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Canadian Rail 314 1978

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Canadian Rail 314 1978

Canadian Rail i

COVER PHOTO:
Freight Extra 202 North,
descending the 2% grade
into the Peace River Valley
in 1976. Photo courtesy Mr.
George H. France of Peace
River, Alberta.
OPPOSITE:
The B LUE TRAI N was North­
ern Albertas Nos. 1 and 2 between Edmonton and
Dawson
Creek, so named because of
its longtime blue with gold
trim color scheme. NARs
name train was caught with
Pacific Type 4-6-2 No. 161
on the head end back in the
hey-day of steam. 161 is an
ex-CPR G-2 class No. 2563
who completed her working
1 i fe on the NAR. Photo
courtesy Northern Alberta
Rai lways.
ISSN 0008 -4875
Published monthly by The Canadian Railroad Historical Association
P.O. Box 22, Station B Montreal
Quebec Canada H3B 3J5
EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
EDITOR EMERITUS: S. S. Worthen
BUSINESS CAR: John Welsh
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN
L. M. Unwin, Secretary
1727 23rd Ave. N.W., Calgary Alberta
T2M lV6
OTTAWA
D. E. Stoltz, Secretary
P. O. Box 141, Station A, Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8Vl
PACIFIC COAST
R. Keillor, Secretary
P. O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2Pl
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
C. K. Hatcher, Secretary
P. O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Al berta T5B 2NO
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
J. C. Kyle, Secretary
P. O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto Ontario
M5W lP3
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
R. Ballard, Sr., Secretary
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor, Ontario
N9G lA2

. SixfyYears
.TolhePeace
191671976 by Geo~ France
P,~ac~ Rive.I.Aib.erta, sometim.e Jon the. early. 1930 5 judging .from
.. t:he vintage auto!1lobiles pre,sent a:s-the :vic~-regal train probd.b1y -.,
carryingtne Earl of Beesbolough pulls up at thes±ation Photo
courtesy of tlieNoithern Alberta Railway Company_
Sixty Years
TaThe Peace
1916-1976 by George France
Around about 10:10 A.M. on a September morning in 1976,
Extra 202 north of tH~ Northern Alberta Rai 1 ways ~hi s t 1 ed for the
Judah Hill crossing, rolled across the Heart River trestle and
whistled yet again for the Grouard Hill crossing. Then, the lone
GP 9 in the grey, yellow and blue-black livery of the Northern
Alberta Railways drifted down the side of the escarpment into the
town of Peace River, Alberta with the thrice-weekly way-freight
from McLennan (mile 261.5 from Edmonton), through Peace River
(mi 1 e 311.4) and Grimsha~1 (mi 1 e 328.1), on the way to Hines Creek
at mile 376.2, the end of the subdivision.
When Number 202 brought its train into Peace River, sixty
years of railway service to Peace River Crossing was completed.
To commemorate the Diamond Jubilee of railway service to
Peace River, the Towns Centennial Museum and the Sir Alexander
Mackenzie Historical Society jointly commissioned the construction
of a rubber-tyreo locomo·tive and four cars, the latter being in
the form of floats, to participate in t~e parade of Peace
Rivers Agricultural Fair on August 17, 1976.
This rare photo of the ED&BC Railway was taken at Sawridge an
Lesser Slave Lake on September 2,1914. Photo courtesy of Mrs.
E.Hanson from the collection of Wm.H.Meikle.
CANADIAN
71
R A I L
The locomotive which was created to haul this train
was a 2-2-0 Field Marshal tractor, vintage 1948, painteo in the
livery of the Edmonton, Dunvegan and British Columbia Railway of
1916 and sporting NU~lber 1916 for th~ occasion. This useful piece
of motive power, developed by the Ruthor of this account, hauled
two floats, the first portraying an express/baqgage car laden with
settlers effects and farm produce, with the second cRrrying pas­
senoers dressed in 1916-period costumes, the whole under the super­
vision of a uniformed passenqer-train conductor.
The weather on celebration day, always an ingredient of
great importance, was slightly damp, to say the least. More than
three inches of rain fell, but it failed to dampen the enthusiasm
of the train crews, passengers or spectators. The Diamond Jubi­
lee Express made its run through the town on time, bell clanging,
whistle wailing and smoke belching from the 2-2-0s tall stack.
The railway to the Peace River district started out from Edmonton,
Alberta in the spring of 1912, being constructed by J.D.
McArthur and Company Limited of Winnipeg, a well known contracting
firm. On April 8, 1915, the Edmonton, Dunvegan and British Colum­
bia Railway was completed and opened for service as far as Giroux­
ville, some 17.3 miles west of McLennan and 287.8 miles northwest
of Edmonton, according to todays NAR mileage.
Fork-lift trucks were non-existant back in 1916 when this photo­
graph was taken on the Central Canada Railway at Judah Hill Crossing.
Wheat is being loaded into the distant car while a crated piano
balances at an uneasy angle waiting no doubt for the photographer
to finish taking the picture. Photo courtesy of Mrs. E.Hanson
from the collection of Wm. H.Meikle.
W JG 11-77
6
NOR T H
TOR IES N
—I—:~ _._. __ ._._.,._.-.
• Q:-:
I
…j!
(/i i
i C!>.: …..
. ~
I
I
I
I
I
,. High
,
B
I
I Hlne. .
~. . Crook Romo
, River
L evol
E R T A
Fort
. . t–…… MoLennan ~
S> S irlt ~–4oaoe River
Dawlon Cr •• k ~ Girouxvilio
i~– I …. ~-…t
LEGENO
00001 Central Canada-485miles
*
~
McMurray

(
.J
.
)
)
/
J

I
I

……. ~: E.D. 8 B.C. (1916)-408 miles
xxx x Canadian Northern -44 miles
~

! I
I


(MacKenzie 8 Mann)
-t-.. -t-: Pembina Valley -26 miles
(
, —
.. ~ .. –.. –.. –
–: Northern Alberta Rly.
A,
R, R.: Alberta Resources Rly.{i970)
G.S.L R.: Great Slave Lake Rly. (1960)
B,C.R.: British Columbia Rly.
C.N.R. Canadian National Rly.
RAILS TO THE PEACE
IN 1916
Modern Rly. Lines as Reference
r
CANADIAN
73
R A I L
Another rai1l1ay, built by J.D. McArthur and Company,
under the name of the Central Canada Railway Company, left the
ED & BC at Winagami, 1.3 miles north of McLennan anrl was opened
for service to the Osborne farm on the east rim of the Peace River
valley in December 1915. In that year, tfle rai11ay had inched its
lay down the 7.5 miles of 2.2% grade towards the canyon of the
Heart River. The excitement generated by the impending arrival of
the railway that promised a link between this far-flung settlement
and the Big City and civilization to the south can best be appre­
ciated by a perusal of the issues of the local, vleek1y newspaper
of the time, the Peace River Record.
The issue of October 15, 1915 reported that there would
be trains into Peace River Crossing before Christmas … actual
steel should be at the Heart River, inside the village limits,
between the 15th and the 30th of November.
Excitement increased with the appearance of the issue of
December 10: Steel is completed to the Heart River bridge … It
is disappointing to learn that service to the end of steel will
remain at the top of the hill until trains can be brouQht across
the Heart River.
There were, of course, two very qood reasons for this
decision. Until the steam locomotives of the day could take water
from the Peace River, the nearest supply would b~ at Tank, today
Nampa, at Mile 3D, and this supply would not be enouDh for a
return trip up the hill. In addition, the track was not ballasted
sufficiently and would not stand the pounding of the locomotives
cQming up the grade.
. ..,rf1:.
Even the heart of a local Lake Steamer arrived by roil and hod to
be off loaded onto a team drown skid. The boiler for the S.S.D.A.
Thomas is shown here being eased down the hill from Central Canada
Railway at Judah Hill Crossing in 1916. Photo courtesy Mrs. E.Hanson
from the collection of Mr. Wm. H.Meikle.
CANADIAN
74
R A I L
In the year-end review of December 31, 1915, the
Record reported •.• for it has been during the year just closin9
that Peace River has been brought into com~unication with the out­
side world by the arrival of the railroad ..• Rails were pushed
forward until the last month of the year saw the arrival of the
first train into Peace River Crossing. It was not surprisin find that J. D. !~cArthur. President of the Central Canada Raihay,
was on board this first train.
NORTHERN
ALBERTA
RAILWAYS
No. 69 Apr. 25
1971
LOCAL TIME TABLES
(Mountain Time)

Northern Alberta Railways Trains arrive at
and depart from Dunvegan Yards Station,
(St. Albert
Trail)

Tickets may be secured at Dunvegan Yards
Station (SI. Albert
Trail)

General Offices:
13025 SI. Albert Trail, Edmonton, Alberta
T5L 4L4
K. R. PERRY
General Manager
Edmonton
A. J. DOVE
Tra({ic Manager
Edmonton
The next sort of activity
was recorded in the issue of July
14, 1916: Work was commenced 01
~I 0 n d ay 0 nth e 1 i yin 9 0 f s tee 1 0 n
the last stretch of grade between
the Heart River brinae and the
depot site, and fromthere continuing
on the sidinqs and industrial spur
dOI/n on the ri ver.
The erection of the small
bridge across Pats Creek (mile 48.50)
and the fi na 1 co~pl etion of the
road on this side of the (Heart)
river will now be but a matter of a
few days. It isexpected that trains
will be runnina to the depot some time
next week.~
And s.o, there arri v.ed on
August 11,1916 a special train of
the EO&BC, carrying the first member
of the cabinet of the GovernMent of
Alberta to visit the Peace River
district. The ~1inister of the
Interior, Dr. Roche, ~as accompanied
by Dr. ~1cLennan and several other
officials of the railway.
The month following there
was again great excitement, when on
September S, Manitoba visitors
hi~hly pleased with Peace River …
Visit of officials of the Union Bank
of Canada to Peace Ri ver (i s) an
event of importance, not only because
of the standing of those comprising
the party, but because of the inaugur­
ation of service over the ~cArthur
Road.
CANADIAN
75
R A I L
Meanwhile, the Royal North ~iest Mounted Pol ice, in the
person of Superintendent McDonell of the Peace River Subdivision,
were less concerned with the excitement and (apparently) stuck
to the facts. From the Superintendents report of October 2,
1916, we may read of the progress of the railway and the notation
that freight service was in operation to the top of the hill all
winter in 1915-16. However, 50me freight was handled at the Heart
River railhead during the winter, as evidenced by p~otographs
taken during this period.
Superintendent McDonell continued under date of October
2, 1916: The great benefit the railway has conferred on the
north country can be better imagined than described. Formerly,
the journey from Edmonton to Peace River or Grande Prairie took
from three to four weeks over almost impassable trails; now the
same journey can be accomplished by rail in two days. The rail­
way company has inaugurated a regular passenger (train) service
between these pOints twice a week, and trains run on scheduled
time. Pullman and dining cars are attached to all passen~er
trains as far as McLennan, so that passengers can now travel in
comparative comfort.
The extension of the main line from Spirit River to the
British Columbia boundary is under construction, and fully eighty
percent of the grading (is) finished, the steel will be laid this
winter. A preliminary survey has also been completed from West
Peace River to the Waterhole district, a distance of approximately
55 miles; it is expected that this branch will be built next year,
also the bridge accross the Peace.
.
–.-
..
Edmonton, Dunvegan and British Columbia passenger train crossing
the Peace River Bridge, Eastbound sometime between 1920 _ 1922.
Photo courtesy Mr. George H.France collection.
The last passenger train from Edmonton to Dawson Creek on the NAR
operated on May 31, 1974 and was hauled by this Diesel Electric
locomotive which was suitably marked for the occasion. Photo cour­
tesy of Mr. George H.France.
· I
The Northern Alberta Railways Peace River Bridge located at the
town of the same was built in the years 1917 to 1920. This view
is taken looking west and was snapped by the Author in 1953. The
water tGnk in the wye at the west end of the bridge is visible in
the background.
This is how it was back on May 20, 1974 as NAR GP-9 No. 209 worked
to make up train 31 westbound. Once completed the train would be cou
pled up to caboose No. 13026 for the westbound ride from Dunvegan
Yard. Photo courtesy Mr. W.e.Slim.

A mO,re gen,eralized view of o~r cover photo is presented here ,as
freight extra 202 crosses the Heart River Bridge near Peace River I .­
Alberta in 1976. ,Photo courtesy Mr, Georg,e H.France.
CANADIAN
82
R A I L
The railway depot at Peace River is nearing completion.
It is a modern and up-to-date structure and will be a great con­
venience to the travelling public.
All freight for the north was shipped to Peace River
via the ED&BC Railway last winter and stored there in readiness
for the opening of navigation in the spring.
The RNHMP report for October 1916 said that the rail­
way depot was complete and in December 1916 it was recorded that
the contract had been let for the railway bridge across the Peace
River. This major engineering undertaking was begun in 1917 and
took three years to complete; after that, construction of the
railway, albeit spasmodic due to financial problems, continued
onward to Berwyn, 23.54 miles from the river. This section was
opened to traffic on October I, 1922.
The act of purchase, which became effective March 20,
1929, created the Northern Alberta Railways Company, which served
the vast homesteading and lumber emprie of the Peace River country.
Alberta received $ 25, 947, 371.74 for the four porperties, partly
in cash and partly by assumption of the funded debt which was paid
off in 1942 and 1944, as the obligations matured. In those years,
eN and CP could well afford to liquidate these obligations. After
1929, the system continued seasonably busy until the advent of
l/orld Har II.
~,.~.,
Close up view of the Heart River Trestle spanning the spectacular
Heart River and sprawling valley. Photo courtesy of the Author.
CANADIAN
83
R A I L
Modern Power on the NAR as SD 38-2 No. 403 leads a lash-up up the
2.2% West Hill Grade in the autumn of 1976. The Peace River bridge
can be seen immediately behind the arched highway bridge. Way in
the distance can be seen the Heart River Bridge carrying the railway
over the river of the same name. This trestle was built in 1916.
Photo courtesy of Mr. George H.France.
CA NAD IAN
84
R A L
The Peace River Centennial Museum, and the Sir Alexander Mackenzie
Historical Society commissioned a commemorative train for the Aug­
ust 1976 celebrations. Motive might be referred to as a Fie}d Mar­
shal 2-2-0. The train consisted of two flat cars decked out to
represent a baggage/express/mail and a coach. The former carried
the schedule and fares of the ED&BC Ry. in effect in 1916 , while
the latter carried passengers dressed in period costumes complete
with the conductor verifying tickets at the rear platform. Photos
courtesy of the Author.
CANADIAN
86
R A I L
The CANOL and Alaska Highway projects brought a remark­
able surge in business and the freight traffic that was offered
nearly taxed the NAR beyond its capacity. This resulted in much
rebuilding of portions of the line. The NARs Blue Train became a
household word north of Ed~onton, with its daily service which
included a diner and sleeping cars between Edmonton and Dawson
Creek, over the provincial boundary in British Columbia. Three
times a week, the train was divided at McLennan and a baggage/
mail/express car, a coach and a sleeper were taken onwards to
Peace River and Grimshaw, terminating at Hines Creek.
After World War II, freight traffic continued at a high
level, but passenger traffic declined steadily. About 1960,
passenger service was quietly withdrawn from the Hines Creek line
and the service on the Dawson Creek run was reduced to twice­
weekly.
The last days of passenger train service on the NAR were
characterized by antiquated equipment, mostly hand-me-downs from
CN and CP, and a tedious ni~ht schedule. The final train-off
came on May 31, 1974. As usual, the final week of passenger ser­
vice was well patronized by relays of old-times, bidding a nos­
ta19ic farel in-a-lifetime ride on a train.
With the prel iminary withdra~al of portions of the pas­
senger service, yet another noteworthy event occurred in this
part of -A·-berta.· In the early 1960s, a bitter political feud had been
settled and a new line had been located, to originate at
Roma Junction, mile 323.4 from Edmonton and 17 rail-miles west
of the town of Peace River, to run 480 miles north into the North­
west Territories to Hay River, with a 50-mile branch to Pine
Point, on the shores of Great Slave Lake. Here, deposits of lead­
zinc ore had been found, which could only be processed at refin­
eries to the south.
Mrs. E.Hanson snapped this photo of the last steam-hauled passenger
train on the NAR at Grimshaw, Alberta in 1956.
CANADIAN
87
R A I L
This potential rail traffic, together with
the seasonal shipments of supplies down the Mackenzie River to
the HiQh Arctic, made the construction of this line, the Great
Slave Cake Railway, worth-while. Moreover, pro~uctive 1ar~lands
and forests in the High level-Vermillion areas would provide
more traffic for the new railway. It was completed in 1965 and was
thereafter operated by Canadian National Railways.
The NAR then embarked upon a new career as a bridge­
line, hauling suoplies into the booming Arctic and bringina back
equally 10n9 trains of ore-cars full of lead-zinc concentrates
billed to COMINCOs smelters at Trail, British Colu~bia (see
CANADIAN nAIL Number 294, July 1976, p. 201).
The Mclennan-Roma Junction section of the NAR was up­
graded to carry the heavier loads and the entire roadbed was im­
proved to a high standard. But the Company was constantly power­
hungry, its total roster consisting of a fleet of ageing GP 9s and
four switchers. Extra GP 7s and 9s were leased from CN and CP,
but the fleet took a new lease on life on January 15, 1976, when
four new SD 38-2 units blasted up the Peace River Hill. Specially
ordered from the Diesel Division, General Motors of Canada limited,
for service on the Peace River line and through the little Smokey
Hills at Watino, mile 297.5 west of Mclennan, the new units have
road Numbers 401, 402, 403 and 404.
These four new SD 38-2s proved that they cDuld handle any
reasonable load without slippin9, but the couplers on the older
gondolas were just not equal to the strain imposed by the 2% south­
bound an~ 2.2% northbound grades, with their tight reverse curves.
Experience has shown that the practice of splitting the train and
doubling the hill, ~/hen heavy consists are behind the new pOler, must
continue for a while yet. The regular power assiqned to the
Great Slave l~ke Railway ore-trains is three SD 38-2s, while a
lone GP 9 handles the way-freight service.
Unfortunately, one of the new units was damaged whe~ it
ran i n to a 1 ash 0 uta n d c a ,~ g!: t f i Y i n r,l i r c I 1 976; I, a 11 1 i 1 II, i tis
now (,lanuary 1977) back in regular, revenue service. An excess­
ively wet summer in 1976 resulted in many unanticipated derailments
and mishaps.
During the summer and fall of 76, traffic was disap­
pointingly light, due in part to the financial recession in North
America. This decline in the tempo of business reduced the capi­
tal generally available from the United States-based oil companies.
But the future looks bright for the Northern Alberta Railways.
Discoveries of oil along the North Slope and in the Mackenzie River
delta region postulate some form of transport to bring the result­
ing natural gas and crude oil south to the refineries. Even if
these commodities do not eventually move by rail, the components
of the alternate transportation system must inevitably be brought
north by rail. In addition, there are extensive deposits of gypsum
in the Wood Buffalo National Park, east of the Great Slave lake
Railway. The exploitation of these deposits await the conclusion
of a working agreement between the Governments of Canada and
Alberta. The NAR is in a position to profit from this traffic; the
eyes of the energy and resource-hungry nations of the world are
looking to these northern regions of Canada.
CANADIAN
88
R A I L
Railway service to Peace River had been officially in­
augurated on September 3, 1916, but this did not imply continous
service. These were war years. Supplies and manpower were
scarce and J.D. 1-1acArthur was perhaps not the most ethical of
railway builders. Much of the rail was substandard and of such
poor quality that it would frequently fail under a train, even w hen
the 1 a t t e r ~ a s rna v i n gat a s n ail I spa c e . C u 1 ve r t san d
drainage work had been minimal, so washouts were a constant cause
for suspension of service. Even in 1924, there is a record of
settlers leaving a train at Reno, mile 24, as that was as far as
the train could go.
Incidentally. although it is not really part of this
story, it should be mentioned that Superintendent McDonell noted
that the grade was completed west of Spirit River to the British
Columbia boundary and steel was to be laid during the winter of
1916-17. This, in fact, never did occur; the grade was abandoned
and eventually the line was located west from Grande Prairie,
not actually reaching Dawson Creek, 3ritish Columbia, until 1931.
An agreement had been made in 1922 between the ED&BC,
the Province of Alberta, J.D. McArthur and Company Limited and
the Union Bank of Canada, the Canadian Pacific Railway Company and John
D. McArthur himself. to lease the ED&BC and the Central
Canada Railway to the Canadian Pacific Railway for a term of
five years. In August 1926, the Government of Alberta advised
the otheY signa-t terminated and that it would assume complete control of the two
railways.
. -.,
NAR flanger 16603 is photographed in use with the SPINO rail-grind­
ing train back in September 1976. Photo courtesy of the Author.
Alberta operated the railways thereafter until 1929. In
that year, the Canadian Pacific and the Canadian National
Railways jointly purchased the congloMeration of EO&nC, Central
Canada, Alberta and Great ~aterways and Pembina Valley Railways,
who s eli n e s ran as f 0 1 1 0 VI S :
Edmonton, Dunvegan ~ British Columbia Railway:
Edmonton to Grande Prairie, Alberta
To Hythe, Alberta
Alberta
and Great Waterways Railway Company:
Carbondale to Lac La Biche, Alberta
To Waterways, Alberta (Fort McMurray)
Central Canada Railway Company:
Winagami
to Peace River, Alberta
To Fairview, Alberta
Pembina Valley Railway:
Busby to Barrhead, Alberta
AC KNOI~L E flGE t~E NTS
401.3 miles
439.7 miles
113.1 miles
299.1 miles
48.5 miles
97.4 miles
26.5 miles
The Author would like to thank the following people who
assisted him in the preparation of this article:
Mrs. Evelyn Hanson Peace River, Alberta
The Editor, Peace River Gazette Peace River, Alberta
t~r. S. S. Horthen t~ontrea 1, Quebec
REFERENCES
The Peace River Record Peace River, Alberta various issues
Editor: Mr. C. Fredericks
Canadian National Railways: Volume 2 Stevens, G.R. 1962 Towards
the Inevitable Clarke, Irwin & Company, Toronto
A Brief History of the Northern Alberta
Railways Company (undated) (no author given)
The·· … ~ ..
cusiness car
CP RAILS ALASKA CRUISE VESSEL PRINCESS PATRICIA WILL BE OF­
fered for sale after the 1978 season. Earnings have
dipped in recent years and projected increases in costs
make future operations uneconomic. Extensive improvements, esti­
mated at ll-millton, would be required for the ship to meet new
U.S. regulations which become effective in 1979 -for example,
self-contained waste disposal systems will be mandatory for all
vessels entering U.S. waters after that date. The 6,000 ton, 320-
passenger ship makes 18 trips annually from Vancouver to Alaska.
(Toronto GLOBE AND MAIL, Dec. 15/77)
ARTICULATED OR lutiWIi,G BUSES HAVE BLEil ROAD-TESTEO III EDI10inOil and
Calgary since last September. Edmonton is trying
out a 50-ft. Volvo which carries 6!J seated passengers
and 57 standing, against the 73-passenger capacity of conventional
buses. Calgary is testing two German-made M.A.. buses which,
like the Edmonton vehicle, were leased by Transportation Alberta
for two years of testing. Plans are for the Volvo to go to Calgary
at the end of July. In return, the two M.A.N. buses will go to
Edmonton for testing. All three buses will be in Edmonton for
the Klondike Days and the Commonwealth Games this year. Thanks to
Lon Marsh for this item.
(Saint Johns Edmonton Report, Uec.
12/77)
125TH ANHIVERSARY OF COMPLETION OF THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL RAIL­
way in Horth America, the Grand Trunk, will be celebrat­
ed at Island Pond, Vt. July 14-1~-lG. 1973, according
to the Island Pond Historical Societys newsletter. 18~3 also saw
the establ ishrnent of Isl and Pond as the mid~lay point of tIle new
1 i ne.
CANADIAN
91
R A I L
ANOTHER LUXURY [JUS SERVICE liAS BEEN CAilCELLED 111 ONTARIO. TRAVEL­
ways announced its daily luxury service between Orillia
and Toronto would be dropped Jan. 8/78 because of a
lack of passengers; regular (non-luxury) service continues.
(Toronto Globe and /1ail, Jan. 5/78)
TORONTO TRANSIT C01111ISSION IS PROCEEDING WITH COflSTRUCTIOIl OF A
1.5 mile extension of the Bloor-Danforth subway line
past the Warden Ave. station to a new station at Kennedy
Rd. and Eglinton Ave. East. The extension is expected to cost
about ~90-million and is scheduled to open in the summer of 1980.
The proposed LRT (Light Rapid Transit) project, linking the pro­
posed Kennedy Rd. station to the Scarborough Town Centre at
Ellesmere and McCowan Rds, wont be started for another two years.
The LRT $108-7-million high speed line should be ready during the
summer of 1982.
(Toronto Daily Star, Dec. 30/77)
FOR THE RECORD, GROVETON, N.H. WAS CLOSED AS A CN-GT TRAIN ORDER
office last October and North Stratford was closed in
early December.
(The
470, Portland Div.,
Railroad Enthusiasts Inc.)
CNS 1~[STERll REGION, THE URIGHTEST SPOT Iii ITS COAST-TO-COAST iJET­
work, will receive priority treatment in future capital
budget allocations, particularly to improve unit train
capacity. President [{obert l3andeen, in a Calgary intervie~, said
that between 25 and 30 per cent of planned capital expenditures of
appro-x. $SOO-[;lillion will be made west of tile Lakehead. Gains in
western Canadian coal shipments to both do~estic and export markets
-Alberta coal will soon be moving in volume to Ontario -and other
resource commodities will account for most of the expected growth
in freight business. In addition, CI. is in a commanding position,
because of its presence in northern Alberta and B.C., to benefit
from construction of the proposed natural gas pipeline from Alaska.
Long term forecasts point to a doubling of the 20-mil-
1 ion tons of regional freight movements annually on the 1 ines to
tidewater at Vancouver and other destinations by the late 1960s.
According to Charles Armstrong, vice-president, Mountain
region, rail construction frOM the Sukunka River Valley of B.C. to
Prince Rupert could be accomplisiled ~Iith relative ease, opening
an alternative access to the sea.
(Toronto Globe and 11ail, Dec. 17/77)
U.S. DEPT. OF TRA,JSPORTATIOII RECEIHLY RELEASED SI.B-IIILLION TO TliE
Adirondack Railway of New York State for track recondi­
tioning on the 118 mile line from Remsen to Lake Placid.
This line is going to provide passenger service to the 1980 Winter
Olympics. Early plans call for regular passenger service on the
line in 1978.
CANADIAN
92
R A I L
MONTREAL-QUEBEC CITY EXECUTIVE BUS SlRVICE IS BEIWG PLANNED BY
Voyageur to start rolling next April. New buses seating
only 25 passengers will be used. Uroadloomed floors,
light meal service, drop-down desks at every seat, telephone ser­
vice and other extras will be featured. Fare will be approximately
double the standard rate, according to Wormand Denault of Voyageur.
Closure of Quebecs centrally-located Palais Station and resulting
inconvenience to rail passengers have adversely affected CN and CP
Rail traffic totals. Voyageur feels it can pick up more of this
business (as well as some from the airlines) by offering improved
service.
(110iH REAL STAR, Dec. 14 i7 7)
VICTORIA-COURTENAY, B.C. RAIL PASSENGER SERVICE BY CP RAILS
Esquimault & Nanaimo unit was allowed to end January
31/78 by order of the Canadian Transport Commission which
said that the service was uneconomic and likely to con­
tinue to be uneconomic. Out Premier Bill Bennett of B.C. im­.
mediately said that tile government would appeal the CTC decision.
lie also said that the government wants its land back if CP Rail
abandons the short line between Osoyoos and Okanagan Falls, B.C.
(Toronto Globe and 14ail and
t40ntreal Star)
URBAN TIAliSPOlnATION DEVELOPI1EiH CORPORATIOljS 430-ACRE SITE InAR
1·lillilaven, just ~est of lZingston, Ont. is beginning to
come to life, with work progressing on tile 2,!ioO-metre
test track ~Ihich includes an elevated portion of 41U metres (this
will be used to test such tlljngs as noise levels, tracking pro­
perties, stopping, uncoupling and failure simulation). A second
track of 4,800 metres will be used for testing street cars of
four, six and eight axle deSigns. A ~350,000 two-storey building
will be ready soon. Already more than lOU are employed on site
some of whom are from Canadair, a partner with UTDC in a project
referred to as an intermediate-capacity transit system ~hich
is based on the use of linear motors.
(Kingston Whig-Standard and
Toronto Globe and Mail)
REMEMBER THE GREAT FLOODS OF 1927? THAT WAS THE YEAR THAT A LARGE
part of upper New England was struck by rains that
wrecked havoc with the railways. The Rutland, Central
Vermont, Boston & Maine, Maine Central, Canadian Pacific were among
the roads snarled. A fine illustrated article, The Flood of 27,
by Patrick E. Purcell, appears in The National Railway ~ulletin,
Vol. 42, No.6, 1977. From this heres a sample of what happened:
The Canadian Pacifics northbound Alouette, bound from ~oston to
Montreal, was near the summit in Sutton when Engineer Ernest H.
Rickaby felt the tracks soften under his engine and stopped the
train. It was to be two days before the tracks were sufficiently
repaired to allow the Alouette to be brought down the grarie to
Barton where it remained nearly a week. Among the passengers was
E.W. Beatty, president of the CP, who struck out for Montreal via
handcar, jitney, a work train to Sherbrooke and a light engine to
his destination.
CANADIAN
93
R A I L
AtHRIICK CLOSED A CO~1l1ISSARY IIH ICI! SUPPLILS FOOD TO LOIIG-HIIUL PIIS­
senger traills after federal inspectors found unsani­
tary conditions. The facility, in northeast I~asllington,
normally provides sandwiches and other prepared food for trains
from Washington to Chicago and Montreal. Total lack of a
sanitary control system throughout 11as said to be the biggest
problem by a U.S. Food and Drug Administration official.
(The 170, Portland Div.,
Railroad Enthusiasts Inc.)
ANOTHER CENTENNIAL PROJECT IS NOTED IN THE MILEPOST (MIDWESTERN
Rail Association Inc., Winnipeg): At the request of the
Stephen Centennial Committee in Stephen, Minn., a rail
trip is being formulated for July 1st from Winnipeg to Stephen
over the original track right-of-way of contract 5. It is
anticipated that the passenger stock will be Canadian Pacific
and operated by CP Ra~l to the border and then operated by
Burlington Northern south of the line.
MOORE HOOPLA FOR THE LRC WAS REPORTED JAN. 14/78 AS A CONTRACT
signing ceremony at Bombardier-MLW, Montreal was held in
the presence of 1,000 employees and guests. Signing was
delayed -some might say underlined -by a gap in the countrys
transportation system which it is hoped the LRC can fill,
noted MO.ntreal Stars reporter. The ceremony was supposed to
start at 11 a.m~ but a government jet bringing the lawyers
with the contract documents from Ottawa was delayed because of
some heating difficulties. The Ottawa staff had to change to
another plane, but they would have arrived on time had they
taken the train. As already widely reported, the contract
covers the building of 22 locomotives and 50 cars for VIA
Rail Canada
(Montreal Star, Jan. 14/78)
TORONTOS UNION STATION IS BEING UPGRADED TO PROVIDE MORE TRACKS
for GO service, wider platforms and better passenger handling
facilities. Access to the TTC subway will be improved with GO
ticketing facilities moving east of the present location into the
lower level of the former postal building. Rebuilding will take
about 22 months to complete. A modified plan for upgrading rail
approaches west of Union Station will be implemented, with special
attention to the bottleneck at the rail junction under Bathurst
Street bridge. Re-designed trackage will allow increased GO traffic
to use the area without interference from other trains and will
also speed up movement of trains through the yard trackage, saving
an estimated five minutes on each run between Union and Exhibition.
(GO NEWS, Nov./77)
LARGEST SINGLE SHIPMENT OF MANDARIN ORANGES EVER HANDLED BY CP RAIL
moved from Vancouver to Ontario and Quebec in late November,
following unloading of the freighter Australic. More than nine
million oranges, filling 60 temperature-controlled insulated box cars
made up this special Mandarin Express.
(CP RAIL NEWS, Jan. 18/78)

Manufacturers of color film are being taxed to the limit what with
all the new color schemes appearing on the scene in recent months.
Pierre Patenaude submits the following four photos for presentation:
Firstly newly pointed CV unit I 3601 in green and yellow, this RS-lf­was
pictured at Montreal Yard on July 1,1977. CP # 8619 freshly re­
built at Angus following fire damage was pictured at St.luc Yard
on 9 October, 1977. This unit features modulor circuitry and 2000 HP
for traction. GO Transit # 500 was in Montreals Pointe St.
Charles Shops (CN) for alterations to permit it to be used in haul­
ing the new double decker cars in and around Toronto, Ontario.
Finally the ONR hos sent their RS-3 s to MLW Industries in Montreal
for a re-fit and yes Virginia, a new point scheme. Pierre caught
the unit in transit at Montreal yard on 23 October, 1977.
Canadian Pacific commenced transcontinentol passenger service in
1886 with the orrivol of the first through train at Port Moody,
B.C. If all goes according to plan CPs transcontintintal service
presently known as THE CANADIAN will come to on end in 1978 when
VIA RAIL CANADA assumes all rail passenger services in Conada
presently provided by CN and CP rail. As reported in our February
issue on amalgamated service is proposed using both CN and CP lines.
We are pleased to present this scenic winter photo of our sleek
CANADIAN high in the Canadian Rockies , the photo is presented
with the COlllpli.enh of CP Roil. II

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