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Canadian Rail 297 1976

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Canadian Rail 297 1976

Canadian Rail
No.297
October 1976

How Sweet It Is
I

Bob McLarty
Photos and Maps by the Author.
C
asually leafing through the pages of tourist brochures
and -occasionally -railway enthusiast publications,
you might get the impression that the only place in
eastern Canada where maple sugar festivals are held is
in La Belle Province of Qu~bec, or in neighbouring por­
tions of the United States. This is not necessarily the
case. While a good deal of maple syrup is produced in
Qu~bec and nearby parts of New England, it is possible to
participate in maple sugar festivals in Ontario, too.
The thrifty and prosperous farmers of the district around El­
mira, Ontario, are mostly of the Mennonite faith. Some people think
that their way of life is very austere and more than a little old­
fashioned -by 1976 standards. But their traditional way of making
maple syrup attracts crowds of visitors from the cities in the Grand
River valley of southern Ontario, not the least of which are the
twins of Kitchener and Waterloo.
In March 1972, as in previous years, the Kiwanis Club of Kitch­
ener/Waterloo sponsored the Sugar Bush Express, a passenger train
shuttle-service between Kitchener and Elmira, via Canadian National
Railways Waterloo SiD. Elmira is a predominantly Mennonite commun­
ity north of Kitchener, in the centre of the best farmland in Water­
loo County. Many of the farmers have carefully preserved their stands
of sugar maples, with the predictable result.
The annual maple syrup festival at Elmira has to be attended to
be appreciated fully. It is one of the most attractive facets of an
otherwise spartan life-style of the old-order Mennonites, which in­
cludes mostly plain, black clothes without zippers, horse-drawn bug­
gies and traditional farming practices, without electricity or tele­
phones, let alone television.
By and large, the Kitchener/Waterloo Kiwanians are not noted
for being either Mennonites or rail enthusiasts, but, however, they
have combined sugaring-off festivities and railroading successfully
to provide a train-ride which adds to the old-time atmosphere of
this notable spring-time event.
The Sugar Bush Express departed from the CN station in Kitch­
ener, a red-brick Victorian structure, the graceful arches of which
FROM THE ENGINEERS SEAT OF CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS UNIT NUMBER
6536, King Street in Waterloo, Ontario, seems to be crowded contin­
ually with wheeled vehicles of all kinds, including the occasional
buggy~
.. THE WESTBOUND KITCHENER/WATERLOO KIWANIS CLUB SUGAR BUSH EXPRESS
runs into the station in Kitchener, Ontario, after the departure of
the TEMPO train for London.
, ..
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ELMIM ( ONT.) BRANCH
C.N. WATERLOO sue.
o I 2 ~
f=E9 s~~I~~
CANADIAN
293
R A I L
have stubbornly defied all attempts by the B&B Deportment, armed with
point and plywood, to create a degree of modernity. A milling crowd
on the station platform also properly belonged to another era and
certainly provided a sharp contrast to the lesser number of patrons
who customarily await the regular eN TEMPO train to Toronto or to
London, to the west.
Despite its brief twelve-mile run, the ride to Elmira on the
Sugar Bush Express was truly nostalgic. Moving out of Kitchener
station, the special negotioted a cross-over and left the main line
for the lighter iron of the Elmira Branch, which winds through Water­
loo over numerous grade crossings where surprised citizens, unused
to roil passenger traffic, gazed with obvious disbelief and unwar­
ranted curiosity.
The train crept slowly past the disused Waterloo station, for
years the headquarters of a Waterloo building materials supplier.The
exterior of the station had been covered with garish panels of imi-
tation shingle, brick and stone. Once, the station had a more at-
tractive natural exterior, but that day is long past. Once, this
station was the point of departure and return -by private rail-car­
for members of the Joseph Seagram family, on annual hunting expedi­
tions.
Beyond the Waterloo yard-limit, the farmland through which the
Elmira Branch runs provides an authentic turn-of-the-century ambience.
Farms regularly have windmills that work. The large barns are in ex­
cellent repair and the substantial houses are surrounded by a variety
of sheds and other outbuildings. Long, neat piles of firewood close
by attest to the stern but productive life-style of the Mennonite
citizens. The many small streams that wind through the fields are
crossed on wooden pile-trestles by the railway.
The run of the Sugar Bush Express terminated at Elmira at a
dead-end. The station has long since been removed and in its place
stood a variety of farm wagons, their floors covered with cleon straw
HAVING NEGOTIATED THE CROSSOVER UNDER THE MARGARET AVENUE BRIDGE
Kitchener, the Sugar Bush Express is led up the Waterloo SiD
diesel unit Number 6536, on the way to Elmira, Ontario.
IN by
IN DOWNTOWN WATERLOO, STORE-FRONT UNIT NUMBER 6536 IS ABOUT TO CR:
oss King Street and thereafter make a slow transit of downtown Wa­
terloo Square parking lot. When the branch was built, the citys gr­
owth could not have been anticipated.
LESS THAN 200 FEET FROM KING STREET, WATERLOO, THE SUGAR BUSH EX­
press runs along the perimeter of the municipal parking lot on its
way to Elmira, pan-cakes and maple syrup.
THIS VIEW OF THE MARCH LANDSCAPE NEAR ST. JACOBS, ONTARIO,REPRESENTS
the prosperous farmland in the Mennonite settlements of Waterloo Co­
unty, Ontario. Orchards and wood-piles abound; wooden trestles like
the one over which eN unit Number 6536 has just passed, occur quite
frequently. The faint sound of diesel horns in the background is
that of other-end unit Number 6758; the engineman is blowing for
Highway 85, a road on which black, horse-drawn buggies -as well as
automobiles -have to stop for trains at railway crossings.


. , ~.,~{.
1

CANADIAN
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R A I L
and drawn by teams of horses, ready to carry the passengers in relays
up to the main street of the town, the scene of curb-side grills and
an endless supply of pan-cakes and good, old-fashioned maple syrup.
While the happy participants enjoyed one of the best-known, na­
tural treats, the Sugar Bush Express was readied for the return to
Kitchener.
With no turning facilities at Elmira and the presence of the
essential steam-generator car in the consist, it might have been ne­
cessary to run the diesel unit around the train on the adjacent si
ding. But there was the ever-present additional urgency for a prompt
return to Kitchener for additional passengers. The whole problem was
neatly resolved by providing a train formation that was bi-direction­
al, consisting of a GMD FP 9A, Number 6536, coupled to the steam­
generator car on the northbound run, with an MLW FPA Number 6758 on
the other end for the trip south. There were eight coaches in between.
This consist had the added attraction for a railway enthusiast.
If he was willing to forego the pan-cakes and maple syrup at Elmira
on one trip, and return at once to Kitchener, the trailing unit mi­
ght, in certain circumstances, be used as a heated observation lounge
complete with the sound effects provided by an idling prime-mover on
the other side of the steel partition. Only one unit was working on
the to and from trips. As a result, the rail photographer could
record the Sugar Bush Express on film on successive runs, from
track-side, from locomotive cab and from vestibule door.
The Kiwanians special also enjoyed its share of operational com­
plications. Arrivals at Kitchener had to be coordinated with other
main-line train movements. Following the first trip back from Elmira,
there was a delay until the morning TEMPO to London had cleared the
station. Then the Sugar Bush Express could come in off the branch
and back into the station.
On a subsequent run, a hurried return to Kitchener was neces-
sary in order to allow the Ontario Rail Associations special train
from Toronto to make the trip up the branch to Elmira. This inter­
city special, now also an annual operation, discharged its passen­
gers and then was shunted to an adjacent siding where it remained
throughout the day, clear of the frequent arrivals and departures of
the Sugar Bush Express.
Believe it or not, the one-day-a-year Sugar Bush Express was a
direct result of the automobile. So many people -in so many motor
cars -converged on the Elmira area that the town just could not
cope with the traffic and the simultaneous parking problem. Approx­
imately 60,000 visitors, according to estimates published by the news
media, arrived at Elmira, a town with a normal population of 5,000 .
They came from various parts of Ontario and many cities in the United
States, just south of the International Boundary. Automobiles lined
Highway 85 bumper-to-bumper for miles outside of Elmira,notwithstand­
ing the advance warning provided by the Ontario Provincial Police.
Other, wiser motorists exchanged these hang-ups for a pleasant,care­
free, 24-mile round-trip by rail, organized by the Kiwanians, who
cleverly translated a chaotic situation into an opportunity to make a
little money for their organization and Canadian National Railways.
There is one characteristic about this portion of Canadian Na­
tional Railways that is quite unforgettable, especially if you are
riding in the cab of a diesel unit. The rails at the approaches to
level crossings have been transverse welded with beads on the rail­
heads, to ensure that the wheels of the infrequent freight trains
,
CANADIAN
299
R A I L
ANOTHER MAPLE SUGAR SPECIAL FROM A GREATER DISTANCE: THE ONTARIO
Rail Associations special troin from Toronto to Elmira, hauled by
units Numbers 6761 and 6752. This was the 1972 operation.
will break up the rust on the rail-heads, thereby assuring a g~od
electrical contact and the operation without fail of the cross~ng
flashers. Even at low speeds, these rail-head beads produce a teeth­
jarring vibration in the cab.
Each year for the past several, the ~Sugar Bush Express~ on a
single Saturday has rolled up more mileage on the Waterloo SiD than
the freight trains do in a week or more. Revenues from this one-day
(sweet) operation, while not disclosed, are rumored to rival those
from freight hauled to and from the various customers on the SiD for
the entire year.
If you happen to remember Kitchener and the maple sugar party
in Elmira, next year, and decide to make the trip to participate in
this enjoyable spring-time activity, perhaps you too can sweet-talk
your way into the cab of the rear diesel unit for the 24-mile trip
with the eight-coach, steam-heater-car, two-diesel ~Sugar Bush Ex­
press. But, watch out. There may be some changes made, as there
were in 1976, when the Sugar Bush Express made its debut as a
four-RDC-car RAILINERS set, borrowed from the Toronto area servi~es,
while the Ontario Rail Intercity Special glided into Elmira behind
an RS 18, of all things.
However, to tell the absolute truth, the total experience will
be a memorable one, whether you like trains, farm wagons, horses or
pan-cakes and maple syrup.
Canadas Armoured
Train.
I
n the spring of 1942, the military
authorities on the west coast of
North America were startled into
action when elements of the Imperial
Navy of Japan occupied one of the
smaller Aleutian Islands off the
west coast of Alaska. The apprehen­
sion of the residents of Canadas
west coast increased dramatically in
June, 1942, when a Japanese submar­
ine surfaced near Estavan Point,Van­
couver Island and fired several sal­
vos at targets on the Island.
To provide a mobile striking force and to protect the terminal
facilities of Canadian National Railways at Prince Rupert, British
Columbia, Canadas Department of National Defence requested Canadian
National Railways to build an armoured train. This train was in-
tended to protect the vulneroble single-track CN line which linked
Prince Rupert with Terrace ond the east.
Built by the CNR at its Transcona Shops outside of Winnipeg, the
ormoured train was composed of seven cars, with the locomotive in the
middle, between cars 3 and 5. At each end of the train (Cars 1 & 8)
there was a general-purpose, steel flat car, on which was mounted a 75
mm gun and a powerful searchlight. There followed a similar gen-
eral-purpose steel gondola (Cars 2 & 7), in which were mounted two 40
mm Bofors machine guns, back to back. Next (Cars 3 & 6), there
was a steel boxcar, converted into a sort of armoured coach by cut­
ting windows in the sides. These cars were used to store rifles,
light machine-guns and light mortars.
The locomotive occupied the position of Car 4 from the (short)
front end of the train and the place of Car 5 when the train was
backing vp. Originally, it was intended to use CNR locomotive Number
9000, which was one-half of CNs famous two-unit diesel-electric lo-
comotive, assembled in the summer of 1928. This unit had been re-
engined with a V-type, two-cycle, 16-cylinder diesel, but it was
still now powerful enough to handle the armoured train and was re-
placed by CN tenwheeler Number 1426, on oil-burner.
Car 5 was another steel boxcar, fitted up as a diner, combined
with a wireless room, a first-aid room and an office. A telephone
system supplied quick communication between all cars in the train.
This unique armoured train, with a peak establishment of some two
hundred soldiers of the 8th. Canadian Division, made its first
run between Terrace and Prince Rupert on 29 July 1942.
After slightly more than 12 months of service -and when the
apprehension of a Japanese attack had subsided -regular patrol ser­
vice was discontinued. The following year (1944), the train was
decommissioned and the cars were rebuilt and restored to regular ser­
vice on Canadian National Railways.
I
I;
t
I~
I
CANADIAN
301
R A I L
by
Fred Gaffen.
MAP OF THE AREA EAST OF PRINCE RUPERT, BRITISH COLUMBIA, WHERE
Canadian National Railways main line follows the estuary of
Skeena River, on its way east to Terrace. Dept.Energy,Mines &
THE
the
Res.
THE MAIN LINE OF CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS ABOUT 10 MILES EAST
Prince Rupert, British Columbia, on the bank of the Skeena River.
National Museums of Canada.
OF
A PICTURE OF THE ARMOURED TRAIN. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, THE NUMBERS OF
the equipment are as follows: CN 141174, CN 141200, CN 573083, CN
4-6-0 steam locomotive Number 1426, GTW 573084, CN 573031, CN 141099 and
CN 141602. Photo courtesy Canadian Forces Photographic U.
ARMOURED BOXCAR GTW 573084, CAR ~ FROM THE REAR IN THE ARMOURED TRAIN.
ALL VULNERABLE PARTS OF THE TRAIN, SUCH AS THIS COUPLING BETWEEN ONE
of the gondolas and a boxcar, were shielded to prevent possible dam­age from
light-calibre automatic weapons. Public Archives of Canada.

CANADIAN
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S~~=-=-:lESI

:1 :z1
.-V-~ =-=-~ C> :z1 t I

Kenneth A.W.Gansel
Photographs by the Author.
CANADIAN
306
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.iiJIIL~ii·~~t~~ ~oq~~~ke~~!~r~~~ml~~d~~~~: ~~pit~;r;!~t
on a long weekend in May, the intention was
to see as much of the Central Vermont Railway
as is possible on a three-day weekend. The way
things turned out, the return trip was made via
Rutland and Whitehall, New York, and it was at
the latter place that the Big Fish were first
spotted. The Delaware 8. Hudson Railways unique
Sharknoses, Numbers 1205 and 1216, were tak­
ing the wayfreight back over the Rutland and
Washington to Rutland, Vermont.
A quick turn-around caught the two Sharks on the through-truss
bridge over the Champlain-Hudson Canal, not half-a-mile from the D&H
station at Whitehall. As the freight was moving smartly east, some
sprightly footwork was necessary to keep the lash-up in sight as it
wound its way east over the curvey and picturesque line towards the
S tote line.
Out of Whitehall, there is a grade until the line reaches Fair
Haven, Vermont, the first town of any size after crossing the State
line. Despite the fact that the country flattens out about here, it
was still slow going for the two units and 40 cars, as it took a
little over an hour to cover the 8.4 miles from Whitehall.
Fair Hoven is one of those typically New England towns, which
once had a few industries to keep it going. Now the industries have
moved elsewhere and the buildings have become factory outlets -or
discount warehouses, if you prefer.
The freight made its first stop at Castleton, Vermont, 13.3 mi­
les from Whitehall, where the branch from Eagle Bridge, New York, 52
miles south, comes in. Here, the S harks set out two cars for a local
feed merchant. The station still stands in the an~le between the two
lines, but it is a railway station ~o longer. It is now a piano and
organ store and is appropriately identified.
The Sharks headed down the Eagle Bridge line for some distance
to fetch three cars from a quarry, near Poultney. This provided the
opportunity to have some lunch. Up to this point, it had been pos­
sible to toke more pictures of the Sharks in scenic surroundings than
on any of the previous visits to this part of New England.
Very soon, the rumble of the returning Sharks was heard and soon
they were coupled up and the train-line was being pumped up. Then we
were away across the valley to West Rutland, where several flats were
set off to be taken to the marble quarries over the old Clarendon and
Pittsford Railroad, now oened by the D&H.
a Now only three miles out of Rutland, it had taken the Sharks
little over four hours to cover the 23.7 miles from Whitehall.
course, this included a 7.7-mile (one-way) trip down the Eagle
Of
Bridge
branch from Castleton.
With a little bit of luck, the return to Whitehall was in time
to see the northbound Adirondack. For the railway enthusiast, a most
interesting day. To the local residents, just another quiet Sun­
day in Vermont.

October, 1976
WIIIILLS
THE MONTREAL GAZETTE OF 22 JUNE 1976 CONTAINED A NOTICE DIRECTED
at consulting engineering firms that, under the authority
of Government of Canada Bill C-27, the Railway Relocation
and Crossing Act, the Province of Novo Scotia, on behalf of the Mu­
nicipalities of the Town of Truro and the County of Colchester, is
undertaking urban development, transportation and financial studies
and plans preparatory to rationalization of the railway traffic pro­
blem in the Town of Truro. John Welsh.
A FOOTNOTE IN THE MAY/JUNE 1976 EUROPEAN CONTINENTAL TIMETABLE OF
Thomas Cook and Sons to the Table 10-A-AMTRAK section,
reads as follows:
A through AMTRAK-Canadian Notional Railways Chicago-Toronto day
train service is expected to commence later in 1976.
WHILE NO BIDS WERE RECEIVED FROM UNITED STATES MANUFACTURERS IN RE­
sponse to requests for tenders for the 120-220 new transit
cars needed by the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Au­
thoritys BLUE and ORANGE Lines, the apparent lowest bidder for the
first alternative of 120 cars and for the second alternative of 220
cars was Hawker Siddeley Canada Limited of Thunder Bay, Ontario. The
second bidder was Bombardier MLW Limited of La Pocatiere, Quebec.
With the United States federal government approved grants for moss
transit rail and bus systems in seven cities now reaching about $ 340
million, there is the distinct possibility that these two Canadian
companies will enjoy some additional business from this source.
Two of the grants -to Seattle, WA and Washington, DC,will
enable these cities to buy articulated buses; these vehicles, popular
in western Europe, are composed of two regular-size bus bodies, one
motor and one trailer, connected with a flexible portion. Total seat­
ing capacity is about 140 passengers.
Other US cities which have already opted for new or ex­
panded rapid-transit rail systems are Baltimore, MD (8 miles), New
York City (commuter services to Connecticut), Boston, MA ( to purch­
ase 190 rapid transit cars) San Francisco, CA (general improvement in
existing streetcar and subway systems) and Detroit, MI ( 153 air-con­
ditioned buses).
Baltimore will use $ 50 million to
ses and Washington will get $ 15.8 million to
124 regular buses. The articulated buses will
fabrik Augsburg-Nurnberg AG of West Germany. buy 150
articulated bu­
buy 50 articulated and
be built by Maschinen-
John Welsh.
BEGINNING AT 10:00, TUESDAY, JULY 27, 1976, THE RAILWAY TRANSPORT COM­
mittee of the Canadian Transport Commission began public
hearings in the Council Chamber, City Hall, Saint John,
New Brunswick, on the application by CP RAIL to abandon operations on
n nortion of the Shore Line SiD from Mile 10.0 to St. George, Mile
CA NAD IAN
310
R A I L
46.3, a distance of 36.3 miles. Cf} RAIL, in the abandonment appli­
cation, said that the service hod on actual loss of $ 69,700 on to­
tal revenues of $ 27,333, in 1974, the last year for which full fig­
ures were available.
MR. JEAN-MICHEL LECLERCQ, THE ASSOCIATIONS REPRESENTATIVE FOR EUROPE
sends a report published in La Suisse that the federal
government of Switzerland has approved the completion of
84 km of double-track on the Berne-LBtschberg-Simplon railway be­
tween Berne and Brigue. If all goes well, 84 km of main line will be
double-tracked, beginning in 1977. At present, about 43% of the main
line is single-tracked. The estimated cost is 620 million Swiss fr­
ancs: the federal government will contribute 490 million, the Canton
of Berne 30 million and the B-L-S 100 million.
The B-L-S Berner Alpenbahn Gesselschaft, opened in 1913,
provides an important link between France and Italy via Neuchatel ,
Berne, Brigue and the Simplon Tunnel to Milan.
SASKATCHEWANS CAPITAL CITY OF REGINA IS THE FIRST IN CANADA TO TAKE
advantage of the federal governments 1974 Roil Relocation
and Crossing Act to move its railway lines out of down­
town. Presently, CP RAILs main line neatly bisects Regina, dividing
industrial, low-income north side from downtown shopping and pros­
perous south side.
The federal government splashed $ 100,000 in prize money
for an international design competition. After screening 121 sub-
missions, the six-man jury selected five finalists. Then, citizen
participation ensued and, as might have been expected, the citizens
went one way and the panel of judges went another. The public ballot
picked a Japanese entry that had two core areas linked by a covered
moll. The judges chose a Parisian entry by architects and planners
Michel and Claire Duplay, featuring a large east-west green way,
called the prairie, which led to a focal central square. This plan
also allowed for a balance of housing, hotels and convention area
that the judges considered essential in order to restore life to the
citys centre.
When Canadian National Railways and CP RAIL are both fin­
ally moved by 1979-80, at least $ 30 million will have been spent on them
alone. Some of the railway right-of-way is already designated
for highways, but the city is now considering retention of some of
it for light rail commuter traffic.
No doubt the usual delays will occur, in view of the fact
that three governments are involved. Nonetheless, many other Canadian
cities will be following Reginas lead. Already, Red Deer, Alberta
and Kamloops, British Columbia have begun studies. Lethbridge, Edmon­
ton and Grande Prairie are expected to follow.
THANKS TO THE 470, MONTHLY NEWSLETTER OF THE 470 RAILROAD CLUB OF
Portland, Maine, U.S.A., we are able to advise our read­
ers of what is probably the last chapter in the history
of the Maine Central Railroads Quebec Junction-Beecher Falls branch,
once the main stem of the Raspberry Branch (CANADIAN RAIL Number
281, June 1975).
The Maine Central petitioned for abandonment of their br­
anch from North Stratford, New Hampshire to Beecher Falls, Vermont,
on July 24, 1973 and, at the hearing, testified that annual opera­
tion of the bronch resulted in a loss of over $ 250,OOO.The initial
CANADIAN
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decision permitting abandonment by the Administrative Law judge
was appealed by the State of New Hampshire and others to the Review
Board of the Interstate Commerce Commission. This Board rendered a
decision on June 16, 1976 which affirmed the Administrative Law
judges decision dated September 12, 1975 and authorizing abandonment
effective July 21, 1976.
While reference has been made to abandonment of the entire
branch from Quebec Junction to Beecher Falls, it should be remembered
that the Maine Central has been using trackage rights over the Boston
and Maine from Coos Junction, north of Lancaster, New Hampshire, to
Groveton, where trackage rights over the Grand Trunk (Canadian Na-
tional) enable access to the MeCs own rails at North Stratford, for
the onward trip to Colebrook and West Stewartstown, New Hampshire and
Beecher Falls, Vermont.
Thus, the only portion of the branch that will be deprived
of rail service is the 23-mile stretch between North Stratford and
Beecher Falls. The B&M will continue to operate the portion from Coos
Junction to Groveton and will probably purchase the stretch from Coos
Junction south through Lancaster to Quebec Junction on the MeC s main
line from Portland to St. Johnsbury, Vermont, in order to operate
their Woodsville-Groveton freight via Waumbek Junction.
An MeC spokesman said that discussions are continuing with
regard to the possible purchase of the 23-mile portion of the branch
by the States of New Hampshire and Vermont.
EARLY IN JULY 1976, THE CITY OF EDMONTON, ALBERTA, WAS REQUESTING
bids for the construction of 4.47 miles of double-track
main line and 1.0 miles of yard track on the Northeast
Rail Rapid Transit Line (Contract 614) from Central Transit Station
on Jasper Avenue to northeast of 129 Avenue.
Section B (optional) included 1.20 miles of double-track
main line from northeast of 129 Avenue to northeast of 137 Avenue.
The tenders included the supply and installation of tr-
eated timber ties, roils, rail fasteners, thermite weld kits, insul­
ated joints and ballast.
Tenders were advertised to close at 2.00 oclock p.m.,
Wednesday, July 28 1976.
REFERRING TO THE PECULIAR 4 10 7/8 GAUGE OF THE SEVERAL SUBURBAN
electric railways in the Toronto area and today that of
the Toronto Transit Commission, Mr. H. Peter Oldham of
Delta, British Columbia, says that the justification for this 1.5
meter width given to him some years ago by on official of the-then
Toronto Transportation Commission was as follows:
The electric urban and suburban railways wished to avoid
the possibility of pressure from the Stephenson-gauged steam rail­
ways to use the electric railways tracks to switch freight cars,es­
pecially over city streets.
Mr. Oldham remarks that the unique gauge of these electric
railways was not too far off standard gouge, so that normal equip-
ment could be ordered and used, albeit with modified wheel separation
on the trucks. But it was just different enough to thwart any inten­
tions by the steam roads~
THE CITY OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, WHICH SEEMS TO BE SETTING SOME KIND
of a record as a location for the production of movies in­
volving railways, was visited in late August 1976 by ex­
Canadian Northern Railway, ex-Canadian National Railways 4-6-0 Num-
CANADIAN
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ber 1392, today the property of the Alberta Pioneer Railroad Asso­
ciation of Edmonton, Alberta.
The accompanying picture, provided through the kindness of
the Lethbridge HERALD and Rick Ervin, was sent, together with the in­
formation, by Pat Webb.
Pats uncle, a retired former superintendent of the Fort
Rouge Shops at Winnipeg, remembers Number 1392 from the days when he was a
machinist. She was one of the class H-6-g that were the first
to be equipped on the Canadian Northern with Walschaert s valve mo­
tion, rather than the Stephenson type. Number 1392 was, according to
her crew, the only one of her class to have a power-reversing gear,
apparently a requirement for operation on the Duluth, Winnipeg and
Pacific Railway, where she worked for a time.
For her most recent trip south from Edmonton, Number 1392
departed Edmonton on Sunday, August 15 in CP RAIL Extra 8105 south,
with a speed restriction of 25 mph because of the big hook in the
consist. She arrived in Lethbridge late the same day.
Shooting on the Lethbridge Viaduct was delayed until the
following Wednesday, due to insurance clearance delays. Number 1392
departed Lethbridge for Whiskey Gap on the Woolford SiD, via Stirling,
Raley and Woolfard.
On the return trip, Number 1392 returned to Lethbridge late
Sunday, arriving in Calgary late Monday and in Edmonton the following
day.
Mr. Norman Corness, APRA member from Edmonton, accompanied
Number 1392 and we hope to present an article by him on his various
adventures during the trip.
RAIL OPERATIONS IN SOUTHERN ONTA~IO, WHILE SIMPLIFIED SOMEWHAT BY THE
advent of CONRAIL, still display motive power and opera­
ting practices of some interest to the observer. Ken Gan­
sel of Ottawa found this Chessie System Extra 3008 east leaving St.
CA NAD I AN
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R A I L
Thomas on ex-Penn Central trackage for the 114-mile trip to Niagara
Falls, NY. This was on 29 July 1976. The Chessie System, ex-C&O,
ex-Pere Marquette, use CONRAIL trackage from St. Thomas to Fort Erie.
IN A MID-SUMMER NEWS ROUND-UP, JOHN HOFFMEISTER OF VICTORIA, BRITISH
Columbia, noted that Canadian National Railways had re­
placed class G-12 diesel units Numbers 991 & 992 with SW
8 units Numbers 7151 & 7152 for work around Victoria. Number 992 was
scheduled to go to CN s Newfoundland Area to supply parts for sim­
ilar G-8 units Numbers 800 through 805. Number 991 was reportedly
being held at Winnipeg pending possible sale. It was unusual to learn
that a standard-gauge diesel unit was to be used to supply parts for
42-inch gauge sister units.
Fores on the BC Government ferries from Horseshoe Bay to
Nanaimo and Tsawassen to Swartz Bay had been upped 200% to $ 10 per
automobile and $ 4.00 per person, one way. The
S.S.Princess Marguerite, ~CANADIAN RAIL Number 293,
June 1976) was scheduled to run only to and from Seattle, this year.
The mid-afternoon Victoria-Port Ange~es trip was to be discontinued
this season.
In the latter part of July 1976, the Railway Transport
Committee of the Canadian Transport Commission decided that CP RAIL
should restore freight service on the 44.5-mile Parksville-Courtenay
segment of the Victoria SiD, out of service since June 30, 1975.
The RTC also ordered that the approaches and structures of
French Creek trestle (Mile 98.6) and Tsable River trestle (Mile 125.1)
be restored to permit train operation over them. This will probably
take some time to complete, since the necessary work is considerable.
The Committee said that CP RAIL had been negligent in allowing these
CA NAD I AN
314
R A I L
trestles to deteriorate, thus resulting in the termination of all
train service without CTC approval.
The CTC ruling regarding the cessation of all passenger
service on the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway has not yet been published.
Meanwhile, CP RAIL has instituted travelling agents from
the Vancouver-based Customer Service Centre; this has resulted in the
closing of stations at Chemainus, Lake Cowichan, Nanaimo (uptown) and
Courtenay.
It is expected that CP RAIL will appeal the CTC ruling re
the resumption of freight service from Parksville to Courtenay, so
it will probably be some months before train operation is resumed,
providing that the appeal is denied.
THE CAPE BRETON DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, SPONSORS OF THE CAPE BRETON
Steam Railway, decided early in 1976 to make Port Marien
the base of operation for the CBSR. In the spring, a wye was
built at Morien Junction, reducing the normal ride on the rail­
way from 18 miles to four miles, a kind of shuttle service de~igned
to run more trains, carry more passengers and reduce operating costs.
Coaling and watering facilities are now available at Port Marien.
DEVCO apparently intends to expand the Port Marien site
into a railway museum, with exhibits of old railway rolling stock,
starting with an old Sydney and Louisburg Railway passenger coach
which has been rusting away on a siding in the shadow of the Sydney
Steel Corporations blast furnaces at DEVCO Railways Sydney round­
house and which has been restored but not to operating condition. It
is also rumored that an old CNR steam auxiliary crane will be put on
display.
Barrie MacLeod, who sent in this information, also remark­
ed that on the CBSR s new four-mile run, there would be no morning
trains at all. In the evening, there is a longer trip to Glace Bay
and back to Port Marien.
~ WE ARE GRATEFUL TO PIERRE PATENAUDE FOR SENDING IN AN INTERESTING
selection of photographs of diesel-electric units on some
of Canadas smaller railways: smaller in mileage, as well
as smaller in gauge~
CP RAIL, which is not in either category, has chop-nosed
a number of their elderly RS 3 units, including Numbers 8445, 8449,
8454, 8456 and 8460. Pierre caught Number 8450 switching in St. Luc
Yard, Montreal, on 1 July 1976. The reason for the chop is to im­
prove the visibility of the engineman.
In trandt, dead, at Canadian National Railways Montreal
Yard on 6 June 1976 was former CNR Number 8019 which had been sold to
Vancouver Wharves, North Vancouver, B.C., to become VT Number 23.
Within sight of the Canadian Railway Museum, St-Constant,
Quebec, is the Creosoting Division of DOMTAR Construction Materials
at Delson. This facility has a considerable amount of 30 trackage
and its motive power is a Whitcomb diesel-mechanical 25-ton unit,
built in 1926 (BIN 40091). Pierre photographed the unit on 17 July
1976.
Preserved at the Canadian Railway Museum is former Rober­
val-Saguenay Railways MLW-built RS 2, Number 20. This unit was the
first road-switcher to be built by MLW in December 1949 (BIN 76095).
Pierre photographed Number 20 on 17 July 1976.
CANADIAN
315
R A L
CANADIAN
316
R A L
CANADIAN R A I L
REPORTS FROM PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND INDICATED RECENTLY THAT NORTHUMBER­
land Ferries Limited of Charlottetown would likely be the
only major Canadian ferry operator to report increased tr­
affic for the 1976 tourist season. This private company operates be­
tween Wood Island, PEl and Coribou, NS and, to 31 July, had a 5.7%
increase in passengers, a 7% increase in automobiles and a 9.6% in­
crease in the number of trucks carried. Sailings were every 45 min­
utes this year, compared with every 75 minutes in 1975.
Traffic on runs operated by Canadian National Railways
East Coast Matine and Ferry Service was reduced this year. To August
31/ passenger traffic on the Cape Tormentine-Borden route had de-
clined 8.7% from last year, with automobile traffic down 9.6% for
the same period, compared to last year. Car-hauled trailers were down
16.8%, but camper units were up 3%. Trucks and tractor-trailers were
up by about 12%.
Similar declines in passengers and automobiles were
tered on ferry runs to Newfoundland, with the latter declining
year-to-date and the former posting an equivocal 0.4% rise for
seven-month period.
regis-
4.6%
the
CNs venerable M.V. Bluenose carried 16.9% fewer pas­
sengers on her Yarmouth, NS to Bar Harbour, ME, run, a direct indica­
tion that citizens of the United States were taking their vacations
at home to enjoy their Bicentennial.
t
THE ACCOMPANYING PHOTOGRAPH OF GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY COMPANYS SHOT­
gun stacked commuter locomotive Number 268, standing in
Bonaventure Station, Montreal, probably comes from the
Associations W.G. Cole Memorial Collection, but the Editor is not at
all sure. Perhaps a reader can identify the location and year posi­
tively and provide a few notes on the type and history of this un­
usual locomotive.

CANADIAN R A I L
THE BUDD COMPANY OF DETROIT, MICHIGAN, UNVEILED IN MIDSUMMER A HIGH­
speed, self-propelled rail passenger car, the latest in
the series which started out with the well-known Rail
Diesel Car. This version is powered by an ordinary 360-horsepower
diesel truck engine and is said to be capable of speeds up to 120
mph. Budd officials said they pion to complete a prototype of the
SVP-2000 car within 18 months and are looking for initial orders of
from 100 to 350 units in the United States. The car will retail for
about $ 750,000. Of course, it can be operated singly or in MU.
ON SEPTEMBER 1, 1976, CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS EAST COAST MARINE
and Ferry Service took over operation of the M.V.Princess
of Acadia from CP RAIL, planning to maintain the same
schedules and rates for the time being on the Saint John, NB -Digby,
NS service. The vessel has a capacity of 159 automobiles and, accor­
ding to a CN spokesman, the 40-mile trans-Bay of Fundy ferry route
performs a vital service by reducing the road mileage from Saint
John to Digby. More than 100 freight customers regularly avail them­
selves of this service.
FIVE DAYS A WEEK, BETWEEN 18:17 and 18:20, IN LATE AUGUST 1976, THE
not-so-casual observer of trains, John Welsh, could note
the following action at Dorval, west of Montreal:
At 18: 17, CP RAIL Train 249, composed of eleven 800-series com­
muter coaches hauled by a single diesel unit, arrived;
at the same minute, Canadian National Railways TURBO Train 67
started from Dorval for Toronto;
as CP RAIL Train 249 cleared the platform, CP RAIL Train 248,
eleven RDCs, entered the station eastbound.
Simultaneously, CNs RAPIDO Train 36 from Ottawa, consisting of
a 4100-series diesel, a club car, two coaches and one snack­
bar coach was approaching the station.
As he observed the action, John wa~ startled to note thot each
train had a di fferent consist. W.ho says that train-watching isnt
interesting .
… JEAN-MICHEL LECLERCQ, THE ASSOCIATIONS REPRESENTATIVE FOR EUROPE
writes to say that a group of tramway enthusiasts in
Geneva, Switzerland, propose to publish a book on the
history of the streetcar in that Swiss city. While the text will be,
in general, in the French language, a short summary in English will
be presented and the picture captions will also appear in the En-
glish language. The proposed prepublication price is Fr.Sw. 70, or
about $ 28 Can. There are 360 pages of text on coated paper stock,
with 280 photographs, 70 designs and plans. The book is 22×28 cm , bound
with a plastic composition cover.
Further details may be obtained by writing the Librairie
de lUniversite, GEORG, 5, Corraterie, Geneva, Suisse.
The accompanying photograph,by M. R. Kollmann and the
Association genevoise pour le Musee des tramways, shows preserved
motor car Be 4/4 and trailer Bi 363 at Chene-Bourg.
~j BOB LOAT, OUR EXPERT PHOTOGRAPHER-MEMBER FROM ALBERTA, WAS OUT HUNT-
I~ ing on Saturday, April 13, 1975, when what should he see but Can-
adian National Railways freight Extra East (Number 520) headed by SW1200RS Numbers 1353 and
1350. The location was the highway over­
pass about one mile east of Spruce Grove, Alberta; the time was 17:00.
Canadian Rail
ISSN 0008 -4875
is published monthly by the
Canadian Railroad Historical Association
p.o. Box 22. Station B, Montreal,Ouebec,Canada/H3B 3J5
Editor; S.S.Worthen Production; P. Murphy
CALGARY & SOUTH-WESTERN
L.H.Un …. in, Secretary 1727 23cd. Avenue N.W.,Coigory,Alta.T2H lV6
OTTAWA
D.E.Stoltz,Secretory P.O.Box 141,Stolion A, Ottowa,Canado KIN BV)
PACIFIC COAST
R. Snontier,Secretory P.O,Box 1006,Station A,Voncouver,B.C.V6C 2PI
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
C.H.Hotchor,Secretary P.O.Box 6102,Slotion C,Edmonton,Alto.T5B 4K5
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
D. Scott ,Socretary P.O.Box 5849,To(;1in01 A Toronto,Ont.HSW lPJ
WINDSOR & ESSEX DIVISION
J.R,Woifo,Secretary 300 Cabana Rood East, Windlloc, Onto N9G lA2
Association Representatives
AUSTRAlIA C.L.Coop 68 Mount Pleosont Rood Ellhom 3095 Victoria
EUROPE J-M.Lcclcrc:q f.:;s.idencc Bellevue dG Plon, Ol220,Oivonne Franco
F
AR EAST II.O.McKcown 6-7, 4-chomo, Yomote_cho,Suito City, Osaka Japon
MANlTOllA K.C.Youngn 267 V(Hnon Rood, Winnipeg, Monilouo R3J 2wI
$ASKATCHHIAtl C. Borralt P.O.Box 288, Lonohor.l, SaskochBllon SOK 2LO
SOUTH AMERICA D.J.Howard Price,Wotorhouse <5. Pooto,Coixo 1978,500 Paulo,Brazil
SOUTHERN ALBERTA E,W.Johnson 4019 Vardell Rood N.W.,Calgary, Albcrta T3A OC3
UNITED
KINGDOM J.H.Sandors 67 Willo,( Woy, Ampthill, Beds. MK45 2SL England
W€ST ArRICA ~.£.Le990tt lost. of Appliod Science,UniV. Ibodon, Ibodon,Nigetio
Visit the Canadian Railway Museum St.Constant;Quebec,Canada.
-More than
100 pieces at equipment on display-

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