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Canadian Rail 321 1978

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Canadian Rail 321 1978

Canadian Rail
No.32t
OCTOBER 1978

COVER PHOTO:
Esquimalt and Manaimo Train
Number 1 consisting of RDC-3 9103
and RDC-l 9067 crosses the 220
foot deep Arbutus Canyon Bridge at
mile 14.9, Victoria Subdivision.
The date was July 29, 1978 as the
E&N enjoyed a well deserved re­vival.
Photo courtesy of Dave
Wilkie, Victoria, B.C.
INSIDE FRONT COVER:
A large gathering took place at
the E&N Victoria Station at 5PM
on Wednesday, March 29, 1978. The
event heralded the ninetieth an­
niversary of passenger service
on the E&N. Minutes later the
RDC car proceeded downtown to the
historic Terminal at Pandora
and Store Streets. John
Hoffmeister Photo.
IAN
ISSN 0008-4875
Published monthly by The Canadian
Railroad Historical Association P.
O. Box 22, Station B
Montreal Quebec Canada H3B 3J5
EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
EDITOR EMERITUS: S. S. Worthen
BUSINESS CAR: John Welsh
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germani uk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN
L. M. Unwin, Secretary
1727 23rd Ave. N.W., Calgary Alberta
T2M lV6
OTTAWA
D. E. Stoltz, Secretary P.
O. Box 141, Station A. Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8Vl
PACIFIC COAST
R. Keillor, Secretary
P. O. Box 1006. Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2Pl
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
C. K. Hatcher, Secretary P.
O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Al berta T5B 2NO
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
J. C. Kyle, Secretary
P. O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto
Ontario M5W 1 P3
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
R. Ballard,. Sr., Secretary
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor,
Ontario N9G lA2
by John Hoffmeister
Early in January 1978, on Vancouver Island, it seemed
as though the future of passenger service on the Esquimalt &
Nanaimo Railway, CP RAILs isolated portion of its trans-Canada
route, was very dark. Then, on the eve of the E & N s
ninetieth anniversary of passenger operation, there developed a
growing public opinion which favoured the continuation of
passenger service. Local 1051 of the United Transportation
Union at Nanaimo, British Columbia, gave its support to the
movement.
On trackage that since 1972 normally has witnessed only yard
service, 9103 has just crossed the Esquimalt road overpass
and will shortly complete her 0.8 mile special run to down-
town Victoria. The track in the foreground is the CNR inter­
change track. Both Canadian and British Columbia flags fluttered
proudly in the setting sun. John Hoffmeister Photo.
For over 90 years (he Esquimalt
and Nanalmo Railway has carried
thousands 01 passengers up and
down the Island …. NOW OFFICIALS
WANT TO STOP THE TRAIN.
In 1884 we threatened 10 secede 10 get the
E & N. In 1978 we need this vila I se .. I,. more
Ihan eve …. DONT LET THEM TAKE OUR
RAILWAY. Holp save the E & N. Show YOll sup­
po~ by wrillng Esquimail MLA Lyle KJhl. Chainnan
01 The CommlHee 10 save the E & N in care 01 the
Pa~lamenl Buildings …. DONT LET
THE WHISTLE STOP.
DONT LET THE WHISTlE STOP.
CANADIAN
294
R A I L
When,VIA RAIL lowered passenger fares on 03 July 1978,
travel traff~c escalated to a level that exceeded the capacity
of CP RAIL Dayliner RDC2, number 9103.
Tuesday, 11 July 1978, was a remarkable day on the
E & N. British Columbia Premier William Bennett and his party
boarded Train 1 at Victoria, for the trip to Courtenay, Train
1 consisted of CP RAIL Dayliner RDC-2 Number BC-31. The
return trip to Courtenay was a great success. This marked the
first use of foreign passenger equipment on the Island. It
was also the first time that RDC units had been MUed on the
E & N.
Nine days later (Friday, 20 July 1978), CP RAIL
Dayliner RDC-l, Number 9067, arrived from Montreal to join
Number 9103, the duo running as Trains 1 & 2, Victoria to
Courtenay and return. Number 9103 led northbound and Number 9067
led southbound. Advertising in local media generated enough
passengers to fill the train. Simultaneously, the United
On the Johnson Street Bridge,which carries both rail and vehic­
ular traffic,the special run has only to cross,where on the far
side a crowd of over 1000 people and prominent officials will
celebrate the events of March 29, 1888. John Hoffmeister Photo.
CANADIAN
295
R A L
CANADIAN
296
R A I L
Transportation Union began to pressure CP RAIL to reinstate
passenger service on the branch of the E & N from Parksville
to Port Alberni, on the Islands west coast. The mixed train
which provided this service was withdrawn in 1957. The most
practicable method of providing service on this branch would be by
another CP RAIL Dayliner, which would be attached to
Train 1 northbound from Victoria to Parksville and would join
Train 2 southbound to Victoria at the same place.
And as a foot-note, Sunday passenger train service
was reinstated on 06 August – a Sunday -after an absence of
46 years, nearly half-a-century.
Whatever may be the next act in this extraordinary
presentation, it will be difficult to surpass the events of
mid-1978.
Just like old times comments photographer John Hoffmeister
on April 2, 1978 as E&N train # 51 headed up by GP-9, # 8660
crosses Lampson St., Esouimalt Township. Surprise the second
unit is a real live Baldwin # 7070 back in service on the E&N
which for 26 years (1949-1975) was a Baldwin stronghold. # 7070
a class DS-4-4-1000 model, has been assigned to yard duty at
Nanaimos Wellcox Terminalsince January 1978. Once a month she
makes the trip to Victoria for inspection and we see her here
making the return trip.
HEROES IN THEIR OWN RIGHT
S. S. Worthen
A good
deal has been written about the men -and some­
times the machines -who became well-known because of their extra­
ordinary exploits during World War II of 1939-45. The men are
most famous by far, and quite rightly so. However, there are
those machines whose names were a by-word during the middle years
of the Twentieth Century.
In addition to the machines which became world-famous,
like Lightning, Zero, Messerschmidt, Hurricane and Spit­
fi re, there were other terrestri a1 part i ci pants, other than
tanks, indeed, which performed valiant service for Great Britain
and her allies. These were the steam locomotives which were con­
structed by British and United States builders for use on mili­
tary and paramilitary railways in the theatres of war, world-wide.
You might think that researching the history and dis­
position of these wartime locomotives is a somewhat extraordinary
and unimportant undertaking. To some, it may be, but it is,
nevertheless, a particular form of railway enthusiasm which is of
importance to groups in many parts of the world like the Railway
Correspondence and Travel Society of Great Britain.
Mr. R. Tourret of Great Britain has written and pub­
lished recently a first work on this subject titled War Depart­
ment Locomoti ves. These eng i nes were not all steam, not all
Stephenson gauge and not all designed and built in the United
States. Some were diesel powered, some were narrow gauge and some were
build in North America.
Mr. Tourrets book is the happy association of consi­
derable information which he has accumulated over the years, the
research for which has been sponsored, in part, by our sister
association, the Railway Correspondence and Travel Society. The
Whole work is published in two parts, one dealing with British
War Department locomotives and the other with United States Army
Transportation Corps locomotives. Some of the research was first
presented in the RAILWAY OBSERVER, from 1949 to 1958.
In brief General Notes at the beginning of the work,
the Author outlines the difficulties of establishing a suitable
framework in which these motive power units can be described. In
the first section, he gives some thumbnail sketches of campaigns in
the different theatres of war; in the second and third sec­
tions, he presents the histories of the British and United States
CANADIAN
298
R A I L
As this book is intended, in the words of the Author,
for both British and American readers, dimensions are given in
British units for British engines and in American units for
American engines. It might be noted here that inasmuch as both
Britain and the Unites States are or should be proceeding to the
Syst~me Internationa1e, dimensions in metric units would have been
forward-looking.
And, what a dissimilar collection of engines are des­
cribed. There are bizarre 0-6-0 switchers from the Middle East,
Curious ex-London, Midland and Scottish Railway 0-6-0 diesel
switchers and tiny 0-4-0 150 hp diesels for Europe, as well as
British and United States consolidations for Egypt and North
Africa. Speaking of North Afica, the British War Department
liberated some very peculiar, small steam and diesel-electric
engines from the colonial railways in that part of the world.
There is a most interesting section on the 52 diesel­
electric 0-4-4-0 (B-B) locomotives, ordered in 1941 under lend­
lease agreement from Baldwin of Philadelphia and built by the
Whitcomb Locomotive Company of Rochelle, Illinois, U.S.A. They were Whitcomb
type 65DE14. In the fo110win9 year, 60 more were
built, Whitcomb type 65DE14b. Both types had centre cabs. After
the German defeat in North Africa, some of these units were moved
to Sicily and Italy with the Allied Forces. After many adven­
tures, some of them were still in service as late as 1960. Two
were brought back to Britain early in 1943 and the last of the
pair was not broken up until 1957.
Whereas,
prior to World War II, the consolidations
(2-8-0) built to LMS designs were the heaviest power used by
British War Department, some very large Decapods (2-10-0) were
built in 1943/44/45 by the North British Locomotive Company to
the desings of Mr. R.A. Riddle, D~puty Director-General, RE Equip­
ment, formerly Works Manager, St. Rollox, London, Midland and
Scottish Railway. There were also ten metre-gauge, light, Beyer­
Garett 2-8-0 plus 0-8-2s for India in 1942, 14 additional 2-8-2
units in 1943, put into service on the Bengal-Assam Railway in
1944 and, later, 20 locomutives of the 4-8-2 plus 2-8-4 configur­
ation for the same railway, the units previous received being
transferred to other metre-gauge railways in Commonwealth pos­
sessions in the same area (Burma, Malaya, Siam).
There were also 42-inch gauge and other metre-gauge
Beyer-Garatts, and armoured standard-gauge 2-4-2s (can you
imagine!), but discussion of these anomal ies can be found in
Mr. Touretts book. Towards the end of 1941, in the face of
mounting Japanese pressure, the British decided to evacuate some
standard-gauge steam locomotives from Hong Kong, in China, to re­
lieve the motive-power shortage in the Middle East. The story of
their evacuation and eventual disposition makes a most interesting
chapter among many interesting chapters.
While Mr. Tourrets book might be said by some to be
too specialized for the general interest, it is evident that War
Department Locomotives should be of interest of many enthusiasts,
not only for its historical data but also as a description of an
important aspect of World War II, which hitherto has been ne-
gl ected.
l
WAR DEPARTMENT LOCOMOTIVES: Tourret, R. 1976
Tourret Publishing, 5 Byron Close, Abdingdon, Oxon,
OX14 5PA, United Kingdom; 82 pp. ISBN 0 905878 00 0
14 maps, 6 drawings, 92 small and medium b&w photos,
1 head-on collision, 1 strafed 0-6-0.
Price 3.90 postpaid.
CANADIAN
300
R A I L
A FIRST ATTEMPT -AND A SUCCESS!
S. S. Worthen
It was with considerable pleasure and great satisfaction
that the first publication from a new publishing company was re­
ceived recently. It was a considerable pleasure to read about the
history of the Algoma Eastern Railway of west-central Ontario,
Canada, and it was most satisfying to remark that this interesting
story had been published by a new Canadian entitly: Nickel Belt
Rails, Sudbury, Ontario/Fredericton, New Brunswick.
Let us first consider the history. The Algoma Eastern
Railway, at one time one of the most profitable of the railway
undertakings in this part of the Province of Ontario, has been mentioned in a number
of other publications, but in a rather frag­
mented and disconnected manner. Now, Dale Wilson has assembled
and reviewed these fragments, carried out a considerable amount
of personal research and has combined the whole into a most in­
teresting account of this remote railway.
And before saying anything else about the publication,
Mr. Larry Connell and the publishers must be heartily complimented
for the extraordinarily expert work that they have done in select­
ing and preparing the pictures for Algoma Eastern Railway. This
reviewer had seen one or two of the protographs before, but the
quality of reproduction obtained by Mr. Connell far exceeds any­
thing that might have been anticipated.
Gordon Jominis layout and printing are both pleasing to
the eye and make the text easy to read. Mr. Jomini, incidentally,
is the Fredericton, New Brunswick portion of the consortium.
Mr. John Strother-Stewart drew most of the maps which are, in the
opinion of this reviewer, an essential part of this and any suc­
cessful book on railway history.
Dale Wilson, the author, presents the unusual history of
the Algoma Eastern in a clear and readable manner. The genesis of
the Algoma Eastern is often unnecessarily complicated, confused
with that of the Algoma Central and Hudsons Bay, some distance to
the west. True, they were both brain-children of Francis H.
Clergue of Philadelphia, U.S.A., but there the resemblance ends.
Building a railway to achieve Glergues purpose was
something else. The rocky hills of the Sudbury/Espanola region
were particularly resistant to the AERs contractors, just as they
had been to the intrusion of the Canadian Pacific two decades be­
fore. Added to the geographical complications were the unusually
frequent financial crises. During the interval 1907-1910, but ten
miles of railway were built!
The Algoma Eastern was not the Algoma Eastern from the
outset. The author reminds the reader that the AER in fact was
born on 11 May 1911, a relative newcomer to the scene, having
emerged, phoenix-like, from the ashes of the Manitoulin and North Shore Railway Company,
organized previously in 1888. The name of
the original company provided a good idea of the route that it in­
tended to follow and which, in the end, it did follow, but under
another name.
CANADIAN
301
R A I L
With mines and ore-treatment plants and yards along its
line, the AER prospered, particularly during World War I. But
with the closing of some of the mines after 1920, revenue became more
difficult to generate. Passenger traffic was maintained at
a satisfactory level. and some of the circular tours organized by
the AERs passenger traffic department out of Toronto must have oeen a
pleasure to experience.
CANADIAN 302 R A I L
The early environmentalists created difficulties in the
early 30s and changing freight traffic patterns diverted some of
the AERs business to the Canadian Pacific. Little wonder, then,
that the Algoma Eastern finally acquiesced to the modest pro­
posals of the CPR, with the result that the Algoma Easterns
separate existence came to an end in March, 1930.
In the concluding chapter, the author engages in a most
intriguing speculation about whether or not the Algoma Eastern
could have survived into the second half of the Twentieth Century,
had not the arrangement with Big Brother intervened. Since t~r.
Wilson began work on his book, many and various events have oc­
curred in the Sudbury/Copper Cliff region, which make the survi­
val possibility much more speculative. However, the author pre­
sents a strong and persuasive argument.
Dale Wilsons history of the Algoma Eastern Railway is
a work which will ~e of interest to the reader about Canadian
railways and of importance to the Canadian railway historian and
railway archeologist, among the latter of whom this reviewer has been
ennumerated already in the preface.
ALGOMA EASTERN RAILWAY Wilson, Dale 1977
~ichel Belt Rails, P.O. Box 483, Station B. Sudbury, Ontario,
Canada P3E 4P6
ISBN 0-920356-00-1
52 pp •• 70 b&w photographs, 5 maps, 3 employees timetables,
1 locomotive roster;
price postpaid first-class $4.00.
CANADIAN RAILWAYS IN PICTURES
Robert F .Legget
Dr. Robert Leggetts primary work, Roilroads of
Canada was published by David & Charles in 1973 and, while
it was well illustrated, it is true that the pictures could
have been presented in a larger dimension. However, this
would most certoinly have increased the cost of the book.
Now, Dr. Legget has achieved this larger dimension
for his illustrations in his new book, Canadian Railwoys
in Pictures. At the same time, he has searched diligently
for other rare photographs in the files of numerous Canadian
publications and societies from coast to coast.
The result of this search are presented in a book
about 200 x 300 mm, which presents the pictures to advantage.
The front of the dust jacket is groced by the immortal midwinter
portrait of the famous 5.5. Landsdowne, sidewheeler car-ferry,
once of the Grand Trunk Railway Company of Canada, and, at the
time, in service on the Detroit River between Windsor, Onto rio
and Detroit, Michigan.
CANADIAN
303
R A I L
More surprises await the reader. The first illus­
tration is a reproduction of the remarkable painting by the
famous artist Cornelius Krieghoff of the Tubular Bridge at
St. Henrys Falls, showing a Grand Trunk train crossing this
bridge over the Etchemin River at St. Henrys Falls, four miles
west of present-day Levis, Quebec. An extraordinary scene~
CANADIAN
304
R A I L
Two other illustrations may be mentioned without
revealing too much of the books contents. William Cornelius
Van Horne -need one say, later, Sir William ••• -is shown
in his most characteristic, aggressive, hard-nosed pose, with
a group of workmen at Stoney Creek, British Columbia. I smoke
all I can, I drink all I can, and ••• .
The second remarkable illustration is an unforgettable
portrait of a mixed train on the Cumberland Railway and Coal
Company Limiteds then main line, near Springhill, in western
Nova Scotia, taken expertly by the late Elmer Treloar.
There are in sum one hundred and eighteen delightful
glimpses of Canadas railways, past and present, in Robert Leggets
book, together with a suitable amount of explanatory text. The
location of each of the views is indicated on two maps in the
books endpapers, a most effective method of orientating the
reader -and viewer.
And now that Dr. Leggets selection has been inspected
and considered, the reader might be persuaded to say what
additions or substitutions he would recommend for the next
printing.
As one reader -in a wilderness of readers, one hopes _
this reviewer would exhange the buffalo at Wainwright, Alberta
for a picture of a British Columbia Railway freight on the
high bridge over the Fraser River near Lillooet, British Columbia.
He would replace the view of the CNR Northern Number 6203 on the
concrete viaduct at St. Hilaire, Quebec, with a view of a 6000
class on Train 17 on the St. Francis River bridge north of
Richmond, Quebec. In the Bridges and Tunnels section, the
conventional picture of the coal train on Stoney Creek Bridge
could be replaced by a similar CN unit train on one of the
bridges at Lytton,or more admirably, by a picture of CN and CP
Roil unit trains changing sides of the Fraser River at Cisco,
British Columbia.
Ah, well. Let us not be too greedy. Let us be thank­
ful for the completion of this most entertaining publication.
As Dr. Legget points out, special thanks are due to Mr. T. Stanhope
Sprigg and Mr. David St. John Thomas of David and Charles,
Newton Abbot, Devon, England and Douglas, David & Charles,
North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
There are some extraordinary pictures in Canadian
Railways in Pictures. Dr. Legget is to be complimented on
putting together this remarkable selection.
CANADIAN RAILWAYS IN PICTURES. By Robert F. Legget, O.C.
Douglas, David & Charles, 1875 Welch Street, North Vancouver,
British Columbia V7P IB7. ISBN 0-88914-052-9 96 pp.
118 i11us. 290 x 220 mm Can. 514.95
CANADIAN
305
R A I L
A CENTURY OF RAILROADING IN CRAWFORD NOTCH
Comments by: Stephen Wray
Basically a photo history of the Maine Central line be­
tween Bartlett and Fabyan – a distance of only 18.5 miles -this
book would be of little interest if it were not for the fact that
this section of line p~sses through Crawford Notch, perhaps one of
the best known and scenic of rail photography spots in eastern
North America.
Authors Benjamin W. English and Edwin B. Robertson take
advantage of the above by presenting many photos of the area which have been
shot in the period since construction of the line com­menced in
the 1870s. By showing the line, equipment and people
at different times in its history the authors are able to convey
to the reader just how much things have changed in some ways and remained
the same in still others. Perhaps the best example of
this in the book would be the awesome change in motive power made
over the years -from small to larger steam locomotives and then
to first and second generation diesel units. As all these changes
were taking place the age old struggle between man and the ele­
ments was always continuing in ways that have not changed much
since the line opened to traffic.
Through the use of many photographs and a limited text,
the authors are able to outline, in brief form, the history of the
line including its construction, early days, the rise and fall of
the passenger train, as well as present day freight operations.
An effort is also made to explain why the line was built, why it
was and is important, and with which lines it connects.
Another interesting feature of the book, as mentioned
previously, is the attempt to show change through the use of
photographs of the same area taken at different times in the past.
The contrasts are often amazing in that not only have the trains
themselves evolved but also the surrounding landscape and struc­
tures. Of course. this is not always the case as the photos point
out. In some instances if it were not for the inclusion of a
growler from EMD many readers might think that the photo was much
older than it actually is, time having seemed to have stood still
in some areas.
As with any publication dealing with old photos s~me of
the prints are rather light or in some cases underexposed. Never­
the less the reader can put up with these flaws because of the in­
teresting way in which the photographs and complimentary text are
presented. This small volume truly exemplifies the nature of
mountain railroading and the people involved with it whether it
be in Crawford Notch or the Canadian Rockies.
A Century of Railroading in Crawford Notch -Edwin
B. Robertson and l3enjamin W. English
Soft Cover 74 Pages 78 Photographs 10 Maps, Schedules, etc.
Cost: $4.00 aU.S. Funds)
Available from: Edwin B. Robertson
198 Saco Street
Westbrook. Maine 04092
CANADIAN R A I L
The Maine Central Railroads daily Portland St.Johnsbury Vt.
passenger train winds its way up the 2.2% grade to Crawford
Notch, N.H., having just passed Tim Sweeneys house. (the
section foreman). Photo courtesy J.J.Shaughnessy from the
CRHA Archives, S.S.Worthen Collection.
CA NAD IAN 307 R A I L
MAINE CENTRAL STEAM LOCOMOTIVES
Written, printed and publ ished by Mr. Edwin B. Robertson,
this soft cover publication, in handy 5 x 7 format is basically,
as the title might suggest, a locomotive roster of the Maine Cen­
tral Railroad. The book covers all steam classes in existence be­
tween 1923 and the end of the steam era on this particular road.
Test is limited to the introduction and the photo captions, the
book being largely limited to photos and data on the different
classes. Roughly the first two-thirds of the book is devoted to
individual MEC engine classes. For each class two facing pages
are used, one featuring a photo or side elevation of one member
of the class and the other giving the numbers and specifications
of that specific group of locomotives.
The last third of the book is devoted to full page black
and white locomotive photos. In this portion of the book captions
are kept very short usually just giving the road number, the loca­
tion and perhaps the year of the shot. For further information
one would have to retrace their steps to the roster information
at the beginning of the book.
Perhaps the only fault of the book is the almost exclus­
ive use of broadside or three-quarter view photographs. Very few
photos are what could be described as action shots. As well some
of the photos are somewhat on the dark side. Because of this some
of the detail is lost on some photos. Apart from these two faults
the book would be an excellent buy for any rail fan interested in
the Maine Central and its steam heritage. Priced at only $4.00
(U.S. Funds, postpaid) this practical book should be a welcome
addition to any rail fans library.
Maine Central Steam Locomotives
-Edwin B. Robertson
Published 1977 by Edwin B. Rdbertson
198 Saco Street
Westbrook, Maine 04092
Soft Cover 96 pages 50 photographs 17 data sheets
Cost: $4.00 (U.S. Funds) Available from the author
[he. .
uuslness car
JACK BEATTY HAS BROUGHT TO OUR ATTENTION THAT CN TRAIN 725 IS
not the last such joint facility movement in Canada as
mentioned in our June issue and indeed there are numerous
joint facility movements still in effect. We are pleased to pre­
sent the following list which we are sure will be of interest
to Canadian Rail readers.
JOINT FACILITY MOVEMENTS
CANADIAN NATIONAL OPERATION ON OTHER LINES
SUBDIVISION
British Columbia Okanagan Okanagan
Rawlinson
Yale
Alberta
Athabaska
Brazeau
Brazeau
Saskatchewan
Reg~na Terminals
Glenavon
Ontario
Kinghorn
Sudbury Terminals
BETWEEN
Armstrong Jct -Vernon
Can Pac Jct -Campbell Creek
Livingstone-Roberts Bank
North End Fraser River Bridge-
MILES
14.6 CP
9.0 CP
7.5 BCH
Vancouver Jct. 11.0 BN
N.A. Rlw.-Morin Jct.
Otway-Ullin
North Jet (cp) South Jct(CP)
Dewdney Ave.-Regina
Jct. with C.P.R.-Regina
20.2 NAR
4.5 CP
8.0 CP
0.4 CP
0.8 CP
Current Jct.-Thunder Bay North 5.4 CP
C.N.Jct.-Clarabelle 1.7 CP
CANADIAN
Manitouwadge
Pagwa
Kapuskasing
Grimsby
Smith Falls
Quebec
West S hefford
New Brunswick
Oromocto
Centreville
Nova Scotia
Middleton
United States
Palmer & w1ndsor
309
Manitouwadge-Geco
and on Will roy Spur
R A I L
5.4 CP
1.8 CP
At Hearst J ct. I use of Wye
must be authorized by A.C. Rly.
Dispatcher
Cochrane-Cochrane Jct.
Suspension Bridge: Movements
over Bridge are controlled by
ConRail Dispatcher at Buffalo
Smith Falls-Brockville
Meigs-Farnham
Saint John-Westfield Beach
South Devon-Valley
Middleton Jct. -Middleton
East Northfield-White River
Jet.
0.3 AC
27.8 CP
0.2 CP
14.0 CP
65.1 CP
0.7 DAR
73.4 B&M
Joint Facility Movements
Canadian Pacific Operation on Other Lines
SUBDIVISION
British Columbia
Okanagan
Mission Mission
Alberta
Langdon
Saskatchewan
Wh1te Fox
Melfort
Prince Albert
Cutknife
Meadow Lake
Medstead
Ontario
M & 0
Carleton Place
Port McNicoll
Port McNicoll
Hamilton
BETWEEN
Vernon-Kelowna
Page-Livingstone
Livingstone-Roberts Bank
Kneehill-Rosedale
Sharpe-Prince Albert
Keddy-Dent
Humboldt-Orlebar
Rosemound-North Battleford
Prince Albert-Tobey
North Battleford-Healy
M & 0 Jct.-Ottawa
Ottawa-Bells Jct.
Coldwater-McMillan
Mileage 70.9-Midland
Bathurst St.-Hamilton Jct.
MILES
33.5 CN
2.0 CN
7.5 BCH
6.9 CN
18.4 CN
1.1 CN
0.3 CN
38.5 CN
60.2 CN
48.8 CN
2.0 CN
10.9 CN
11. 9 CN
4.3 CN
36.2 CN
Quebec
Vallee
Levis
Beebe
CANADIAN
~
QCR~
QCR QCR
New Brunswick
F reden_cton
Edmundston
Gibson
Nova Scotia
Habfax (bAR)
310
R A I L
Diamond-Quebec
Harlaka-Point Levis
Lennoxville-CNR/CPR Conn.
CN Yard Tracks, Fredericton
14.9 CN
5.4 CN
0.3 CN
Cyr Jct.-Canadian Pacific Jct.26.4 CN
South Devon-Una Jct. 1.3 CN
Windsor Jct.-Halifax 15.7 CN
CN
MONCTON SHOPS RENOVATION INCLUDES UPGRADING THE BRASS FOUNDRY
to become the sole supplier for the railway. Previously,
the foundry had supplied on-ly 20 per cent of CN total
brass reouirements with th9 remainder being purchased in Western
Canada. About 65 per cent of CNs 100,000 freight cars still
run on brass journals, reports Keeping Track (June /78)
CNS KEEPING TRACK (JUNE /78) ALSO CARRIED THIS ITEM; MANY
employees and pensioners have expressed concern over the
possible loss of their pass privileges when VIA Rail
Canada takes over passenger service. We are pleased to inform
employees and pensioners that arrangements have been made with
VIA to honour your present passes until the end of 1978. If
necessary, this date will be extended until the next round of
negotiations with the ARU are finalized.
RAIL-MOVIE BUFFS WATCH FOR A REMAKE OF THE 39 STEPS BASED ON
John Buchans story (first filmed by Alfred Hitchcock).
The Railway Observer (May/78) reports that scenes
have been shot at Bewdley station which, for the film story, had
to be converted into St. Pancras where Richard Hannay, played
by Robert Powell, disguised as a priest, boards the train for
Scotland.
IN WHAT MUST RANK AS SOME OF THE MOST STARTLING NEWS OF THE
year the Canadian Transport Commission not only required
CP Rail to retain its once weekly round trip passenger
service between Montreal and Mont Laurier but to expand it to
include round trips to Labelle (approximately two thirds of the
distance to Mont Laurier) each Saturday and Sunday from July 1,
1978 until late Octdber and again from December 1978 until
March 1979.
Before the introduction of these excursion trains to
Labelle CP Rail ran their once a week train (No. 167) to Mont
Laurier on Friday evenings and the train remained in Mont
Laurier until Sunday afternoon when it returned to Montreal as
No. 172. This operation has now been abandonned. When No. 167
reaches Mont Laurier it immediately deadheads back to Montreal
so that the train can be used for the Saturday special leaving
Montreal at 9;00 AM. After arriving at Labelle on Saturday the
train remains there until departure time (5:52 PM) when it returns
to Montreal. On Sundays the same proceedure is followed north­
bound except that when the train arrives at Labelle it stops
to allow the passengers to get off and then deadheads north
to Mont Laurier. Arriving at Mont Laurier it awaits the departure
time of the regular train (No. 172). Upon arrival at Labelle
it picks up the schedule of the excursion and operates as both
trains southbound from Labelle.
The introduction of the specials has meant that CP Rail
has had to restore to service numberous Dayliners (Rail Diesel
Cars) which had been out of service for over a year since their
withdrawl from Montreal area commuter service. As the Canadian
Transport Commission required that the new service offer baggage
service it meons the appearance of the first RDC-3 in the Montreal
area in several years in regular service Currently number
9022 is filling the bill. The rest of the train is made up of
RDC-ls and the converted RDC-2s in the 9300series which have
had their baggage sections remodelled into passenger accommodation.
It remains to be seen whether the service will take off
or not. The first run was provided by five cars as opposed to
the normal single RDC-l of the regular trains. Publicity has
been minimal if indeed there has been any but with a return fare
of only $8.00 return from Montreal to Labelle the trip is one
that should not be missed.
Montreal Labelle -Mont-Laurier
En vigueur Ie 1 e. julliel 1978
Elfeclive July
I, 1978
Decouvrez la beaute
des Laurenlides
dans
Ie contort
dune voiture
climatisee:
prenez
Ie
train
For scenic beauty
in air conditioned
comfo
rt try the
easy route to the
Laurentians,
take
the
train
ExploltfJ par
Operated by CPRai/~
vln
VIA Rail Canada
DI hlule bill Read Oown MONTR~AL-LABELLE-MONT·LAURIER D, bioi en hlullA .. d up
~ @ . @ ..
,.67
Km ., Dr,.ISun, SIm./Sll Ven./Frl.
0 0 0900 0900 1815
3
2 @0905
~5 ilI1S20
0 5 $0910 11.10910 «11825
••
2
Q)0923 ~01l23 <1>838
25
••
0920 (£10928 (£11843
30 I. >e)g: 00934 <»1849
37 23 @0939
093
®1854
38

00941 00941 «>1856
41 ,. 0943 00943 ~ 1858
0943 0943 1900
8
30 $0952 00952 01906
53 33 00956 00956 (J)1910
62 3. 1005 1005 1918
7. 48 1!l1019 (J)1019 @1932
83 52 .. 55 1032 1032 194
5 5
!Il().42 @1042 (!)1953
101 63 (-) 1().49 (0) 1049 {:J) 1959
lOS .5 €I 1054 @1054 02000
112 69
1107 1107 2015
133 83
(!)1134 (!) 1134 <02040
139 o. Q) 1142 Q) 1142 02047
.

01151 @1151 @2055
155 .. $ 1201 (!)1201 i!l2104
170 OS
1215 1215 2117
• 9. 11 • «.12135
197 123 ®2142
208 129 @2154
225 0
@2211
SO
155 02236
263 184 2250
DnlUon ckt .ymbolH
C!I No prond PIS do bagages enreglslr6s.
Q) ~~~:r:~1 f(;od;,~~f~i;::!.~re ~e:a~7,rws~~ro,o
sur sIgnal aUl( gates Interm6dlar,:,s pour prendre los voYlgeu/S
quI se rendenlall-del. do SIe-Thtrtse.
(!) AuAt pour lalU8rvoyageurs venanldau-del1 do SIe-
Th6rtu.
@
SelVlt:eup6rimenlalenlreMonlrhIeILabelle.En
~~:~~~~ :~~~u~~O::~!:l~~~ 191B el du 9
~~ Arr.llacull.tII.
Auloralls cllmallsM.
Remarque
Pu de service de ,opas dans les trains.
.
HIUf. eM Iftl 112
Enllmllml Dlm./Sun.
Op
Montreal, Ou6 .• M 2100
Westmounl ….. ., … 2052
Monlreel·Ouest/W. 2045
Park Avenue 2032
(Jean-Talon)
202
Bordeaux
SI·Martln Jet: . @202O
Sle-Aose Cl/20.
Rosembre .
:~ .. ::::: Op
{f)2013
Ar St.-TIl. 2010
DpSI •• T~ril .. . .. 2010
Souchard .. i!l2002
St..Janvler C!l1958
SI..J~r6me ……. 1950
Shawbrldge . 0.938
Piedmont ….. 1929
Mont-Rolland 1923
Ste-Marguerlte C!) 1914
Val-Morin 01907
Val·Davld ·,903
Sie-Agatha 1855
SI·Faustin … 01830
MOHlson $1823
St-Jovlte . $1815
Monl-Trembiani·
.::
Dp
018()5
Ar Labelle 1752
Annonclallon : .. Q) 1732
L
acosle .. Nomlnlngue … (!l1716
La
c-5aguay . 01700
Barrette ………… 01636
Ar Mont·Laurier, Ou6. Dp 162&
EXplaMllon of r.I.nt:4 maolh
@ No chec:.ked baggage,
@ @
SIm./S,1.
2100
2052
0<5
203
(!)2024
02020
<£>2013
2010
20.0
0200
1!l1958
,.50
@1936
01929
1923
01903 1855
0
830
$ 1823
(I) 1815
(!)1805
~
(&I Wjll nol ClifTY pasungClrs between slaUons Montlut and Sto·ThOfhelnc:Iu.slvo.
ThLs Irllin will, however, nag slop IIllnt8fmedle.te stlliions to entrain
pas­
seng.rs who 118 going beyond 519-Th6,l!te.
(iJ Slops 10 dolral rtvonue passengers Irom polnls beyond
510 Th6,be.
In erlet:I during tho perIod hom July t to October 8,
191B and from O&eGmber 9,197810 Match IB, 1979.
• Air con
dition& -Windsor St.tlon.
No
mael service on trains.
CANADIAN
312
R A I L
CANADIAN RAIL HAS BEEN UN-SUCCESSFUL TO DATE IN OBTAINING
detailed information on the SANDFORD FLEMING eNs
new track inspection car. John Welsh caught the im­
pressive unit on the rear end of train 34 Ottawa-Montreal
on March 22,1978. Hopefully details will be forthcoming and
will be presented in a future issue.
CA NAD I AN
313
R A I L
WORK IS RAPIDLY NEARING COMPLETION ON THE SOUTHWESTERN EXTENSION
of the Montreal Metro which is due to open September 4,
1978. According to MUCTC spakesman Mr. George Gariepy
workmen are currently involved in track laying on the extension
of Line Number One and also on Line Number Two as far as Lionel
Groulx station, a new transfer point between the two lines. At
the same time the Metropolitan Transportation Bureau is busy
installing a modern automatic track control system, blocks being
divided into 600 foot or so lengths. Signal display is shown
in the control car cabs as opposed to earlier lines and equipment
where signals were only located on the walls of the tunnels.
The existing network is having its signalling system updated
at night when the Metro is not running and the original subway
cars are being modified as well. When work is completed all
track will be controlled by automatic track control as opposed
to the current automatic block signals.
A feature of the Line Number One extension will be a
Metro garage at the southwestern terminus of Angrignon Park,
the garage will have enough room for twenty nine car trains and
one track will be equipped with an inspection pit to effect
running repairs. Major work for cars on this line will be done
at the Honore Beaugrand shops which opened when Line Number One was
extended eastward in time for the Summer Olympics of 1976.
When all present construction on the Metro is completed
(on Lines One and Two) the MUCTC plans to segregate the original
1966 subway cars from the Bombardier cars delivered ten years
later. The original subway cars will be used on Lines One and
Four and will be maintained at the shops located near Honore
Beaugrand Station. The newer cars will be used on Line Two and
on the proposed Line Five connecting the northern section of
Line Two with western Montreal. These cars will be maintained
at the original subway shops at Cremazie. The reason for the
segregation is that the automatic couplers, although compatible
mechanically on the two different types of cars,do not mate
electrically so the operation has to be done manually, wasting
much time.
(Stephen Wray)
TROUTER TRAIN BACK ON TRACK WAS THE HEADING ON A STORY FROM
St. Johns late last May. Readers may wish to jot down
a reminder in their 1979 fishing diary, to ride the
St. Johns-Argentia special, revived three years ago as a tamer
version of a famous train that once carried anglers to their
favorite fishing spots. The original Trouters Special, started
by the former Newfoundland Railway in the 1930s, was a true
special in the sense that its sole purpose was to transport
anglers. CN maintained the special until 1962, then dropped
it as being uneconomic. This years train was a madified version
of trains 207-208/232, with three coaches and a baggage car.
Traditionally, the train operates May 24, and all available seats
are sold well in advance. Will some alert CRHA member please
alert us when it is known that the train will run in 1979.
The Editor of Canadian Rail
CANADIAN 314 R A I L
CANADIAN RAILWAY MUSEUM TO THE RESCUE~ IN MAY OF THIS YEAR,
after a very successful excursion to Grandmere, Quebec
CN officials in Montreal noticed that one of the tires
on the leading axle of the pilot truck of CNs only operating
steam locomotive 6060, was cracked. Obviously this would have
to be replaced before the scheduled excursion from Montreal ta
Ottawa could take place the following weekend. The problem
was where could a spare wheel set identical to those on 6060 be
found? They are certainly no longer stock items on the wheel
tracks in the average diesel shops~
After exhausting several other possibilities and being
unable to locate a suitable wheel set, CN officials contacted
Charles Dejean and Gord Hill of the C.R.H.A. and the Canadian
Railway Museum on Thursday. By Friday afternoon a suitable
wheel set had been located on CN 6153 at the museum, details
of an exchange had been finalized, and a CN crew was at the
Museum ready to do the exchange.
It was an interesting operation to watch. CN had
brought a 60 ton road-rail crane which was run onto the Museum
turntable. The turntable was then rotated away from the l~ad
track and 6153 was pushed down the lead track until its pilot
truck was over the turntable pit. The crane lowered the front
wheel set and then raised the wheel set from 6060 into position
on 6153. The crack in this wheel set had been previously spot
welded so that 6153 could still be moved about the Mus·eum. 6153 was
then pulled back onto the lead track and CN picked up the
good wheel set and departed. On Saturday, CN 6060 ran to Coteau
and back to test the new wheels, and on Sunday took the excursion
to Ottawa. Since then 6060 has resumed her normal summer runs
from Toronto to Niagara Falls, thanks to the Canadian Railway
Museums wheel set.
CANADIAN 315
~, ,t •
R A I L
All rail movements
at the Museum were
carried out by C.R.H.
crews and locomotives
CN 77 and Roberval
and Saguenay No. 20
Photographs
courtesy of
Hr. Charles DeJean.
CANADIAN
316 R A I L
STEPHEN (MINNESOTA) CELEBRATED 100 YEARS OF RAIL SERVICE OVER
the St. Boniface-St. Paul line by greeting a special
train from Winnipeg, July 1/78, sponsored by the
Midwestern Rail Association of Winnipeg in cooperation with
the Stephen Centennial Committee. Stephen, named after George
Stephen, late r Lord Mount Stephen, is some 40 mi 1 es s out h of
Emerson.
The train carried some 800 passengers on its return
trip, Winnipeg-Stephen-Winnipeg, using CP Rail power (diesel
units 8693 and 8490), CN and VIA coaches, and the CP Rail
business car Strathcona. It followed the route of the
Pembina Branch (St. Boniface-Emerson) and the connecting St.
& Pacific line (now Burlington Northern). Nick Andrusiaks
photo shows the Rail Heritage 100+1 Special at Emerson, Man.
~~ad~
tR~~ wid
~~&-atee
1U4eHU
§fRAIL HERITAGElf~
GJL!0UR -100 plus ill~
?Mbe~&~
~~~
.RECKERIOC<~ < S~, 190, ;t!~ SPuet,
<,< iII~, ;t! 3~ ()1t2 ,
@ <<, tel 943-7037
~ 7tdeu 4 Medt
MIDWESTERN RAIL ~. f ~
ASSOCIATION (1975) INC ….~ .
Box 18S~. Winnipeg, ManilOOa R3C 3RI ST PAUL
Paul
CANADIAN 317 R A I L
Next December 4th, the Midwestern Rail Association will
hold a centennial banquet at Winnipegs Fort Garry Hotel, to
celebrate passage from St. Boniface to St. Paul.
B.C. RAILWAYS 1977 CARLOADINGS AND REVENUES REACHED RECORD
levels in 1977, operating loss showed improvements, but
net loss was $58.3 million. Annual report showed
carloadings up 28 per cent from 1976. Capital budget for 1978
is $37 million including $18 million for upgrading the Fort
Nelson extension.
Work on the Fort Nelson line will proceed despite a
royal commission recommendation that it be shut down, according
to Premier William Bennett (Toronto Globe & Mail, May 30/78).
He said most of the upgrading will extend over the next three
years at a cost of between $35 million and $40 million. He
expects the federal government to share 50 per cent of the costs.
CP RAIL HAS BECOME THE FIRST CANADIAN RAILWAY TO USE A MOBILE
train analyzer/simulator for teaching train-handling
techniques to enginemen, reports CP Rail News. The
unit, which travels by road, is capable of visiting all areas
on the system. The analyzer is housed in a specially modified
Olsen-Kerbmaster truck. The training area of the mobile unit
seats seven people including a supervisor. It holds a locomotive
control panel, a telex machine, a keyboard about the size of an
office calculator to tie in with the computer, a mi~i-computer
and a cathode-ray tube monitor. The system can duplicate anything
from a single engine unit and a caboose to a 200 car unit train
with remote control slave engines.
CANADIAN RAILWAY THEME STAMPS HAVE BEEN CATALOGUED BY MEMBERS
of CRHAs Toronto & York Division. The May/78 issue
of The Turnout has a detailed list prepared by Earl
Barr, of the twelve known stamps, plus one of Newfoundland
(pre-Confederation). The Canadian issues begin with the 1851 3
pence red designed by Sandford Fleming and end with the 1977
.12¢ brown which shows Sir Sandford.
GORD TAYLOR OF LONDON , ONTARIO SENDS ALONG THESE THREE PHOTOS
of recently outshopped units from General Motors Diesel.
GO Transit F 40 PH road number 515 is pictured from
outside the plant area and is the last of an order recently
placed for units with the new body style. CN switcher 1267 had
just picked the units up for transfer to Toronto on May
31, 1978 when Gord took the picture. In June CP Rail took
delivery of two new SD-40-2 s # 5785 -5786. Note the ditch
lights which have become standard equipment on GMD units for
CP Rail. On June 22 that same unit 5785 was sanded for the
first time and later that same evening left for her first run­
in on a light freight. Our thanks to Gord Taylor for being
, johnny on the spot and submitting these current photos.
The un~mistokable touch of Jim Shaughnessy is evident in this
night tiMe shot of CPR Budd Cor 9023 switching in the Glen Yard
passenger focility.

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