Consulter nos archives / Consult our archives

La majorité des documents conservés par le Centre d'archives et de documentation de l'ACHF sont disponibles pour consultation.

Most of the documents kept by the ACHF Archives and Documentation Center are available for consultation.

Canadian Rail 305 1977

Lien vers le document

Canadian Rail 305 1977

r ;
. . ~
No. 305
JUNE 1977

~
WINN IPEG
0
UTE Of CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
TRAIN H286
Winnieeg

5 ioux Lookout
I..EWIS
I
–z-
ELMA
< >
z

~
D
DECIMAL
m
>
————-

D
Z
MALACHI
~
>

-WADE D
MINAKI

MAP OF THE REDDITT
SUB-DIVISION – CNR
REDDITT
CANYON
NO TO SCALE
BY, KENNETH A. W. GAN5FL
REO LAKE ROAD

MAY 1976 •

.m C
e. 0
me m
MESO
L
,n
om r



-.
m
••
HUOSON
_m
0
z

SIOUX LOOKOUT
THUNDER
BAY …….
~
SUPERIOR JeT.
MIXED T~IN TO
SIOUX LOOKOur
Kenneth A.W. Gansel
Map and Photographs by the Author.
J
ust in case you might think that it was all
done on purpose, let me say at once that,
partially by chance and partially by design,
I was in Winnipeg, Manitoba, in February,
1976. This circumstance suggested that, for
the fun of it, I might return to Ottawa by
riding mixed trains, as many as possible, on
the way east. A rapid consultotion of the
current public folder suggested that I might
ride as many as three mixed in three days:
Train M286, Winnipeg to Sioux Lookout; Trains
M269-M270, Hornepayne to Manitouwadge and re­
turn and Train 676 – a mini-mixed -from
Hornepayne to Oba on the ex-National Trans­
continental portion of Canadian National Ra­
ilways main line.
The gaps between Sioux Lookout and Hornepayne, Oba and Ottawa
were bridged by riding Train 2, the S uper Continental, eastbound.
You may be surprised to learn that it was possible to ride some 390
miles using CNs mixed-train services.
Our faithful member from Pointe Claire, Qu6bec Mr. Bill Donaldson
has provided the excellent pen and ink sketch represented on this
months cover. Inspired by the CRHAs excursion in commemoration
of the fiftieth anniversary of the opening of the Mount Royal
Tunnel which operated on October 20,1968, Bill Donaldson has sket­
ched the historic electric locomotive and train as she appeared at
CNs Val Royal Station. With all the alternatives and studies
presently under consideration regarding both the Montreal Urban
Community Transit Commission and the proposed rapid transit link
to Mirabel Airport old 101 and sisters have indeed become an en­
dangered species.
AT 08 30 HOURS ON A DULL FEBRUARY 1976 MORNING, CANADIAN NATIONALS
mixed Train M286 gets underway for its run to Sioux Lookout, Ontario.
Note the Road Repair Car just ahead of combine Number 7189.
It all started at the Canadian National Railways station at
Winnipeg at 07 00, when I walked up to the ticket wicket and asked
for a one-way coach ticket to Ottawa, via the mixed trains mentioned
above. The ticket clerk was quite surprised and rather confused at
being asked for such a ticket and, as he did not have the tariff for
the Hornepayne-Manitouwadge portion, he had to call the accounting
office for the correct price. Then he had to issue two more similar
tickets, for there were two other railway enthusiasts with me who
intended to make the same journey. That was enough to make that ti­
cket clerks day.
After 20 minutes of telephoning, writing and stamping, we
our money and got the tickets and retired to the station cafe
a quick breakfast. We wondered just how many people would be
the mixed train that morning. We did notice one man wearing
jackets and snowmobile boots and carrying a corrugated carton
canned goods. He looked like a natural for a February trip
Sioux Lookout mixed~
paid
for
riding
three
of
on the
At 08 15, the train announcer said -via the PA system -that
Train M286 would now receive passengers. We filed through the bar-
rier, showing our tickets and climbed aboard. Train M286 was power­
ed that day by a GP 9, Number 4305 and had eight freight cars and a
combination baggage/passenger car, Number 7189. The combine was equip­
ped with an oil hot-air furnace and a 110v AC generator for lighting
in the rear vestibule. There were two rows of four seats -16 alto­
gether -for passengers, a small room with a desk for the conductor,
as well as other items normally found in a caboose. There was a
large baggage section, too.
We were right. The man wrapped up in the three jackets and the
snowmobile boots did board the train and he turned out to be Mr.
Frank Wade from Minaki, a regular on the mixed. Mr. Wade travelled
twice a month on the mixed from Minaki to Winnipeg and return, a dis­
tance of 229 miles. Wade, Ontario, mile 143.7 of CNs Redditt SiD, is
named for his family, who located there in the early days of the
opening up of this portion of northwestern Ontario.
CANADIAN 165 R A I L
At 08 30, the slack went out rather briskly and we were on our
252-mile jaunt to Sioux Lookout, which would take 9 hours and 40 min­
utes, if everything went according to plan. Hamburger stands -we
were told -were sufficiently infrequent in this part of the country
to suggest that we bring a lunch. We didi we were prepared for the
trip with enough food for two days, just in case the nearly 10 hour
trip was prolonged.
AT WADE, ONTARIO, THE TRAIN CREW OF THE MIXED UNLOADED FROZEN FOOD
and other provisiong for the track gang. This is a typical chore for
the crew af the mixed on its run from Winnipeg to Redditt and Sioux
Lookout, Tuesdays and Thursdays.
We were picking up speed as we passed CNs Transcona Shops, just
east of Winnipeg. The urban area began to thin out and, before long,
we were out in the white country. We could hear our conductor talk-
ing on the radio with the crew of Train 374, which would follow us
in about 45 minutes. Our conductor wanted 374 s crew to drop off four
tankcars of gasoline at Red Lake Road, 71.3 miles west of Sioux Look­
out, but the latter were reluctant to do this. But the dispatcher, who
had been listening to this exchange all the while, interrupted the
conversation to tell 374s conductor to do it, anyway. The conductor
was a little put off, because he was concerned that he would be plac­
ing his passengers in danger, if he had to bring back the tankcars
from Siaux Lookout to Red Lake Road, the next day.
Our first stop was at Lewis, mile 204.3 of the Redditt SiD, to
let Number 1, the Super Continental, pass. Next stop was Elma, mile
196.8, to set off four cars and pick up two bunk cars. The station
at Elmo was still painted in Canadian Northern Railway colours and
was of wooden construction with a stucco exterior. After about 20
minutes, we were rolling again. The next stop was at Decimal, mile
CANADIAN 166 R A I L
175.0, to let Number 374 overtake us; the Redditt SiD is eTC-signal-
led, so we had no meet orders. By now, it was snowing. We rumbled
through Winnitoba, much to the surprise and disappointment of the
section-men, who wanted to put their pay-ca~ds on the mixed to have
them delivered to Sioux Lookout. They were very put off, no question.
Via the radio, our conductor asked the engineer why he did not stop
and the engineer said that he did not know that he had to; nobody
had told him to stop for the time-cards. Well, no doubt he would be
forgiven for the oversight; it was his first run with the mixed.
We were talking to Mr. Frank Wade when Train M286 pulled into
Wade, Ontario, which was and is just a passing track in the bush.
Here, we set off the two bunk cars and unloaded a reefer-full of
frozen food for the steel gang working on doubling the main line
between Wade and Minaki. The boxes of frozen food were unloaded a-
cross the main line on a blind curve, by means of a human conveyor
belt, passing the boxes from one man to another. We got the distinct
impression that this was what a mixed-train operation was all about.
The next stop was Minaki, where Mr. Wade Left us. He said that
he hoped to hitch a ride down the highway about five miles or so and
then he would have a walk through the bush to his camp a few miles
from the highway. He was accustomed to travel to Winnipeg about twice
a month for shopping and made use of mixed Trains M286/M287 for
transportation for the larger part of the journey.
For the 14 miles from Minaki to Redditt, we had the passenger
portion of the combo all to ourselves. Redditt used to be a division
point in the days of steam, but now all that remains of this once­
busy terminal is the large two-storey station and part of the round­
house. Most of the yard tracks hove been lifted.
MIXED TRAIN M286 WENT INTO THE HOLE AT REDDITT FOR A MEET WITH EXTRA
5581 west, with three units on the head-end. This took place about
half-way on the run to Sioux Lookout.
CANADIAN 167 R A I L
We were in the hole for Extra 5581 west, with the roadmaster
from Sioux Lookout aboard. He swung off Ex5581 and boarded our mixed
train. An Indian lady and her child also entrained for Sioux Lookout.
Fifty-two miles further east, we ground to a stop at Red Lake
Road, which is about 100 miles south of Red Lake. We switched out the
worrisome four cars of gasoline and picked up 14 cars of lumber. This
took about 30 minutes. Our trip from Redditt to Red Lake Road had in­
cluded two tunnels at Canyon, one at Mile 89 and the other at Mile
88.2. These two spots would make ideal locations at which to spend
one or two days in the summer, photographing trains on CNs trans­
continental main line. There is one other tunnel on this subdivision
at Mile 41.5. Of course, it is very hard to make any statements re­
gording the black flies and mosquitos in June on a day in February.
AT RED LAKE ROAD, ONTARIO, THE MIXED PICKED UP TWO FLATS LOADED WITH
lumber, after setting off four tankcars of gasoline. There was quite
a lot of activity here, considering that all there was on the roil­
way was a passing siding and a couple of stub sidings.
By the time we reached Hudson, 15 miles west of Sioux Lookout,
it was too dark to take any photographs, although we had a meet with
another westbound extra freight. We got to Sioux Lookout at 18 OO,ten
minutes ahead of schedule. Our arrival generated or coincided with
a great flurry of activity, even though there were only five passen­
gers on board, including ourselves. The freight part of the train
was quickly spotted in the freight yard, as the crew had had a long
day and were anxious to book off for supper and a well earned rest.
Early the following day, they were scheduled to depart Sioux Lookout
for the 252-mile haul back to Winnipeg.
In 1975, the Winnipeg-Sioux Lookout mixed Train M286/M287 opera­
ted twice-a-week, leaving Winnipeg on Tuesdays and Thursdays and re­
turning from Sioux Lookout on Wednesdays and Fridays. It said in the
public timetable that these trains would stop at ~ location along
the route, to entrain or detrain revenue passengers, as there were
-and are – a number of summer cottages along the line, owned by
people living in Winnipeg.
CANADIAN 168 R A I L
A~:DARKNESS CAME CLOSER AND CLOSER, THE INSIDE OF COMBINE NUMBER 7189
;be.came cosier and cosier. In addition to the two railway enthusiasts,
.. ,1:no will be recognized by some readers, there was a l.ady from Redditt
6nd a gentleman from Winnipeg. It wos now too dark to take any more
pictures of CN mixed Train M286.
The spring 1976 public timetable advertised these same trains on a
slightly different timing. They were not shown as mixed trains,
but they probably were, just the same. During the summer holiday per­
iod, two additional Trains 190/191 operated from Winnipeg to Farlane,
just east of Redditt, on Friday nights, returning to Winnipeg on
Sunday nights. Obviously, these trains were for the convenience of
the Winnipeg cottage-goers.
The Winnipeg-Sioux Lookout mixed train service is really enjoy­
able if you can spend the time required without worrying about the
fact that you are on the rear-end of a freight. You can take a short
course in the fine art of railroading from one importont point of
view, with a reasonable amount of enjoyment and comfort included. On
the trip described, we all enjoyed it. Of course, you might say that
we were already biased when we boarded the train. You would be right.
But we are sure that almost everyone who would like to see this re­
mote portion of Canada close-up would enjoy the trip, too. Maybe it
would be more pleasant in the summer, after the black flies and mos-
quitos have departed, of course, but it would nonetheless lack a
mysterious something that only the Canadian winter can and does
contribute.
EXPORTABLE
TECHNOLOGY
5.5. Worthen
N
early a quarter of a century ago (1954), when it was
decided on the motion of President den Hollander of
the Netherlands Railways (NS) to organize a fleet of
fast, light-weight trainsets to operate intercity
over the main lines of seven European countries,no one
would have ever guessed that, one day, four units of
these first-generation trains would, one day, make
the journey to Canada. The Trans-Europe Expresses(TEE),
for such was their class name, soon won back to the
railways of western Europe much of the passenger traf­
fic which had been lost to the private automobile and
the short-haul airlines.
Switzerland and the Netherlands were the first members of the
group to implement President den Hollanders recommendation, order­
ing five four-car, diesel-powered trainsets in 1957, for service on
the Zurich-Amsterdam and Amsterdam-Paris runs.
PHOTO COURTESY Swiss Federal Railways
Swiss TEE-diesel train set operated for more than fifteen years
TEE RAm 501,502
Dleselalsklr. T fens-Europ-Expre6·Zug
._—–__ ,,,,, ___ .
Wagen 1
Oienslgewlehl lolal 114r
Aaddurchmeaser des Much.·wagens .
Reddurchmesaor der Qbrlgen Wagen .
Getrlebeuberaetzung ……….. .
Anzahl Fahrmotoren … .
Mlnlmalos Relbungagewlcht ..
Dienstgewlcht des luges ……… .
Max. Gewlchl des Zuges (voll belastel)
Gepackraum Ladegewlcht ….. .
Brennstoffvorrat ……. .
Anzshl Sitzplalze
Anzahl RastlluretionspUitze ……. .
Nennlalstung der Hauptdleselmotoren
1040mm
.940
mm
1 : 3.14
4
761
228 I
240
I
11
4800 I
114
32
b.,1400U ………. 2Xl000PS
Nannla/stung d81 Hllfsdlenlmotors
b.1 1000 U …………. .
Max. Anfahrzugkraft am Rad ..
StundenzugkrBft am Rad
bel V ~ 70 kmlh
lelstung em Red …………. . lalstung
an der Welle ……… , ..
Maxlmala: Guchwlndlgkelt …….. .
5700 kg
1500PS
4X285 kW
1040 km/h
DDoor
q~~ ;W–1t)O-.!10 __________ . __ , Wagen 2
Silzplilze 54
Tara 38t
That same year, France introduced a companion TEE service from
Paris to Amsterdam, in cooperation with the Netherlands Railways.The
Federal Republic of Germany introduced the same type of service be­
tween Dortmund and Paris. Each of the countries participating in the
TEE program (France, West Germany, Luxemburg, Belgium, the Nether-
lands, Switzerland and Italy) was delegated the responsibility of
constructing its own trainsets, but minimum common standards had
already been agreed to by all the participants. These basic stan-
dards included train speeds, seat placement, sound-proofing, ven-
tilation, lighting and exterior painting for easy recognition by the
public.
And so it was that, from 1957 onward, diesel-powered intercity
trainsets of various forms and designs, were ta be seen flashing
across the landscape of western Europe, all easily identified by
their uniform colour scheme of red and cream, and their common inter­
national designation: TRANS EUROPE EXPRESS.
But to return to TEE Type 1. The only readily-visible interior.
differences in the five Swiss-Netherlands trainsets were in the col­
ours of the seat upholstery, the walls, ceilings and floor-coverings.
Each trainset was composed of a power-car, with various service com­
partments, followed by three passenger cars, one a dining car and the
las~ with a drivers cab, so that the trains were bi-directional and
did not need to be turned at their terminii.
Nennleistung des Hilfsdieselmolors
bei 1000 U … … .
Max. Anfahrzugkraft am Rad ..
Siundenzugkraft am Rad
bei V ~ 70 km/h
leis tung am Rad ….. .
Leistung 8n der Welle. . . ..
Mu:imaJe Geschwindigkeit .. , ….
T .. A ….. EURO,, ~XPEI!6 I
DDDLl Dt:=ILJ i
……………….. _ … D_._ .. _ .. _. ______ .~
300 PS
13000 kg
5700 kg
1500 PS
4X285kW
140 km/h
~ I~.
___ .1 .. ttc19 _____________ 1< __ _
Wagen 3
Silzplatu 32
T..,a 391
Schweizerische Bundesbahnen
Zugforderungs-und WerksUittedienst
lUOO
,,,,,
Wagen 4
Slb:ptltu 42
lb.lfl .. ~Il,,7951 I awll,,,,,,,: Wlrk,.pn., SIB UII eae
A consortium of Swiss and Netherlands industries were given the
responsibility of designing and constructing this new rolling stock.
The Netherlands company, Werkspoor N.V., undertook the manufacture of
the power-cars and supplied the diesel engines. Brown, Boveri and
Company of Boden, Switzerland, furnished the electrical equipment.The
passenger cars were ordered from the Societe industrielle suisse
(SIG: Schweizerische Industrie Gesellschaft) of Neuhausen, Switzer­
land. The trainsets could be coupled in multiple, but additional
cars could not be coupled into the individual train because of the
increased power thereby required from the prime-movers.
Each of these TEE Type 1 trainsets could seat 114 passengers in
the two coaches, with another 32 seats available in the restaurant
car. The total weight of the train was 225 tonnes, the power-cor it­
self weighing 115 tons. The adhesion weight was 76 tonnes and the
total length over buffers was 98 metres.
In the engine room of the power-cor were two diesel engine-elec-
tric generator sets, each delivering 1000 hp for traction, and a
third diesel motor-generator of 300 hp for various train auxiliaries.
The traction diesel engines were four-cycle design, with B~chi-system
high-pressure supercharging and inlet-air cooling. They were 16-cyl­
inder, V-type engines with pistons of 160 mm bore and 200 mm stroke.
Maximum engine speed was 1400 rpm.
The main traction generators were designed for a one-hour rating
CANADIAN 172 R A I L
of 1250 amperes at 650 volts. The generator for the train auxiliary
services delivered three-phase, 50-cycle current at 220/380 volts,
with a continuous output of 270 kVA.
The two outer axles of each three-axle truck were driven by a
traction motor. The four motors were designed for a continuous out-
put of 292 kw at 580 v and 1550 rpm. They were flexibly mounted on
the trucks and transmitted their power to the axle by means of a
flexible drive of the usual Brown Boveri type.
The body of the power-car was of rigid, self-supporting con-
struction and included the drivers cab, the engine room about 13
metres long, a baggage compartment three and a half metres long, three
small rooms for customs personnel, the train conductor and the tech­
nical assistant, as well as a small toilet for the train crew.
As these TEE trainsets operated over the railways of several
countries during one run, their operation was simplified as much as
possible. Train direction and speed was controlled by the driver
through three levers: one for the speed (throttle), one for the
brakes and one for the direction of travel.There were several switch­
es for lighting and control. On the instrument panel, there were
four ammeters showing traction-motor current, three tachometers for
the diesel engine speeds and air-brake gauges. On the control panel
there was a Hasler electric speed recorder and various indicating
lights. Safety appliances included an automatic train-stop control
which shut off the power and applied the airbrakes when the driver
was incapacitated.
The direct-current traction generators were rigidly coupled to
:r the diesel engines. The 50 kW generator for the traction auxiliaries
h was a part of the main traction generator and supplied direct current
:1, for the radiator motors, air compressors, emergency lighting, train
control and battery charging. Each traction generator supplied two
traction motors, permanently coupled in parallel.
To start the diesel engines, a 90-plate alkaline battery with
a capacity of 300 ampere-hours used the traction generators, acting
as starter-motors, to crank the diesels.
The diesel engines were water-cooled, with cooling radiators in­
stalled in the power-car roof and fitted with electrically-driven fans
to force air through them. Thermostats automatically regulated the
cooling-water temperature. Safety devices stopped the diesel engines
when the cooling-water temperature rose beyong 85
0
C , when the cool­
ing-water level in the radiators was too low or when the lubricating­
oil pressure or cooling-water pressure fell too low. T~ere were four
fuel tanks installed with a combined capacity of 4.5 m •
Two air pumps supplied compressed air for the brakes; each pump
compressed 800 litres of air per minute to a maximum of 9 atmos-
pheres (135 psig). The Oerlikon brakes facilitated gradual brake
application and release. The clasp-type brakes acted through two
shoes per wheel (braking ratio of 150%).
The maximum speed of these trainsets, anticipated by the cal-
culations to prepare the timetables, was 140 km/h • Tests confirmed
that a speed of 70 km/h could be achieved on a gradient of 1.6% in
three miButes after starting.
The various transportation ministries participating in the Trans
Europe Express service not only wanted to introduce fast train ser­
vices between the large cities of western Europe, but also were anx­
ious to provide the maximum in passenger confort. Therefore, every
CANADIAN 173 R A I L
care was taken to improve the interior arrangements and riding
qualities of the coaches, the former following simple and well pro­
portioned lines. The coaches were mounted on American-style trucks.
The chassis was formed of hollow, welded beams.
Since the coaches were equipped with Stone air-conditioning, it
was therefore necessary to mount the window-panes permanently in their
frames, thus enhancing the sound-proofing of the cars. For added pas­
senger comfort, window-shades were fitted to each frame. All of the
seats were individual, with reclining backs and an attractive cover­
ing of fine quality fabric.
The first coach behind the power-car was arranged in the Euro­
pean style with a side-corridor giving access to nine compartments,
each having six seats. Each compartment measured 2100 mm wide by
1925 mm deep. The second car was the restaurant car. Its kitchen was
equipped with numerous modern electrical appliances: grill, fryer,
coffee-maker, electric mixer, etc. It was possible to prepare single­
choice meals and to serve a large number of them. In the dining car,
there were eight tables seating four persons each in the main area,
while 18 additional passengers could be served in a smaller, adjoin­
ing room. The last car of the trainset, which could also be used as
a control car, was a centre-aisle type, seating 42 passengers. At
the outer end of this car, there was a driving compartment and, near­
by, a small sleeping compartment for the train-crew.
The entrance-exit doors to the cars in these TEE trainsets were
specially designed and recessed into the bodies of the cars. The
end-platforms and gangways between the coaches were also specific to
these trains, being larger than usual and completely closed in. The
passengers were thereby sheltered from blasts of air and dust should
they wish to go to and from the restaurant car, while the train was
at speed.
When these Netherlands-Swiss trainsets were placed in service in
1957, three of them were given road Numbers 1001-1003 on the Nether­
lands Railways (NS), while the other two became Numbers 501-502 of
the Chemins de fer federaux (CFF) of Switzerland. CFF Number 501 was
destroyed in an accident at Aitrang, near Munich in West Germany,
while operating as the TEE Bavaria.
From 1957 to 1974, these TEE Type 1 trainsets provided service
between different cities in western Europe, notably as the TEE Edel­
weiss, Zurich-Bruxelles-Amsterdam. Travellers liked these trainsets
and the Swiss CFF were sorry that they could not have used them long­
er. However, the development of the quadri-current electric locomo­
tive and the progress made in the field of polycurrent trainsets
and locomotives necessitated the replacement of these diesel train­
sets with newer electric-powered trains.
After a series of discrete negotiations, Ontarios Minister of
Transport announced on October 9, 1976, that these four TEE Type 1
trainsets would be purchased by the Government of Ontario, which
would then lease them back to Ontario Northland Rail Services (ONR)
for use on the Toronto-North Bay-Timmins run in northern Ontario,
a distance of 783 km .
Before beginning their new career in Canada, the trainsets were
to be completely overhauled in Switzerland and the Netherlands. The
diesel prime-movers would be thoroughly inspected and repaired at
the shops of the Netherlands Railways at Tilburg. The trucks and
traction motors were to be repaired at the Swiss CFF shops at Zur­
ich, while the car-bodies and interior fittings would be examined and
CANADIAN 174 R A I L
renewed as required by the Societe industrielle suisse (SIG) at Neu­
hausen, in fact the very shops where these trains were built back in
1957.
The ONR planned that the first two of these trainsets would be
placed in service at the end of April 1977, with the remaining two
entering service by the end of September. This meant that at least
two of the four trains would have to be ready to be loaded at Rot-
terdam at the end of March, 1977. It was assumed that, regardless of
the ONRs schedule, all four trains would come to Canada at the same
time.
No one knows for sure how these TEE Type 1 trains, engineered
for the somewhat more moderate climate of western Europe, will per­
form during the chill winter of northern Ontario. The optimistic and
probably predetermined position of the purchaser is that if these
Type 1s could scamper up and down western Europe through more than
fifteen winters, then their chances of success in Canada are very
good.
Someone has facetiously remarked that, frequently, over-age Can­
adian rolling stock completes its career in another country, notably
one in South America. Thus, the purchase second-hand of European rol­
ling stock by a Canadian railway is probably something of a first
in Canada, if not in North America.
On the other hand, the Swiss and Dutch are to be complimented
for taking the first step in what is demonstrably the development of
exportable technology, at least for self-propelled trainsets. After
all, the Swedish and French engineers are not the only ones who can
design and build high-performance diesel-powered trains~
Acknowledgements.
The author would like to thank M. Sebastien Jacobi, Secretariat
general CFF, Information and Public Relations, M. Jean-Michel Leclercq,
Representative for Europe, Canadion Railroad Historical Association,
and Mr. B.A. Biglow, Motive Power & Car Equipment, Canadian National
Railways, Montreal, Canada, for their kind assistance in the prepar­
ation of this article.
The photograph accompanying this article is Number 501 of the
Chemins de fer federaux of Switzerland, who kindly provided the pic­
ture. The train diagram was also provided by the CFF.
r—-From~~~—.
Our Archives
We are pleased to present a new department in the pages of CANA­
DIAN RAIL called FRON OUR ARCHIVES. From time to time we will
select a representative cross section from our collection and re­
produce them for your enjoyment. Unless otherwise credited the
photos in this selection are all from the collection of our Editor
Emeritus Mr. S.S. Worthen which he has generously donated to the
CRHA.
It was back in the spring of 1949 when the Montreal Tramways Com­
pany was in the course of constructing their Garland Termius on
Decarie Boulevard. To accomodate track re-arrangement the MTC ar­
ranged for single track operation through the construction area.
Here we see a southbound 1600 class one man car equipped with a
golden glow headlight peculiar to the suburban lines of the MTC
embarking passengers at the corner of Decarie Blvd. and Plamondon Ave. Today
thi s 1 ocati on represents a si x 1 ane depressed express­
way complete with the associated service roads, pollution and noise
•.•••••••• how times have changed.

A-be·audful sunfl:Y day iii the rollln:9hills of the Eastern Townships
saw,CPR No. 419 pr.eparing to lift out on a-rural-run. T:.his loc.orno­
t
ive. on.e 0 f the D -4.; G c 1.a5 s Wa s . b·u il t a 1:An9 us S h{)p:s. i. n 19].5,.
CHRs class X-10-A (4-6-4-FT) provided commuter service
Lakeshore to the western suburbs of Montreal for years.
to operate in either direction equally well here we see
Vaudreuil. Quebec in 1948.
along the
Equipped
No. 48 at
Meanwhile acrosS the platform on the paralleling CPR line Sandy
caught G3J Pacific No. 2469 on the head end of the Ottawa train,
the locomotive was barely broken in having been built by MLW in
1948.
Steaming along with a string of box cars is CPR class D-lu-G
No. 872 pictured here in 1949 on the eastbound tract immediately
behind Blue Bonnets Racetrack within the city limits of Montreal.
The locomotive was built at Angus shops in 1910 and was one of the
hundreds of ten wheelers on the system.
Remember the days when the New York Central trundled across the
bridge and into Cornwall. Ontario? While details of the photo are
lacking the effect is superlative as NYC No. 1273 blows off steam
on a foggy day back in the late 40s.
South of the Border saw such things as the Delaware & Hudsons
nearly new Alco, RS-2 heading up a mainline drag. Built in Novem­
ber 1946 the D&H 4000 sported builders number 74991, she was
scrapped in April of 1961.
Representing the City of Toronto is tourtram 2894 pictured here
by Ted Wickson eastbound on Queen Street near Victoria Street on
August 6, 1973. This is one of two such cars rehabiliatated and
placed into tourtram I charter excursion service by the TTC in
recent years.
Not to be forgotten also is the Montreal and Southern Counties,
here represented by car 104 in excursion service and pictured on
the Richelieu River Bridge near Chambly, Quebec. Car 104 was
built by Ottawa Car in 1912 and is presently preserved at the
Canadian Railway Museum in St. Constant, Quebec.
. .
The· ……. ~ ..
business car
OFF AGAIN -CN ANNOUNCED IN APRIL THAT PLANS TO UPGRADE THE RAIL
line between Gillam, Man. and the port of Churchill were
being cancelled. Questioned in the House of Commons, Trans­
port Minister Lang said that the apparent public reasons for
that postponement do not make a great deal of sense and I will
be looking into the matter.
(Hansard, April 20/77)
AU REVOIR IMPERIALS -PARIS IS LOSING THE LAST OF ITS DOUBLE
decker buses, known as imperials. They ripped off the
branches of the chestnut trees, to be found on most routes,
and had been restricted to two treeless routes, one to the Opera
and the other to the Concorde. Most will be turned into mobile
blood donor units. The top deck will serve as a restaurant and a bedroom,
according to a spokesman for the transit authority.
(The London Guardian)
NEW GO STATIDN -THE PRESENT BRONTE (ONT.) RAIL STATION WILL
be closed on completion of a new Oakville West GO station
in July.
LAKE PLACID (N.Y.) COULD SEE RAIL PASSENGER SERVICE LATER THIS
year. A citizens advisory committee has been appointed to
study the future of the Remson-Lake Placid line for the
State Transportation Dept. The l18-mile line was port of the
former Pen Central and was acquired by the State of New York
when PC planned to abandon and tear up the line. A group of
Adirondack citizens are joining with the owners of a Pennsyl­
vania-based railroad firm to form the Adirondack Railway Corp.
to operate the line. The Corporation has already acquired two
steam locomotives and a number of coaches and has options on
CANADIAN 185 R A I L
two self-propelled motor coaches. No regular passenger ser­
vice would be operated but only excursions and charter groups.
The line is in sufficiently good shape that it could be up­
graded to handle regular passenger train service to the 1980 Olympic
Games at Lake Placid.
(The Semaphore, Rochester
Chapter, NRHS)
SECOND ANNUAL RAIL PASSENGER CONFERENCE & PUBLIC TRANSPORT USERS
Congress is now scheduled for Sept. 30-0ct. 2, at Algonquin
College, Woodroffe Campus, Ottawa. Sept. 30 session will
be held at the Four Seasons Hotel (formerly the Carleton Towers).
A rail excursion is planned for the afternoon of Oct. 2. Contact
Mrs. Barbara Smith, Algonquin College Conference Secretariat,
1385 Woodroffe Ave., Ottawa, Onto K2G IV8, if you want to con­
tribute or participate. Proceedings of the first such confe­
rence (held last year) are now available from the Bookstore,
University of Regina, Regina, Sask. S4S OA2, at $5.95 plus
$0.30 postage, according to Rick Mannen.
AMTRAKS PERFORMANCE IS REPORTED IN THE NATIONAL RAILWAY BULLETIN
(NRHS) Vol. 42, No.1. Here are excerpts relating to trains
serving Canadian points:-
Trains Percent on-time
operated
Nov. 1..76 Nov·U6 Oc t. 1..76 Nov·U5
New York-Montreal 60 66.7 71. 0 80.0
Washington-Montreal 60 83.3 66.1 86.7
Seattle-Vancouver 60 88.3 91.9 95.0
Passenger Counts
Jan.-Nov·U5 Jan.-Nov·U6
New York-Montreal 81.645 94,969
Washington-Montreal* 273,865 330,442
Seattle-Vancouver 42,508 42.234
* includes Washington-New York local traffic
ALGOMA CENTRAL IS DEVELOPING A LAND-USE PLAN FOR 850,000 ACRES IT
owns between Sault Ste. Marie and Wawa. Onto The land was
granted by an act of the Legislature in 1900, under which the
railway received 7,400 acres of land for every mile of rail line
it built in an area between the Soo and Hawk Junction, near Wawa.
(Toronto Globe and Ma i l)
CANADIAN PACIFIC ESTIMATES SERVICE LIVES FOR PRINCIPAL CATEGORIES
of assets as follows, according to its 1976 annual report to
CANADIAN 186 R A I L
shareholders:
road diesel locomotives -20 years; railway freight cars -30
years; ships -20-25 years; aircraft -12-15 years; and trucks -8-12
years. Rates based on these estimated service lives are
used to calculate depreciation.
ALGOMA CENTRAL CHAIRMAN, JOHN B. AIRD, TOLD THE ANNUAL MEETING,
April 18, that the company has been awarded a contract by
Ontario Hydro to move coal from Thunder Bay to Nanticoke
(Ont.). The contract will begin in 1979 and cover a 15-year
period. This business for ACRs marine division is expected to
contribute significantly to revenue, and the fleet (now eleven
vessels with a twelfth under construction) will be expanded.
The rail division has been unable to expand because of industrail
and geographical limitations. However, the system is being up­
graded under a program which calls for an expenditure of $2
million annually for three years.
(Toronto Globe & Mail)
OUR MEMBERS HAVE BEEN BUSY ON THE INDUSTRIAL CIRCUIT DURING THIS
past month, firstly Mr.Oliver McKee of Cardinal, Ontario informs
us that ex CN 8018 has gained a new blue color scheme and become
CANADA STARCH No.7. This locomotive replaces their No.6 a GE 44
tonner which we understand has been retired. It is interesting
that our own diesel locomotive No.77 used to switch the Canada
Starch plant in the early Diesel era .
. .
. … , ..
CANADIAN 187 R A I L
Pierre Patenaude reports that DOMINION BRIDGE of Lachine, Quebec
operates former CN 5-4 No.8020 as their N-16 in switching duties.
Pierre captured the unit on film back on 6 January 1977. Meanwhile
over at the 5IDBEC D05CO Montreal Works CLC units are not extinct
as they operate this 35 ton CLC Whitcomb unit serial 2645 built in
1950 and pictured on the 5th. of January 1977. This unit replaces
side rod clancking No.458 serial 28-462 built in 1946 and present­
ly out of service because of engine failure. Our thanks to Pierre
and Oliver McKee for keeping us abreast of the industrial scene.
CANADIAN 188 R A I L
CANADIAN 189 R A I L
JOHN AND ANDREW SUTHERLAND OF WEST HILL, ONTARIO, HAVE TEAMED UP TO
present an interesting series of three pictures taken in
and around Toronto, Ontario. The first picture, that of
Canadian National Railways closs Q-5-b diesel-electric switcher Num­
ber 7988, was taken at the Canadian Railway Museum, Harbourfront Park,
Toronto in April 1976. Number 7988 has been restored to its original
point scheme.
CP RAILs SD 40 Number 5500 was photographed by John on February
28, 1976 and shaws the small multimark that was applied to a few of
the divisions GMDL road engines, painted in 1975. This paint scheme
was superceded by a new modification, with the full-size symbol and
brooder end-stripes, as shown on Number 5764, at the rear of Number
5500.
Andrew photographed two switchers, Numbers 52 ond 56, of the
Toronto, Homilton and Buffalo Railway, outside the roundhouse at
Hamilton, Ontario on a sunny February 3, 1975. Andrew noted that the
TH&B was then already wholly-owned by Canadian Pacific Limited.
PROPOSED 40-MIlE LINE, ASHCROFT~ClINTON (B.C.) HAS BEEN POSTPONED
indefinitely. This bridge between the B.C. Railway and
both CN and CP main lines was announced in 1973 as part of
a joint rail construction package estimated to cost $40 million.
By 1975, inflation had pushed the cost to $65 million -and de­
ferral was decided that year but not publicly announced until
the recent (1977) western regional conference of the Engineering
Institute of Canada in Vancouver. Robin T. lewis, Department of
Transport, made the announcement. At the same meeting, Charles
Armstrong, vice-president of CNs western region, stated that
studies were under way for a new section of line which would have
the effect of double-tracking a 3D-mile stretch of main
line west of Red Pas~ Junction. For a distance of some 30 miles,
the mainline parallels the northern branch to Prince Rupert. A
connection between the two lines near Valemount, B.C., as being
studied, would cost an estimated $12 million.
(Vancouver Province)

THE ONTARIO NORTHLAND RAILWAY WILL BE PLACING FOUR NEW TRAINS INTO
service this summer and fall. Origionally port of the TEE (Trans
Europe Express) network each refurbished train consistl of a diesel
locoaotive ond three cars. The first two units will operate between
Toronto and Timmins, beginning June 9, although on inaugural run is
scheduled for Hoy 28 to be followed by display stop. along the route
to enoble local residents to inspect the coaches. The first locomot­
ive is pictured here being unloaded fro~ the SS Wolfgang RUls on
April 19,1977. Photograph courtesy of the TORONTO GLOBE AND MAIL
BACK COVER
This north-bound doubleheoded CN ski-special was caught by Sandy
Warthen back in the late faurties as she ruabled to a station
stop at Horin Heights, Quebec. Only the suspect grade through
the toll gross remains today as the trains, station ond other
non-roil aeons of tronsportotion hove long disappeared froa the
scene. ( Photo CRHA A{.chives )

Canacial Rail
IS~N 00015-41175
;,-

by
Cona!ian __ HsIuricaIAssociation
P.O.b2:2..sa.IIone..~~~H383J5
Edtor,s.s._
_ P.Po.qlhy
Clll.G4IIV ,. SOUTII-II(n[t/I
L..II … I~. cr. •• ~ on> 23.4. A …… ,I.II.,Col, .. 1,ALt •• .. .. ,
on ……
O.E.I •• I ……….. ,
,0.0. 1..11 … A. o … w •• c …. ~. ~lN Ill
••
•• nlu,S .. ,..uy
lfiC OMST
•• 0 .••• 100<1,$1.0 A.V ........... C.y6C 211
lOOl lI(IU~rI
C.II.II ••• h.,S ….. Oly .0 …. 6102 … 1 .. C.[~_ ••• U •. T ••
fllltCllflO I. _ IIIVlllOll
••
s..n h …… , .0 ….. iIIo9,To •• 1o.1 h …… O ••• ,,~
IInilStll I. usn VUIO!I
J ••• ~.II •. … , ….. , :100 t-M 1_ h •• , III ••••• , 0. ••

AssociatiOl. Rep esE!lltatiYes
_ ….. u.
.. ~.
… _0 .l_ ….. _ .
llt_ )Of
• f:::.!:

……… I. ••• … • toll •• _ 01»0._ •
U
w.o …. ·_.·
,.,
•. _. ,_,_,,,.1,0 •. 0 ….
.
_11_
~ ……….
:16 0 __ .
.u …..
_ .. –
~.o
• .s .. I(>W_
,
…….
:;;;:-~.~:~-~-r.-_.!7c:i:;·;;;;_ t .. Po
_ ..
-_10;. .. )._ ..• .•••• 11
l,r~ ….. fA r,v_,. ._
:::.~: :! ~~.~:!,.~j,~ii~i:::· .::r~
n … ,
… 1I1~ .,_
J.M.Jo ••••• h.,.,.!
lOUT (A
•. (.l …… 10 . … , … S .. -.. ,,T. , … -., …. • 4 …..
VIllI! 1-Canadian RaIway fAJset.m St.Conslant;a…bee,c.n.a
• Mono IIwn IOO~ 01…..,… on dIIPIY-

Demande en ligne