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Canadian Rail 318 1978

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Canadian Rail 318 1978

Canadian Rail ~
No. 318
JULY 1978

COVER PHOTO:
Just another CN passenger special
you say! Not quite, our July cover sports
an excellent
sho~ of the first ever passenger
traln to operate in Canadas
Northwes t Territori es as taken
by Peter Lofthouse. The Inukshuk
E~press is idling at the Hay
Rlver depot awaiting the high­ball for Pine Point,
N.W.T.
OPPOS ITE:
The happy anxious faces of children are evident,
as many of
them had never seen let alone
rode on a conventional passenger
train. This was the picture of a typical departure
from the Hay
Ri ver Depot.
ISSN 0008 -4875
Published monthly by The Canadian
Railroad Historical Association
P.O. Box 22, Station B
Montreal Quebec Canada H3B 3J5
EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
EDITOR EMERITUS: S. S. Worthen
BUSINESS CAR: John Welsh
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germani uk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN
L. M. Unwin, Secretary
1727 23rd Ave. N.W., Calgary Alberta
T2M lV6
OTTAWA
D. E. Stoltz, Secretary
P. O. Box 141, Station A, Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8Vl
PACIFIC COAST
R. Keillor, Secretary
P. O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2Pl
ROCKY MOLINTAIN
C. K. Hatcher, Secretary
P. O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Al berta T5B 2NO
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
J. C. Kyle, Secretary
P. O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto Ontario
M5W 1 P3
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
R. Ballard, Sr., Secretary
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor,
Ontario N9G lA2

INUKSHUK
EXPRESS····
FIRST PASSENGER-TRAIN IN THE N:W. T.

CJattering across the W~st Cha{)n~l Bridg.e from Old Town (V~le Islcina)
into New To-wn,(l:!a,y Rive:r) I ,Peter caught 4345 at:ld tra-inill a inemor-
~ble Arctic foetting.
¥. , .,
. .. , ,, ,,
, i;,
/~ J
:,: [
. t-
~.p
.11
••
INUKSHUK EXPRESS
FIRST PASSENGER TRAIN IN THE N. W. T.
We had hoped for a sunny, clear day but the ~orninq was
d a r.l p, col dan d 0 ve rca 5 t a 5 ny ~,; f e and I boa r de d the I n u k 5 h u k [x –
press at Hay River bound for Pine Point. The Te~perature was
-2loC. and a chill wind blew from the frozen surface of Great Slave
Lake. Vie had dri ven the 500 km from our home in Yel 1 o~/klli fe the
previous day, expecially for this ride on the Great Slave Lake
Ra i 1 way.
The
bleakness outside, however, was soon put aside. The
inside of the train was warm, clean and comfortable and the crew,
composed that morning of Engineer George Klem, Conductor Con
Wolansky, Trainr,lan llennis Jlerbison, a friendly C.iLR. cleaner and
Arctic Winter Games representative Angus Mills, gave us a cheery
greeting. While waiting for departure at 08:00 hours, the crew
kindly provided SOlOle of the information for this article.
The train was headed by a regular Great Slave Lake Rail­
way lOCoMotive Nt. 434S (GR-17z,G.M.,l9t9) followed by steam heat­
ing unit tlo. 15436 and coaches 5187, 5216 and 5286 -all in C.J/.R.
colours. A second stand-by, steam heating unit was brought north
with the coaches from Edmonton on March lG. Although never re­
quired, this second steam heating was incorporated into the train
on the second and final weekend of operation -probably because
this stand-by was in V.I.A. colours and gave V.I.A. some good
pub 1 i ci ty north of 60
0
rl!
C.N.R. provided the train as a courtesy gesture to the
Arctic !4inter Games Committee for the period of the Games (/larch
19-25) for the transportation of athletes and supporters between
the Games co-host communities of Hay River and Pine Point.
In
addition to the train, C.N.R. provided two train crews and
other personnel support. One trai n crel/ was provi ded from the
Hay River roster; the other from Roma Junction, the principal depot
on the G.S.L. Railway. Support staff included two coach cleaners,
a machinist, master mechanic and foreman -all from Edmonton. The
crews and support staff worked well to ensure that all schedules
were met throughout the week and fortunately no serious problems
were experienced with the equipment.
The name Inukshuk Express was taken from the Official
symbol of the fifth Arctic Ilinter Games. These Games are held bi-(
ennia11y for athletes fron the N.~I.T., Yukon, Alaska, ilorthern
Quebec and Labrador. Iiorthern sports are a key element of these
Games. In Illukshuk is a man-shaped, piled-rock, type marker built
by Inuit to facilitate navi~ation over tundra landscapes (or so it
is thought).
Hay Ri~er and Pine Point are both located on the south
shore of Great Slave lake, sone 90 km apart. Jlay River is the
CANADIAN
199
R A I L
pri nci pa 1 base 0 f tile ;Iorthern Trans porta t i on Company, a Cro~ln
Cor p 0 rat ion 0 f fer i n g VI ate r t ran s p 0 r t do VI nth e r.1 i 9 h t Y fj a c ken z i e
River and alonq the fllctic Coast; Pine Point if a lead-zinc mining
town. The G.S:L. Raihlay vias constructed in the early 1960s to
carry the lead-zinc concentriltes south to Trail, B.C., for smelt­
inC] and to carry goods to Hay Ri ver for the annual re-supply of
the ;jorth.
Promptly at the scheduled hour of 08:00, the train pull­
ed out of Hay Rivers old town yards, slipped by the airport, a-
c r 0 s s Ii est C han n e 1 and a r r i ve d a t f~ e VI T OVI nat 08: 07 . If ere the
majority of passenaers boarded from a temporary platform adjacent
to the Mackenzie Highway. The train was moving alain by 08:15 and
we continued smoothly towards Pine Junction, approximately 10
kilorletres south of Hay f the Juncti on, then, vie vlere off aga in, ac ros s the f~ackenz i e Ililh­
way, the Hay River Gorge, and into open countrv.
This is to certify that
has travelled between Hay River, N.W.T. and Pine Point, N.W.T. aboard the
INUKSHUK EXPRESS
FIRST PASSENGER TRAIN IN THE N. W. T.
5TH ARCTIC WINTER GAMES / MARCH 19-25, 1978
/ ~ Tlcklt ff// 0
_~ p 7;L7/Jo.rvvv,.
D,M. Stewart, Mayor of Hay River $2.00 J.J. Morin, Mayor of Pine Point
The countryside between Hay River and Pine Point is
somewhat similar to that of Northern Quebec and Northern Ontario,
with stands of birch, black spruce and scrub willow inter-laced.
Because of recent snowfalls, the colours were all black and white
as you looked out of the steamy window. There are no significant
grades on the track which closely parallels the road. There are
a nUPlber of trestles enroute and a substantial brillge over the
Buffalo River. The train moved along at a sedate 50-60 km/h.
Inside the train, the concession stand was busy selling
food, drinks and memorabilia. For many, especially the children,
t his VI a s the i r fir s t rid eon.. a t r a in. rio s t p e 0 p 1 e k n el the ro ute,
so passenger interest tended to be focused within the train -the
cheery decorations, seat configurations, the conductor and, of
course, fellovi passengers and 1 oca 1 goss i p.
The train arrived at the Pine Point Y at 09:35 and re­
versed via the Y into a temporary station at P.ine Point. Ilere
athletes were met by buses and trilnsported two kilometres to the
sports arena.
CANADIAN
200
R A I L
.. J
-, -;
[
Both the locomotive, as well as the steam gennie carried the Arctic
Winter Games logo, it was also applied to the coaches leaving no
doubt as to the special duty of the train.
CANADIAN
202
R A I L
My wife and I remained on the train for the return jour­
ney which departed Pine Point at 10:30 hours, arriving Hay River
Old To~tn at 12:17 hours. The return journey involved a reversal
on the Pine Junction yo with a resulting ten-kilometre ride fac­
ing backwards into Hay River and many shrill whistles from the
front-end coach as we approached crossings.
Thus, an ambition to ride a train in the N.W.T. had been most
satisfactorily achieved. HO~lever, the ride on the train did
not constitute the end of our interest. We chased the train, by
road, to several scenic places on the final weekend of operation
and observed it many times from our hotel in Hay River. Our final
view was on Sunday, March 26. We were enroute Pine Point -Hay
River, by road, travelling parallel to the tracks, when the train
appeared around a corner; silently in the snow, gliding by us.
Bernie Plaquin of C.N.R., Hay River and President of
the In u k shu k Ex pre s s has bee n mo s the 1 p f u 1 i Ii pro v i din 9 b a c k­ground
information for this article and also the statistics shown below
in the table.
DATE
tla rch 18
March 19
March 20
March 21
March 22
March 23
t1a rc h 24
~la rc h 25
TABLE 1
INUKSHUK EXPRESS
IWf1[JEll OF
RC}O il 0 TRTPS PASSENGERS
85
2 162
3* 467
3*
5110
3* 700
3* 752
3* 756
3
1 ,010
RE i,rARKs
Athletes
Athletes
0

Athletes &
Athletes &
Athletes
0
u
Athletes &
Athletes &
Athletes
Ma rch 26 2 Work trains
* Hay River depart 03:00, 15:00 and 21:30 hours.
Pine Point depart 10:30, 17:3U and 23:30 hours.
Ticket Pric~: $2.00
VIPs
PulJlic
Public
Public
Public
Public
The seating capacity on the train was approximately lBO
seats. The Inukshuk Express co~pleted 23 round trips, offerred
8,280 seats and carried 4,472 passengers which represents a load
factor of 54% – a most creditable performance in view of the fact
that little advertising or sales was undertaken outside the co­
host communities of Hay River-Pine Point.
CANADIAN 203 R A I L
At the Pine Point Depot the athletes were met by school bus for
transport to the site of the games.
CANADIAN
204
R A I L
Traffic grew rapidly during the week, with March 24
being the peak day and the afternoon departure from Hay River
being the peak train. Athletes constituted 709 of the 4,472 pas­
sengers or 16%, the balance being VIPs and the public.
In the finest tradition of frontier trains the inaugural
champagne trip of VIPs on t,1arch 19 ~Ias held up by masked ban­
dits riding ski-doos. The bandits stole an untold amount of cham­pagne and 1
eft the Comroli ss i oner of the N. .l. T., Stua rt Hodgson, and
the Federal Minister for Amateur Sport, lona Campagnolo, hand­
cuffed together. Former Governor-General Roland Michener delight­
ed in telling this story over eBe radio!
The train played a key role in making the Fifth Arctic
Winter Games a success. The train eventually departed the .W.T.
as part of a regular freight on March 27, leaving behind many fond memories and
memorabilia such as first day envelopes and Inuk­
shuk Express tickets.
Tail end view at Pine Point, N.W.T., note the special reversing head­
light to provide illumination during the reverse moves required. All
photos courtesy Mr.Peter Lofthouse of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories.
CANADIAN R A I L
One of the two sets of crews which operated the Inukshuk Express
poses for their picture for Canadion Rail.
DEEP CUT
Text by S.S. Horthen Pictures by Philip Mason
The images which are evoked by the title of Marcel
Prousts remarkable book of the first part of the Twentieth
Century, which was translated admirably into the English language
as Rem e bra n c e s 0 f T h i n g sPa s t , tog e t h,: r wit has mal leo 1 lee t ion
of pictures by Philip Mason, taken with a ne~1 camera on a hot day
in late July, 1966, made the writer wonder about the significance
of the photos and their relevance to modern Canadian railways and
the current crop of railway buffs.
The two pictures which begin Philips sequence were
taken at the Canadian Pacific Railway station at Westmount, Quebec, and
are a preface to the real location of this essay. The train
arrivals board (standard time) was considerably more optimistic
than it is in 1977, on the eve of VIA Rail Canada. Just imagine!
There was a Delaware & Hudson night train from Albany and Hew
York, in addition to the day express. Are the train numbers
mystifying? They may have been Numuers 221 and 223 north of
Delson, Quebec, but they were Numbers 9 and 35 on the D & H. From
New York City to Albany, the-then New York Central identified them
as Train 35, The Iroquois, New York to Buffalo, and Train 51,
the Empire State Express, New York to Buffalo, Cleveland and
Chicago, and to Detroit via Train 351 from Buffalo, via Fort
Erie, Welland, St. Thomas and Windsor.
This kind of wool-gathering is not the way to Deep Cut.
Under the waiting-room window at Westmount, the order
of the train departure boards plainly stated that Train 204 for
Sherbrooke had already left, while Train l, the Canadian -what used
to be described as the pride of the Fleet, when there was
a fleet -would be along shortly at 1:36 p.m., not 14:36, thank
you! She would take six minutes to come up the hill from Hindsor
Station, Montreal.
If fact, it was via the Canadian that Philip reached
Deed Cut.
(
I
CANADIAN
207
R A I L
This was the train arrivals board as it appeared on July 30, 1966 at
Canadian Pacifics Westmount, Quebec station. As expected the arrival
board still exists, but the entries thereon are greatly reduced.

CA NAD IAN
210
R A I L
To where?
To Deep Cut, and dont expose your ignorance by saying
that you never heard of it! But lets be reasonable: if you are
among the current crop of fans, you can hardly be blamed, for Deep
Cut, along with its associated accessories, disappeared shortly
after July 31,1966, when it was officially closed and its use­
fulness was said to have ended.
It is fairly easy to discover Deep Cuts location.
It had to be near a main-line station, shared by Canadian National
and Canadian Pacific Railways, and on the route of the Canadian
westbound. And it had to be sufficiently near Montreal so that
you could leave that city at 14:36 daylignt saving time and arrive
at Deep Cut with plenty of sun left to take pictures.
Yes, youre right. Just east of the-then Union Station
in Ottawa, the Nations capital. Union Station still stands,
just across Rideau Street from the Chateau Laurier. Th~ under­
ground inclined tunnel still leads from the former statlon con­
course to the 10~ler level of the hotel.
Deep Cut was the operating point where the Canadian
National and Canadian P-acific entered 011 the joint trackage into
Union Station. In the last of the trio of Philips pictures pre­
sented here, the operator may be observed standing on the cabin
steps, while the CN afternoon train for Montreal accelerated to­
wards the switch which would swing the consist south towards
Maxville, Alexandria and Coteau. Had it been a CPR train, it
would have kept straight on to Hurdman and the M&O for Montreal.
The right-hand track ill the picture, sometimes iden­
tified as the CPRs line into Union Station, was in fact a natural
extension of that companys main line from Hurdman, the crossing
at grade with the Sussex Subdivision of the CPR, on the east bank
of the Rideau River. The lIurdman-Union Station line was the
second track from the east bank of the Rideau Canal until the
first track from the canal swung over at the semaphore signal to
join it for the final approach to the station: something less
than 500 metres from the position in the trainshed where all
trains stopped. As the sign on the semaphore mast said, it was
the end of two tracks; notice that it did NOT say end of double
track.
Now that we have resolved the where of Deep Cut, it
is only reasonable that we should consider the why. A look at
the geography of the area around this railway location fails com­p 1 e
tel y to fin dan y r i s e in the 1 and t h ro ugh w hie h a c u t 0 f any
dimension would have to be excavated. So, to explain this
description, we must turn to another man-made transportation
artery in the immediate vicinity, the Rideau Canal.
In his most interesting description of this early water­
transport route, Dr. Robert Legget provides the following expla­
nation:
But construction (of the Rideau Canal •. Ed.) has so
completely changed the entire landscape in this locality
that little is to be gained by even trying to imagine
the land as it used to be. The Canal is now a very
CANADIAN 211 R A I L
. ~,
This was the operators cabin at Deep Cut, located about 1 mile east
of the-then Union Station, Ottawa.
CANADIAN
212
R A I L
narrow channel indeed, bounded on the right-hand side
by the wide approach to what used to be a fine railway
station, and on the other by a steeply sloping bank,
graced once again with garden plots. The steep bank is
the only reminder today that we are passing through
the part which used to be known as The Deep Cut, the
name being descriptive of the heavy excavation which
had
here to be carried out in treacherous clay.
As the only legitimate heir to the legacy bequeathed by
water transport, the railway, in this case the Canada Atlantic,
could hardly be censured. From about the first of June, 1832 to
the first of August, 1966, the excavation through the steeply
sloping bank of treacherous clay in this borough of Ottawa was
thus memorialized -one hundred and thirty-four years, and one month.
Today, scarcely a trace of Deep Cut remains. The cabin,
semaphore signal, the two tracks and all the other tracks are
long gone. So is the multi-stalled roundhouse (CN) and the gas
works at Nicholas Street, faintly visible in the background of
picture number 5. What was that sturdy brick building behind
the cabin at Deep Cut? It resembles one of the many brick
armoury buildings which were built by the Department of National
Defence in so many Canadian cities in the interval between the
two World Wars. The reader is invited to inspect picture number
3, and ponder.
In picture number 4, theres no mistaking Colonel Bys
extraordinary accomplishment, the Rideau Canal, and in the back­
ground, the tall chimney of the station heating plant, mingled
with the towers and turrets of that most royal of hotels, the
Chateau Laurier. Theres also no mistaking the lazy-worm CN on
the front of the diesel in picture number 5. The paint scheme of
the passenger cars (picture numbers 4 and 5) -as well as that
of the FP 9A Number 6527 -wont be the same a year from today.
In fact, its likely than many of the coaches in the yard in 1966
are already clattering about in the blue of VIA Rail Canada.
And a year or two from today, well all have a better
idea if VIA Rail Canada is making it, and how its making it!
And Deep Cut will have receded further into history,
while the civic lawnmowers and snowblowers manicure the smooth
slopes and parkways where once the switchlights gleamed and the
car-knockers made their musical progress, Du C5t~ de Coez Denald
Gordon, with apologies to Proust.
CANADIAN 213
.~J,I
trl~
R A I L
. i …
. . .-
I
,
The semaphore slgnal governing the switch where the two tracks to
and from Union Station became a single track leading into the stat­
ion. The Rideau Canal can be seen at the left of the photo.
CANADIAN
214
R A I L
Recommended Reading:
RIDEAU WATERWAY
Legget, Robert Revised edition 1972
ISBN 0-8020-6156-7 16 b&w i11us.,
237 pp. text & tables University of
Toronto Press, Toronto, Ontaria-1972.
RAILWAYS IN OTTAWA TODAY
Stoltz, Douglas E. Canadian Rail
Number 165, April, 1965 pp. 50-56.
Canadian Railroad Historical Association.
OTTAWA UNION STATION CLOSES
Lava11~e, O.S. Canadian Rail
Number 179, July-August, 1966, pp. 138-160.
Canadian Railroad Historical Association.
–,. :.,
… ~.:.: .. -, .
. .
.: . .-
The Canadian National Railways afternoon express for Montreal with
FP 90 Number 6527 on the head-end and a chair-car on the rear, accel­
erates through Deep Cut, and over the switch leading to the Alexan­
dria Subdivision.
The· … ~ •.
business car
ADVANCE NOTICE OF 48 HOURS ON SHIPMENTS OF HIGH VALUE IS NOW SOUGHT
by Canadas railways which report substantial losses with
various shipments because they were not aware of the exceptional
high value or fragility of such shipments. According to the Canadian
Manufocturers Association (Transportation Circular 4672), a pro­
posed new section to Rule 3 of the Canadian Freight Classification
would r.e.,!uire 48 hours prior notice when the value of a shipment
exceeds $300,000 per freight car or $150,000 per trailer or container.
NICK ANDRUSIAK WAS THE ALERT PHOTOGRAPHER WHO SNAPPED THE WINNIPEG
Rail Heritage 100 picture which appeared in our Jan/78 issue,
page 24. Thanks, Nick.
AMTRAKS PERFORMANCE IN TWO CATEGORIES IS SHOWN IN THE NATIONAL
Railway Bulletin (NRHS), Vol. 43, No.1. Here are excerpts
as they cover Canadian-interest operations.
On-time performance
Seattle-Vancouver
New York-Montreal
Washington-Montreal
Total fo~ Amtrak system
Passengers Carried
Seattle-Vancouver
New York-Montreal
Washington-Montreal
*Jan. to Sept. inclusive
Per Cent on time
September 1977
86.7
33.3
70.0
68.9
1977*
65,280
59,950
87,520
1976*
28,200
43,190
85,210
BISTRO CAR ON THE CNR, A MUSICAL SHOW WHICH OPENED IN NEW YORK
in March, received unflattering reviews by the critics. Quotes
from the New York Times: The train is supposed to be an
express that used to run between Toronto and Montreal, but the show
CANADIAN
216
R A I L
might just get by on the BMT in a blizzard … The four performers
pretend to be performing on the cabaret cars last trip but the
audience has to pretend even harder … The whole thing should be
towed away -it cannot possibly move under its own power. By
contrast, On the Twentieth Century which opened earlier on
Broadway continues to draw good crowds. Oldsters will remember
the 1934 film version with John Barrymore and Carole Lombard, in
hilarious black-and-white.
JUMBO RAIL TANK CARS WILL HAVE TO BE EQUIPPED WITH NEW SAFETY
equipment is U.S. Government administration officials push
through new regulations following recent accidents involving
cars of dangerous chemicals. Under present rules, that nations
22,000 jumbos must be auipped with improved couplers by July/79
and with front and rear crash shields and thermal insulJtion by
Dec. 31/81. The National Transportation Safety Boord has recommended
that both couplers and shields be in place on all such cars by the
end of 1978, reports the New York Times of April 8/78. No word
from Ottawa on what action, if any, will be token in Canada.
SOUTHERN PACIFIC ENGINEERS WALKED OFF THEIR JOBS FOR A DAY
(Dec. 16/77) to protest unsafe working conditions due to
violence and vandalism along the tracks. A district court
judge then ordered the railroad to toke steps to ensure the safety
of the 400 men. Their union had reported that over a three month
period, 15-25 engineers had suffered eye injuries, back injuries,
broken ribs and psychological problems as a result of work-related
problems. The jud,ge ordered the railroad to provide crash helmets
and safety goggle. for ~he engineers, although the men need not
wear them.
(Los Angeles Herold Examiner, Dec. 17/77)
TIMETABLE FANCIERS WILL BE INTERESTED IN TWO VIA ISSUES WHICH
appeared last Oct. 30 (sorry were late reporting this). They
are folders (4 pages, 3t x 6t) identified as STL-ll-77
(Montreal-Ottawa) and STL-IO-77 (Montreal-Quebec). Both show
service only over CN lines but this information is not provided.
The unwary traveller is not told that CN stations are used at the
three points (Montreal, Dorval, Quebec) which CP Rail also serves,
with its own stations. The Montreal-Ottowa folder shows a VIA
diesel on the cover but the same diesel (6524) appears on the
Montreal-Quebec folder bearing the CN logo on its nose. While
quantities last, you can have a copy of each folder by sending a
stamped self-addressed envelope to John Welsh, 1050 Sixth Ave.,
Dorval, Quebec, H9S IH9.
ALL ABOARD FOR RADIO SHACK -THE TANDY CORP., OWNERS OF THE RADIO
S hack store chain, operates the only privately-owned subway
in the United States, notes Pacific News (Feb./78). The
Tandy Center subway in FOct Worth,Texas, will soon get six new cars
created from ports of Washington, D.C. PCC cars. These will run on
the parking lot to downtown subway, originally constructed in the
early 1960 s by Leonards Department Store. Present rehabilitation
of the system is prompted by the opening by Tandy of on eight-block
development in downtown Fo~th Worth.
CANADIAN
217
R A I L
CANADIAN NATIONAL HAS DELIVERED TO MATAGAMI, QUEBEC THE FIRST OF 16
turbine rotors for the LG-2 complex of the James Bay Energy Corp.
The turbine rotor is 20 2 in diameter and weights 115 tons.
A special 8 axle flotcar owned by the Energy Corporation was used to
transfer the rotor from Longue Pointe where it was cast to Sorel
where it was machined, then on to Matagami where it was off loaded
on to a special truck for the final leg of the journey. In addition to
this special load, CN has been very active in the general transportation
to the site by hauling fuel, explosives, steel, cement, and numerous
ather requirements.
( CN s K e e pin g T r a c k)
ALSO FROM SOUGH OF THE BORDER COMES A REPORT THAT MORRISON-KNUDSEN
Co. is preparing to challenge GM and GE for a slice of the
diesel locomotive market. The Idaho construction and engineer­
ing firm already has four units, designated TE70-4S, testing on
Southern Pacific tracks. They use a Swiss-made diesel engine from
Sulzer Bros., a car body that allows easier access to working parts,
and a German cooling system that works in proportion to the engines
speed. Meanwhile, GMs EMD folks are testing their new GP40X, said
to cost abaut 10 per cent less than a comparable SDP40, yet deliver
500 hp more.
(Business Week, April 10/78)
CANADIAN
218
R A I L
CNS KEEPING TRACK REPORTS THE USE OF A LEASED LORAM 36-STONE
rail grinder to remove rail corrugation – a relatively recent
problem for track engineers. The machine has already seen
service on the Mountain Region. The fully self-contained, self­
propelled unit removes corrugations from the rails while operating
at a saeed of two miles an hour. Between work locations, the
machin~ can travel at 35 mph. Corrugation has become a more evident
and serious problem since the introduction of high h.p. diesel
locomotives and the operation of longer and heaver unit trains.
THE ACI SYSTEM OF ROLLING STOCK IDENTIFICATION IS EXPECTED TO
disappear following an extensive review by railways in Canada
and the U.S.A. This system uses the familiar multi-colored,
striped rectangular panel to trigger automatic identification
equipment for checking and recard purposes. Queried by Canadian
Rail, The Railway Association of Canadas executive secretary,
R.E. Wilkes, wrote (April 7/78) that in summary, it can be said
that disappointing experience with ACI since its introduction;
failure of anticipated economic and operating benefits to materialize;
competition for capital from investment opportunities with greater
potential; all contributed to the consensus of Canadian and U.S.
railways to terminate, effective January 1, 1978, the application
of ACI labels to railway rolling stock. It is, of course, the
prerogative of individual companies to continue the use of ACI on
their own property, if it suits their purpose to do so.
CLASSES FOR PROFESSIONAL RAILFANS WERE OFFERED BY SOUTHERN
Pacific in Los Angeles during March-April-May 1978, according
to Wheel Clicks (Pacific Railroad Society Inc.). The classes,
to be taught by SP s district training supervisor or district super­
intendent and an SP engineer, cover field etiquette and safety,
rights of the railroad, hand signals for communication of hazards
to the crew, prevention of rock throwing and vandalism, and the
taking of unique photos and where to take them. Also planned were
hands-on experience with locomotive simulators, and some theory
and description of the finer points of railroading. Vists to area
yards and servicing facilities plus opportunity to operate a diesel
were also included.
CANADIAN
219
R A I L
TRANSPORT MINISTER OTTO LANGS APRIL ANNOUNCEMENT THAT THE FEDERAL
~overnment plans to spend $5-million to help provide STOL
~short take off and landing) air service between Toronto­
Montreal-Ottawa predictably brought a spirited response from critics
of S T OL, fro mop p 0 n e n t s toT 0 ron t 0 I s I and air po r t ex pan s ion, and
from proponents of VIA Rail service in this triangle. The $5-million
would go to upgrade the small but conveniently located Toronto Island
airport. Additional millions would be required to subsidize the pro­
duction of the Dash-7 aircraft, built by government-subsidized de
Havilland Aircraft of Canada. Transport 2000 president Harry Gow
said that STOL flights from Toronto would cream off the profitable
business travellers from VIA. Via has enough troubles without the
Ministry of Transport funding every possible competitor from the
start, particularly in VIAs best territory, according to a Canadian
Press report (April 22/78).
BCR EXTENSION -THE ROYAL COMMISSION ENQUIRING INTO THE AFFAIRS OF
the British Columbia Railway has recommended that its money­
losing, $190-million Fort Nelson extension be terminated as
soon as possible, to save $60-million to $70-million during the next
five years. Termination of the line between Fort Nelson and Fort
St. John should not be later than this spring when substantial repair
work on the line was to start, the commission said. Its report said
the extension will show an operating loss of $5.4 million for 1978.
(Toronto Globe & Mail, April 14/78)
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS HAS DEVELOPED A NEW CUPOLA LESS CABOOSE
for use in terminal and transfer service. CN 76500 is the proto­
type for the new units and toured the terminals of Toronto,
Vancouver, Edmonton and Montreal. Pierre Patenaude pictured the
new caboose at Montreal Yard on 31 July 1977.
CANADIAN
220
R A I L
THOSE NEW TORONTO STREETCARS THAT YOU HAVE BEEN READING ABOUT IN
Canadian Roil were transported from the Port of Montreal
to the City of Toronto aboard a special flatcar laid with
TTC gouge roils. ( 4 10 7/8 ) The flatcar and load was care­
fully hauled to Toronto by special movement taking approximately
eight hours to make the trip.
C.P. Rail News.
BANGOR & eAR005TOOK MUST PAY DAMAGES OF$176,O@0 TO MAINE CENTeRAl
and $87,000 to Boston and Maine, plus interest, for illegally
diverting some 24,000 freight cars annually from a Maine
Central -B&M route to a CP Rail route via Brownville Junction.
This ruling by the Interstate Commerce Commission (U.S.) was upheld
by the U.S. First Circuit Court of Appeals in April/78. The ICC
said Bangor & Aroostook had indicated its deliberate attempt to
divert traffic from Maine Central and Boston and Maine by preparing
and distributing route guides which showed only the Canadian line
and recommended to shippers that CP was the best service route
despite known difficulties caused by winter weather, reports the
Bangor News.
INFLATION NORWITHSTANDING, YOU (AND YOUR FAMILY AND FRIENDS) CAN
get a full helping of Histor~-Nostalgia-Discovery at the
Canadian Railway Museum. Thl.s summer, remember to include a
visit in your vacation plans or weekend outings. Starting May 13,
the Museum will be open daily ( 9 to 6 ) until Labor Day; then on
Saturdays and Sundays through October 29. Need we remind you that
youll see two exhibit buildings filled with more than 100 of the
best and most varied pieces of equipment to be found on the continent.
And in the Hays Building, a model railway that will make you drool.
Street cor and caboose rides are offered on Sundays throughout the
season. And much more. No admission charge for CRHA members;
regular members may include their immediate families at no charge.
Special rates for groups. Regular rates for adults -$2.50, for
children $1.25, and for on entire family, only $6.50. The Museum
is located less than 10 miles from downtown Montreal, on St. Pierre
Street, in St. Constant.
CA NAD I AN
221
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~.
–~
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RICK SHANTLER OF OUR VANCOUVER BRANCH
of rail happenings in and around
4074 and 1411, locomotives being
departure of the CANADIAN on October
R A I L
T
SENDS US THESE TWO PICTURES
Vancouver, B.C. CP Rail
serviced for the evening
1, 1977.
.
In the second photo we see the five ex-American Freedom Train
cars numbered 201 to 205 at the British Columbia Railways North
Vancouver yard. The cars were open for public display on September
25, 1977.
CANADIAN 222 R A I L

PIERRE PATENAUDE HAS BEEN BUSY OF LATE PHOTOGRAPHING INDUSTRIAL
power in and around the Montreal area and has been kind
eno:l9h to s~h.mit t-he following fouP phot=·,for presentation
in Canadian Rail. First we see ASEA, a major electric transformer
manufacturers 45 tonner. Formerly of Sidbec Doseo this GE unit
carries seriel nimber 28462 and was pictured at Varennes, Quebec
on 14 October, 1977.
This obscure unit is none other than Dominion Limes 35 ton Whit­
comb, seriel number 60002 and was built in 1937. Photographed
at Lime Ridge, Quebec this 200 HP unit was pictured on 16 September
1977 •

,

..
The AsbestQS and Danville Railway has purchO$ed 3 Southern Pacific
Aleo 5-6 s roted at 1000HP each. Pictured is No. 54 believed to
be e~ SP 1238, seriel 81812. The photograph was token at Asbestos,
o.uebec on 16 Septe.,ber, 1977.
Independent Cement (Cimenh Independonts) of Joliette, Quebec 1105
purchosed ex CP 6622 and still bears the some number let alone 0
ulti_~ork on the cob side. Pierre caught the unit at Jo!ielte,
P.O. on 14 October, 1977. Our thanks to Pierre Potenaude for rem­
ellbering Canodian Roil in his trovels.

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