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Canadian Rail 291 1976

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Canadian Rail 291 1976

Canadian
Rail
No. 29-1
April 1976

TRAINS
TO THE
OKANAGAN
Jim Hope
Pictures by the Author,
unless otherwise noted.
T
he Okanogan Volley of south-central British Columbia has·­
long been known for its temperate winter climate and the
almost-tropical heat of its summers, equalling and some­
times exceeding anything attained in Florida or Califor-
nia, in the southern latitudes of the United States. Even
today, you can grow almost all kinds of fruit in the Okan­
ogan, provided you irrigate. The sides of the volley which
rise precipitously from Okanogan Lake are dry and dusty
But if you have a source of water, you can grow vegetables
and fruit, especially the lotter, in quantities that will
make you richer than the moguls who owned the copper mines
at Grand Forks, Eholt and Princeton on the former Kettle
Volley Railway.
The first railway to be built from the main line of the Canadian
Pacific to the north end of Okanogan Lake was the Shuswap and Okan­
ogan Railway, which was chartered in 1886. It was completed from
Sicamous, on Shuswap Lake, through Armstrong and Vernon to Okanagan
Landing, British Columbia, in June 1893 and, 22 years later, was
leased for 999 years to the Canadian Pacific Railway Company from
July 1, 1915.
It is probable that, from its beginning, the Shuswap and
agan was worked by the Canadian Pacific and therefore never
any motive power or rolling stock. At least, no photographs
Okan­
owned
showing
ONE OF THE STERNWHEEL STEAMBOATS WHICH PUSHED THE CAR-BARGES ON OKAN­
ogan Lake, the 5.5. SICAMOUS, at the dock at Okanagan Landing, B.C.,
in July 1941. The S.S.SICAMOUS was launched on May 26, 1914, at Okan­
agan Landing, her hull having been prefabricated by the Western D:y
Dock Company of Port Arthur, Ontario. She was converted to cargo Ln
1930 and withdrawn from service in 1949. She was sold to the City of
Penticton, B.C. in 1949 for conversion to a museum.
TIME WAS WI1Elj THE TOWER AT HURDMAN CONTROLLED THE TRAFFIC ON THE CAN­
adian Pacific Rail~a/ s [;loin line to the joint trackaqe of the Union
Station, Ottowa, from Montreal, as well as the occasional train on
the New York Centrals branch from Massena, New York and the sparse
traffic on the Sussex Street SiD. Philip Mason took this picture on
July 30, 1966. Hurdman was obliterated when service to Union Station
was terminated and the new Ottawa Station built.
CANADIAN
~ ~Ja: CAMPSEJJ.~JC:r.
Ie: kAMLOOP.s.. BSN~
100
c P CA.lilIIR. 1 –
VANCOUVE.R.
MAIN ..INt
.:;0, .
Duc.KS Nf.ADOW
It.ONlf. LAl FALKlAND
«X1~~~
WESTWOLD
RAILWAYS OFiHE. OKANAGAN
o 10
CPR.. -0 _—3. … _–
CNR aM Iii()
STATION ~
(STILL Sf ANDING, 1972)
SWE.Ef5BR1
OKE-EFt
WINFIE.LD
~ POSTHIL.L
kELOWl RUTLAND
, t..iIII.
~..-
I eN … C P cAA. R.,OIICTS
~ • Tb PENTI cTON
CANADIAN 101 R A I L
engines and cars lettered Shuswap and Okanagan Railway have turned
up.
The Shuswap & Okanagan left the CPRs main line at Sicamous on
Shuswap Lake, 44.2 miles west of Revelstoke and 84.1 miles east of
Kamloops, British Columbia. The line followed the west shore of Mara
Lake to its south end, where the valley opened out at the hamlets of
Mara and Grindrod into beautiful forming country, which continued on
through Enderby and Armstrong to Vernon. South of Vernon, the valley
was drier and irrigation was and is needed. The extension of the ra­
ilway south of Vernon, through real orchard country, followed beau­
tiful Kalamalka Lake, its name being taken from the Shuswap Indian
phrase meaning Lake of Many Colours. This is, in fact, very true,
as on bright days especially, the lake reflects many different sha­
des of blue and green.
At the end of Kalamalka Lake, the line crossed the isthmus at
Oyama and followed the length of Wood Lake on the east side, then
past Dog Lake to Rutland and into Kelowna.
The area around Armstrong and Enderby is today noted for its
fine mixed farming. A considerable amount of wheat is grown here, as
well as other grains, fruit, vegetables and live-stock. In the early
years of the development of thi~. part of the Okanagan region, car­
load after carload of celery and lettuce was shipped from Armstrong.
This small city also hosts each September the Interior Provincial
Exhibition, Hhich is the largest show of its kind in British Colum­
bia, Vancouvers Pacific National Exhibition notwithstanding~
Southwest from Vernon, the S&O built a three-mile spur to Okan­
agan Landing on the lake, Hhere passengers and LCL freight and ex­
press Here transferred to the sternHheel steamboat for the remainder
of the journey down Okanagan Lake to Kelowna, about 33 miles, and to
the landings along the west shore of the lake, the run terminating at
Penticton, later the headquarters of the Kettle Volley Railway.
Carloads of freight and empty box and refrigerator cars were
ferried down the lake on car-barges, at first pushed by the stern­
wheelers and later by steam and diesel-powered tugboats.
Canadian National Roilways completed their branch into the Okan­
agan region in 1925. The original portion of the branch from the
~ ON A WARM, SUNNY DAY, MARCH 27, 1947, THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAYS
~~work Extra 5771 Has Horking about 1 mile south of Armstrong, British
~. Columbia, dumping a little fill on an embankment Hhich needed it.
THE CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS WAYFREIGHT RATTLED NORTH OVER THE CP
Okanagan Sub on February 25, 1943. The engine was Number 2104, an
M-3-a class consolidation. The consist included several cars of for­
est products.
THE STATION AT ARMSTRONG, B.C., WAS A BUSY PLACE IN JUNE 1946, WHEN
Canadian Pacifics mixed train, headed by engine Number 962, held
the main line next to the station platform, while CN s wayfreight
with engine Number 2124 waited in the siding for the mixed to clear.
SIX MONTHS LATER, ON JANUARY 25, 1947, A SIMILAR SCENE WAS ENACTED.
This time, Canadian Nationals mixed train, with engine Number 2704
was standing at the main-line platform, while the CP wayfreight with
D-10 Number 983 waited in the siding for the mixed to leave.

CANADIAN 106 R A I L
Canadian Northern Pacific Railways main line at Kamloops Junction
to the town of Kamloops was built by the CNorP and opened on July
2, 1920. The branch left the main line at Kamloops Junction on the
east side of the North Thompson River, 2.84 miles north of the town.
It crossed the South Thompson River on a swing-bridge and terminated
at an imposing station in Kamloops, adjacent to the CPR main line.
When the CN decided to build a line into the Okanagan, the fir­
st portion to be built was an 0.69-mile piece from their station in
Kamloops, parallel to the CPR main line to,the east. At C.P.R. Jun­
ction, the CN obtained running rights over the CPR for another 10.81
miles east to Campbell Creek Junction. Here, the CNs own 56.43-mile
line to Kelowna began, climbing up out of the South Thompson River
valley to the settlements of Ducks Meadow and Monte Lake. This was
quite a grade and, in the old days, the CN used pushers on this
stretch.
After passing Monte Lake, the line ran through Westwold and
Falkland, both communities noted for mixed farming and live-stock
raising. Falkland used to have a big rodeo show every May 24. The
next station was OKeefe, named after one of the pioneers in the area
who owned a very large ranch. The old ranch buildings are now a pro­
vincial museum.
From
0 Keefe, the CNs line began to descend into the valley in
which the town of Armstrong was locared, following the west side of
the valley in a northerly direction and coming around to the south
in a big horseshoe curve to join the CPRs branch line from Sicamous.
Having reached Armstrong, the CN obtained running rights for
14.69 miles onward over the CPR to Vernon, where the CNs branch re­
sumed for the 33.73-mile distance to Kelowna, where it terminated. A
14.39-mile branch had already been constructed from Lumby Junction,
about two miles south of Vernon, to the town of Lumby, to the east.
This branch had been opened for service on October 20, 1915 and was
and is a freight-only line, the potential for passenger service ap­
parently never having existed.
In summary, then, the S&O built to Vernon and Okanagan Landing
from the CPRs main line at Sicamous. The Canadian Northern Pacific
built from Kamloops Junction to Kamloops and from Lumby Junction to
Lumby. The Canadian National laid the rails from Campbell Creek Jun­
ction to Armstrong Junction and from Lumby Junction to Kelowna. The
Canadian Nationals trackage was placed in operation on September 14,
1925.
When the CN s Okanagan Subdivision from Campbell Creek Junction
south, it was planned to build the line directly from OKeefe to Ver­
non, by-passing Armstrong. The citizens of Armstrong, not content with
one railway, apparently put up such a fuss that the CN was forced to
change their location so that the branch went to Armstrong, after all~
Originally, freight traffic into the north end of the Okanagan
Valley was mostly building supplies and consumer goods, while vege-
tables and fruit in refrigerator cars made up the majority of the
northbound tonnage. The valley meadows along the lakeshore were a
very righ fruit-farming area and, in the 20s, from early summer to
well into the winter, there was train-load after train-load of fruit
routed through Armstong. While carloads of apples predominated, there
were also reefers of celery and lettuce.
Both CP and CN used the yards at Vernon intially, although traf­
fic patterns changed somewhat over the years. When the CN completed
CA NAD I AN 107 R A I L
its branch to Kelowna, about 34 miles further down the lake, the CPR
abandoned its dock facilities at Okanagan Landing and built new ones
at Kelowna. CN was not slow to get into the tug-and-barge business
in competition with the CPRs sternwheelers. This competition was to
continue for more than 30 years.
Passenger service on these two Okanagan Volley lines was always
good. There was a CN passenger train to and from Kamloops Junction,
on the main line, daily except Sunday, and a CPR passenger train to
and from Sicamous on the same frequency. In the 1930s and 40s, CN
offered a sleeping car service, daily except Sunday, an Trains 193-
194, between Kelowna and Vancouver, using a 12-section/drawing room
car, Number 739-740. This car was handled on Trains 1 and 2 between
Kamloops Junction and Vancouver.
On Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays, there was a through sleeper
off CN Train 1, the Continental Limited, from Blue River to Kel­
owna. This was also a 12-sectian/drawing room sleeper, Number 807.
On the alternate days, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, the same ser­
vice was provided between Kelowna and Blue River by sleeping car Num­
ber 808 on Trains 193 and 2, arriving at Blue River at 08:50 hours.
In the early 1940s, Canadian Pacific offered a single passenger
service by roil from Sicamous to Kelownaj this was Train 708, which
departed Sicamous at 10: 25 a.m. South of Kelowna, there were three
highway bus runs to Penticton, with baggage carried by Canadian Pa­
cific Express highway truck. Freight was handled by car-barge. North­
bound from Kelowna, CPR Train 707 departed at 3.50 p.m. and made a
connectian at Sicamous with Train 2, the eastbound transcontinental,
at about 8.10 p.m. and, .on Saturdays and Sundays, with Train 3-7,the
westbound Dominion.
After 1925, it was a great advantage to have two railway lines
from Campbell Creek (Junction) to Armstrong (Junction), for whenever
there was a derailment or washout on either line, both CPR. and CNR
trains could use the others route. However, if CP s main line from
C.P.R.Junction to Campbell Creek Junction or from Armstrong (Junction)
to Vernon were cut, there was no service into the northern end of the
Okanogan Volley.
~ THE D-10 WITH THE DIFFERENCE. CPR ENGINE NUMBER 962 ~IAS PAINTED IN
~ ~ the tuscan red and block colour scheme generally reserved far main­
~r line passenger power. She was portrayed in the yard at Armstrong on
September 26, 1947.
OPERATOR ARVID JOHNSON, THE AUTHORS BROTHER-IN-LAW, HOOPS UP ORDERS
to the engine crew at Armstrong, B. C., on July 25, 1943. Engine Num­
ber 5771 was on the head-end of the passenger, which was slowing down
for the station-stop.
THE CN WAYFREIGHT, HAULED BY M-3-A CLASS 2-8-0 NUMBER 2111,CLATTERED
along on CP rails about 1 mile south of Armstrong, British Columbia,
on a summers day in 1947. The engine is just passing the mile-board
for Realm.
NEW YEARrs DAY, 19~2, AT THE MILE-BOARD FOR REALM, PRESENTED A RATHER
different sight, with Canadian Pacifics Train 708 and engine Number 569
slogging away at the grade. Number 569 was a 1903 Schenectady pro­
duct, class D-9-c.

-.:.
.-.
-:-.,

~.
r
——–
——~
——


——–~


~
~

———————-
–~
I.
.
,
ONE

OF
CANADIAN
P,ACIFlC:S DIMINUTIVE
TENWHEELERS,
NUMBER
443
,
POSED

for
appotograph
in
the
yards
at
Armstrong
on
August
1,
1947.
CANADIAN 1 14 R A I L
The heavy late-summer traffic in vegetables and fruit, origina­
ting in the small settlements along Okanagan Lake, was initially all
carried by the CPR on car-barges to Okanagan Landing and switched
into trains in the yard at Vernon. Later, the interfa~e of rail-wat­
er services was relocated to Kelowna, when the CNR built their exten­
sion in 1925. About this time, the Cn began to compete with the CP
for the fruit traffic. Refrigerator cars were taken by barge to the
fruit and vegetable packing houses along the west shore of the lake,
where they were switched off the barges and into sidings alongside
the plants. Switching was generally carried out using winches or
horses. The tug-and-barge operation lasted until about 1970, when
refrigerated semitrailer trucks took over the perishable transport
business.
Armstrong (Junction) was a great place to observe the action on
branches of Canadas two rna jor railways in the days of the steam
locomotive, although the variety of power in this area was somewhat
limited. While there was a trend to larger power in the 305 and 405,
in the 30s, the CNR used 2-8-05 and 4-6-05, both light engines. In
the later years, until the end of steam in the late 50s, larger pa­
cifies and consolidations appeared, together with some 2-10-25. The
pacifies were of the 5100-series, the 2-8-05 of the 2500 and 2700-
series and-the 2-,10-25 oJ the 4300-seribes. The ional 400-series mogul (2-6-0).
The Canadian Pacific was a little more conservative in its se­
lection of motive power, using class D-9 tenwheelers in the 30s,with
some 3600-series 2-8-0s during the fruit season. In later years,D-10-
closs 4-6-05 arrived, with some 2-10-0s of the 5750-5790 series.
Occasionally, just for variety, a D-4 appeared on one of the freight
trains.
It is curious that, in all of those years, the Canadian Pacific
never made a practice of running engines with trailing wheels on the
branch to Armstrong. As far as the writer can remember, the first
steam engine with trailing wheels to come down from Sicamous was a
4-4-4 Jubilee-type on a new streamlined train named the Chinook,wh-
ich was being exhibited prior to entering service between Calgary
and Edmonton, Alberta.
It has been reported that the Canadian Pacific once used 2700-
series pacifies on the Sicamous-Armstrong branch. This is not true.
At one time, the Canadian National used engine Number 3560, a 2-8-2,
on freights through Armstrong (Junction), but this was apparently not
a permanent arrangement. Frequently, CPR engine Number 575 appeared
on the mixed train; later, she was replaced by Number 962, one of
the ubiquitous D-10 tenwheelers -but with a difference~
The CN rostered one of the 1423-series on their mixed train; la­
ter, class M-3-a engines powered this service. Later still, 2500 and
2700-series 2-8-05 appeared, then 4-6-2 Number 5120 and still later
Number 4323, a 2-10-2. Near the end of steam, there were the booster-
fitted steamers of the 5100-series, which had been displaced from
main-line service by the 6000-series mountain-type engines.
If you were to turn off the Trans-Canada Highway at Sicamous
next Friday and drive down British Columbia Highway 97-A to Armstrong,
you would probably be disappointed at the lack of railway activity
there and the condition of the track in the yard. Well, things arent
exactly the same as they used to be. At one time, there was a great
deal of ceming and going in the yards at Armstrong (Junction), Brit­
ish Columbia, with a satisfying variety of large and small steam
engines -and freight traffic.
,
,
CA NAD I AN 1 15 R A I L
Things are different in 1975. About the only place to find any
variety in motive power on CP RAIL is at Calgary and the variety only
becomes interesting when one or two of the Vancouver Island Baldwins
or one or two of the Kootenay D.i:vision F-M C-Liners or H-Liners
rumble in.to Ogden Shops for repoirs. Otherwise, there is a steady
stream of MLW and GM units, two moin themes with few variations.
It is hard to say very much about present-day power an Canadian
National in the Rockies these days, except that it is efficient and
utilitarian. Indeed, these are very desirable characteristics, but
they dont gain the attention to the motive power at the station
stops that the steam engines did, when they were rooring through the
Rockies~
CANADIAN NATIONALS TRAIN 193, WITH ENGINE NUMBER 5120, INCLUDED TWO
sleeping cars on the northbound run to Kamloops ond Blue River on a day
in June 1947. The train has left the joint CP-CN trackage and is
rounding the horseshoe curve, climbing to OKeefe and Monte Lake.
~ ON THE HORSESHOE CURVE NORTH OF ARMSTRONG JUNCTION, CANADIAN NATIONAL
~ ~Train 193, bound for Kamloops, with engine Number 2096 on the hedd­
~. end, flashes through the late-afternoon sunlight on May 28, 1945.
ABOUT TWO MILES SOUTH OF ARMSTRONG, CANADIAN PACIFIC ENGINE NUMBER 585
hauls a reefer and seven passenger cars south to Vernon and Kelowna on
April 6, 1942.
ON AUGUST 7, 1943, CPR 2-10-0 NUMBER 5787, CLASS R-3-D, POWERED THE
mixed train pictured at Armstrong, B.C. Number 5787 was built in 1919.
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILHAYS ALSO USED BIG POWER ON THE MIXED TRAINS. Here
is Number 4323, a 2-10-2, at Kelowna, B.C., on September 5,1957.
CANADIAN PACIFICS ENGINE NUMBER 923 WAS MAKING UP THE MIXED
for the trip north to Armstrong and S icamous on July 17, 1951.
picture was taken at Vernon, B.C., by the late E. Allan Toohey.
TRAIN
The

April/ 76
JACK BEATTY HAS BEEN READING CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY PASSENGER BUL­
letins again and the following comments have resultedi
The following list of changes in station names shows. al tera­
tions made in 1914, 1915 and 1916. Readers will observe that,
in some cases, station names are f~eeting thingsi of those
shown, eight were later given new names and four had their
original names restored.
Apparently, during the years of World War I, the term
Junction or Jct. must have hod some pre judicial connota­
tion. Some 33 changes involved its deletion. And, on the Wind-
sor Subdivision at any rate, the inclusion of North was
something to be avoided.
Devoted students of this aspect of railway history should
bear in mind that, in the autumn of 1916, the Canadian Pa­
cific Railway underwent a general reorganization. Formerly,
Divisions were made up of Districts. After reorganization
Districts were paramount and were composed of a number of
Divisions.
Thus, the Eastern Division became the Quebec District
Districts 1, 2 and 3 became the Farnham, Montreal Terminals
and Laurentian Divisions. Districts 4 and 5 were combined to
become the Smiths Falls Division.
These revisions necessitated name-changes for certain sub­
divisions. The Farnham Subdivision became the Adirondack Sub­
division, the Laurentian became the Ste-Agathe and the Ottawa
Subdivision was neatly bisected into the present-day Park
Avenue and Lachute Subdivisions.
From here on, you are on your own. Happy exploring~
Date Division/Subdivision From To
January Esquimalt & Nanaimo
1914
September La Riviere
May
1915
Colon say
Laggan
Shogomoc
Shore Line
St. John
Brownville
Moosehead
McBride Jct.,B.C.
(later)
S haunawan, Man. (
later)
Radium, Sask.
Shaganappi, Alta.
Grant, N.B. Debec
Jct., N.B. (
later)
Newburg Jct N. B.
Brighton, N.B.
Aroostook Jct.,N.B.
Bayshore Jct., N.B.
Ellerslie, N.B.
McAdam Jct., N.B.
Somerset Jct., Me.
Elliott, Me.
Parksville Jet.
Parksville
Selborne
Domain
Plassey
Brickburn
Marne Debec Debec
Jct.
Newburg
Tedlie
Aroostook
Bayshore
Morna
McAdam
Squaw Brook
Bodfish
June
1915
CANADIAN
Aroostook
Gibson
St. Andrews
Adirondack
Newport
Drummondville
Montreal Terminals
M & 0
Chalk River
Prescott
Thessalon
Cartier
White River
Havelock
Kingston
Peterboro
Belleville
Galt
Windsor
Owen Sound
Orangeville
Laggan
122
R A I L
Stevens Mills,
King, Me.
Walton, Me.
Me. Stebbins
Maynard
Maines
Springhill, N.B. Clanfield
Southampton Jet.,NB Southampton
Brunswick Jet.,N.B. Brunswick
Watt Jet., N.B. Watt
Brigham Jet., Que.
Iberville Jet.,Que.
( later)
Delson Jet., Que.
Eastman Jet., Que.
Troy Jet., Vermont
Drummondville Jet.
Acton, Que.
Montreal Jet., Que.
Western Jet., Que.
Brookport
Cumandes (1)
I berville Jet.
Delson
Eastray
Elkhurst
Enlaugra
Aetonvale
Montreal West
Ballantyne
NYC&O Jet., Ont. Hurdman Maniwaki
Jet., Que. Beemer
Eganville Jet., Ont. Payne
Chaudiere Jet.,Ont. Chaudiere
(later) Ellwood
Maywood, Onto Hallam
Romford Jet., Onto Romford
Nieholsons, Onto Nicholson
Central Ontario Jet. Central Ontario
(later) Bonarlaw
Harrowsmith Jet.Ont. Harrowsmith
Parham, Ont. T iehborne
(New station 2 miles
west of Tiehborne) •• Parham
Burketon Jet., Onto Burketon
Leaside Jet., Onto Leaside
Ingersoll Jet., Onto Zorra
North Appin, Onto Appin
North Gleneoe,Ont. Glencoe
North Newbury,Ont. Newbury
North Bothwell,Dnt. Bothwell
North Thamesville Thamesville
Thames River, Onto Eastend
Chatham West, Onto West end
Lakeshore Jet.,Ont. Lakeshore
(later) Lakeshore Tower
Fraxa Jet., Onto
Saugeen Jet., Onto
Cataract Jet., Onto
Melville Jet., Onto
Laggan, Alta.
Fraxa
Saugeen
Cataract
Melville
Lake Louise
CANADIAN
July Coquiholla
1915
September Port McNicoll
1915
October
1915
July
1915
July
1916
August
1916
October
1916
November 1916
NOTE:
Brandon
Expanse
Brooks
Crowsnest
MacTier
Kenora
Calgary Terminals
Red Deer
Brownville
St. Stephen
St. John
Ste. Agathe
Trois-Rivieres
Park Avenue
Thessalon
La Riviere
Reston
Macleod
Cascade
Grand River Railway
Westminster
Maniwaki
Windsor
Coutts
123 R A I L
Mons Jct., B.C. Brodie
Martyrs Hill, Onto Breboeuf
(later) Fort St. Ignace
Sewell{ Man. (
later)
Reycroft, Sask.
Carlstadt, Alta.
Sentinel, B.C. (
later)
Muskoka, Onto
Camp Hughes
Shilo
Mossbank
Alderson
Sentry
Sentinel
MacT ier
North Transcona,Man. Norcran
Maharg, Alta. 12th.Street East
Rosebud, Alta.
Cherokee Siding,Me.
Spragues, Me.
Milltown Switch,NB
South Bay, N.B. (
later)
Nomining, Que.
St. Margaret, Que.
Cap St.Martin, Que.
Little St. Martin
Ekobda, Onto
De Wet, Man.
Kaiser, Sask.
Minaret
Cherokee
Drew
Mill town Jet.
Primecrest
South Bay
Nominingue
Ste. Marguerite
St. Martin
Le Cap, Que.
Echo Bay
Sewell
Peebles
West Macleod, Alta. Mekastoe
Hope, B.C. Haig
(New station, Hope, opened on the
Kettle Valley Railway.)
Berlin, Onto
Westminster, B.C.
Castor Lake, Que.
( later)
Melrose, Onto
Wells, Alta.
Kitchener
New Westminster
Castor
Clemow
Lobo
Craddock
rrr–In case you are wondering, this name should be pronounced
CU-EM-and-ESS. The derivation is then obvious to railway
historians.
TO CELEBRATE THE UNITED STATES BICENTENNIAL YEAR OF 1976, CANADIAN
National Railways three United States subsidiaries have
selected and specially painted diesel units. A brief re­
port from Barry Biglow on the Duluth, Winnipeg & Pacific Railways
unit was printed in a recent issue of CANADIAN RAIL.
CANADIAN 1 24 R A I L
John Carbonneau, jr., of Florida, reminds us that the
Central Vermont/Grand Trunk have also prepared a 1956 GP 9 in special
red, white and blue colours. This unit was delivered by EMD in 1956
as Number 1776, but more recently was renumbered 4450. The unit is
now painted primarily blue with a large 1776 in white on the sides.
The Bennington flag adorns the cab sides and the railings and
couplers are red and the hoses are white. The trucks are painted blue
with red hubs on the roller-bearings.
SOME RESIDENTS OF ONTARIO MIGHT HAVE THOUGHT THEY WERE SEEING THINGS
last November, when, what to their wondering eyes should
appear but 0 CN Tempo train with TEMPO coaches, standard
coaches, a Metroliner coach labelled AMTRAK and CNs R&D car Num­
ber 15015. Not to worry, though. CN had borrowed the Metroliner
coach for some comparison tests with their own passenger cars.
A CN official said that preliminary results show that the
Amcoach rides as well as CN coaches and had a low sound level. After
the completion of the tests, the Amcoach was displayed at Toronto and
Montreal.
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS SELF-PROPELLED CAR NUMBER 15791 WAS A
product of CalladianCar & FOondry i11 1924Cnd woulod seat
11 and sleep 10. It was rebuilt in 1930, powered by a
Mack 6-cylinder engine and General Electric 261-C motors. At the end
of December 1938, it was spare-Toronto and this photograph ~as ta­
ken about 1935 by a member of Canadian National Railways staff. It
is now in the Photogrophic Department.
Trailer car Number 15748 was a companion in the yards at
Toronto, about 1935, when both of these pictures were taken. This
negative is also in the Photographic Department, Canadian National
Rai lI~ays.

CANADIAN 1 26 R A I L
HERE IS A BRIEF NOTE ON CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS ORIGINAL DOUBLE
rood unit, Number 9000, assembled at the Canadian Locomo­
tive Companys facilities in Kingston, Ontario, late in
1928. Shortly thereafter, Number 9000 made a trial trip from Mon­
treal to Vancouver and back in regular passenger service, demonstra­
ting the capabilities of diesel-electric locomotives for normal op­
erating assignments over long distances.
The prime-mover in each half-unit was a Beardmore single
12-cylinder 12 x 12-inch engine, rated at 1500 hp. at 900 rpm. The
electrical equipment was supplied by Canadian Westinghouse. Provis­
ion was made for supercharging the diesel engines, but this was never
done.
Just prior to World War II, the two half-units were sep­
arated and renumbered 9000 and 9001. While Number 9001 was out of
service in 1938, Number 9000 was running in commuter service between
Toronto and Hamilton, Ontario, as late as June 2, 1938.
When Canadian National Railways was ordered to build the
armoured train in 1944 for operation between Terrace an~ Prince Ru­
pert, British Columbia, Number 9000, selected as the motive power,
was repowered with an EMD 1440 hp. V-16 prime-mover, was armoured
and camouflaged to resemble a standard boxcar. However, the armoured
train was too heavy and Number 9000 could not haul it at the speed
required.
It should be noted that about 1939, when the two halves
were separated and renumbered, they were derated to 1330 hp. at 800
rpm. and had a 2-D-1 axle configuration.
In August 1945, Number 9001, the unrepowered half,
hauling Train 51 from Quebec City to Edmunston, New Brunswick.
After some 18 years of on-and-off service, and with
senger train consists still on the heavy side, CN electrical
mechanical engineers decided that Numbers 9000 and 9001 would
was
pas­
and
have
to be rebuilt or scrapped. As steam power was still very much in
vogue, Canadas two pioneer diesel-electric locomotives were with­
drawn and scrapped in 1946.
The first picture accompanying this report shows the
pioneer unit Number 9000 as it came out of CLC in Kingston. This
picture is from the Archives of the Association. The secand picture,
from the Public Archives of Canada, shows 2-D-1 unit Number 9000 in
armour-plate, when it was the motive power for the west-coast ar­
moured train in 1944. The third photograph, courtesy of Canadian Na­
tional Railways, shows unit Number 9001 outside of Spadina Round­
house, Toronto, about 1935.
CANADIAN 127 R A I L
~JOHN SUTHERLAND SENDS US THIS PICTURE OF CP RAIL EXTRA 8161 SETTING
out business car Number 24 in front of the old Lake Erie & Northern
Railways freight shed at Brantford, Ontario, about 1100 hours on
October 28, 1975. Car 24 had been moved empty from the CP RAIL con­
nection at Gqlt to Brontford, presumably to entertain some Brantford
shippers ta lunch. Engine Number 8161 is one of three units normally
assigned to the former CPR electric lines: The Grand River and Lake
Erie & Northern Railways.
Canadian Rail
is published monthly by the
Canadian Railroad Historical Association
p.o. Box 22, Station B, Montreal,C!uebec,Canada/H3B 3J5
Editor; S.S.Worthen Production; P. Murphy
Association Branches
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN
L.M.Unwin, Secretary 1727 23rd. Avenue N.W. Calgary, Alta,T2M 1V6
OTTAWA
W.R.Linley,Secretary P.O. Box 141 ,Station A Ottowa,Canoda K1N 8V1
PACIFIC COAST
R.H.~leyer, Secretary P.O.Box 1006,Station A Vancouvcr,B.C.V6C 2P1
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
J.M.Meikle,Secretory,P.O.Box 6102,Station C,Edmonton,Alta.T5B 4K5
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
P.Shergold,Secreta P.O.Box 5849 Terminal A Toronto Ont.rl5W 1P3
Association Representatives
AUSTRAl.IA C.L.Coop 68 Hount Pleosant Rood Eltholl1 3095 Victoria
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FAR EAST W.O.McKeo …. n 6-7, 4_chol!lc, Yallote-ene,Suilo City,Osaka Japan
MANITOBA K.G.Younger 267 Varnon Rood, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3J 2Wl
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SOUTH AMERICA O.J.Ho …. ord Price,Waterhouse & Pcoto,CoixQ 1978,500 POLJlo,BroZil
SOUTHERN ALBERTA E.W.Johnson 4019 Vor Road N.W. ,Calgary, Alberta TJA OC3
UNITED KINGDOM J.H.Sondors 67 Wil Ampthill, Bods. MK45 2SL England
~IEST AFRICA R.E. tt Scienco,Univ. lbadon,ll>odan,Ni .
Visit the Canadian Railway Museum St.Constant;Quebec,Canada.
-More than
100 pieces of equipment on display-

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