Consulter nos archives / Consult our archives

La majorité des documents conservés par le Centre d'archives et de documentation de l'ACHF sont disponibles pour consultation.

Most of the documents kept by the ACHF Archives and Documentation Center are available for consultation.

Canadian Rail 303 1977

Lien vers le document

Canadian Rail 303 1977

Canadian Rail a
No.303
APRIL 1977

Anus Sho
gQ£. THE CANA PACIfIC RAILWAY Ps
All photographs courtesy CP photographic services
and we appreciate the kind co-operation of Mr. Frank Stelfox
The sprawling collection of buildings running parallel
to Rachel Street in east-central Montreal has long been known
simply as Angus Shops. Built in 1904 and named for Richard 8.
Angus, then General Manager of the Bank of Montreal and a Uirector
of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company from its inception in 1881
until his death in 1922, till! new shops ~Iere necessary in order to
replace the CPRs Delorimie~ Shops, which could not expand due to
their confined location near tile harbour front north of Notre-Dame
Street and east of Delorimier Avenue.
This original location was a plot of land 4800 by 2100
feet. The new Angus Shops comprised some 37 acres with a total
trackage of approximately 50 miles. There was an extensive gen­
eral repair shop. intended to perform work for the entire railway
system. Most of the locomotive repair work was soon transferred
from the Delorimier Shops and the car-building facilities were
moved from Hochelaga Shops.
After Angus Shops were opened in 1904, the construction
of the first steam locomotive was completed under the direction
of H.H. Vaughan, Superintendent of Motive Power. This was an
0-6-0 switcher, Number 2045, Angus Shops BIN 1385, which came off
the erecting floor in November of that year. This switcher was
followed by some 677 other engines, the last of which was G-5-a
class 4-6-2 Number 1201, BIN 2074, built in June, 1944.
~IWhat better subject to grace the cover of our April issue than this
~1951 photograph depicting a skillful patternmaker at work in CPRs Angus
Shops. This craftsman is representative of the thousands of
non operating railway employees who we normally dont get to see
preforming their particular trade but are so vital to the efficient
operation of a railroad.
+A partial aerial view of Angus shops taken in 1948 before total ur­
banization surrounded the giant plant.
I
V
Interior view of the wood freight car shop in the days when wooden
cars were the rule rather than the exception. One has to be im-}
pressed with the overall neatness of the shop, no doubt to reduce
the obvious fire hazard in such a location.
From wood to steel, here we see the interior of the steel car shop.
Unfortunately the date of the photo is unknown but plainly visible
is a variety of rolling stock including: box, gondola, passenger
and baggage cars in for repairs of varying degrees.
CANADIAN 101 R A I L
Angus Shops was a city in its~lf. It had a power sta­
tion, a hopital, ambulance service, a lieating plant, a police
force, a fire brigade, lunch rooms, a shop-canteen service, a
recreation centre and a total population of about 7,500 employ~es
at the height of its activity.
There were, at one time, some 68 buildings: 31 main
buildings, such as locomotive erecting shops, and 37 auxiliary
shops, such as machine shops and carpenters shops. There were
facilities for building locomotives and cars as well as those
for at least 90% of the necessary maintenance and heavy repairs
on this equipment. At the peak of activity, five new steam
locomotives were constructed each month, in addition to 10 new
passenger cars and 40 new freight cars and including repairs of
all kinds to existing equipment.
The repair shops at Angus had a capacity of 100 shop
repairs per day on both wooden and steel cars, which figure was
developed to about 21,000 repairs a year. Included were repairs
of all types: conversions, modernizations, improvements to bra­
kes, lighting, springing and trucks and wheels. After the advent
of the automobile, car carriers were adapted to the changing
styles. Railway passenger cars were modernized with steel-sheath­
ing and air-conditioning.
To carry out these repairs, there was a locomotive re­
pair shop, four passenger car and two freiglit car repair build­
ings, a wheel-casting foundry, a general castings foundry, a
track frog and switch repair shop, a nut-and-bolt manufacturing
shop, a large blacksmith shop, a truck repair shop, a car metal­
working machine shop, one of the largest planeiny mills in
Canada, electrical shops, a cabinet and varnishing shop for in­
terior accessories, pattern, brass and tinsmithing shops and, of
course, administration offices. All of these varied and com­
prehensive facilities were necessary to perform the building and
maintenance associated witil sucil a huge railway operation.
The wheel foundry could turn out more than 90,000
locomotive and car wheels annually. Tile grey iron foundry re­
quired more than 15,000,000 pounds of iron each year. Angus Shops needed
for a years operation 16,800,000 board-feet of
lumber, 40,000 pounds of steel, 18 million kilowatt-hours of
electricity, 13.2 million cubic feet of gas and 33.6 million
cubic feet of water.
Angus Shops always had the reputation for being able
to do the impossible and World War II established this reputation
beyong a doubt. At tile outset of the war, the Canadian Pacific
Railway Company placed the facilities of Angus Shops at the dis­
pOSition of the Government of Canada. In June 1940, the first
order for tanks was placed and Anyus would make more than 1,700
of these steel monsters before the wars end. This production
was an added burden to Angus Shops, whose employees were all
hard at work keeping the railway operating. Added to tile order
for tanks was an order for marine engines, to power frigates
and corvette-type destroyers. Range-finders for naval guns were
required; Asdic submarine detection devices were needed;
Angus Shops made them, along with a multitude of machine-tools.
In between times, the employees of Angus Shops establ ished new
The wheel shop cl rca 1946, no facet of the ra i 1 ~Iay opera ti on was
lacking at Angus Shops. No less than 74,000 cast steel wheels were
turned out per year in the peak years of Angus.
records for blood donations, essential to save the lives of many
wounded Canadian soldiers, sailors and airmen.
The repair programmes accomplished at Angus Shops in
this critical period were vital to the railway. Testing and
inspection departments, monitoring every piece of equipment on
the railway, confirmed that annual repairs and rebuilding were
held to a minimum by good workmanship and a sense of personal
responsibility on the part of every employee at Angus Shops.
One of the most interesting operations at Angus Shops
CANADIAN 103 R A I L
was the complete reconditioning or Class 1 repair of a steam
locomotive. The necessity of such a complete overhaul generally
depended on many factors including the condition of the boiler,
firebox, grate, valve gear and motion, as well as mileage run
since the last overhaul and any particular requirements neces­
sitated by the terrain through which the locomotive operated.
On arrival at Angus, the engine was taken to the coal-
i n g pit w her e the rem a i n i n g co ali nth e ten d e r ~ a s r e r,lO v e d • TIl e
firebox grates were then cleaned, the ashes were dumped, the water
drained from the boiler and the tender and the firebrick arch
was taken down and removed from the front end of the firebox.
The dead engine was then moved to the sand-blast house, where
pitted and rough exterior painted surfaces were first thoroughly
cleaned and then covered with a primer coat of rust-retardant red
oxide paint. From there, the engine was taken into the erecting
shop and placed on the stripping track, while the tender was
separated from the engine and taken to the Tender Shop.
To lift a multi-ton engine off its wheels was indeed a
major task requiring the removal of all guard stays, brake gear,
main and side-rods and, at this point, various other crafts
joined tJLe project to perform their tasks.
The smoke-box front, grates, headlight, handrails,
dynamo, steam and safety valve casings and the automatic fire­
door were all removed by the Erecting Shop crew; the firebox and
cylinder jackets by the Jacket Shop; the smoke-box netting and
plates from the front end were taken off by the Tank Shop gang,
which also commenced to strip the ash pan. The Carpenter Shop crew removed
firebox lagging, so that the firebox could be exa­
mined properly when being tested and the cab-seats, window sashes
and arm-rests were removed. After tile Steamfitter Shop gang had
stripped the pipes for testing, the boiler and frame were lifted
off the wheels by two cranes which trundled it down the shop and
placed it upon the pit where the repairs were to be made.
Assuming
that the repair of the locomotive ~as to be done
on an lS-day schedule. tile progress of the principal work
was as follows:
2
3
4
5
6
Operation
stripping;
stripping;
hydrostatic test of boiler;
stripping completed and all parts cleaned
and delivered; boiler tube removal com­menced;
boiler tube removal completed; driving-box
brasses and wearing faces removed; valves
and valve motion cleaned and tested; main and
side-rods tested;
old cylinder and valve bushings removed;
boiler scaled and smokebox cleaned; new
driving -box brasses in place; superheater
header examined; frames repaireu;
cylinders repaired; driving boxes drilled;
,,-
c
Proof positive that steam locomotives were built at Angus as we
witness here the milling of a pair of main rods in 1948.
7
8
g
10
11
12
13
14
1 :;
16
17
13
CANADIAN 105 R A I L
superheater pipes examined; motion work
repairs commenced; dynamo cleaned;
cylinders bored; boiler patches applied;
tank, tender-frame, engine-truck and cab
repairs commenced; dynamo repairs com­menced; wooden
parts of cab cleaned and
primed;
frame repairs completed; staybolts instal­
led and tubes welded; numerous frame cast­
ings completed; superheater pipes finished;
tender surfaces cleaned and primed;
guard stays and shoes and wedges lined up;
tubes cut to length and tested; pumps re­
paired; superheater pipes fitted; cab doors
and sashes completed; first coat of back
engine surfacer appl ied;
boiler mountings applied; tubes rolled and
beaded; arch tubes, crossheads, guide bars,
dry pipe, etc. applied; spring gear deliv­
ered; inside of cab painted;
dry-pipe tested; tubing completed and
boiler tested; wheels and motion parts de­
livered; headlight repaired; dynamo tested;
paint rubbed down on tender and cab;
engine wheeled and trucked; dry pipe and
superheater headers applied; valves, steam
chest covers and cylinder covers applied;
tender brake details cleaned and tested;
boiler and cylinders lagged; coat of black
engine finish applied to cab and tender;
main and eccentric rods delivered; stand
pipe applied; superheater pipes applied and
tested; jacketing commenced; lettering,
numbering and striping on cab and tender
completed;
valves set; steam and exhaust pipes ap­
plied; tender and cab varnished;
engine blown through; pistons, etc. deliv­
ered; tender and tender truck repairs com­
pleted; brake gear delivered;
grates, fire-brick arch, pistons brake
gear, ash-pan and cab doors applied; tender
mounted; second coat of varnish on tank;
ash-pan and gear appl ied; smokebox front,
smokestack, cinder netting, main and side­
rods, cab sashes appl i ed; genera 1 pa i nt
work commenced;
safety valves set and sealed; all plplng
and light plate work completed, brakes tes­
ted and set; tender coupled to engine;
dynamo and wiring tested; paint work fin­
ished.
r
I
While Angus Shops brings to mind thoughts of massive cranes and heavy
repairs, so too Angus provided all of the lighter aspects
of railway repairs and maintenance. Here we see two ladies busy in
the upholstery shop running seams on passenger car window cur­
tains.
For those who are interested in figures, here are a few:
Perimiter of fence around Angus Shops Length
of concrete runways
Number of machine tools
Number of connected electric motors
Approximate demand rating of electric motors
Number of board-feet of lumber used per month
Steel tonnage consumed by Blacksmith Shop/month Tonnage
handled in Iron Foundry/month
Number of cast-iron wheels manufactured/month
14,500 feet
13,000 feet
1 ,400
1 ,600
20,SOO hp
1,400,000
150 tons
120 tons
6,200
CANADIAN 107
Tonnage handled in Wheel Foundry/month
Average output: general repairs/month
locomotives -steam
locomotives -diesel
freight car repairs
passenger car repairs
traction motor overhauls
In the plant, each day, there are an average
locomotives
freight cars
passenger cars
Output of track material, per month
frogs
switch points
switch stanus
Every day, the Reclaiming Dock handles
scrap
reclaimed value of about
($350,OOO/year)
Power requirements, per month e 1 e c t
ric i ty
water
Stores Stock:
gas
fuel oil
Approximate value
Monthly issues
R A
of
Shop manufactures & transfers/month
Steel delivered to Angus Shops each year
I L
2,225
5
20
2,000
45
60
50
1 ,000
110
100 200 100
425
$ 1 ,000
1,500,000
2,800,000
1,100,000
90,000
$6,200,000
900,000
2,000,000
tons
tons
kwh.
cu.ft.
cu.ft.
gal.
20,000 tons
The greatest population of the city which was Angus Shops
was about 7,500 workers, the average family size of these
workers being five persons. This meant that Angus Shops provided
a livinQ for some 35,000 people in Montreal.
With changing technology, Angus Shops today have shrunk
considerably. The complex is now only about half the size it
once was, due to consolidation of functions, decentralization of
activity and purchase of certain requirements, instead of manu­
facture. With the advent of dieselization in the 1950s and almost
total replacement of the steam engine by 1959, some trades became
obsolete, some departments were closed and the work-force at Angus Shops began a
slow decline to its present 2,200.
While Angus is still the main repair centre for CP RAILs
fleet of diesels, construction of freight cars and cabooses is
still carried on and the passenger car repair shop is still func­
tioning. Albeit reduced in size, CP RAILs Angus Shops are still
busy, although the responsibility of maintenance and repair of
equipment on the system is shared with Ogden Shops, Calgary,
Alberta and Heston Shops, Hillnipeg, ~1anitoba.
And there has been one other, audible change. The
whistle, which called the employees of Angus Shops to work ever
since they were opened in 1904, blew its last blast at 4.30 p.m.
on August 13, 1971. The anti-pollutionists claimed that it was
polluting the environment with noise!
120 tons of lifting capacity provided by two overhead travelling
cranes lifts the entire locomotive assembly leaving behind the
4-8-4 wheel arrangement peculiar to CPRs road numbers 3100 and 3101.
Northern type locomotives were never popular on the CPR
and the two that existed spent more than their share of time in
the shops undergoing various repairs.
The locomotive shops, if there was ever a doubt as to the magna­
tude of repairs undertaken at Angus these photos will dispell all
doubts. In the first overall view the locomotives identifiable
are: 2596, 2812 and 430. In the second photo dozens of trades­
men and supervisors are busy on and around this unidentifiable
CPR steamer. Both photos date from the early 1940, s.
The tender shop date unknown, in the foreground on the left track
is the tender to No. 2231. Without even looking too hard we can
easily spot no less than 13 tenders on the floor at the particular
time when the photo was taken.
liHRVIU( GAlE
74-
).
~
-~~
~~
;;
~
34
33
=
781
=
~82
U
;7
15
~~
~
~I
60
~
b
L..Jl
3
~
37
79
~
~38.
79
14-
12
69
~
7p:t
.~
l.J
DAVIDSON
ST.
GAff
i.
I
d
0
ci

.—11
~
1-67~
f6jl
G2
··
..
/ilnnnn
LEGEND
NO
.j SHCPS
No.
SHOPS
No.
.5HOf
OPS
No.
SItOPS
I
lOCO
.·OTIYE
SPoOPS
1> HOT HOeSt:
3
REPAIR
rro., OfFICE
58
CARrET CLEANING
SHED
,
Gj)EY RON fOUNDRY
18
SHH
CAS
liNG
SHEO

MAHklAl
~
StlOP
5.
YARD
MASTERS
OFFICE
3
P..l,TTH:N
SHOP
19
I!ICYClE
SH~I1U1
36
POliCE
8.
I
)00
STORE
60
G(NERAl
OffICE
&
EXT.
·
PATTERi!
srO~E
10
HOSPITAL
37
POLICE
STJ
:TRIC SHOP
61
BAN:
5
(IIR
ACH!r
..
e
:>H()P

lUNCH
ROOM
3.
rOllce
sv
;fR
CAR
6
SEOION
GANG
6
lMUCI(
!)H()P (CAJ

RAil
SAW
39
pouce
ST)
1·3
65
lIQUIO
AIR
7
fR~)c.Hr
CAt;:
SHOP
76
CAif TJfAUHER
fAp.~e
39M
POUCt:
sv
;I;R
CAR
66
RESERVOIR:

STEEl
CAR
SHOt
n
CAR
P.OOF
SPRINlC.lU
0
GfNERJ.L 5

67
MUNlTlON
STORE

WHrEl
FOUNDRY
28
W~E~I
BRF:A!(ER

lOCO
BLAe
10
fReG
AND SWITCH SHOP
79
WATER
coeLfll;
2
Cd!
flLACioi
flON
68
MOTOR
BLOWING
II
BOLT
J.NO
NUl
SHOP
30
Wr1Eb. f
ORY
DOCK
3
POWER
H(
CKS
6.
AUTO
PARK
12
GAS
~IOU~f
31
SCAl!:

PLANING
,.
IZING
5HfO
70
STORE
HOUSE
l3
LOCOMOTive
BAlAtKE
31
REP
AI!!:
TRACK
BLDG.
.5
GARAGE
,e.
TrNSMIlH SHOPS
71
SCALE
HOUSE
14
lRANSfOil:MI.R HOUSE
J3
A(PAIil:
TRACK
BLDG.
6
KilN
ERING
SHOP
72
SAPJD
HOuSE
o
58
No. 73 75 76 77 7. 7. 80 81 82
SlIor
S
13
e
METAL
STORE
&
lUNctlROOM
CEAR
STObCE
SHEO
COr.E STORAGE
SHED
COKE
SCALE
SHELHR
El(ClIUC
CONTROL
SHEtTER
ElECTRIC
WElDERS
SHELT~R
BICYCLE
SHHTER
SHOT BlAST
flUIlOING
REClAIM
BlDG.
RECLAIM
DOCK
() l> Z l> o l> Z 11 ~ ~ ~ III ;0 l> r

CANADIAN 115 R A I L
~IAs steam phases out, diesel phases in. Here we see t~IO vie~s of
~ the diesel shops circa 196b-1966. While the technology is com­
~ pletely different, the variation in locomotive types on the floor
~ is ever evident. A units, B units, yard and road switchers com-
bine to make the diesel shops as varied in their own way as the
steam locomotive shops.
A demonstration of the Angus built military tanks for World War II
drew thousands of workers out of the shops to see for themselves.
The prevailing spirit of the times is evidenced by the motto We
sha 11 not fa i 1 or falter as seen on the banner ins ta 11 ed acros s
the main street of Angus.
The …
business
car
THE BUSINESS CAR (FORMERLY WAYBILLS) IS EDITED BY OUR LONGTIME
member and friend Mr. John Welsh of Dorval. We wish to encourage
our members to submit any and all interesting news items be they
newspaper clippings, magazine articles, or personal observations
with or without photographic accompanyment to BUSINESS CAR, c/o
CANADIAN RAIL, P.O. Box 22, Station B, Montreal, P.Q. H3B 3J5.
Even if your news items are not published all material submitted
is turned over to the C~HA archives for future reference.
VIA RAIL CANADA INC., WITH HEAD OFFICE IN MONTREAL, WAS ANNOUNCED
by Minister of Transport Otto Lang, Feb. 28. Robert A. Bandeen,
president and chief executive officer of CNR, is chairman of the
new companys board of directors. VIAs president and CEO is Frank
Roberts, formerly vice-president of CNRs St. Lawrence Region. VIA
is a subsidiary of CNR. It will operate passenger train services
now handled by CN and CP Rail with the aim of providing improved
services at less cost to the Canadian taxpayer. Mr. Roberts says
that commuter services will not come under the proposed re-organi­
sation. As the Canadian Transport Commission decides which pass­
enger routes should be retained, VIA will take over, contracting
with CN and CP for the actual operation of trains on the properties
of either railway company. Once VIA takes over a service it will
receive 100 percent subsidies for losses on the operation, instead
of the current 80 percent passenger loss subsidy now received by
CN and CP. The government will continue 80 percent loss subsidies
for services that are not upgraded to standards suitable to be
taken over by VIA. What will happen to passenger services of the
Ontario Northland, Algoma Central and British Columbia lines is
yet unknown; similarly, the NAR and the CP-TH&B-Conrai1 link,
Toronto-Hami1ton-Buffa10 (Algoma Central lias applied to discontinue
its passenger service between Sault Ste. Marie and Hearst, on which
it lost $920,000 in 1975).
Lang said that VIA would immediately take over the busy
Quebec City-Windsor corridor, that the establishment of VIA does
not relieve CN and CP of their statutory obligation to provide
passenger service, and that the aim (of VIA) is efficient and
attractive services in areas where rail is an appropriate and ef­
fective form of passenger transportation. He hopes VIA will com­
plete its takeover of passenger train routes within two years.
As readers of CANADIAN RAIL will perceive, much room is
CANADIAN 117 R A I L
left for debate. For example, in The Montreal Star, a letter to
the editor reads:
Since creation of VIA Rail frees Canadian Pacific from its
historic contract to provide passenger services, it should be
safe for us to assume that the new Crown corporation will not
have to pay for use of the private companys trackage where
needed. Or am I dreaming?
Others have expressed fears that an AMTRAK-style opera­
tion may incur massive deficits. lang, in a letter to The Finan­
cial Times of Canada (Feb. 20/77), says in part I feel that our
program is now putting us well within reach of controlling a
rapidly escalating railway passenger deficit in Canada; I cannot
and will not promise that the railway passenger service will be in
a profit position.
Although VIA is a CN subsidiary, its board of directors
will include representations from CP Rail, government, labor and
business.
The Canadian Transport Commission is expected to release
its preferred plan for the Montreal-Toronto-Vancouver service in
1 ate Ma r c h wit h the fin alp 1 an com i n g aft e r pub 1 i c he a r i n g s . He a r­
ings on the Maritimes services are also coming soon and it is re­
ported that a so-called Charlottetown Agreement, following a Febru­
ary meeting of lang and the four premiers, calls for reduction of
through service to one daily train between Montreal and Halifax.
Public hearings are not expected to be Ileld in Maine although CP
Rails Atlantic limited provides the only regular rail passenger
service in that state.
of trains
operating
according
Meanwhile, the CTC has ordered CN to continue operation
11, 12, 14, 15, 18, 19, 601, 602, 603 and 604. Actual
losses on these runs totalled $27.3 million in 1975,
to the CTC.
CP RAILS VANCOUVER PASSENGER TERMINAL WIll BE REFUR~ISHED TO AC­
commodate commuters using the new Uurrard ferry system, scheduled
to open June 15/77. The station, built in 1912, may also become
the western terminus for VIA. A spokesman for Marathon Realty,
which owns the building, is also hopeful that it will become the
terminus for rail commuter service being planned by the B.C.
Government.
Ferry commuters wi 11 get from the ferry terminal to the
CP station by using a 400-ft. escalator and a glass-enclosed walk­
way approx. 350 ft. long which will cross over the railway tracks
and connect to the back of the station, through which they will
pass to connecting buses. (Vancouver Sun)
A SECOND RAIL PASSENGER CONFERENCE IS PLANNED FOR OTTAWA, SEPTEMBER
30-0ctober 2, 1977; co-sponsor is the Algonquin College of Applied
Arts and Technology. Theme: Progress in consumer participation
in transportation planning. The first such conference was held in
Regina last October. (SRS News)
CANADIAN U:8 R A I L
ACCIDENTLY COINCIDENTAL TO OTTO LANGS ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE FORMA­
tion of VIA Rail Canada Inc. was the introduction of Amtraks new
presence in Canada. On March 1, 1977 Amtraks sleek new Rohr
built turboliner eased out of I~ontreals ~/indsor Station on the
first regularly scheduled southbound run to New York City over
Delaware and Hudson iron. Jim Shaughnessys ever excellent photo
story tells of all the events leading up to Amtraks big day.
On February 13 test runs were initiated using the Turbo­
liner equipment between Albany/Rensselar and Montreal. These were
non-revenue runs as the regular D&H Adirondak service was obvious­
ly maintained until full introduction of the Turboliner service
could be accomplished. Our first photo shows a northbound test run
whining through Saratoga Springs, N.Y. on February 13, 1977.
Turboliner service had been introduced on the Albany/
Rensselar -New York portion of the line two weeks prior to full
implementation. Bad weather and the lack of Turbo equipment pre­
vented crew training on the D&H portion of the line resulting in
the delay. During this two week period an across the platform
transfer of passengers took place in the Albany/Rensselar station
where patrons transferred from the PA-l hauled regular D&H equip­
ment to the Turboliner for the continuation of the journey.
The first day of through New York -Montreal Turboliner
service captured on film at the meet in Mechanicville, N.Y. The
last conventionally equipped D&H southbound train hauled by that
gleaming pair of PA-ls road numbers 18 and 19 meets northbound
ADIRONDACK Turboliner train set No. 157 on March 1, 1977. Turbo­
liners are scheduled to be operating on the run for 60 days at
which time their use will be re-assessed, this whole operation
once again places the future of the famous PAs in an uncertain
position. Our sincere thanks to Jim Shaughnessy for the photos
and information.

CANADIAN 120 R A I L
MORE HOPPER CARS FOR GRAIN MOVEMENT ARE BEING BOUGHT BY CANADIAN
taxpayers (via the federal government). Three contracts worth
almost $80 million have been let for 2,000 cars, to be built by
Hawker Siddeley (Trenton, N.S.), 688 steel cars; National Steel
Car (Hamilton, Ont.), 824 aluminum cars; and Marine Industries
(Sorel, Que.), 488 steel cars. Delivery of steel cars is to begin
in July, while aluminum cars are expected 2-3 months later. Allo­
cation of cars will be based on each railways share of the total
grain movement; about 52.5 percent CP Rail, the rest CN. This will
bring to 8,000 the government-owned fleet of such cars.
BRITISH COLUMBIAS TRAVEL MINISTER, MRS. GRACE MCCARTHY, HAS AN­
nounced that the Royal Hudson steam train will leave Vancouver March
19 on a five-week promotional tour of the western U.S. Fif­
teen cities in Washington, Oregon and California will be covered.
The tour will commemorate the Queens Silver Jubilee as well as promote
B.C.s tourist attractions. (Toronto Globe and Mail)
Look whose coming to visit the nortn-west U.S., none other than ex
CPR Royal Hudson 2860 and train on a vast publicity tour to promote
British Columbia to our friends south of the border. Both photos
courtesy of Robin Russell.
CANADIAN 121 R A I L
CP RAIL HAS BEEN ORDERED TO RESTORE SERVICE ON TWO SHORT LINES.
The CTC has ruled restoration of the 9t-mi1e Payne-Douglas, Onto
line near Ottawa, and of 20-miles of the Lepreau-St. Georges, N.B.
line. The Ontario line has been without service for five years,
the N.B. line for three years.
THE HIGH SPEED TRAIN OF BRITISH
enger service, Feb. 16/77, when
Bri sto1 to London in 71 mi nutes
Previous record was 92 mph.
RAIL BROKE ITS OWN RECORD FOR PASS­
it covered the 11B miles from
at an average speed of 99.5 mph. (London
Daily Telegraph)
OUR MEMBER AND FRIEND MR. W.J. CADOGAN OF KITCHENER, ONTARIO
WRITES:
I was interested in the photo of Grand Trunk 268 which
appeared in the October issue of Canadian Rail on page 317. The
equipment appears to be in a terminal, although it could be in a
coachyard, perhaps Montreal, Toronto or Hamilton. I could not
identify the high building in the background.
The 268 series existed prior to 1914 when at that time
GT 4-6-4 tankers road numbers 1540-1545 took over. These were
re-numbered CN 45-50 in later years.
The 268 became 1~25 and I recall 1527, 1530, 1533 hand­
ling menial tasks such as moving dead engines around Point St.
Charles Yard in Montreal. It would be interesting to hear from any
other members who might have recollections about these en­
gines.
MAKING THE FRONT PAGE OF THE VALLEY LEADER OF CARMAN, MANITOBA, AS
of October 13, 1976, was a story relating how CP RAIL cr­
ews were removing roils from the Carman SiD from the town
of Carman to a point a quarter-of-a-mile north of the elevator at
Kronsgard. This portion of the siD had been abandoned for about se­
ven years because continued operation was uneconomical.
The 16.6 miles of track were once part of the Great Northern Ra­
ilways operation in southern Manitoba. The part of the line from
Elm Creek to Mile 6 was completed on May 17, 1885 and that from Mile
6 to Carman on November 24, 1889. The section presently being re­
moved was opened for operation in May 1907.
The Canadian Pacific took possession of the line in 1926 and
the track from Plum Coulee to the International Boundary was lifted,
as was also the section from Carman to Portage La Prairie.
On the other side of the front page of The Valley Leader was
a story on the opening of Cargill Grain Companys $ 4 million new
high throughput grain terminal, designed to receive 20,000 bushels
of grain per hour, equivalent to at least 250 full-sized trucks per
day. Yes, it has a railway siding for grain hopper cars.
CANADIAN 122 R A I L
WHEN THE DIESELIZATION PROGRAM OF THE TORONTO, HAMILTON AND BUFFALO
Railway Company was nearly completed in 1956, steam locomo­
tive Number 103, a big-boilered 2-8-0, was donated to the
City of Hamilton, Ontario at the suggestion of the Hamilton Chapter
of the Upper Canada Railway Society of Toronto, Ontario. For more
than fifteen years, the Hamilton Chapter of the UCRS kept the engine
looking good, with paint and other essential items for her maintenan­
ce. But Number 103 s location in Gage Park, near the Citys centre,
made maintenance difficult and short-lived, especially in winter,
and there was a growing problem of vandalism, which was almost im-
possible to stop.
In 1972, there were some suggestions that the locomotive should
be moved to Wentworth Pioneer Village, a project of the Regional Mu­
nicipality of Hamilton-Wentworth locat~d on 30 acres in Beverly To­
wnship near Rockton, Ontario.~This project also includes the rail­
way station of the TH&B from Jerseyville, Ontario. The Hamilton Ch­
apter of the UCRS at first resisted this proposal, but as time pas­
sed, this alternative seemed the only reasonable solution to the
worsening problem.
CANADIAN 123 R A I L
And so it was that, at the turn of this year, Number 103 was
loaded on a low-bed trailer and trundled off to Wentworth Pioneer
Village to join the TH&B caboose already at the station. This is one
of t~e wooden ~abooses of the TH&B made redundant when the railway
recelved a dellvery of new steel cabooses in November 1973.
It is interesting to note that another of these redundant wood­en
cabooses today forms part of the Victoria Station restaurant at
the corner of Rue de la Savanne and Victoria Avenue in northwestern
Montreal.
Unfortunately for record-keepers, the number of the caboose at
Wentworth Pioneer Village was indecipherable in July 1976, when Bert
Holland saw it. Similarly, the one being prepared for Victoria Sta­
tion Restaurant in Montreal was unidentifiable, the number having
been blacked out with black paint.
The photo of TH&B Number 103 in Gage Park, Hamilton which ac­
companys this report was taken by Bert Holland on Januar~ 21, 1973.
SILLY SEASON: THE FIRST PORTION OF 1977 BROUGHT THE USUAL NUMBER OF
paradoxical news items and, through the courtesy of John
Welsh of Dorval, we are able to present a few:
As a starter, do you remember CP RAILs proposal to collaborate
with Inchcape and Company of London, England, in the creation and
operation of a car-float operation between Quebec and newsprint pa-per
mills on the north shore of the St. Lawrence River? If you do,
you also remember that Canadian National Railways sought to fore-
stall this service by purchasing the Canada and Gulf Terminal Rail­
wdy, Mont Joli to Matane, Quebec, and creating a car-ferry service
from Matane to Baie Comeau and Port Cartier, on the North Shore.
Well, in capsule form, ownership of the car-ferry INCAN ST-
LAURENT, built for CP RAIL at a cost of $ 6.8 million, passed to CN
early in the New Year. This car-ferry was intended for service be­
tween Baie Comeau and Quebec. CP RAIL was unsuccessful in establish­
ing this service for what must be termed political reasons. What
is even more peculiar is that CN intended to start its Matane-Baie
Comeau service in the spring of 1977, but thereafter deferred its
implementation until at least September 1978 because of delays in
the construction of the necessary ramps at the two ports. As a result,
CN advertised the INCAN ST-LAURENT for charter until the end of next
summer! In case you are wondering where the INCAN ST-LAURENT really
was (in January), she was berthed at Vancouver, where she had been
gracefully swaying in the swell for a year.
CANADIAN 124 R A I L
The group which will operate the across-the-river service from
Matane to Baie Comeau, Port Cartier Sept-lIes and Haute Rive is said
to be composed of lower St-Laurentbusiness men and is called La Com-
pagnie de gestion de Matane, Incporporee (COGEMA). CN owns 49% of
COGEMA. Traffic from Matane will be consumer goods for area residents,
chemicals, supplies and parts for paper mills and the Canadian Rey­
nolds Metals Limited.
Second curious new item was a report from Vancouver, Btitish
Columbia, which described how Robert Bandeen, Ph.D., President and
Chief Executive Officer of Canadian National Railways advocated that,
since CN made an overall profit in 1976 -amount unstated -, some
serious consideration should be given to making CN a public company,
by offering shares in its subsidiaries to the public. He did not re­
mind his listeners that CN lost $ 16.4 million in 1975.
In sharp contrast to Dr. Bandeens enthusiasm was the informa­
tion contained in the $ 373,000 study tabled in September 1974 and
confirmed by a year-long federal Department of Transport study issued
18 January 1977. Both studies recommended a major expansion of CN
highway services, increased trucking service, up-dated bus service
and abandonment of plans to restore rail passenger service on CN s
Newfoundland rail system. In the case of the Newfoundland railways,
Dr. Bandeen prescribed additional federal government subsidies for
the rail network, the same support as is presently accorded CNs Ma­
rine Operations w~ich is about $ 70 mil~ion anrrually.
Just two more stories ought to complete this group of nonsen-
sical announcements. At the beginning of 1977, federal Minister of
Transport Otto Lang announced that a Crown corporation would be es­
tablished to run Canadas intercity passenger trains within a few
months. This move, it was said, would help Canadian National and CP
RAIL to wipe out some of the annual losses they regularly report
on their passenger train services. Similar to that of AMTRAK, the
Unitid States national railway passenger corporation, the new system
would involve a simple payment by the federal government to the rail­
ways for hauling the trains, the latter being owned entirely by the
new passenger train corporation. Mr. Lang also explained on a TV
show that all operating losses of the new passenger train corporation
would be covered by the government. The Canadian taxpayer, no matter
where he lives, be it Glace Bay, Fredericton, Summerside, Sept-lIes,
Valleyfield, Cambridge, Sault Ste. Marie, Swan River, Emerson, Mel­
fort, Prince Albert, St. Walburg, Waterways, Peace River, Lethbridge,
Penticton, Nelson, Deerholme and Courtenay, will find himself making
a contribution, through his various federal tuxes (e.g., sales tax,
income tax) to passenger train services between Quebec, Montreal,
Toronto and Windsor/Sarnia.
And when this fact finally is understood by the Canadian citizen,
there ought to be a few scattered expressions of disagreement with
Mr. Langs panaceal proposition.
Last but by no means least in this series of inexplicable items
was found in the February 1977 issue of TRAINS, THE magazine of rail­
roading, which said, on page 6, that AMTRAK plaiiSin 1979 to lease
a pair of LRC locomotive-hauled five-car trains from a Canadian con­
sortium. Under terms of the lease, the LRCs could be rented for 15
years, by which time AMTRAK would take title, or be returned after
two years, in which event Canada would buy them for domestic use.
If this proposition were confined to the consortium which first pro­
moted the LRC concept, then this proposal would be, if accepted, at
their own risk. However, when it is suggested that the Government
of Canada will buy back from a foreign corporation two trainsets ra­
ted as unsatisfactory to that corporation, for use in Canada, that
is something else!
CANADIAN 125 R A I L
Well, lets not get too excited. As of the time of writing this
item, all that was in the cupboard was one power-car and one passen­
ger car, half wires and half swivel seats and that is still a train
only iF judged by the Uniform Code definition.
MIKE GREEN, EDITOR OF THE SANDHOUSE, THE REMARKABLE PUBLICATION OF
the Pacific Coast Branch of the Association, has publish­
ed two items which are certainly of more thon local (Br­
itish Columbia) interest. Here they are:
In October 1976, it was learned that BC Hydro had offered for
sale its last two steeple-cab 1000 hp electric locomotives, Numbers
961 and 962, at the startling price of $ 1 each. At that time, both
locomotives were stored below the south end of Burrand Street bridge
in Vancouver. It was rumored that Mr. Robert Swanson of Railway
Appliance Research had bid for one. Thus, the question was, what fate
awaited the other? By the time you read this, the question likely
has been answered.
At the beginning of the year 1977, Canadian National and CP RAIL
were engaged in a dispute regarding the charges levied by CN for
handling CP RAIL traffic over the Second Narrows bridge to British
Columbia Railwoy, on the north side of Burrard Inlet. CN claimed that
the interchange point has always been at the foot of Dunlevy Street
in Van~9uver in Waterfront Yard, more than four miles from the ter-
minals on the north shore and the BCR and thus beyond the inter-
switching limit described in Canadian Transport Commission General
Order T-12. This order limits charges over distances of less than
four miles to below 1.5¢ per 100 lb. of freight. CP RAIL claims that
the interchange point is at the south end of the of ore mentioned br­
idge, where a switch was removed in 1969, the year after CN rebuilt
the lift-bridge. If CNs contention is allowed, the rate on CP RAIL
grain cars crossing to North Vancouver rises from $ 10.44 t6 $ 42.98
per car over the last eight years which CN says reflects its 1n­
vestment and switching charges. Not so, said CP RAIL and has refused
to pay the charges in full and is now some $ 300,000 in arrears. The
two companies have agreed to submit the argument to arbitration and
the three-man arbitration team was scheduled to meet in March 1977.
Last but not least, Mike wonders if many readers will remember
that CP RAIL has a 4,579-foot tunnel under downtown Vancouver.Here s
one reader who didnt know it~ When CP RAIL closes its Drake Street
roundhouse and yards to make way for a housing project, the tunnel
will remain in use. Built in 1931-33, it provides direct access from
False Creek to the Vancouver waterfront, just west of Pier B, and
eliminates seven road crossings in the process. It will have to be
maintained to provide a connection with the CP-owned Vancouver and
Lulu Island Railway, running south to Steveston via the trestle over
the mouth of False Creek, Kerrisdale and Marpole. Presently, BC Hydro
Railway leases the line for freight operations. Drake Street yards,
meanwhile, handle piggyback and container traffic, store and clean
the Canadians passenger equipment and refuel and maintain the
diesel units used in local service. Also present in the yards is a
motley collection of rolling stock owned by the Government of British
Columbia, including the BC Museum Train (and Climax Number 2) and
the passenger cars used on the British Columbia 1860 Royal Hudson
summer excursion train.
EDITORIAL
NOTE
As you have read in the pages of CANADIAN RAIL we are
somewhat altering our metllOd of operation, this having commenced
with the March issue which you should all have in your hands by
now. I would like to take this opportunity to outline to you just
what has taken place regarding your favorite railway magazine.
Sandy Worthen after no less than nine years as Editor
decided to relinquish his duties but decidely agreed to stay on
in an advisory and consultative capacity. Like all of us Sandy
wished more time to do all the things he ever wanted to do, (in­
cluding researcliing and writing) but never had the time to do it.
Having ~lOrkes closely with Saofldy on the production side
of Canadian Rail over the last nine years I agreed to a request
made by the Board of Directors to edit £ANADIAN RAIL commencing
theoretically with the January 1977 issue but in actual fact with
the t·! a rc his sue.
One cannot tamper with success, and the new editorial
policy if ~e really must call it that will reflect as little tam­
pering with system as possible. I wish to outline a few points
and just give you some rough guidelines that I intend to follow
in the up-coming issues. Firstly the pages of CANADIAN RAIL are
available to all members, and you are encouraged to write and s
ubmit material for publication anytime. While we as usual can­
not guarantee publication all material will be acknowledged and if
selected the edited version (if editing is required) will be re­
turned for your approval. Articles should be accompanied with
photos wherever possible, and if 35mm slides are selected they
must be bright and sharp as we must produce a 5×7 black and white
from them to work from.
I must be understood that the AUTHOR is responsible for
the accuracy of his article. We will try to verify and assist
the author, and indeed we normally pick up any blatent inaccur­
acies but the final responsibility is the authors.
The overall aim of CANADIAN RAIL is to provide a monthly
railway magazine to our membership reflecting not only researched
articles on past railway history, but also timely insights into
the present day railway scent in Canada. Most important is the
continuing policy to mix not only the subject matter from steam
to diesel and electric, but also to guarantee the representation
from all corners of the country from Victoria to St. Johns.
Regarding the actual format of CANADIAN RAIL we have now
the services of Mr. Joe Smith who has taken over the layout respon­
sibility and from the comments weve heard to date everyone is
noticing a much needed improvement.
While the yellow pages will continue. any important mile­
stones 1nvolvlng tIle Association will be covered in the pages of
CANADIAN RAil. last month we presented the Presidents Report and up-coming
we hope to present an illustrated account of the Edmonton Branchs –
APRA new museu~ operation in Edmonton. Day to day
dolngs of the CRHA will continue to be covered in the yellow pages.
Articles too lengthy for one issue will be serialized as
in the past, but it Is our intention to try and run the parts con­
secutively if possible. It is also our intention to try and have
the cover photo related to the lead article whenever possible. We
also hope from time to time to feature from the archives corner w
herein our members will be treated to some of the rare treasures
present in our archival collection. Dr. Nicholls and lIarvey Elson
are already hard at work making the preliminary selections for pre­
sentation.
All
in all we are looking forward to meetln~ the chal­
lenge but it is most encouraging to know that more than ever CA
NADIAn RAIL is really a team effort involving not only Sandy
Worthen. John Welsh, Joe Smith and myself but also each and every
one of you. Without our members to contribute and indeed subscribe
to CAtiADIA/I RAil no amount of effort on our part would make the
project either possible or tlorthwhlle.
M. Peter Hurphy
Ed 1 tor

The last steahl locomotive built by Angus Shops, class G5a, 4-6-.2 1.4
locomotive 110. 1201 outshopped ii June 1944. 1.201 has recently ~
been overhauled by Ontario Rail for the National Capital Commis­si
on in Uttawa and spcrlds her wee~ellds during the summer wOI,ths in excu
rsion service between Ottawa and Wakefield. Quebec.
Canacian Rail
ISSN 0006-4875
is ptj:lished

by the
Canacian __ IistoricaI Association
p.o. BC1122.Statian s.,…,..,au.tJec,Carwilt/H3B 3J5
Editorjs.s.Worthen Production; P. !AlIphy
C …. Jj. •• U 4 SOUTH … IUrUH
L..Uowl., S.« …. , 1121 23.4. h •••• M.WCol …. ~,Ah. ,~ …
01T4IIA
O.[.SI.I ••• S. …… , ~.O .••• 1~I.Stat!o. A, Otto.a,Co.odo ~1 ~I
PACIfiC CCA5r
I. SIoa •• I … S •• , ….. P.O …. 1~.1t.t10 A,YU IOCKY IIOUIiUIII
C.M.H.o •• ~ ••• S ••••••• y P,O.B •• 6102.H •• I.~ C.[4:nh.,AU •. He .-cS
1(11101<10 & YOO!I( OIVI5IotI
o. 5 …. h …… y P.O.h, ~49,T ••• {a A To ll~OI! ~ nS[J P!VISlotI
J …… 11o.5oe ….. y )00 CO •• I ••• h … III0d •••• 0.,.

Association Representatives
I/ST …. U
~:!;:~::r.. ::.7;~:::i:n:~.·;:4.h,
• It …. lon ~I ••• d •
,-
11220 Dh •••• r …….
AA rM •. o., •• ~. _1, 4 …….. • _ ……. ,.01. t,.o ….
-. _nou ~.G .• _.,
261 u .. _ …… .. ,. …… ,,-U.1oa 03J !WI
.o.sK.IITo;M!
,. to,tt
~ ;~;:~:.~ … ~:·r.-.;.,!:~~i:~·mi ,._ _Io~::.~~ (IIJ! ……. !CA D.J.M …. ,
1(IIJTHt: UU [.w.). …. ••••• )1 ….. H.W .• C.I … ,. AI…… r .. Q(3 …. !T[O
~I-J ••• S ••••
t:.~~!;·.-:!i~1!~~;~.~:t~: ~~~_.!i~;i:
.
..,11(.0 …. l._
Vitlilhe Canadian Raiway ~ Sl.Constant;Q..ebec,Ca1ada.
-Men lhen IOOpiecesot ~ on cIspIay-

Demande en ligne