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Canadian Rail 290 1976

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Canadian Rail 290 1976

DIESEL DAYS
OF, AN
ENTOMOLOGIST
by
Andrew
P. Nimmo
Illustrations by N.F.Corness.
O
ne day last Autumn, it occurred to me that
it might be of interest to other railway
enthusiasts if I set down my impressions
and reminiscences of a three-month period
in 1974 which I spent as a Machinists Help­
er at the Calder Shops of Ca:ladian National
Railways in Edmonton, Alberta. I believed I
might be able to record my experiences in
an instructive and -perhaps -amusing man­
ner. Here are the results.
Diesel Days ..• being expla·ined above, how do we account for
the Entomologist part of the title. An entomologist is defined in
the dictionary as one who studies insects. Entomology, therefore,
is a profession, my profession. How in the world, you may ask, did I end up
working as a machinists helper in Calder Shops?
It is an axiom that oil and water do not mix and neither, one
would think, do diesels and insect detectives. But given the proper
conditions, both pairs of incompatables may be made to mix, at least
temporarily. In my case, the emulsifying agents were a lifelong in­
terest in railways plus a rather grim employment prospect for Can­
adian biologists generally, at that time. On returning to Canada in
the spring of 1974, I was in need of some sort of employment to tide
me over until I could find a suit6ble position. It was at this point
that I decided to put my interest in railways to the test. I made
inquiries at Canadian Nationals employment office in Edmonton and,
much to my surprise, I started shortly thereafter as a machinists
helper at Calder Shops.
Perhaps my decision to join Canadian National was inherited, for
my maternal grandfather worked as a moulder for the North British Lo­
comotive Company in Glasgow, Scotland, and helped to build many steam
MACHINIST JIM CARDAMONE REPLACES THE NUMBER TWO WHEELS ON ONE TRUCK
of unit Number 5166, a class GF 30h on Canadian National Railways.
The Diesel Division, General Motors of Canada Limited builders
plate is clearly visible. Photo courtesy Norman J. Corness.
~ THE EAST SIDE OF CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS CALDER SHOPS AT EDMONTON,
Alberta, opened in 1958.
CANADIAN 68 R A I L
locomotives for the railways of Britain and Commonwealth countries.My
paternal grandfather worked for the Pennsylvania Railroad in the Uni­
ted States, before returning to Britain in hopes of joining up for
World War I. Moreover, I already had some experience with machinery,
as I had worked 13 months as a millwrights helper in a paper mill
before going on to university for an undergraduate degree in forestry,
followed by a doctorate in entomology.
My sojourn at Calder Shops was not, therefore, so strange as
might at first be thought. So, what of my impressions or reminiscences
as a machinists helper? They follow.
At the outset, I should unashamedly state that I am primarily a
steam locomotive enthusiast, and make no apologies. Previously, I
tended to despise the diesel for all but the obvious economic factors
in its favour. After working at Calder, I found that I had a some-
what increased respect for these internal combustion units and there­
after I did watch them out on the main line with rather more interest
than formerly.
While I was not involved in all of the possible types of diesel
repai~ or maintenance jobs, I participated in an interesting variety.
Included were wheel and traction-motor changes on the drop-pits; re­
placing wheels and/or motors, whichever was defective; trip inspec-
tions -weekly for yard and hump units and monthly for road units
providing nothing had gone wrong in the meantime; working on power
J;,:,:,,!a~s,e~bli~s: ,changing heads, pistons, liners and other.associated jobs;
,:,i.~ . ..;f~Il~ng ln ln the tool toom, when no one else was avaJ;:~J.:able – a thor­
,.~S;;Y~;Q,ughly boring job. Then, there was the daily inspection and maintain­
.;,~~~ie,~ce of rail diesel cars, three in al~. Apar~ from the tool room, .1
;:,..,/~:llked that job least but, strangely, lt, provlded the only opportunlty
, to follow the calling for which I had been trained. Examination of the
cowcatcher at either end of the cars produced a rich harvest of in-
sects of many varieties.
Another job was looking for leaks: of oil into water; of water
into oil; of air from the brake control system and so on. Great fun
but intensely frustrating and a stiff test of the machinists in-
genuity. There were many other jobs to be done, but these are the
ones I remember best.
The thing that surprised me most about diesel units was the pr­
ime-mover itself. My main interest being steam engines, I knew lit­
tle about diesel-electric traction other than the fact that units
move by means of electricity generated by a large diesel engine. I
also appreciated the fact that the prime-movers cylinders were ig­
nited by compression rather than by an electrical spark-plug. Other
than that, I assumed that a diesel engine consisted basically of a
solid block, as in an automobile engine, with cylinders, pistons and
a crankshaft, arranged in a similar manner. I was surprised, there­
fore, to find that this was not necessarily so. There may be prime-
movers with solid blocks, but I have yet to see one. All of those
on which I worked had diesel engines consisting of a built-up frame­
work of welded castings. Like the cream-puff, the diesel engine is
composed, to a large extent, of empty space.
Virtually every part of the engine is removable and interchan-
geable. Cylinder heads were also removeable, but every piston has its
.,.. THE SANDING TOWERS ON THE INCOMING SERVICING TRACKS, WITH THE DIESEL
shop in the background, Calder Shops, Edmonton, Alberta.

UPPER-DECK PLATFORMS ON PIT TRACKS 3 AND 4, FOR THE REMOVAL OF RADIA­
tors and cooling fans by means of the 5-ton overhead crane.
own separate head and each cylinder is a removeable liner. Moreover,
the pistons are attached loosely to the connecting rods, with only
a snap-ring on the inside to engage the connecting-rod carrier to
pull them back down, should firing on the compression stroke fail
to occur-.
I was
surprised when I discovered just how dirty a diesel unit
can become, both inside and outside the hood. No explanation is need­
ed now as to why so many wiping rags are used on the cleaning job.
Diesel units have one characteristic which should surprise no
one and that is their thirst for oil for lubrication. One should be
thankful for the comparatively low cost of operating an automobile .
For example, CNs 5000-class units take about 130 gallons of crank­
case oil per filling. And, of course, when the lubricating oil is
changed, the used oil has to be disposed of. At Calder Shops, it was
sent away for re-refining, so that little waste or pollution of the
environment occurred. The variety of oils and greases used on a sin­
gle diesel unit is quite remarkable, all the way from the thinnest,
used in speedometers to the frozen molasses, called TRAMO, used
in the traction-motor gearboxes.
TRAMO is supplied in sealed plastic bags of about 1 pound weight
each and nine bags are stuffed into one empty gearbox, plastic bag
and all. The plastic, of course, is simply chewed up by the gears to
form a homogenous mass with the TRAMO. No damage to the gears re­
sults.
Work on diesel units ranges from the straightforward, if heavy,
sort of job to the maddeningly frustrating task. I agree that some
parts just cannot be designed much better than they are now, for the
space available under the hood. But it seems as though other parts
have been deliberately designed to frustrate maintenance. This re-
mark refers mostly to the locations of fastenings, usually of the
• ENGINE NUMBER 4320 GOING THROUGH THE WASH RACK ON PIT TRACK 12
l unit Number 9495 undergoing a mileage test on Pit Track 13.
WITH
nut-and-bolt or simple cap-screw variety, which are very nearly un­
reachable. In some cases, as little as 4-inch play, perhaps even less,
is available for wrenches, with the result that ones patience wears
thin and tempers shorten in direct proportion to the sometimes quite
lengthy time required to remove or replace tightly one single screw~
Usually, more than one of these brutes is encountered-at the same
time and all seem to have been tightened by contortionists of her­
culean strength.
The ingenuity of the design engineer in placing these bolts or
screws is equalled only by the ingenuity of the tools devised to out­
wit the design. I ~ould suggest as a form of Hell on earth that the
design engineers should be made to spend several months or more work­
ing on the maintenance of their own product~
A word on the Calder Shops should be odded here. The diesel lo­
comotive bays, of which there are eighteen, if I remember correctly,
flank the central office and locker-room area in two groups of nine.
All are dead-end. The rails in the bays are on pedestals with pits
between. Above the tracks are decks at hand-rail level.
Two pits in each group of nine have upper decks for those units
requiring work on the hood superstructure. One bay only is devoted to
the washing of units. On the wheel floor, there are two tracks, one
straight through the shop, each with its drop-pit. I spent about half
my time on wheel-drops and preferred that job most. Perhaps it was
because most of the heavy work was done by overhead crane. While I
am not exactly a weakling, neither am I Charles Atlas and I certainly
could not lift a piston-head from the deck into place in one go ,as
some of the machinists did occasionally.
One thing to note about the dead-end bays is that they cannot
accommodate two 5000-class unit~ simultaneously. These units are
rather longer than the 4000-class, which were the longest units in
the region when Calder Shops were built.

! THE WHEELS ARE REMOVED FROM UNIT NUMBER 5166 FOR TRACTION MOTOR
l pair. The drop pits are on Number 1 and 2 pits.
RE-
~ PIT TRACKS 1 AND 2 AT CALDER SHOPS SHOWING THE la-TON CRANE FOR LIFT­
ing wheels and ftacti{)n motors. The wheel-mounting section is in the
foreground and there is a unit on the pit in the background.
On the wheel-drops, we changed wheels on all classes of diesel
locomotive. The SOOO-class units were by far the easiest ond most
straightforward to work on. This fact inspired me to begin rephras­
ing the old western song:
Oh give me a home
Where the SOOOs roam ..•
One
job whioh was performed on the single straight-through tr­
ack and with which I was (thankfully) never involved, consisted of
raising the entire unit off its trucks by means of four heavy screw­
jacks, in order to permit a mechanic to crawl between the body and
the trucks to replace some part. This was apparently the only way to
do this worrisome job, doubly worrisome for the mechanic involve~.
It is of interest to note, in the conclusion of this part of my
narrative, that the entire diesel locomotive fleet at Calder Shops
was built by General Motors of Canada Limited. While this situation
tends to simplify maintenance procedures and was designed to do
so, it was quite curious how often the stores department was short
of some essential -if small -part. The unit under repair would then
have to wait until the part could be ordered and received. Improvisa­
tion was not always possible.
And now, having disposed of the diesels, as such, let me move on
to general reminiscences. Here are a few of the more interesting re­
collections that come to mind.
There is an amazine diversity of origin in the staff who work
together at Calder. Apart from those born and raised in and around
Edmonton, a large proportion were quite recently_arrived new Can-
CANADIAN 74 R A I L
adians. There was a Malayasian Chinese, an Indian from India, two
Egyptians, a Lebanese, a Greek, Poles, Germans, Englishmen and Scots.
There seemed to be no Irishmen or Welshmen. There was one other new
Canadian from Mauritius.
Where in the world is Mauritius? I think I was the first person
in Canada who had not asked him that question. To save you rushing to
the atlas, MauritiUS-is a small island in the Indian Ocean, some hun­
dreds of miles east of Madagascar. This new Canadian had arrived in
Edmonton via British Railways and Canadian National in Montreal. He
had been directed to Montreal -and had spent about a year there
because his mother tongue was French.
I worked most often with the Egyptian machinist on wheel-drops
but, as helpers are assigned daily, it was not a permanent arrange­
ment. I worked with most of the others at one time or another.
Four main trades are represented at Calder Shops. Machinists are
by far the largest group, followed by electricians, pipe fitters and
boilermakers (welders). The electricians only had apprentices to work
with them. They had no helpers. Working with various electrical vol­
tages and frequencies requires training and caution to avoid the in­
herent dangers.
Canadian National apparently performs contract maintenance wark on
diesel units belonging to private companies, as time and manpower
permit. Such foreign units occasionally appeared at Calder, in
bright shades of yellow, pink or some equally evident colour. Look­
ing carefully, in the proper light, it was sometimes possible to read
.,. the painted-over name of the former owner, as the lettering was usual­
ly slightly proud of the base coat of paint. The most interesting of
these units was a 4-cylinder yard switcher, otherwise normal looking
and apparently from the stone-age of the diesel. Originally, it had
been lettered for the Vermont Railway~
On one occasion, the only time I spent on the air-brake control
system, an entire shift was spent trying to find out why part of the
controls would not work properly. I was of little help on this occas­
ion and spent most of the time in careful observation of my machinist,
assorted foremen and other machinists, all trying to locate the
source of the trouble. Parts which were known to work were borrowed
from other units for test purposes, amid the loud objections of the
crews who were working on them. It was all to no avail until, with
30 minutes to go to the end of the shift, a very faint breath of air­
you could hardly call it a flow -was detected coming from part of
the gasket between the main junction block and an accessory part. On
removing the accessory part, which had only recently been installed
as new, it was discovered that the black sealing tape, which pre-
vents the entry of dust and dirt while the part is in stores, had
been left on by the machinist who installed the part~ A simple om­
mission, to be sure, but three shifts in all had been spent in look­
ing for the fault.
Calder Shops are operational 24 hours a day, 365 days per year-
366 days in leap-years. They never close. The day shift is from 0800
to 1600 hours, the afternoon shift from 1600 to 2400 hours and the
night shift taking up the remaining 8-hour period. The usual work
~TURNING WHEELS ON A HEGENSCHEIDT WHEEL-TRUEING MACHINE. ONE PAIR OF
wheels can be turned in less than two hours. The operator is machin­
ist W. Pierzchajlo.

CANADIAN
76
R A I L
week is five days on and two days off; the two days off vary from
worker to worker. My days off were Wednesdays and Thursdays. When
statutory holidays come around, it does not mean you have the day
off; it means your hourly rate is increased if you work on a holiday.
In conclusion, I would like to extend my sincere thanks to Can­
adian National Railways and the machinists and others with whom I
worked at Calder Shops, for the many kindnesses and courtesies shown
me during the three-month period that I worked at Calder Shops. It
was a privilege and a pleasure to have the opportunity to make the
acquanitance of the men who keep the diesel units running east and
west of Edmonton on Canadian National Railways.
t
ON THE OUTBOUND INSPECTION TRACKS THERE ARE INSPECTION PITS ADJACENT
to the fuel servicing pumps. Repaired units, waiting assignments, can
be seen in the background.
Cousin Chatterboxs
Railway Alphabet
S.S. Worthen
T
he emergence in England of the railway in
the 1830s and 40s had a profound effect
on every level of society and every kind
of citizen, not the least of which were
the children. To satisfy their natural
curiosity and to produce an item which lov­
ing parents would purchase, picture books
about railways soon began to appear.
?

In 1854 there was published a 9 3/4-inch by 6t-inch, six-lea­
ved (12 page) pamphlet, the pages of which were printed on one side
only, the whole being bound in a yellow paper cover and titled as
Cousin Chatterboxs Railway Alphabet, on the inside of the front
cover. The inside of the cover was also used for the text, thus ma­
king available eight faces, containing a pictorial t,itle and 23
letters, at three to the printed page.
Although the title given above was printed over an illustration
of the famous Britannia Tubular Bridge of the Chester & Holyhead Ra­
ilway, across the Menai Strait between North Wales and the Island
of Angelsey (double-track operation commenced in October 1850), the
front cover of the pamphlet bore the words Cousin Honeycombs The
Railway Alphabet and indicated that this was one of a series of
Cousin Honeycombs New Series of Entertaining and Original Toy
Books, also known as Cousin Honeycombs 13 Sorts, published in
London, England between 1853 and 1855 by Thomas Dean & Son, Thread­
needle Street: price 6d. each.
Mr.
John EiC.Palmer, Department of Printed Books, Rare Book
Collections, Reference Division, The British Library, pointed out
in a letter in October 1974 that, according to Todds Directory of
Printers, Thomas Dean & Son had just removed to 31 Ludgate Hill
from Threadneedle Street in October 1855. In addition, Mr. Palmer
noted that the illustrator of the pamphlet, who also may have been
the author of the verses, was Freeman Gage DeLaMotte (1814-1862),
who was the son of William DeLaMotte (1775-1863), the landscape
painter, who was a close friend of Joseph Mallory William Turner,
the famous English painter.
As mentioned above, the fact that the leaves of the pamphlet
were printed on one side only is noteworthy, for this clearly in­
dicates that these pamphlets were produced especially for dissec­
tion and pasting in scrapbooks. It was thus that little Emma and
little Willie learned their letters.
Mr. Charles E. Lee, the well-known railway historian of London,
England, who has kindly provided much of the information enabling
the composition of these notes, has an original copy of this child­
rens pamphlet. Mr. Palmer notes that the Rare Books Collection of
the British Library has a different edition of the pamphlet,as well
as others in the Cousin Honeycomb series: the Army and Navy Alpha­
bet, the Steam Boat Alphabet, the Historical Alphabet, but no copy
of the sixpenny edition of the railway alphabet. the copy of the
CANADIAN 78 R A I L
~~cond edition in the British Library is undated, but has the Copy­
righ:!:.. Office receipt stamp of 1 November 1855, which indicates that
the pamphlet had been recently published.
In the December 1938 issue of the RAILWAY MAGAZINE, Miss Be.a­
trice A. Lees wrote an interesting article on this unusual alphabet­
pamphlet and it was this report and the subsequent postscript by Mr.
Charles E. Lee, that stimulated the re-investigation of Cousin
Honeycombs The Railway Alphabet. The author is very grateful to
Messrs. Lee and Palmer and to Mr. J.N.Slater, Editor, RAILWAY MAG­
AZINE, for their kind cooperation and assistance.
COUSIN CHATTERBOXS RAILWAY ALPHABET
1854
A
iS the ARCH, which you see when you start,
That people pass under before they depart.
a BUFFER, with pads so complete,
saves you from jolts when the carriages meet.
CANADIAN 79 R A I L
C
is the letter that stands for the CHAIN
Thatlinks all the carriages into one train.
D
is the DRIVER, who drives without whip,
And keeps up the steam as he takes you a trip.
E
is the ENGINE, all puff, fire and smoke,
That is fed in a day with some bushels of coke.
F
i s the FOG, t hat in win t e r we fi n d
Often causes the train to be hours behind.
G
is the GUARD, that sits perched up above,
And sees that no parcels or passengers move.
H
I
is the famous HOTEL of the town,
Where gentlemen stop when by rail they come down.
is the INDEX, which points to both ends,
And tells all the news that the telegraph sends.
CANADIAN
80
R A I L
J
is the JOURNEY, so pleasant to take,
By which all their money the Company makes.
K
is the KEEPER, who fastens the doors,
To keep safe with keys all goods and all stores.
L
is the LANTERN policemen thrust out,
And ask you to show what your tickets about.
M
is the MILE-MARK, that never is wrong,
And shows us how quickly the train goes along.
N
is the NAVIGATOR, with pickaxe and spade,
Who works very hard till a railway is made.
O
iS the OFFICE, with book-keepers strange,
Who give up the tickets for cash in exchange.
P
is the careful POLICEMAN, who stands,
To guard us from danger, with flag in his honds.
CANADIAN 81 R A I L
Q
iS the QUEEN, who oft goes by the train,
And Windsor receives her at home once again.
R
is the RAIL, which for miles is laid down,
And takes you, by steam, such a long way from town.
S
is the STATION, with bustle and din,
Where some folks get out, and others get in.
T
is the TUNNEL, thats under the ground,
Here the whistle is heard with a very long sound.
CANADIAN 82 R A I L
U
is the URCHIN, so simple and small,
Who cannot make out how the train goes at all.
V
is the VIADUCT crossing the road,
Where the river beneath is oft overflowed.
W
iS the WHISTLE that often we hear,
When a tunnel is nigh, or a station is near.
X
is the train that is called the X-PRESS, Which
travels a mile in a minute or less.
V
is YOURSELF, coming home from the school,
Where lessons are all said according to rule.
Z
is the last of the letters we take,
Showing the ZIGZAGS the lines often make.
Explanatory Notes.
The ARCH, used to illustrate the letter A, was Phillip Hardwicks
famous Doric arch at Euston Station, London, of the Lon­
don & Birmingham Railway, opened in September 1838.
The GUARD, a hold-over from the days of coaching in England, kept
his traditional place atop the coach or carriage for some
years, before being relocated to a compartment in the
carriage. In North America, he became the conductor in
the first decade of operation of public railways.
The INDEX probably refers to the needle on the face of the early
telegraph instruments, the position and fluctuation of
which was related to letters of the alphabet, thus en-
abling the transmission of messages. This system of mes­
sage transmission was a derivative of the semaphore sys­
tem of message transmission, developed in England during
the Napoleonic Wars at the beginning of the Nineteenth
Century.
The KEEPER later became the station porter, whose duty it was to
close and fasten the doors of passenger and goods vehicles,
as well as those of the goods sheds and the station.
The LANTERN may have been thrust out by the policeman originally, but
the ticket inspector (perhaps the policeman in disguise)
carried out this function in later years.
When the era of frantic railway construction in England came to an
end, the NAVIGATOR often became a plate-layer, later a
ganger, while, in North America, he was called a section­
man.
The
railway POLICEMAN originally was a kind of signal-man, who in-
(
CANADIAN
83
R A I L
deed did carry a flag or lantern to indicate to the dri­
ver or engineer that the line ahead was clear or blocked
by another train. This important functionary was after­
wards translated to a signal-box, sometimes elevated, and
provided with levers to work the signals. His alter-ego
remained at track level and became a pointsman, or switch­
tender in North America.
The use of URCHIN and X-PRESS in the alphabetical sequence seems to
be a little strained, but critics are invited to discover
suitable replacements.
The explanation for ZIGZAGS is utterly mysterious and cannot be de­
termined, unless it is a simplistic description of the
patterns formed by the railway tracks at junctions, sta­
tions or goods (freight) yards.
Why
,
the Prince

IS
,
on the Engine
,

,
John Beswarick Thompson
P
rince of Wales Drives Own Train on
way to Ottawa, shouted a headline
in the Montreal Gazette of 6 Nov­ember
1919: Heir En joyed Himsel f as
Engine Driver.
The news story was one of the last to be written about the 11-
week tour of Canada, by Edward, the 25-year-old Prince of Wales.
Since August 1919, the young heir to the British throne had travel­
led across Canada and, among other things, had iaid the cornerstone
of the new Peace Tower of the Parliament Buildings in Ottawa,bought
a ranch in Alberta and shaken the hands and warmed the hearts of
thousands of Canadians.
The first week of November was his last week in Canada in 1919;
before leaving, he climbed into the cab of Canadian Pacific Railway
locomotive Number 2231 dnd piloted the Royal Train himself.
The Gazette reported:
The Prince of Wales, who has been many things in
Canada–Indian chief, cowpuncher and baseball pi­
tcher–in turn today became an engine driver. When
the train stopped at a siding near Col borne on the
way to Ottawa (from Toronto), he mounted into the
cab and drove his own train eighteen miles. He star­
ted gingerly, but soon the pace mounted merrily and
the train bowled along at a speed that would be a
credit to a professional. In this manner the train
ran into the little station of Flavelle, where the
usual crowd was gathered. The crowd was waiting with
eager eyes at the rear of the train, expecting the
Prince to appear, when suddenly an astonished woman
cried, Why, the Prince is on the engine~
All the crowd turned to see H.R.H. hanging out of
the window waving his hat and enjoying both their
astonishment and his own achievement. The reason for
stopping near Col borne was a charming informal cere­
mony, in which H.R.H. thanked the whole staff of
this wonderful train before it breaks up at Ottawa,
to use the Princes own words.
In a siding in a lonely countryside, the Prince
stood by the carriage, which had been his home for
two months, and shook hands with each member of the
train crew. Chefs in white overalls, photographers
with cameras with which they presently meant to shoot
the scene, engineers in jeans and peaked caps, negro
porters, waiters –every man on the splendid Canadian
Pacific Railway train –was personally thanked by
the Prince.

CANADIAN 86 R A I L
In a short speech he praised the work they had done
and the great efficiency they had shown. He prom­
ised each one a signed photo of himself as a memento of
the time all had spent together. It was then that he
went to the engine, and mounted the cab. After having
the mechanism explained to him, he expressed a desire to
act as a driver, and so he ran the train.
Visitors to the Associations Canadian Railway Museum at Saint
Constant, Quebec, are usually greatly impressed by Canadian Pacific
Railway steam locomotive Number 2850, the Royal Hudson that headed
the Royal Train in 1939.
Seldom do they notice, standing in relative obscurity in Shed
Number 2, C.P.R. pacific type 4-6-2 Number 2231, the engine which
the Prince of Wales so enjoyed driving coming down from Toronto to
Ottawa on that autumn day 55 years ago.
March 1976
.IIIILL8
THE GOVERNMENT OF MANITOBA AND CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS JOINTLY
announced on December 12, 1975, that the CNs transporta­
tion training centre at Gimli, Manitoba, would be expanded
at a cost of $ 3 million. The Gimli centre, the only one of its kind
in Canada, was established by CNs system transportation group in
1972 to train locomotive engineers. Less than a year later, it be-
came a full-fledged training centre for the railway industry and
started courses for railway dispatchers and operating officers.
Detailed plans for the new buildings will be prepared by
the Department of Public Works of Manitoba and tenders for the work
will be called in the spring of 1976. A building to house a second
locomotive training simulator is to be ready by October 1976, while
the balance of the new facilities will be completed by July 1977.
Under terms of the new agreement between Manitoba and Can­
adian Notional, the railway will pay for the facilities and services
on a monthly lease basis. The agreement is for 15 years, with two
five-year renewal options. The buildings will remain the property of
Manitoba and will include the simulator-classroom building, a new
two-storey quadrangle domitory with 150 rooms and an inner court­
yard and a new assembly-recreational hall. An office-classroom buil­
ding will be retained in its present form.
CHANGES IN CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE, DESIGN­ed
to improve efficiency and profitability of the company and
effective January 1, 1976, were announced December 19 1975 by
Board Chairman Pierre Taschereau, a.c. and R.A.Bandeen, Ph.D.,
President and Chief Executive Officer. Board approval was given De­
cember 8.
Two corporate vice-presidents, W.D.Piggott and J.H.Spicer,
will assist Dr. Bandeen in areas of policy development, administra-
tion and planning. Mr. J.H.Richer has been appointed senior vice-
president assigned to special duties.
The five subsidiary divisions will be CN Rail, CN Trucking
and Express, CN Telecommunications, Grand Trunk Corporation ( for CN
operations in the United States) and CN Passenger Services-CN Hotels­
CN Tower.
The division heads, each fully accountable and responsible
for the actions of his division will be: Rad Latimer, Vice-President
and Senior Executive Officer, CN Rail; Yvon Masse, Vice-President,
CN Trucking and Express; J.H.Burdakin, President, Grand Trunk Corpor­
ation, and A.J.Kuhr, General Manager, CN Telecommunications.Appoint­
ment of a vice-president responsible for CN Passenger Services -CN
Hotels-CN Tower will be made at a later date.
Mr. Latimer has been CNs vice-president of marketing since
1974. Mr. Masse has been Vice-President of Management Services for CN
during the past year. M~. Burdakin joined the Grand Trunk from Penn
Central in 1971. Mr. Kuhr joined CN in 1936 and has spent his entire
Canadian National career in the telecommunications field.
CANADIAN 88 R A I L
AT THE END OF 1975, CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS ADVISED ITS COMMUTER
customers that it intended to raise commuter fares early
in 1976 on its Montreal/Deux Montagnes and Montreal/ St­
Hilaire East lines by about 25%. This decision was necessitated be­
cause of 1975 losses of $ 6.3 million on the Montreal/Cartierville/
Deux Montagnes line, projected to reach $ 10.9 million in 1980. The
opening of the last section of Autoroute 13 in 1975-76 and the ex­
tension of METRO Line 2 in 1980 will attract a considerable number
of commuters now travellinq by train.
ON JULY 1, 1975, BEAUTIFUL BRITISH COLUMBIA EXHIBITED FOR THE FIRST
ti~e the British Columbia Museu~ Train, both a vehicle
for travelling exhibits and a major restoration of his­
toric rolling stock, at Central Park in Burnaby, British Columbia.
Dave Davies, Pacific Coast Branch member resident in Burnaby,sudden­
ly realized that the train was only one mile from his house and hur­
riedly trotted out the trusty camera to make the photographic record
which is presented herewith. Dave said, The British Columbia Museum
Train is a superb illustration of railway history and I am full of
praise for it.
The mainlond motive power for the Museum Train is, as you
might have guessed, ex-Canadian Pacific Railway Number 3716, a 2-8-0
built by MLW, Montreal, in Octob,er 1912, B/N 51628. Under her new
ownership, she is decorated in much the same manner as her sister,
Number 2860, but the former is named Port Coquitlam, in honour of
the city where she was planned to be exhibited back in April 1966.
Behind the locomotive tender is a tank car for extra woter capacity,
fitted with a steam-driven pump and designated as belonging to the
Provincial Museum.
Next in the train -after the tank car -is a flot car on
which is mounted a donkey logging engine with a winch and winding
drum – a spool donkey of 1896. It operates by steam from Number 3716 when
the train is being displayed and it is on loan from the
British Columbia Forest Museum of Duncan, Vancouver Island, B.C. The
spool donkey is na~ed Chemainus River.
The Caycuse River, next in the consist of the
Train, is a 1912 Climax geared engine which used to belong
Museum
to the
Shownigan Lake Lumber Company. Mr. Granger Taylor found the Climax
the in the bush in 1970 -she was last used in 1927. Purchased by
British Columbia government in 1974, she was restored by BC Forest
Products and operates by steam from Number 3716. The Climaxs
trucks are raised about 1 inch above the track on the flat car
which she rests, so that the pistons, jack shaft and main rod
all work, while the engine stands still.
rear
on
can
There follows a more or less standard boxcar which houses
such things as tools, stores and a motor-generator set. This car is
not named.
Skeena River and Kootenay River are two exhibit cars,
converted from two CPR daycoaches. These cars contain dioramas, mo­
dels, photographic exhibits and many other kinds of railway memora­
bilia. The reporting marks on these and other cars seem to be BCPM:
British Columbia Provincial Museum, the train being administered by
this body, while being part of the Department of Recreation and
Conservation of British Columbia.
The third renovated coach, named Cowichan River, is half
information centre and half movie theatre; the proportions are closer
to 3/8:5/8. In the theatre portion, specially produced films are
shown, the basic theme being STEAM POWER AND BRITISH COLUMBIA: 1830s
to the 1950s,
CA NAD I AN
89 R A I L
As you might have guessed, the last car in the train is
ai10pen rear-platform private car, once the Northern Summit of the
Paci fic Great Eastern Railway of the 1960s. Now named Peace River:
this car houses the staff who process visitors through the display
cars and the theatre.
As described below, the stand-by power and the only power
that can be used on Vancouver Island is ex-Macmillan Bloedel Number
1077, which has been stored for some years.
The Museum Train moved north over the British Columbia
Railway during July and August 1975, stopping at Quesnel on 18 July.
It returned to Vancouver on 20 August and was taken by car-barge to
Nanaimo on 26 August, where it began the Island portion of its tour.
The Museum Train project manager was Robert E. Swanson, a
Director of the BCOl and the whole affair was under the general
jurisdiction of R. Yorke Edwards, Director, and Daniel T. Gallacher,
Curator of Modern History of the British Columbia Provincial Museum.
Mr. Robert Turner is Temporary Historical Curator for the Museum Tr­
ain at the Provincial Museum, Victoria.
CANADIAN 90 R A I L
/
CANADIAN 91 R A I L
CANADIAN 92 R A I L
LAST STOP IN 1975 FOR BRITISH COLUMBIAS MUSEUM TRAIN WAS VANCOUVER
Island, reported John Hoffmeister of Victoria. While
British Columbia Number 3716 was the power on the main-
land, she was too heavy for some of the bridges on the Island and
therefore was replaced by ex-Macmillan Bloedel 2-6-2 Number 1077,held
since 1969 at Nanaimo River Camp, where she was last in service.
For the tour over the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Division of
CP RAIL to Port Alberni, Parksville, Nanaimo, Duncan and Victoria,
Number 1077 was named Herb Hawkins in honour of the octogenarian
boiler-maker who restored the locomotive to active service to power
the 8-car Museum Train on the Island. The 2-6-2 is also identified on
the tender as belonging to the Provincial Museum.
FROM CAPE BRETON ISLAND, NOVA SCOTIA, BARRIE MACLEOD WRITES THAT THE
Cape Breton Steam Railway did not complete its fall (1975)
schedule because of a work stoppage by Devco Railway crews.
The CBSR carried about 2000 more passengers in 1975 than in 1974. The
autumn run to Iona-Grand Narrows, says Barrie, was not as well patron­
ized as last year. The weather was terrible, with gale force winds
and Torrential rains.
The application by Canadian National Railways to abandon
the 55.6-mile Inverness SiD has stimulated the CBSR to consider the
idea of operating tourist trains on that branch. However, only part
of the siD could be used, as a total round trip of 120-130 miles is
quite out of the question for a one-day excursion.
Meunwhile, Barry reports that Devco Railway is alternating
units Numbers 214-215 with Numbers 200-201-202 on the Sydney Mines to
Sydney coal train operation. It is this haul, which uses CN ~ails,that
Devco is considering replacing by highway trucks. Devco Railway unit
Number 207, which was severely damaged in the summer of 75, is
being repaired at Sydney.
Canodian National Railways has converted some of their RS
10 3800-series units to six-axle units, such as (old) Number 3854,
which is now Number 1754. Some of these newly converted units are
in use on the Inverness SiD.
WHILE ON HOLIDAY IN WINNIPEG, MANITOBA, BARRY BIGLOW SENT US A PIC­
ture from the Free Press showing the collapsed span of
the swing-bridge over the Fraser River at New Westminster,
B.C. On Friday, December 26, 1975, an empty logging barge broke free
of its moorings in New Westminster harbour and, blown upstream again­
st the current by strong winds, it rammed the approach span to the
swing bridge with the result shown. The bridge is owned by the De­
partment of Public Works-Canada and is used by CN. Just recently,the
CNs Technical Research Centre and Engineering Department finished
checking the bridge with strain gauges to certify it for use by the
railwnys .latest unit trains.
Barry also noted that CN was constructing a new run-around
facility at Symington Yard, which would be in service in 1976. Also
noted at Symington was Duluth, Winnipeg & Pacific Railroad MR 18-a
Number 3405, freshly painted in an attractive red, white and blue
colour combination for the United States Bicentennial in 1976. Final
striping on the unit was to be done at West Virginia, Minnesota, ap­
parently.
UNITED
change
1975.
CA NAD IAN 93 R A I L
RAILWAY SUPPLY HAS OVERHAULED FORMER CANADIAN NATIONAL S-2
Number 8122 for Price Brothers Limited of Kenogami, Que­
bec as their Number 1. To be used for switching and inter­
work, the unit was photographed by Pierre Patenaude on 10 June
IN TRANSIT FROM GE-ERIE TO THE MAINE CENTRAL RAILROAD, THE FIRST TWO
of an order for 10 U-18-B model units stopped over at CP
RAILs St-Luc Yard, Montreal on 29 June 1975. These units
were taken dead in CP RAILs Newport/Lvndonville S/Ds and delivered
to the Maine Central at St. Johnsbury, Vermont. Thanks to Pierre for
the photograph.
THROUGH THE COOPERATION OF THE PHOTOGRAPHS_SECTION OF THE PUBLIC AR­
chives of Canada, we are able to present to our members this picture
of Canada Atlantic Railway 0-6-0 Number 1. No details are available
about the date, location or identities of the various employees in
the photograph.
——-…..
,>


Canadian Rail
is published monthly by the
Canadian Railroad Historical Association
p.o. Box 22,Station B, Montreal,OUebec,Canada/H3B 3J5
Editor; S.s.Worthen Production; P. Murphy
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