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Canadian Rail 307 1977

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Canadian Rail 307 1977

Canadian Rail
No. 307
AUGUST 1977

CAl
OP pas I TE
CN Wash9go, Ontario as the
sleek ex-TEE streamliner makes a
northbound station stop.
The old classic wooden water
tower now serves the needs of
the town.
FRONT COVER
Fresh for the inaugural run of
Ontario Northland Railways
NORTHLANDER is lead unit
1900 and train awaiting the
highball in Torontos Union
Station on 28 May, 1977.
R4IL
ISSN 0008 -4875
Published monthly by The Canadian
Railroad Historical Association
P.O. Box 22, Station B
Montreal Quebec Canada H3B 3J5
EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
EDITOR EMERITUS: S. S. Worthen
BUSINESS CAR: John Welsh
LAYOUT: Joe Smith
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN
L. M. Unwin, Secretary
1727 23rd Ave. N.W., Calgary Alberta
T2M lV6
OTTAWA
D. E. Stoltz, Secretary
P. O. Box 141, Station A, Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8Vl
PACIFIC COAST
R. Keillor, Secretary
P. O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2Pl
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
C. K. Hatcher, Secretary
P. O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Al berta T5B 2NO
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
J. C. Kyle, Secretary
P. O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto Ontario
M5.W 1 P3
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
R. Ballard, Sr., Secretary
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor,
Ontario N9G lA2
, ~
, –,
-With
Torontos
ci
–7ine
~{n
the
ba
Nort-h7a-
nds
No
for
NOfth
-Bay a
.Ju7y
2,
7977
as
North by
Northlander:~NNETH A.W. GANSEL
Saturday May 28 marked
the beginning of a new rail
service between Toronto, North
Bay and Timmins, Ontario Iliiu
The Ontario Northland Ra .illl
What is new about this s e;
to be called the NORTHLANDER
the fact that the rail
. , .
. .
being used is ex
e-Express equip­
known as TEE
pe-Express)
.~.~ •
CANADIAN 230 R A I L
The two sets which ONR has on lease from the Urban
Transportation Development Corporation (UTDC for short) for
five years came from Holland and Switzerland. These diesel
sets were made available in 1975 when the Dutch railway com­
pleted electrification. It was in 1975 that UTDC first became
interested in purchasing this equipment. Since then the equip­
ment has been completely refurbished and painted in the dyna­
mic colours (yellow and blue) of the ONR. Testing was also car­
ried out to see how well this equipment would perform in the
Canadian North during the winter months.
The TEE trains arrived on the docks of Toronto from Rotterdam
in late April and since then the ONR has been putting
the finishing touches on them getting them ready for the inaug­
ural trip.
THE INAUGURAL TRIP
The inaugural trip became quite an event with a red
carpet at the entrance to Union Station in Toronto and a big
yellow and blue banner proclaiming the Inaugural Run of the
NORTHLANDER. Also there were a number of provincial and Cana­dian
flags on the lower concourse of the station with more
signs pointing the way to track 6 and its 8 A.M. departure
time.
There were about 100 invited guests for the trip to
North Bay and there was also another NORTHLANDER (the other
train set) departing from Timmins at the same time for North Bay
also. I made my way up the stairs and out onto the platform
only to come face to face with the train taking on a form of a
smiling cheschire cat, this was formed by its three headlights
and slanted cab windows. The seating on board consists of two
types -an open coach type of car with two rows of seats allow­
ing two people to sit together on one side and one person to sit
by himself on the other. The other cars consist of individual
compartments european style in which six people can occupy these
compartments. This is an ideal way for business people to carry
on a conference enroute. The cars are extremely soundproof and one
cannot hear outside noises.
On the dot at 08:00 we departed from Toronto Union
Station eastward to the Don River and the line for Washago,
Huntsville and North Bay. We slipped up the Don Valley in the
morning sunshine with a smoothness which must be experienced to
be appreciated. As we reach the top of the valley we cross over
the Toronto freight access line and enter the Ba1a Subdivision
and begin to accelerate to our track speed of 70 MPH. We are on
our way and breakfast conSisting of coffee and danish pastry is
served to the guests and dignitaries such as the Minister of
Transportation (Ontario) JAMES SNOW, who is aboard for this trip
as well as Ray Williams, Vice-President of Canadian National
Railways plus a number of people connected with the Dutch and Swiss
National Railways. By 09:00 we are out in the country with
Toronto far behind us as we pass through places with names like
Zephyr, Beaverton and along the shores of Lake Simcoe. Our first
stop comes at 10:00 at Washago, a railway junction town which
still has a wooden water tank which now serves as a water supply
for the town. We are here for 20 minutes allowing Mr. Snow to
meet with the mayor and local memhers of provincial parliament.
——~,—-
Further up the line the inauQural train calls at Huntsville,
Ontario, ONR is hoping to lure passengers back to the rails
with the modern service provided.
One musnt forget that there is an election on in Ontario and
this train is important for votes too. In regular service the
stop at Washago will be about 3 minutes, just long enough for the
train dispatcher to set the switches to allow us to proceed to
the town of Gravenhurst, our halfway point from Toronto to North Bay.
Gravenhurst is a crew change point on the CN. here the
engineer and conductor are replaced by new personnel familiar
with the territory ahead. Just after leaving Gravenhurst the
first call to a buffet lunch is announced. When the train is in
regular service a full meal service will be offered at appropri­
ate times as well as snack services at all times. The meals will
be served on china plates with plated flatware. none of the plas­
tic airline quality will be allowed on the NORTHLANDER. The
scene outside the window is always changing as we get further
north. the windows are large and have a venetian blind type shade between
the glass.
After lunch a stop is made at Huntsville on Lake Vernon a most
impressive sight as we round the lake and come
to a stop at the station. Huntsville gives us a chance to
stretch our legs and look over the train. An official from
the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) Railway Division
is conducting tests on the amount of movement of the axles and from
time totime replaces a thin rod of solder taped to the
side of the truck. These solder rods will be examined in Ottawa to
see as to how much movement there is in the axle. as railway
tracks in .North America do not match the very high quality of
European lines.
~~ North Bay, Ontario as the southbound train from Timmins with
unit 1901 in the lead meets our north~ound special with
sister locomotive 1900 on the point. Most passenqers trans­
fered to the southbound train at this point in order to make
it back to Toronto that same evening.
Only eighty miles from North Bay as we pull away from
Huntsville, about an hour out of North Bay we have a meet with
a South bound freight train No. US6R the Iron Ore train from Sherman Mines
enroute to Hamilton, (Ont.). This is just one of
the important links with the South, as these ore trains provide
the raw material for steel making in Hamilton.
More si~ns of life return as we approach North Bay, where
we meet our counterpart train from Timmins. Both trains
are placed nose to nose in front of the North Bay CNR/ONR sta­
tion. There is a celebration and the usual speeches from the
Minister of Transport, Mr. Snow, on a commitment to the North
to provide improved rail service.
A transfer is made from one train to the other for
those people returninq to Toronto as the train which came from Timmins
will continue on South and vice-versa. By 15:30 we
are ready to depart back to the big city of TO (a nickname
for Toronto). It seems that most of the people on the train
returned to Timmins or in all the excitement left the train at
North Bay, in any event it has been a great trip and one looks
forward to the evening meal being prepared in the diner.
As we pass throuqh Huntsville the first call for din­
ner is being made but there is just enough time to get off for
one last photograph of the day, as the NRC are checking the
An enqineers eye view of the compact yet modern control con­
sole. All indications appear to be in the mectric system
probably making the train a forerunner of this system of
measurement which is presently being introduced nationally.
Ontarios Minister of Transportation Mr. James Snow qreetinq
guests on the inaugural trip of 28 May, 1977.

CANADIAN 234 R A I L
front truck. Thinqs begin to pickup as the wine flows in the
diner and other parts of the train. wow what a trip.
By dark we are just entering the suburbs of Toronto
having completed the trip from Washago in record time. At points
we were qoing 75 MPH. It is quite an experience to rocket down
the bala sub at such speeds especially from the cab of the NORTH­
LANDER, I was up in the cab for about 10 minutes just to get a
feeling of the operation from the engineers point of view.
Just before reaching Toronto we have a meet with
Freiqht Tr. 219 (The Western Hotshot) and with the NORTHLAND the
standard equipment overnight train to Timmins. We are back at
Union Station some 13 hours from our start, the crowd heads for
the stairs, well itls allover but on June 9th it will be back
on one of the greatest trips in Canada. So if you are in
Ontario remember the NORTHLANDER, the food is out of this world,
so is the train.
This souvenir medallion was presented to passengers on the
inaugural trip wy proud railway and qovernment Officials.
CANADIAN 235 R A I L
CANADIAN 236
NORTHLANDER
Technical Description
Track gauqe
Tra i n 1
ength
Maximum width
Maximum heiqht
Floor 1 eve1
Power
for traction
Fact Sheet
(main diesel motor 2x 1000)
Auxiliary power unit
Traction Motors (4)
Maximum Service Speed
Maximum permissible speed
(test only)
Acceleration d to 43.5 mph
Braking, service, 87.5 mph
to 0 on 1 eve 1
Brakfng, emergency,
87.5 to
o on 1 eve 1
Fuel consumption average
including auxiliary power (under European
conditions)
Fuel capaci ty
Total train weight,
ready to run
Maximum axle load,
power car
Maximum axle load,
trailer car
Additional Features
Capacity per train
R A I L
4 -8-1/2
318
9 -6
13 -7
45-1/4
2000 HP
300 HP
1550 HP
87.5 mph
93.0 mph
180 sec.
3936
3116
0.929
ga 1. /m1.
1268 gal.
248 tons
41,895 1bs.
21,5001bs.
114 seated pas­
sengers
CANADIAN 237 R A I L
Air conditioning
Heating
Low centre of gravity design
Streamlined design -double-ended configuration
Weatherproof, sealed passageways between cars
Large vestibule areas
Venetian blinds fitted between panes of
double-glazed windows
Low interior noise level
Panoramic windows
Public address system
Fluorescent lighting
Electrically heated windshields in cabs
Multiple-unit capability
Units Numbered: 19QO and 1901
To accommodate
external tem­
pera tures as high as 140
degrees F.
To maintain a
passenger com­
partment temper­
ature of 70
degrees Fat 60
mph at outside
temperatures to
-40 degrees F.
Two other train sets to be delivered to Toronto before 15
September 1977. They will be numbered 1902 and 1903. The numbering
is for the entire train set as each car is not num­
bered plus number boards are the same at each end of the train
set.
Train sets are made up of a Diesel unit and 3 cars; 1st car is
a coach type, 2nd car is the meal service car, 3rd car has 7 compartments each
seating 6 and the end control cab,
Due to safety regulations the engine unit will always be leading.
Because of duplication within the eN computer ONR Northlander
train-sets had to be re-numbered soon after being placed into ser­
vice. 1900 is now 1980 and 1901 becomes 1981. here we see 1980
being serviced at North Bay on 14 June. 1977. A slight rearrange­
ment in operation has also been made with trains 121 and 122 now
operating via the Newmarket Sub. while trains 123 and 120 operate
via the Bala Sub. This avoids turning the train in Toronto as the
engine must be leading for safety reasons.
: . .
. .,
…. (3;. 0 0– ~-
,.: . –
. .. -. ~..,
. – , ~ ~ -. .
OHRIS new paint scheme is also being applied to their diesel
power. Here we see their first newly painted unit a GMD FP-7a
road number 1518 resplendent in shiny new livery.
BOOK
REVI E W
The STEAM AGE IN WESTERN ONTARIO continues into 1977 even if only
with CNRs last and only operating steam locomotive 6060. Pictured
here on the Jordan Trestle ( a favorite spot for railfans ) Ken
Gansel caught the oil bvrning relic on Jvne II, 1977.
Three members were kind enough to submit reviews of the recently
published work The Steam Age in Western Ontario by Dr. George.
Fortunately the remarks made by both Mr. Ray Corley of Toronto
and Mr. Stafford Swain of Winnipeg agree with the review as pre­
sented by Mr. S. Robert Elliot of Barrie, Ontario.
Western Ontario is arguably one of the most fascinating
areas of Canada as far as railroad history is concerned. Great
Western, Grand Trunk, Canada Air Line and now Canadian National,
Canadian Pacific; a host of minor lines including the Preston and
Berlin, Galt and Guelph, Port Dover and Lake Huron and U.S. lines
such as the Pere t~arquette, Michgan Central and the Wabash, all
made their imprint. Many are forgotten, although the recent con­
troversy over the ownership of the Canada Southern suggests that
the past may not really be so far behind. Yet the area has not
received the coverage it deserves.
Dr. George has attempted in his words to, as least put
something into this gap. His book is essentially a succession of
first-hand reminiscences set largely in the area immediately around
London, Ontario. As such, it is full of names of his acquaint­
ances, some of their tales aod photographs, some of which show them. But as
an historical document it leaves a great deal to be
desired. Nor does he atteDpt to make it otherwise and to unravel
the generally obscure and complex history of the lines that served
that area. He does give general coverage of some lines, essential­
ly to put his very personal narrative into context. His style is
literate and easy, but not profound. He obviously derived a great
deal of pleasure from putting on paper the memories of years past.
His 225 illustrations are a very mixed bag indeed, rang­
ing from builders prints to copies of post cards and timetables,
~hrough a clutch of amateur personal items. Composition is there­
fore patchy. And he has not been well served by either his photo
editor or his printer. Too many should have been cropped and en­
larged. Too many could have been greatly improved by technical
assistance in reprinting. He uses good-quality rag-stock ~lossy
paper and the reproduction, when he has good material, is good. His
index of them is first class as far as equipment is concerned.
There is a general map of the area west of the Toronto,
Grey and Bruce (Toronto-Owen Sound). Again this is a photocopy
of what was obviously a coloured original. Though it is a pull­
out, which I appreciate, the reproduction is not very clear and
some of the names, both of towns and roads, are hard to read. It
does give an idea of the complex network of lines which existed
in the area. But a sketch or trace, showing less political detail,
would have given this better.
Regrettably, there are a number of errors. For example,
CN 1535 is not in Barrie. CN 1531 is. Clegg and Corley say that
she was not a GTR engine but was built for the Canadian Northern
in Montreal in 1910 as 1321. The electric line out of London was
not the London and Southwestern Traction Comp.ny but, as his
copy of a newspaper picture and the Statutory History show, South­
western only. Perhaps its absorbtion by the London & Lake Erie
and the passage of years may have led to the confusion.
Personnaly I buy this sort of book for a number of rea­
sons: to support Canadian talent, because Ive nothing on an area
in which I train-watched over many happy hours, partly because
there is little else on railroads in a fascinating region. At
$22.50 it is expensive and, unless you have ties to the area, it
is more a curiosity than an essential reference book.
THE STEAM AGE IN WESTERN ONTARIO: George, Prof. E.B. Ph.D., Litt.
D. 218pp; 1 sketch; 225 photographs including
15 documents, 174 locomotives or powered
stock. 35 miscellaneous, Map.
F.J. Ram Publisher, London. Ontario 1975
This work has been published by our sister society the New Zealand Railway and Locomotive
Society and is subtitled The Railway Con­
quest of the Rimutakas. This 336 pag~ title amply deals with the
third rail Fell system as employed north east of Wellington in
order to surmount the formidable Rimutaka Mountain Range. The book
is well written, amply illustrated and extremely thorough, indeed
it is most difficult to find fault with it.
~t deals with early exploration and survey work between Wellington
and Masterton, the evolution of the Fell system, its construction,
operation and demise, details of the locomotives, stations, train
workings and accidents associated with this part of the line and
the final demise brought about by the opening of the 9 KM Rimutaka
tunnel in 1955. All 1n all a very good buy for those interested
in railway history down under.
A LINE OF RAILWAY -The Railway Conquest of the Rimutakas by W.N.
Cameron 336 pages size 6 X 9 hard bound
ISBN 0-908573-00-6
Published by The New Zealand Railway and Locomotive
Society Inc. P.O. Box 5134
Wellington, New Zealand
Cost to CRHA members NZ $10.50 ea.
Hisloryof
The Canadian Pacific
RaHway
CANADIAN 243 R A I L
Coverinq the period from 1850-1972 the author, a former
Dominion Archivist, goes into considerable denth to study both the
growth and development of the Company. The book does contain a
great deal of interesting statements of a historical nature which
reveal much about the part the Company played in the growth of the
Canadian nation. Many of these facts have never before been pub­
lished and their revelation here lends credence to the books in­
terest. The author goes to great lengths to cover the history of
the various component companies which merged to form the company we
now know as the Canadian Pacific and follows their subsequent de­
velopment within the confines of the Company. The later develop­
ments of varied diversionary companys under the broad control of
Canadian Pacific Limited is also covered extensively.
While
detailing a Qood number of financial and numercal
details and statements throughout the course of the book, the
author is well able to maintain the interest of the reader by
maintaininq a continuous flow of interesting facts and historical
data. This lessens the fact that some miqht well claim the book
is a financial statement of sorts and provides a continuing in­
terest for the reader to continue.
As far as the photographs used to illustrate are con­
cerned, these are both many and varied and appeal to both the aver­
age reader, the rail fan and the railroader alike. The basic text
of the book provides hours of reading and is supplemented by the
addition of a qood nllmber of pages of appendices and notes relat­
ing to each chapter in the book. T~ese apoendices contain a wealth
of interesting and factual information which only add to the
readers interest in the history of the Canadian Pacific.
All consirlered, History of the Canadian Pacific by W.
Kaye Lam~ is an excellent book, well wort~ the price and makes
sxcel1ent reading.
History of the Canadian Pacific Railway
-t1. Kave Lamh
First Edition 1977 -Published by Collier MacMillan Canada Ltd.
-part of the Railroads of America series -5th volume
Hard Cover 476
raqes 78 photographs 6 Maps
2 reproductions Cost $17.95
Cornmentsby Harvey.J. Elson
To illustrate our review of the HISTORY OF THE CANADIAN PACIFIC
RAILWAY we have chosen one of the numerous excellent photos con­
tained in the photo albums in the CRHA Archives. This shot prob­
ably from the camera of Jim Shaughnessy ot T~oy N. Y. shows CPR
No. 5329 lifting out of the hole in Quebecs Eastern Townships
sometime back around 1955.
The· ……
business car
THE QUEBEC GOVERNMENT HAS CALLED FOR A REDUCTION IN NUMBER OF
transcontinental passenger trains crossing the province
en route to the Atlantic provinces in order to improve
reQional service in Quebec. A brief to the Canadian Transport
Commission, June 15, recommended the elimination of two of the
three daily trains now linking Montreal and the east. The re­
sulting $15 million in estimated savings should be reinvested by
the railways to improve inter-city service in Quebec, said the
provincial transport department. The Quebec study said the pre­
sent trains cost about $26.9 million annually on Quebec territory;
this could be reduced to ~11.9 million annually if the three
trains were replaced with a single daily train. The savings could
then be used for rapid trains linking Montreal, Quebec, Sherbrooke
and other towns in eastern Quebec.
(Montreal GAZETTE)
AT THE FIRST PUBLIC HEARING BY THE CTC INTO PASSENGER TRAIN SER­
vices in Atlantic Canada (May 17), Transport 2000 (a
nationwide coalition of transport us~rs) proposed:
restructured schedules to permit fast direct service
between major centres at convenient times of the day,
e.g.;
Sydney-Hal ifax
Halifax-Saint John Moncton-Hal
ifax
4 trains
3 trains
4 trains
retention of three through trains between the Maritimes
and Montreal but on faster timings to allow two all­
daylight schedules;
reductions in subsidies by taxpayers by at least $17
million, achieved through increased rid~~ship, improved
labour productivity, and new equipment designed for
higher capacity and simpler maintenance;
CANADIAN 245 R A I L
retention of existing regional rail services and ad­
dition of coordinated bus service to other areas, pro­
viding an integrated public transport network throuthout
the region.
BIRTHDAY FOR GO -MAY 23/77 WAS THE 10th BIRTHDAY FOR GO TRANSIT
which reports that the original rail equipment of 8
locomotives and 49 cars has grown to 19 locomotives.
9 auxiliary power units and 123 cars; forecast maximum daily car­
ryings of 15,000 has been exceeded to the point where the average
daily total now approaches 30,000 and the annual total has gone from
4,540,500 in 1968 to 9,158,000 in 1976; the GO bus fleet has
increased from 15 vehicles in September 1970 to the present 130
buses. and route miles from less than 200 to more than 600. GOs
80 bi-level cars will start going into service by year-end 1977,

it is expected. The new cars provide 75 per cent more seats than
conventional GO cars.
(GO Transit)
FROM THE ORIENT EXPRESS, AN ENGINE AND EIGHT CARS HAVE BEEN BOUGHT
by the Koyo Hotel, Otsu, Japan, for use as an extension
to the hotel. Price paid -~327,OOO.
(Toronto GLOBE & MAIL)
A RAIL RELOCATION STUDY AT NORTH BAY, ONT. WILL LOOK AT ThE POS­
sibility of removing CN or CP Rail tracks from the down­town
area and combining all rail traffic on a single
line, according to a federal government announcement. Governments
(federal, provincial and municipal) will contribute a total of
$300,000.
(Toronto GLOBE & MAIL)
CNs TRANSCONA SHOPS CURRENT PROGRAM INCLUDES CONVERSION OF SEVEN
sleeping cars to Dayniter coaches, reconditioning 337
box cars with standard single doors for Class A ser­
vice, construction of 169 flat cars to carry living units for
work gangs. and preparation of 23 generator cars to provide work gangs
with independent electrical service.
(CN Keeping TrackN)
LRC TESTS BY AMTRAK ARE SUMMARIZED IN A JUNE 13/77 NEWS RELEASE
by Bombardier-MLW Ltd. (HLW Industries Division).
builders of the prototype locomotive and coach used in
these safety tests. Earlier this year, AMTRAK (National Rail­
road/Passenger Corporation of the U.S.A.) Signed a lease/purchase
agreement for the LRC (light-rapid-comfortable). Initially, two
train sets of one locomotive and five coaches each have been
ordered for service between Vancouver-Seattle-Portland. The
order was contigent on the LRC meeting Federal Railways Adminis-
CANADIAN 246 R A I L
tration safety standards. These standards have been met and sur­
passed, according to the news release. Design details are now
being finalized before production of the trains begins. The
trains are slated for two years revenue service in the Northwest
and will be carefully monitored by AMTRAK with a view to applying
this equipment to other areas where curved track exists and to
exercising its option for an additional ten train sets.
IN THE OLD COUWTRY, THE BRITISII GOVERNMENT ENDORSED THE VIEW OF A
Commons Select Committee that high speed rail travel
can best be ir.lproved by developing conventional trains
on wheels, rather than by introducing novel concepts of advanced
ground transport (AGT.). AGT involves new and difficult techno­
logy, such as propulsion by linear motors of trains which would be
suspended magnetically over specially constructed tracks. The
Select Committee on Science and Technology reported last year that
there is no point in investing in this new technology unless a
domestic and international market can be seen for the product.
Development of conventional trains on wheels, like British Rails
125 mph and 155 mph advanced passenger trains, offered a more
practical way of benefiting rail users. Any economies in the run­
ning of AGT were considered highly speculative and there was
not much prospect of it proving cost effective in Britain before
the turn of the century, the Governments White Paper stated.

(The GUARDIAN -London and
Manchester)
AND A FOOTNOTE TO THE ABOVE – A BRITISH RAIL INTER-CITY 12~ TRAIN
from Swansea to London ran the 191 miles in a record
2 hours 22 minutes, June 11/77. This was 20 minutes
faster than the usual high-speed runs and a full hour quicker than
a year ago.
(The Daily Telegraph -London)
FLYWHEEL ENERGY-RECOVERY SYSTEMS ARE PROPOSED FOR NEW YORK CITY
subway cars by the Garrett Corporation. Such systems
capture the energy generated -and usually vented to
the surrounding air as heat -when the motors of each car of a subway
train carry out braking to 5101-1 tile train. In flywheel­
equipped cars, the braking action, similar to the reversal of
thrust in jet engines when an airliner lands, speeds up the
flywheel. When the train is to start again, tiJe spinning fly­
wheel turns an electric generator to drive the motors, thus
removing the need to draw a surge of electric power from the
third rail. In tests covering some 14,000 miles on New York subway
lines last year, two cars of the RS-2 type saved between 20 and.
40 percent of the normal power usage, depending on the
number and frequency of stops made by the cars. The 11etropolitan
Transportation Authority is consideriAg placing 200 flywheel­
equipped cars in service by Oct. 27, lY79, the 75th anniversary
of the opening of New Yorks first subway. According to a study
by Garrett, installation of a flywheen system would save an
average of 6.2 cents worth of electircity for each mile the car
travelled during an expected lifetime of 23 years. Total saving
of ~690,OOO would generate a net saving of $500,000 a car. Cost
of the program is esti~lated at $40 million.
(Ijel· York Times)
CONCRETE TIES ON CI~ ARE BEIIIG LAW 011 TIlE MAIN LINE l-JEST OF
Spences Bridge, 8.C. at a rate double the production
target of 1,400 feet and 700 ties a day. In conjunction
with the tie program, ne~ contiuuous welded rail is being laid and
ballast renewed. Work to be completed this year on the Mountain Region
includes 42 miles of concrete ties and welded rail on the
Ashcroft Sub and an additional 13 miles on the Albreda Sub. 2U
miles of work on the Ashcroft Sub will include the first eN in­
stallation of 136-pound rail, heaviest on the system.
(CN Keeping Track)
BRITISH COLUMBIA RAILWAYS DERAILMENT COSTS FOR 197b TOTALLED
$2.5 million, according to documents filed with the
Royal Commission inquiring into the provincially-owned
lines affairs. Worst record, in terms of mishaps versus mileage,
occured on the 243-mile extension between Fort St. John and Fort
Nelson, which handles only one train a day; 39 derailments in 1976
cost $788,732 in all.
T~ronto GLOBE & MAIL)
NEW CP BYGONES CATALOGUE IS NOW AVAILABLE AT A PRICE OF $1.00
(refundable on first order) per copy from CP Bygones,
Room 117, Windsor Station, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3E4.
No charge for the catalogue if accompanied by an order; cheques
or money orders to be made payable to Canadian Pacific Limited,
please.
ANOTHER CN UNIT TRAIN SERVICE STARTED RECENTLY, RUNNING FROM THE
new $650 million Petrosar petro-chemical plant at
Sarnia, Onto to Ontario Hydros generating plant at
Douglas Point, Unto The new train (initially of 55 cars carrying
850,000 gallons of oil) will operate over the 441-mile round trip
route six times a month. As production at Petrosar increases,
the unit train operation will be increased to 12 times a month,
the additional shipments going to a generating plant at Bath, near
Kingston, Onto A second unit train will also be introduced. This
will be a 60-car train carrying more than one-million gallons to
a generating plant at Essexville, Michigan. It will operate five
times a week and use Grand Trunk Western lines. The heavy re­
sidual oil, known as Bunker C, requires loading at 180 degrees F. and
speedy transport in insulated tank cars to permit unloading
before the temperature falls below 130 degrees.
(CN Keeping Track)
CANADIAN 249 R A I L
BRITISH COLUI1BIAS MUSEUt1 TRAIN liAS SCIIEIJULEU TO START ITS SUMMER
tour June 25th, from Port Moody, and winding things up
at Kelowna, Sept. 6. Timetable No.3 (eight pages)
gives details of the schedule, features of the train and a use­
ful map. Should this issue of CANADIAN RAIL reach you in time,
here are the last three publicly-advertised stops; Armstrong
(Aug. 24-25), Vernon (Aug. 27-30), Kelowna (Sept. 2-6). Train
is open 10 a.m. to Y p.m. each day.
RAIL PASSE~GER CHIEFS URGE REntHIOIl OF DOI~NTOlm STATIONS IS THE
heading on a June 21J/77 news release of the Saskatchewan
Rail Committee which quotes from separate letters to
the Commi tee by J. Frank Roberts, head of Vi a Ra i 1 Canada Inc.,
and Garth C. Campbell, vice-president of passenger marketing
for Canadian National. The two executives blame remove1 of
train stations to the suuurbs for some catastrophic drops in
intercity rail traffic.
THE RAIL COMMITTEE HAS bE~H PRESSING FOR A MOUIFICATION UF
Reginas total relocation plan, to allow retention
of the CP main line and of tile downtown Union Station
and as intermodal rail-bus terminal.
TilE SOVIET RAILWAY ADtlINISHATlllH IS HSTIiH; EHGIIJES AND TRACKS
for a high-speed train between Moscow and Leningrad
that will cut the trip bet~leen the Soviet Unions two
largest cities from six hours to three, Pravda (the Communist
Party newspaper) reported June 1/77 •. It said the train would
cover the 396 miles at 13b miles an hour.
BOTH RAIL EXECUTIVES CIHU PAST EXPERIEnCE HI CAIIAUA AS PROOF
that station relocation causes a drop in passenger
traffic. Mr. Roberts said that the 1965 relocation
in Saskatoon of the CN station resulted in a 75 percent decl ine
in Regina-Saskatoon rail patronage within 1, years, lost to bus which had
retained its downtown terminal. In Ottawa, rail traf­
fic to Montreal fell by 45 percent in 1968, the year following
removal of the Union Station to the city outskirts. More re­
cently, Montreal-Quebec carryings have declined 15-20 percent
due to closure of Quebecs downtown station a year ago, re-
placed by a CN station at Ste-Foy and in CP station in St­
Sacrement. Mr. Campbell, citing the changes at Ottawa, Saskatoon,
Quebec City and, to a lesser extent, Windsor, Onto said that in
all cases, loss of traffic directly attributable to the relo­
cation of the station has been immediate and substantial. At
present, our loss in ~uebec City is of the order of 20 percent
in one year alone …. Ironically, there were instances where
public officials encouraged the relocation of railway terminals
only to later cite the relocation itself as evidence of the rail­
ways lack of interest in passenger service and as proof that
tra ins are outmoded as a means of transporta tion ..•• Unfortuna tely,
if railway tracks and terminals are removed, they are impossible
to restore at a future time. The best example we have ;s Ottawa,
where it would be virtually impossible to re-establish a railway
terminal in the downtown area. He added that good transit access
to a suburban station, While better than nothing at all, is a
very poor second choice to a downtown station.
OUR ROVING REPORTERS HAVE BEEN AT IT AGAIN AS GORD TAYLOR OF LAKE­
side Ontario submitted this photo of MLW, RSC 13 shown here in
the London,Ontario reclaimation yard of Canadian National. Officials
had stripped useable parts from the unit in order to help keep
other aging MLW power on the road. This unit along with some sister
units had already been sitting in the yard for over a year at the
time the photo was taken back in mid March, 1977.
Meanwhile Gord reports that CPRs 5500 and 5600 series units have
been showing up recently in the London area, complete with the
newly installed ditch lights. Almost every unit in the line up
sports some different kind of paint scheme, multi mark application,
reflective striping, etc.
Further East, Kenneth Gansel caught eNs train #34 ( Ottawa -·Mtl. )
highballing through Maxville, Ontario on a rainy Sunday, 12 June
1977 .
L..-_______________ Le 350 ou Rocket (1892)—————–

BACK IN FEBRUARY 1977, 20 CARS OF A HAMILTON TO MONTREAL FREIGHT
left the rails at some 50 m.p.h., three miles east of
Napanee on the Toronto to Montreal main line of CN.
Officials blamed the mishap on a broken tie-bar on a US owned
car, meanwhile tracks were blocked for some 24 hours. Passenger
trains were diverted over the Napanee -Smiths Falls lines as
witnessed by eNs FPA-4s #6779 & 6765, complete with five car
train rumbling past the Napanee River Bridge in Yarker on Febru­
ary 24, 1977. Photos and information courtesy of Mr. I.C. Platt
of Sydenham, Ontario.
CANADIAN 254 R A I L
As yet anather color scheme enters the Canadian Railway picture
with the bold blue and yellow of VIA, our members have been out
busy capturing the event on film. Pierre Patenaude caught twa
units recently outs hopped from Montreals Pointe St.Charles Shops,
Budd Car 6302 and FPB-4 unit 6864 on 21 May, 1977.
Other local events Pierre caught were the arrival of a set of
new Montreal Metro cars at the Plateau Youville from their man­
ufacturer Material de Transport Bombardier located at St. Anne
de la Pocatiere. Pierre snapped the action on July 10, 1977.
Just passing through was Cartier Railway C-630 rood number 34
pictured here at the Port of Montreal on 19 March, 1977. Pierre
Patenaude caught the unit before being loaded and shipped down
the St.Lawrence River to her future home.
CANADIAN 255 R A I L

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