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Canadian Rail 299 1976

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Canadian Rail 299 1976


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NO. 299
DECEMBER 1976

lfiE NIP
Ii TUCKaIe Wihac
A
t Bruce Mines, Ontario, on Lake Hurons
north shore, copper mining and ore con­
centrating was carried on successfully
from the 1840s until almost 1870. Some
of the waste from these operations, in the
form of quartz tailings, was used as bal­
last when the Sault Ste. Marie branch of
the Canadian Pacific Railway was built in
1887. Due to the primitive concentrating
process used, these tailings contained a
significant amount of residual copper and
some precious metals and, one day, Can­
adian Pacific Limited may find it worth­
while to mine this part of CP RAILs own
roadbed.
Back in 1898, two new copper mining concerns appeared at the
Bruce, one at the town and the other at Rock Lake, some ten miles
to the north. Bruce Copper Mines Limited, the town company, spent
large sums of money on surface installations, like a stamp mill for
crushing ore, a coal dock and over a mile of railway to connect mill
and mine and dock.
Rock Lake Mining Company also erected expensive facilities above
ground, the most impressive being a huge mill on the shores of Rock
Lake, about two miles from the mine. A standard-gauge railway was
built to connect the two sites. The mills production was to be sent
to a smelter in Michigan for refining and, in order to transport it
out of Rock Lake, the Bruce Mines and Algoma Railway Company ~as
chartered in 1899 to build north to Rock Lake from a point (junction)
on the Canadian Pacifics Sault Branch. Construction began in 1900
from the CPRs Bruce station, two miles north of the town. Progress
was so slow that a Baldwin 0-4-0 steam locomotive and the necessary
accessory ore cars had to be dragged overland and barged, where pos­
sible, to reach the mill ahead of the rails.
Much of the line followed the broad valley of the Thessalon
River, which widens into Ottertail, Gordon and Rock Lakes, in its
southward course. Sweeping curves, sidehill construction, minimal
blasting and three major trestles over the Thessalon tell the story
in general terms. Final mileage, Bruce Station to Rock Lake, was
about 15 and construction was completed, at last, in the autumn of
1901.
TWO STALWART EMPLOYEES OF THE LAKE HURON AND NORTHERN ONTARIO POSED,
~ one day about 1914, on their trusty hand-car on the passing track
at an unspecified location. Photo courtesy Mr. Harry West.
IT IS PARTICULARLY FITTING TO PRESENT THIS FINE PEN-AND-INK
of CP RAILs Canadian, pausing at Montreal West, for, as
W.R.Donaldson remarks, this scene may no longer be observable
in 1977. Rationalization of railway passenger services in
may reduce or eliminate this trans-Canada service.
SKETCH
artist
daily
Canada
.mine
~1
2 3 4mi.
main map
o
~lin:e:rtt=-~5~O~06.~11!:O)(OO yds.
CA NADIAN 357 R A I L
Residents in the area rejected the railways official name and
even seldom used its initials. Instead, they settled on the euphemism
The Nip & Tuck as their way of indicating their doubts about the
success of physi~al operation and financial stability of the enter­
prise. They were unskilled fortune-tellers, of a sort.
In 1902, the Nip & Tuck obtained a charter and a subsidy to
build their line to Lake Huron from Bruce Station, thus providing
Bruce Copper Mines and the town with a rail connection to outside
points, via the Canadian Pacific. The BM&A and BCM junction was a
wye
just northeast of downtown Bruce Mines, and here a station was
built.
The agreement between the railway and the Bruce Copper Mines was
complicated, for it had to include the cost of the copper ore left
in the rock pillars which supported the railways roadbed. The BCM
had not been open-pit mining the copper and had no intentions of
being obliged to do so by the building of the railway.
By year-end, the BM&A was the proud owner of 17 miles of
with copper-mining customers at both ends. The railway looked
an ongoing successfuf business operation, with the shipments of
concentrates from Rock Lake, in addition to local freight and pas­
senger revenues. The owners had a right to be pleased, for the time
being.
track
like
bulk
Unfortunately, the Bruce Copper Mines contributed little to the
railways revenues. Despite ambitious plans, the BCM never shipped
more than token amounts of copper concentrates by rail. Certainly,
this company and the succeeding owners of the properties up to 1915,
excavated a good deal of rock and accumulated a considerable pile of
tailings, but to little purpose. The companies spent most of their
time at the Bruce developing, rather than mining. That is, they
pumped out flooded shafts, extended tunnels to reach ore bodies,con­
structed head frames for shafts and renovated concentrator mills. Of
course such work was necessary, but it did not produce ore concentra­
tes and money in the bank. One company hod to pump 27 million gallons
of water out of the mine in order to find out what there was in the
shaft and stopes below. They found nothing. Another company built
a power house only to have it burn down before it could be put into
operation.
Obviously, none of this activity required the services of the
railway.
Things got worse. During 1903, the Rock Lake mine closed, de-
priving the Nip & Tuck of its only large customer. It seems that the
mining company took out all the ore that could be reached easily and
made no effort to prove out reserves for further future production.
Now the railway had to make a living hauling baled hay, livestock,
lumber and firewood. The single passenger car of record at the time
was removed from regular service north of Bruce station on the CPR
and the two locomotives spent far more time idle than in revenue ser­
vice.
Nineteen-oh-four rolled around and, in a bid to create traffic,
the Nip & Tuck pushed its track through the town and over to Jacks
Island on a long trestle. A 400-foot, three-track coal dock was
constructed and soon tonnage, in the form of coal, was on its way
north to the CPR at Bruce and thence to the mill towns like Blind
River and Mossey on the Sault Ste. Marie Branch. Some traffic may
have moved to and beyond the Sault, since that town had no rail!
water transfer facilities at that time.
NUMBER 2 OF THE BRUCE MINES AND ALGOMA RAILWAY POSES PROUDLY WITH A
group of friends. Number 2 was built by the Rhode Island Locomotive
Works in November 1871 for the Great Western Railway of Canada. In
1882, it was acquired by the Grand Trunk Railway Company which num­
bered it 192 and later 156. The Rock Lake Mining Company bought the
engine from the GTR in August 1901. Photo courtesy Mrs. R. Lilly.
THE 1905 WRECK ON THE CURVE, IN WHICH ENGINEER JAMES DUNCAN WAS KIL­
led was a very thorough one. It is obvious why the Dinky was soon
scrapped. By the angle of the tender, it is also obvious how Mr.Dun­
can was trapped between it and the cab and boiler.
Photo courtesy Ruben Beilhartz.
CANADIAN 359 R A I L
There is no doubt that the dock was built, since port of it sur­
vives today and, certainly, coal and other cargoes moved over it for
a number of years. What is difficult to understand is how this route
via the BM&A managed to compete with the CPs long established route
via Algoma, where it had its own cool dock and firmly established
ports in the area, such as Thessalon.
Railway statistics for Canada for 1904 tell a sad story about
the Nip & Tuck. The total revenues were about $ 4,600, split almost
evenly between freight and passenger traffic. The net loss was over
$ 5,400. The overage passenger fore was a meager 29¢ and the freight
hauled came to no more than 60 tons per day. All this took place, so
say the statistics, at an average speed of 18 miles per hour.
Despite these discouragements, someone in the Nip & Tuck organ­
ization had enough nerve and optimism to persuade the Government of
Ontario that the railway should grow and should be categorized as a
colonization railway, to open up this part of Ontario to settlement.
Between 1903 and 1905, permission was granted to build to the CPRs
main line near Chapleau and thence north to connections with the
Canadian Northern Railway and the National Transcontinental Railway,
the latter under construction at the time. The ultimate goal of the
Nip and Tuck was James Bay. Subsidies were promised on the basis of
mileage completed but, as might have been expected, none ever had to
be pa id.
A survey of the route was completed from Rock Lake to the
adian Pacifics main line and a book of surveyors field notes
vives. In it is recorded the actual course to be followed, the
and type of rock outcrops, species of trees and expected cut
acre. It is a pity that the Nip and Tuck never was able to use
information.
Can-
sur­
size
per
this
Going into 1905, the outlook was uncertain. Traffic was minimal
and dreams of expansion were impractical. The railway filled a de-
finite need in the rural areas through which it passed, but faced
financial disaster in the process. The bottom had not quite dropped
out, but it was about to do so unless something unforseen happened.
Something unforseen did hoppen, but not of an advantageous
ture. A wreck is bad news for any railway at any time. When a
panys whole motive power roster -two engines, in the case of
Nip & Tuck -is involved in a head-on collision, total financial
aster is in the making.
Here is the story as it appeared in the SPECTATOR of July
1905:
The Bruce Mines & Algoma passenger train and coal transfer
train collided on a curve lost Saturday morning about a
quarter to ten halfway between the CPR and BM&A stations
causing the death of our esteemed townsman Engineer James
F. Duncan.
The small engine was hauling two carloads of cool from the
cool dock to the CPR station when the occident happened. It
was customary, we understand, for the Dinky to wait at
the switch about the time the passenger train was to re­
turn from the CPR local but evidently the engineers time­
piece was incorrect as he thought he could possibly make
the CPR station before the passenger would leave •••
The passenger train left the CPR station shortly after
the local passed through at its usual time and the tr-
ain was running at about 25 miles an hour when it struck.
na­
com­
the
dis-
14,
CANADIAN 360 R A I L
It was impossible for the engineers to see any distance
ahead as the curve is a sharp one •••
The Dinky with its carloads of coal was running very
easily when the accident happened as the engineer had
reversed the engine and applied the air brakes as soon
as he noticed or heard the passenger coming. As soon as
he did this he jumped and also the fireman.
Mr. Duncan evidently did not see the Dinky coming as the
throttle was wide open when the trains came together.
Young Harman, the fireman, noticed the other train when
it was a few feet away. He shouted, jumped and saved himself
but Mr. Duncan had not time to do anything ••• He made an
effort however to get out and was just in the act of jump­
ing when the trains came together. His right leg was caught
between the engine and tender and crushed to pieces. In
the rebound Mr. Duncan managed to free himself but fell
back on the coal exhausted. After the collision cries of
distress were heard but it was impossible to get near
the sufferer for at least five minutes owing to the
escaping steam … Mr. Duncan passed away about an hour
after the accident.
The next few years of the Nip & Tucks history are not known
precisely. The small engine, apparently an 0-6-0, was reported scrap­
ped and the big one as being sold to timber operators on St.Joseph s
Island, west of Bruce Mines. No operating statistics were submitted
to the federal government for 1905 and the following year the rail-
way was listed as inactive. The company was in receivership for
some years and, despite the fact that some industry publications re­
ported operations, it is unlikely that there was much if any activity
from 1905 to 1911.
Believe it or not, in 1912, the BM&A once again found a big
customer. A large trap rock quarry was established on the lake shore
east of Bruce Mines, with its own railway and large storage and hand­
ling facilities. Access to the quarry and crusher was via the right­
of-way once owned by the Bruce Copper Mines and, somehow, this pro­
perty seems to have fallen into the hands of the BM&A.
A reorganization of the BM&A came in 1913 and a new name -The
Lake Huron and Northern Ontario Railway Company -was adopted. Per­
haps the new financing was partly the result of a promotional map
issued at that time which showed the 17 miles of the LH&NO with pro­
posed new terminal facilities on Lake Huron and the firm intenti6n to
build to the north in the direction of James Bay. Strangely, a slip
of the mapmakers pen made it appear that the railway was actually
completed to the Canadian Pacific main line, 120 miles from Rock
Lake.
The new enterprise was off to a fast start by building an en-
ginehouse at the Bruce for a motive power fleet of three engines,one
of which was a 2-6-0 numbered 105. This suggests that there was some
sort of serial numbering system with the quarry railway which owned
two
Vulcan 0-4-0ST steam locomotives numbered 107 and 108.
Once again, profitable operation depended on bulk sh~pments of
ore or concentrate and, in 1915, one appeared. The Mond N~ckel Com­
pany bought most of the mining properties at the Bruce and commenced
development, intending to mine quartz for use as a furnace flux at
its smelters near Sudbury. Since copper at the Bruce had always been
found in quartz veins, Mond recovered whatever metal there was as a
bonus.
:;
.,. h
THE MARTIN INTERNATIONAL TRAP ROCK COMPANYS OPERATION WAS STILL UN­
der construction about 1913. The Vulcan 0-4-0 was pulling the dump
cars away from the crusher, while a standard-gauge flat car had been
shunted into the siding from the BM&A/LH&NO main line.
As preparation for underground mining continued, tailings which
were readily accessible to the Nip & Tuck were removed. Although the
piles of tailings should have been all quartz, one showed a grading
of 2% copper, while another yielded a sheet of pure copper, leached
out of the tailings over the years. It is said that Mond Nickel re­
covered its whole cost of redevelopment in this manner. In any event,
the carloads were coming and the railway had a steady source of re­
venue for the first time since 1903.
After 1913, some semblance of service was restored on the north
end, from Bruce (CPR) to Rock Lake, but revenues there did not permit
major repairs. In short, the trestles were getting shaky. Train crews
reacted by developing a strange game of catch. On arriving at one
of the shaky trestles, the train stopped and the fireman set out on
foot across the trestle. When be reached the for side, the engineer
opened the throttle slightly and tied it open. He then climbed down
off the engine and watched the train proceed slowly -and unmanned –
across the rickety trestle. When the engine and train reached the
other side, the fireman jumped on the engine, climbed up to the deck
and closed the throttle, waiting patiently until the engineer had
walked across the trestle to resume his position for the onward trip.
There are no records of runaway trains or collapsed trestles on
the LH&NO, but the last passenger train to run north of the CPR at
Bruce station did so on July 12, 1916 and it went no further than
Gordon Lake, ten miles up the line.
LAKE HURON AND NORTHERN ONTARIO RAILWAYS NUMBER 105 WAS PHOTOGRAPHED
at Wests Siding some time during World War I. A boxcar of baled hay
was being picked up behind the flat car. Photo courtesy Mr. Harry West
MARTIN INTERNATIONALS CRUSHING,STORAGE AND LOADING OPERATIONS WERE
in full operation in 1914. Another 0-4-0 was pushing a string of
side-dump cars up to the crusher. Photo courtesy Ontario Archives.
~
I
J
CANADIAN 363 R A I L
Mond Nickel traffic meant, in 1917, a profit of $ 1,600 and this
seems to characterize operations at that time. However, the mortgage
debt incurred in the reorganization of the railway in 1913 required
a clear profit of $ 35,000 each and every year. The trap-rock quarry
operated sporadically and contributed very little revenue. The last
straw came in 1921 when, World War lover, Mond Nickel closed down
and the LH&NO suspended operations in April. Entries in the OFFICIAL
GUIDE were to continue for several years with the notation Service
discontinued.
Briefly, in 1927, the railway was used to supply a further ef­
fort in quarrying, although it is doubtful that the LH&NO could have
provided operating steam engines. Likely, the switching was left to
the CPR. This operation lasted only two years and, shortly after, a
salvaging operation on the quarry machinery and facilities begon.All
that remains today are massive concrete shapes, strangely reminiscent
of a graveyard or a Roman ruin.
In the 1930s, the LH&NO rail was taken up by a Toronto scrap
dealer who used road transport exclusively, since the railway road­
bed was beyond supporting anything. The right-of-way was sold for
taxes and, today, there are few traces to be found. Roads, homes,cot­
tages and, in one case, an outhouse, today decorate the roadbed of
the Lake Huron & Northern Ontario Railway, once intimately known to
local residents as The Nip and Tuck. The non-professional fortune­
tellers were right, after all.
So, another Canadian railway dream passed into history. The Nip
and Tuck was never very large, did not last very long and was never
very prosperous, but those who remember and those who made its ac­
quaintance more recently, will always think of it with affection •
. ; ., . -.. :.
IN THE SPRING OF 1955, A GROUP OF RAILWA~ARCHEOLOGISTS WERE WALK­
ing along the abandoned roadbed, east of the original stamp-mill of
the Bruce Copper Mines, towards the loading docks of the trap-rock
company. Photo courtesy of the Author.
CANADIAN 364 R A I L
BM&A!LH&NO Stations.
0.0
2.0
6.0
8.0
10.0
12.0
13.0 14.0 15.0
17.0
(pro j ected)
137.0
226.0
323.0
Bruce Mines
Bruce Station (junction with the
Sault Ste. Marie
Branch, Canadian
Paci fic Railway)
Rydal Bank
Wests Siding
McLarty Station
Gordon Lake
Cold Springs
Campbells Siding
Leeburn Station
Rock Lake
Wakami
Foley
Alexandra
(junction with the
main line, Canadian
Paci fic Railway)
(junction with th~
main line, Canadian
Northern Railway)
(junction with the
main line, National
Transcontinental Ry.)
Acknowledgements
The Author acknowledges, with thanks, the assistance of the fol­
lowing people in the preparation of this article:
Miss Margaret Van Every
Mrs. R. Lilly
Mr. R.F.Corley
Mr. Al Crockford
Mr. Art Henderson
Mr. Doug Scott
Mr. Ernie Strum
Mr. Harry West
Mr. S.S .Worthen
Toronto, Ontario
Bruce Mines, Ontario
Scarborough, Ontario
Blind River, Ontario
Bruce Mines, Ontario
Sudbury, Ontario
Bruce Mines, Ontario
Rydal Bonk, Ontario
Montreal, Quebec
Sources
NORTH SHORE SENTINEL
NEWSLETTER, Upper Canada
Railway Society
ANNUAL REPORTS, Bureau of
Mines of Ontario
Ministry of Natural Resources
of Ontario
Bruce Mines Museum
Archives of Ontario
Bruce Mines, Ontario
Toronto, Ontario
Toronto, Ontario
Toronto, Ontario
Bruce Mines, Ontario
Toronto, Ontario
Andrew and John Sutherland.
A GO-TRAIN •••
MISCELLANY···
T
hrough the kindness of Andrew and John
Sutherland, members of the Association
in West Hill,Ontario, we are pleased
to be able to present a variety of
views of GO equipment.
In the first scene, John Sutherland discovered GO Train 966 pas-
~ sing the site of the former station at Port Union and approaching the
station at Rouge Hill, being pushed eastward by GO unit Number 9805.
GO Train 971, westbound, hauled by GO unit Number 9803, is on the
left in the distance, pausing at the station. The date was October
10, 1975 and the time was 1728 hours.
Scene two features GO TRANSIT GP 40 Number 9811 leading a train
of leased Chicago and North Western Railroad bi-level coaches past
the site of the former station at Sunnyside in suburban Toronto, on
GO Train 954, April 19, 1976.
Andrew took picture number three of GO TRANSIT unit Number 981~
and a set of C&NW bi-levels entering Union Station, Toronto,past the
base of the famous CN Tower, then under construction. The time was 1652
and the date was May 13,1976.
Picture number four, an excellent shot, was taken by Andrew near
the eastern terminus of the trains run at Pickering, Ontario. Pul­
led by Number 9811, the pusher on the rear was Number 9800. The
picture was taken in the afternoon of April 28, 1976.

fl
DECEMBER 1976
1[IIIILL8
NO ONE CAN SAY THAT CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS HAS NOT PROVIDED CAN­
adas federal government with adequate warning of the very
serious situation which is developing in its commuter ser­
vices in and out of Montreal. If CN is obliged to maintain these ser­
vices without financial assistance to discharge the ever-increasing
financial deficits, a plan of gradual withdrawal from them would be
implemented. The first part of the plan was implemented early in 1976
when a fare increase was followed by a readjustment of services in
April. The first option, highly recommended by CN, would be to mo­
dernize the commuter services and to integrate them with the exist­
ing urba~ transit network, receiving the same financial support that
is granted to other transportation systems.
By September 1976, the federal government had not
cated that it would provide any financial assistance and, in
of measures already taken by CN, the anticipated 1976 deficit
expected to exceed $ 7 million. Therefore, CN could do nothing
implement its gradual withdrawal plan.
indi­
spite
was
but
First, the fare increases. For single-trip tickets, the
increase will be between 20 and 50¢. Weekly flash-cards and 10-trip
booklets up between $ 1.95 and $ 3.80. Monthly flash-cards or 40-tick­
e t boo k 1 e t s in Z on e 1 to inc reo s e from $ 7. 1 0 to $ 11. 40 • Reduced
fares that have been in effect for certain categories of commuters,
including students, will also be affected. However, reduced rates for
retired persons will be maintained.
The planned April 1977 readjustment will affect seven
rush-hour trains, four arriving at Central Station in the morning and
three leaving Central Station in late afternoon. Train 902, leaving
Cartierville at 0725; Number 944, leaving Deux-Montagnes at 0730;
Number 912 leaving Vertu at 0819 and Number 914 leaving Mount Royal
at 0905. The afternoon trains to be withdrawn are Numbers 969, 923,
and 925, leaving Central Station at 1720,1727 and 1800 hours.
Other readjustments will consequently follow. The fre-
quency of stops in Zone 1, between Portal Heights and Cartierville,
will be reduced. Details on this reduction of stops and tariffs will
be published in December 1976 and the new timetables will be avail­
able next spring prior to the dote the changes will become effective.
Implementation will be automatic, unless a government intervention
provides the financial assistance required. .
The September 15 1976 notice from CN to the commuters on
both its Deux-Montagnes and St-Hilaire East lines did not even men­
tion the necessity to do something about the aged equipment being
used in some of these services.
~ONCE UPON A TIME, PASSENGER SERVICE FROM TORONTO TO NIAGARA FALLS,ON­
to rio was generally assured by 4-8-2 steam engines, exem­
plified by Canadian Notional Railways Number 6068,caught
by that expert photographer Jim Shaughnessy on the high bridge near
Oakville, on August 1, 1957. While the presence of the New York Cen­
tral baggage cor on the head-end is probably normal, perhaps one of
our knowledgeable readers can explain the presence of two sets of
bridge piers across the river volley.
CANADIAN 370 R A I L
THE AUGUST 20, 1976 ISSUE OF THE MONTREAL STAR CONTAINED A CANADIAN
Press story on the resurrection of the fifty-year-old lake­
side resort town of Winnipeg Beach, Manitoba, on Lake Win­
nipeg. Among the sttractions which were alleged to have enticed th­
rongs from Winnipeg in the summers of the 1920s were the dancehalls,
the mile-long roller coaster ride, the boardwalk and pier promenades
and the CPR-owned Empress Hotel, where one dressed for dinner.
This hotel would probably have surpassed its Victoria,Br­
itish Columbia counterpart in notoriety had its guests not dressed
(at all) for dinner.
However, the real point of interest in this item sent in
by our friend John D. Welsh is that, at one time, the Canadian Pa­
cific Railway Company apparently had two Empress Hotels, one in Win­
nipeg Beach, Manitoba and one in Victoria, British Columbia.
No doubt one of our knowledgeable readers can (and will)
resolve this paradox; the one about the two hotels with the same name,
that is, not the one about dressing for dinner.
FOR THE RECORD, WE SHOULD HAVE REPORTED THAT QUEBEC CITYS FAMOUS
Gare du Palais -Palace Station received its last passen­
ger train on August 31, 1976. In fact, the last train in­
to Gore du Palais was CP RAIL Train 156, which arrived at 2200 hours.
While the Gare du Palais now belongs to the City of Que­
bec and will be used, it is rumoured,as a market, there is also a
persistent general opinion that this well known station will be used
for some form of passenger train service in the future.
At any rate, on September 1, CP RAIL began using its new
station, about halfway between Cadorna and Lorette, Mile 157.7 and
Mile 152.4 of the Trois Rivieres Subdivision. It is a surprisingly
handsome structure in a dark grey cast material with ribbing, and CP RAIL
in large red letters, which are raised. The solidity of this
new station and the corresponding buildings in the new freight yard
just west of the station indicate that CP RAIL expects to do a con­
siderable business from its new facilities.
Canadian National will now terminate its passenger ser-
vice to Quebec at Ste-Foy, where the station platform has been leng­
thened and three additional shQrt tracks have been added to the yard
in front of the station.
Our reader/member, M. Adrien dAstous of Ste-Foy, has st­
arted an article on the new passenger train facilities and connections
in Quebec and we hope to present it in a future issue of CANADIAN
RAIL. .
WHILE OUT PROWLING AROUND BEACHVILLE, ONTARIO ON OCTOBER 21, 1975,
John Sutherland came upon CP RAIL Extra East 8150,return-
ing to the main line at Woodstock from St. Thomas, On-~
tario, where it has a connection with the-then Penn Central,nowadays
Conrail. Number 8150 had, at the time, not been repainted with the
multimark and the CP RAIL title.
CANADIAN 371 R A I L
CANADIAN 372 R A I L
WE ARE VERY GRATEFUL TO PIERRE PATENAUDE FOR SENDING IN A QUARTET OF
pictures for presentation this month. The represent, in­
deed, an interesting variety of motive power, from Mon­
treal to Vancouver.
Number
CNs
The first picture is Canadian National Railways
6516 at Pointe-St-Charles Shops, Montreal, freshly painted in
new VIA logo on 1 August 1976.
The second photograph, one of Canadian Nationals Number
4479, shows one of the few remaining GP 9 units of the class GR-17E
that are still operating without the winterization hatch. The date
was 1 August 1976.
Third in the line-up of pictures is one of two new SW 1001
units, purchased by the National Harbours Board and identified as
Numbers 7601 and 7602 of the Port of Montreal. Numbered in the 7600
series to indicate the year purchased, the two units were ordered by
the Department of Supply and Services, Government of Canada, the
contract being awarded to the lowest bidder. The units were outshop­
ped at DD GMCL, London, Ontario on 23 July 1976 and have BIN 758024-
1 and 758024-2, respectively. They were delivered to the NHBs shops
in Montreal on 11 August 1976 and were photographed on 31 August 1976.
A real change-of-pace is the picture of Number 56, a Brook­
ville unit working at the Salaberry Works, Canadian Industries Lim­
ited, Valleyfield, Quebec. Formerly -before 1965 -this was Canadian
Arsenals, Limited and During World War II it was Defence Industries,
Limited. Canadian Industries operates Brookville units Numbers 50, 51,
54,56 and-57. Number 52 now operates at Soulanges Industries at St­
Joseph de Soulanges, west of Dorion, Quebec and Number 53 was con­
verted to a track-repair gang-car. Number 56 was photographed at
Salaberry Works on 2 September 1976.
In late December 1975, the BCHydro Railway took delivery
of three EMD (La Grange) MP 15 units, road Numbers 151, 152 and 153,
serial numbers 75626-1, 75626-2 and 75626-3, respectively. Here is
Number 152 at BCHydros Trapp Yard, New Westminster, B.C. on 21 De­
cember 1975. The picture was taken by Keith Anderson and Pierre sup­
plied the print.
CANADIAN 373 R A L
CANADIAN 374 R A L
CANADIAN 375 R A I L
WE ARE PLEASED TO PRESENT HEREWITH THE FRENCH-LANGUAGE REPORT BY M.
Adrien dAstous of Ste-Foy, Quebec, on the closing of the
Gore du Polois, Quebec to passenger service. The pictures,
token by M. dAstous, apply to both reports:
Le 1ier septembre 1976 ne fut pas une dote qui posso innoperyue
pour ceux qui de pres ou de loin s interessent oux chemins de
fer conodiens. En effet, c est a cette dote que les convois de
possogers ont quitte 10 gore du Polo is a Quebec, pour s instal­
ler oux deux nouvelles gores qui prenderont 10 releve, soit
celIe du CP RAIL, situee a 10 hauteur de lovenue St-Socrement,
et celle du CN, situee a Ste-Foy, a proximite du Pont de Quebec.
Celle-ci a ete recemment ogrondie et modernisee et devro jouer
temporoirement le role de terminus pour toute 10 region de Que­
bec, etont donne qua peu pres seul Ie CN dessert 10 region.Les
outoroils DAYLINER du CP RAIL utiliseront 10 gore de lovenue
S t -s ocr e men t .
De nouvelles voies ont ete omenogees a Ste-Foy, of in de
gorer les convois. On a oussi instolle les equipements pour se
rovitoiller en huile, eou, glace, etc. Les convois sont tournes
sur le Y de Cop-Rouge.
CANADIAN 376 R A I L
II ne fout pas prendre cette nouvelle trop au trogique, cor il
est deja question de locoliser un terminus ferrovioire a lin­
terieur de 10 ville de Quebec.
La ville-m&me est devenue proprietoire ds 10 gore du Po­
lois; Dome Rumeur veut que celle-ci soit tronsformee en marc he­
public, oinsi nous esperons qu elle ne tombero pas sous Ie pic
des demolisseurs.
La photogrophie numero I, 10 toujours trd$ belle gore du
Polo is a Quebec, fermee Ie minuit du 31 ooOt 1976. Photogrophie
Ie 22 fevrier 1975.
Numero 2, 10 gore des chemins de fer Notionaux a Ste-Foy;
c est loncienne petite gore qui a ete ogrondie et completement
re-omenogee. Situee a quelques centoines de pieds aux obords
nords du fomeux pont de Quebec. Photogrophie Ie 7 septembre 1976.
La troisieme: 10 nouvelle gore du CP RAIL, inouguree Ie
septembre 1976 et photogrophiee Ie 7 septembre. Elle est sit­
uee a 10 hauteur de lovenue St-Socrement.
CANADIAN 377 R A I L
IT WAS THE KIND OF CANADIAN PRESS STORY THAT SEEMED MOST UNLIKELY,AT
first reading, but when both Bob Legget of Ottawa and John
Welch of Dorval sent in the clipping, it had to have some
authenticity.
The story said that on 9 October 1976, the Minister of Tr­
ansport of Ontario, Mr. James Snow, had announced that the Urban Tr­
ansportation Development Corporation, a provincially-operated com­
pany, would purchase four ex-Trans Europe Express trainsets for $3.7
million and would lease them to the Ontario Northland Railway for
$ 1 million per year over a 5-year agreement.
These TEE trainsets, now about 15 years old, were taken
out of service when the Amsterdam-Zurich-Milan run was electrified
over its entire length. The trainsets must run in their original four­
unit conformation: diesel-electric engine, passenger car,combination
dining car-lounge and compartment car; there are seats for 146 pas­
sengers.
The four trainsets will be refurbished in Switzerland be­
fore being shipped and should be in service on the ONR by spring of
next year (1977).
ONR plans a twice-a-day Toronto-Timmins service next year,
with elimination of some stops between Toronto and North Bay. This
procedure, plus the new equipment, could reduce the present 12-hour
schedule to 10 hours.
Mr. Snow said that the ONR had been looking for
built system, but stated that nothing could be done until
federal government signed a contract for new rolling stock
adian National Railways.
a Canadian­
Canadas
for Can-
JEAN-MICHEL LECLERCQ, THE AS~OCIATIONS REPRESENTATIVE FOR EUROPE,
sent a news item from the French newspaper Le Monde ,
which announced that another world-famous train was being
withdrawn from service. This is the Orient Express, which made its
first trip from the Gare de lEst, in Paris, France, on June 5,1883,
taking three days and a half to make the journey to Constantinople.
The first train consisted of a 4-4-0 steam locomotive and five two­
trucked passenger cars: two sleeping cars, 24 beds each, a dining-car
and two baggage cars -for wardrobe trunks~
After the debacle of World War I, the route of the train
was altered to the south, via Milan, Venice and Trieste. Accordingly,
the name was changed to the Simplon-Orient Express, leaving Paris
from the Gare de Lyon on Monday evening, arriving at Istambul on
Thursday morning.
The Orient Express began to lose its mystique when long
sections of its route were electrified. It lost its individuality eri­
tirely when it had to traverse countries where such a capitalist no­
tion as a train de luxe was not allowed to exist. In 1962, this
famous train received the coupe de grace when it -reluctantly -as­
sumed the name of Direct Orient Express and was transformed into
a travelling circus through central Europe, or worse still, in the
words of Olivier Merlin, a perambulating Persian market~
With but a single sleeping car and an appearance quite un­
like anything described by Agatha Christie or Graham Greene, let alone
Valery Larbaud, it disappeared unnoticed three times a week from the
Gare de Lyon, at midnight, of course, a procession of Turkish workers
and kerchiefed women, who immediately filled up the corridors with
barricades of bundles, travelling bags and corrugated cartons, held
together precariously with bits of string.
And the odours that were wafted through the carpeted cor­
ridors of the sleeping cars were no longer those of Bulgarian attar
of roses and exotic Turkish tobacco.
CANADIAN 378 R A I L
But, as Jean-Michel points out, there are still a few sur­
vivors of that period of gracious travel on elegant named trains. For
example, the following great trains of before two world wars continue
to evoke the idea of the splendid trip by railway:
The Blue Train; Paris-Nice-Ventimiglia, 1,123 km ; The
Nord Express; Paris-Homburg-Copenhagen, 2,500 km ; The
Orient Express; Paris-Budapest-Bucharest, 2,500 km
The Arlberg Expres~; Paris-Zurich-Vienna, 1,470 km ; The
Simplon Express; Paris-Venice-Belgrade, 1,983 kmi
The Rome Express i Paris-Milan-Rome, 1,468 km i
The Sud Express i Paris-Madris-Lisbon, 2,058 km.
WHEN THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY ISSUED A PRESS RELEASE IN NOVEMBER,
1967, it stated unequivocally that the Company had opera­
ted the first freight train in Canada with remotely con­
trolled mid-train units and presented a series of photographs to at­
test to this event.
The first picture was one of diesel-electric unit Number
5557, class DRF-30-b, taken at St. Luc Yard, Montreal, and the cap­
tion material stated: The first remote-control train in Canada lea­
ves Canadian Pacifics St. Luc Yard in Montreal on a test run. The
manned locomotive at the front of the train is specially equipped for
remote control operation of unmanned diesels coupled behind ROBOT 1
in the middle of the train. Signals are received and relayed by the
new ROBOT 1 unit which has a fail-safe radio system and logic cabin~
ets to receive and relay remote control commands.
CANADIAN 379 R A I L
The second picture showed the interior of the cab af Num~
ber 5557 with the engineman at the controls of the 3000 hp diesel.
Special equipment in the locamotive includes rgw push-button air­
brake control unit at upper left and, beside it, the control console
with a rotating-type mode selector switch for synchronized or inde­
pendent operation of the lead group and rear group locomotives.
The third picture showed the freight leaving from the St.
Luc Yard departure side. In the photograph, the number of the lead
unit on the head-end cannot be discerned. However, the two remotely­
controlled, mid-train units are Numbers 5564 and 5563.
S.S.Worthen.
CA NAD I AN 380 R A I L
IN AN ANNOUNCEMENT DATED SEPTEMBER 15, 1976, BOMBARDIER-MLW LIMITED
of Montreal announced that the transportation and heat­
transfer products marketing and manufacturing operations
would be consolidated under the direction of Mr. Henry Valle, former
ly president of the companys Transportation Marketing Division. Mr.
Valle becames president of the MLW Industries division of the Com­
pany, following the retirement of Mr. R.L. Grassby.
Both Mr. Valle and Mr. Grassby have been benefactors of
the the Canadian Railroad Historical Association and, on behalf of
members of the Association, CANADIAN RAIL offers these gentlemen our
most sincere congratulations and good wishes on these important oc­
casions.
Mr. Valle announced that, under this new organization, Mr.
John Byrne, vice-president, Transportation Marketing, would be res­
ponsible for marketing the companys diesel-electric locomotives,tr­
ansit vehicles, the LRC high-speed intercity passenger train and in­
dustrial and marine diesel engines produced at the companys plants
at Montreal and La Pocatiere, Quebec.
BOB LOAT OF EDMONTON, ALBERTA, POSITIONED HIMSELF AT THE EAST SWITCH
at Morrinville, Alberta at 1311 hours, April 13, 1975, to
record on film a remarkable show of power on the Northern
Alberta Railways. What he recorded, we now present. Additional de-
tails are: the train on the left is NAR Train 40, headed by GP 9 Num­
ber 201, followed by GP 9 Canadian National Railways Number 4156,then
GP 9 CNR Number 4348 and last of all, NAR Number 311, a GMD-1.
On the right, NAR Train 31 headed by GP 9 Number 203 and
CP RAIL GP 9 Number 8665.
It was a cold, but action-packed April day~
CANADIAN 381 R A I L
WABAMUN, ALBERTA IS 44.3 MILES WEST OF EDMONTON, ON THE MAIN LINE OF
Canadian National Railways. Canadian National it is today,
but the station, now closed, has a strong resemblance to
stations built at other locations on the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
in the years just before World War I. More recently, like at 1628
hours on Saturday, April 13, 1975, Bob Loat was releasing the shut­
ter of his camera just as CN Extra West 5175, headed up by an SO 40
of the same number, rolled tonnage west towards Hinton and Jasper.
MONTREAL AND TORONTO NEWSPAPERS OF OCTOBER, 1976, CARRIED NOTICES AD-
vising interested persons that public hearings would be
held in mid-November in North Bay and Cochrane, Ontario,
regarding the application by Canadian National Railways to discontinue
passenger train service between Toronto and North Bay and Cochrane and
Kapuskasing, Ontario. These services comprise the daily Northland to
Kapuskasing and weekend trains between Toronto and North Bay. CN claim­
ed that preliminary figures for 1975 showed an actual operating loss
of $ 2,020,524, based on costs of $ 3,080,378 and revenues of
$ 1,059,854. Canadas federal treasury payed 80% of this loss.
CANADIAN 382 R A I L
MEANWHILE, BACK IN MONTREAL, KEN GOSLETT MADE A SORTIE IN FEBRUARY,
1975, to photograph two brand-new CP RAIL SD 40-2 units,
Numbers 5715 and 5714, leading a rather weary FB2 and a
string of freight cars westbound along the siding at Lachine, Quebec.
The freight was being overtaken by Train 163, the (then) daily-except­
Sunday DAYLINER to Hudson, Quebec.
Kens second picture portrays CP RAILs derated dinosaur
Number 4744, with a slightly overaged FB 2 and a more recent RS 10
on the head-end of a westbound freight at the top of St-Lazare Hill,
just east of the station of the same name. The time was, apparently,
February 1975.
.. ~

,..,-/
CANADIAN 383 R A I L
GO TRANSIT IS PREDICTING THAT, ONE OF THESE DAYS, EXTENSIVE RAILWAY
reconstruction will be necessary west of Spadina Avenue,
and the entrance to Union Station, Toronto, to facilitate
GO TRANSIT access to the inner platforms of the station. The accom­
panying artists sketch looks east and shows how GO trains from the
Oakville Corridor will pass under the tracks of other passenger train
traffic to reach GO TRANSIT platforms on the north side of Union Sta­
tions train-shed. GO trains from the Georgetown and Streetsville
routes will run directly into the GO TRANSIT platforms on the north
side of the train-shed.
CHESSIE SYSTEMS CHESAPEAKE AND OHIO RAILROADS GP 30 UNITS NUMBERS
3001, 3034 and 3028 keep company with CP RAILs Number 4713 at the ~
diesel shop at CP RAILs Toronto Yard on February 28, 1976. John I~
Sutherland, who took the picture, notes that these C&O units will
toke the CP RAIL/C&O pool freight west to Detroit, Michigan,later in
the afternoon.
Canadian Rail
ISSN 0008 -4875
is published monthly by the
Canadian Railroad Historical Association
p.o. Box 22. Station B, Montreal,Quebec,Canada/H3B 3J5
Editor; S.S.Worthen Production; P. Murphy
CALGARY & SOUTH-WESTERN
L.N.Unwin, Secretory 1727 23rd. Avenuo N.W.,Colgory,Alto.T2H IV6
OTTAWA
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TORONTO & YORK 01 VIS ION
D. Scott , Socretory PiO.Box 5849,Te1n,1no1 A Toronto,Ont.MSW IP3
WINDSOR & ESSEX DIVISION
J.R.Wolfe,Secrotory 300 Cabana Road East, Windsor, Ont. N9G lA2
Association Representatives
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Visit the Canadian Railway Museum St.Constant;Quebec,Canada.
-More than
100 pieces of equipment on display-

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