
andles the groin in jumbo covered_hoppers from Marathon to Daven
port, 10., where it is turned over the Alter Co., a barge
operator, for the trip down the Mississippi to Destrehan, La. for
e)(port. The orronge~ent reduces the through rate to III per ton
from the Sl6 all-roil tariff, and gives the railroad /luch better
utilization of its cars. (Business Week)
SOMEWHAT BELATEDLY, WE LEARN THAT TWO ANNIVERSARIES WERE OBSERVED
in Alberto lost summer _ the 60th anniversary of the c
rossing of the Peace River by the predecessor of the
Northern Alberto Railways, and the 50th year of operation of
the N.A.R. itself. (The Marker _ APRA)
If YOU THOUGHT THAT DEALING WITH MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENTS WAS
difficult, you havent read a recent issue of The Marker
which describes the Canadian Northerns bottle to secure a
suitable location for their station in downtown Vancouver. In
addition to obtaining running rights over the Great Northern fro~
New Westminster to Main Street, the Co nodi on Northern hod to,
o~ong other things (1) fill in Folse Creek to the extent of five
million cubic yards (2) not less than S4 million was to be spent
recloi~ing the lands, building a seo_wo11 and erecting suitable
station facilities (3) a large trans_Pacifie steamship service
was to be inaugurated within eight years (4) two hotels were to
be built, one on railway property there and the other, not less
than 250 rooms, ta be located in the City $ downtown area (5)
the approach of the railway to the terminal was to be through
high ground by a tunnel surficient for 0 double track line to
be electrified and subject to rigid smoke ond noise controls
(6) a $1.5 million bond hod also to be deposited as evidence of
good faith to complete 011 these undcrtakings~ It isnt always
as easy as it looks: The Saskatchewan Roil Committee (affiliated
with Transport 2000) states in its September Bulletin that
recalling the disastrous results for roil passenger traffic af
previous removals of downtown stations (Saskatoon, Ottowa, Saint
John, Quebec City) SRCs position has been that the Regina
relocation plan should be modified to allow use of Union Station
as on intermodol roil/bus/airport passenger terminal, with
retention of the CP main line through the city to permit worth­whi
le roil passenger service into the city core. While the City
of Regina ignored SRC s recommendations, the Provincial Govern­
ment, apparently, took them seriously. Seriously, that is, until
the province turned the matter over to its Minister of Finance,
who is also on M.L.A. from Regina. Sometime thereafter, 10 and beh
old, both the City and Province reached on ogree~ent that
there would be a total relocation plan. So its bock to Square One
for SRC.

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