Consulter nos archives / Consult our archives

La majorité des documents conservés par le Centre d'archives et de documentation de l'ACHF sont disponibles pour consultation.

Most of the documents kept by the ACHF Archives and Documentation Center are available for consultation.

Canadian Rail 287 1975

Lien vers le document

Canadian Rail 287 1975

Canadian
Rail

No. 287
December
1975

r
l~
The Story of Passenger, Freight,
Ski and Other Trains from Montreal
to the Laurentian Mountains.
M. Peter Murphy
Part III
Climax and Decline.
Parts I & II of this series have appeared
in previous issues of CANADIAN RAIL.
Laurentian Railways in the Peak Years.
In 1925, a new era dawned for the Laurentian Mountains and the
railway lines that served them. Colonization of the area was substan­
tially complete and this vast green area of mountains and valleys be­
came more and more popular with Montrealers as a recreational area.
Spring, summer and autumn, there were a myriad of crystal-clear,
sparkling lakes for fishing, swimming or just plain admiring. Before
long, many summer cottages lined their shores. Life in the country
was very desirable and most pleasant and travel to and from the re­
gion was principally by train, since good roads were rare and few
commuters had automobiles.
The distribution of these part-time residents was interesting.
In the valley of the North River, Canadian Pacific Railway employees
predominated, since their railway passes would take them to and from
the city without charge. Municipalities such as Lake Connelly, Val
David, Ste-Agathe and Ivry had and still have a large number of resi­
dents who are employees of CP Limited or one of its divisions.
WINTER CAME LATE IN THE 1952-53 SEASON AND ON A SNOWY DECEMBER DAY,
Canadian Pacifics Train 39, Saint John, N.B. to Montreal, was run­
ning late. Here she is with 4-6-2 Number 2470 on the head-end,stomp­
ing up the grade west of Eastray, Quebec, through a wintry blizzard.
For reasons best known to himself, Jim Shaughnessy was out in the
blizzard, too, and took yet another wonderful illustration of the
days of steam.
CP RAILS PRIDE OF THE FLEET, THE CANADIAN, REROUTED THROUGH THE
Laurentians? vie 11 , not quite~ Instead, this is the Canadian Railroad
Historical Associations SNOW Excursion from Montreal to Labelle; it
was photographed by Peter Layland at this scenic spot near Piedmont,
Quebec, on the banks of the Riviere du Nord.
r
CANADIAN 360 R A I L
On the other side of the parish, Canadian National Railways em­
ployees built summer homes at Sixteen Island Lake, Arundel, Weir and
Pine Lake, since their weekend trips to and from the cottage could be made
without expense. The paying passengers on regular CN trains to
the Laurentians were often heard to remark that the railways to the
mountains were operating passenger trains solely for the benefit of
their employees! While the exaggeration may have been slight, it
could be permitted -in the opinion of some -for the purposes of
argument!
In the years just before the Hungry Thirties, the sport of
skiing burst upon the unsuspecting inhabitants of the Laurentians.lt
was in this area of North America that the sport of skiing, as we
know it, first achieved great popularity, although some Europeans had
been hard at it since the end of World War I.
The myriad of skiiers, which started about 1927, en joyed climb-
ing up the hills and flashing down through the powdery snow. Quick
to perceive the opportunity to establish a growing market for var-
ious services connected with the sport, one of the inhabitants of
the town of Shawbridge erected the first ski-tow in North America on
the Big Hill on the west side of the valley opposite the village,
in 1929.
The rest is history. Rope ski-tows were strung on almost every
hillside in the lower Laurentians and their success soon obliged the
ski-hill operators in northern New England and the Adirondack Moun­
tains to emulate them by installing this facility.
:, Mr. Victor Nymark opened his famous Nymarks Lodge at the foot
,~.!. of Hill 70 at St-Sauveur-des-Monts in 1933. At the time, he was of
the opinion that skiing as a winter sport would not amount to much.
How wrong he was! For the cross-country skiier, a whole network of
trails through the woods, exemplified by the Maple Leaf Trail from
Ste-Agathe to Shawbridge, was laid out by that grand old man of Can­
adian skiing, H. Smith Jackrabbit Johannsen, who, at the ripe age
of 100-plus yeors, still enjoys life, summer and winter, in Piedmont.
When the bloom went off the financial rose in October 1929,hol­
idays in the Laurentians were still an inexpensive kind of vacation,
particularly for railway pass-holders. This helped to keep the region
alive up to amd through the years of World War II. The real excitement
came soon after 1945, when returning service men, with money in their
pockets and the generally improving economic situation filled the
summer camps, resort hotels and, in the winter, the ski lodges. The
skiiers of that day were a hardy breed, riding the ski-tows and schus­
sing the slopes all day and swapping stories and fire-water all night.
Canadian Pacific spent its promotional dollars on the Mont Rol­
land/Ste-Agathe/St-Jovite/Mont T~emblant areas. Canadian National re­
taliated by budgeting promotional money for Shawbridge/Christieville/
St-Sauveur/Morin Heights. Both railways provided exceptional service
on weekends.
The more affluent skiier of the day could go north by CPR to
Piedmont and then ski cross-country to St-Sauveur or Morin Heights,
returning to Montreal via Canadian National. All this during the cou­
rse of a sunny winters day. The train service was that good. Can­
adian Pacific operated as many as six southbound ski specials of a
Sunday night in the winter, exclusive of the regular southbound Mont
Laurier and Labelle passenger trains.
All in all, fram Ste-Agathe on a Sunday night in winter, there
CANADIAN =361 R A I L
CANADIAN 362 R A I L
were about ten southbound trains to choose from. The consist of most
of them was composed of clossic tuscan red wooden coaches, some with
open platforms. Certain of these passenger trains even offered par­
lor-car service.
Canadian National had about the same thing going, but their traf­
fic never attained the level of that handled by Canadian Pacific. A
1937 timetable shows one regular train and one ski special southbound
from Morin Heights on a Sunday night in winter. In later years, this
service was expanded and one might have seen four trains southbound.
The CN also offered parlor-car service on some of its through trains
to Lac Remi, apparently for the well-to-do summer residents at Arun­
del, Weir and Lake Bevan.
It is generally agreed among the observers of the winter rail­
way scene in the Lourentians about 1955, that there was nothing in
eastern Canada to equal the sight of double-headed 5500-class Can­
adian National locomotives, sporting elephant-ears ( smoke deflec-
tors), roaring down the grade south of Morin Heights with two bag-
gage cars and ten arch-windowed, pullman-green, wooden coaches be-
hind, brightly lighted and bUlging with skiiers and their parapher­
nalia. Passenger equipment that once had been the pride of CN s tr­
anscontinental service, had been relegated to this exacting service.
The otherwise redundant old green coaches bravely discharged their
new responsibility and were very much appreciated by the tired holi­
day-makers, summer and winter~
The passenger traffic boom enjoyed by CN and CP in this region
began to decline as rapidly as it had increased, primarily because of
the increasing popularity of the private automobile and the improve­
ment of roads in the region. Despite winter-time blizzards and sum­
mer-season, pre-expressway traffic jams, which immobilized southbound
motorists for hours on successive Sunday nights, railway passenger
traffic maintained its steady decline. The railways nevertheless con­
tinued to provide excellent service on weekends and, as late as 1960,
the Canadian Pacific scheduled three southbound trains on Sunday eve­
ning. But on many trips, the only passengers were pass-holders.
The final blow to railway passenger service to the Laurentians
was the opening of the Autoroute des Laurentides, otherwise known as
the St-Agathe Expressway. The construction of this double divided hi­
ghway took advantage of much of Canadian Nationals right-of-way from
St-Jerome to St-Sauveur. The last train from Lac Remi came south on
27 May 1962. Canadian Pacific continued to provide passenger service,
but on a considerably reduced frequency.
When Canadian National Railways declared that they would aban­
don the Lac Remi line in 1961, public hearings into the proposal were
held in St-Jerome on 17 and 18 May 1962. There was little or no op­
position to the petition to abandon. The china clay mines at Kasil
had been closed for many years. Freight went by highway to Huberdeau
and Lac Remi. On the rather short notice of ten days, the last CN
passenger train, Train 100, made its last run on 27 May 1962. The
line was officially abandoned north of St-Jerome on 1 June, but as
~ THE LAST CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS TRAIN FROM LAC REMI, QUEBEC, ON
May 27, 1962, was Train 100 departing at 5.00 p.m. On the head-end,
A units Numbers 6771 & 6790, back-to-back. Combination car Number
7167 and six coaches of the 5000, 5100 & 5250-series followed.
Photo courtesy Robert Half yard.

CANADIAN 364 R A I L
passenger service was on weekends only by that time, Sundays train
was the last there was.
On the last day of service, the crane and flat cors were already
waiting at Lac Remi and, on the following Monday morning, the demol­
ition of the line began. As if in protest to the abandonment of the
Montfort & Gatineau, one of the crew-cars on the work-train got loose
somehow and derailed into the creek at Weir, but this postponed the
continuing demolition but a few hours. The rails, tie-plates, switches
and spikes were unceremoniously yanked up past Lac St-Fran~ois-Xavier
crrl Montfort, down the grade at Lac Chevreuil, through Morin Heights
and St-Sauveur. Alas. Cure Labelles colonization railway was deceas­
ed at the relatively early age of sixty-six years.
But the last train from Lac Remi was not without its individual­
ity. Northbound, two A units and seven passenger coaches, all full,
pulled out of Montreals Central Station only slightly later than
the scheduled departure time. From the outset, and in view of the
occasion, an on time arrival at Lac Remi was out of the question.
It was only a matter of how late Train 99 would be.
On arrival at Montfort, opposite the orphanage of the Montfort-
ian Fathers, Train 99 was so far behind time that when one of the
railway-enthusiast passengers asked the conductor if he could ar-
range a run-past for photographers, the latter readily consented.
The site selected was the reverse-curve wooden trestle across Lac
St-Fran~ois-Xavier at Newyago. When the train came to a stop on the
west side of the lake, almost every passenger in the seven cars de­
trained to participate in this last commemorating event.
lnis was the final demonstration of the uniqueness of the Mont­
fort ~ubdivision: it had to be the only line where you could arrange
a run-past with a regular train on 15 minutes notice. Of course, in
the early days, the Montfort & Gatineau picked up and set down pas­
sengers almost anywhere along the line. Things had not changed very
much in that regard in more than sixty years. It was that kind of a
ra ilway~
That was the end of ten-car ski specials with box-cab electric
haulers from Central Station to Val Royal. It was the end of double­
headed, elephant-eared 5500s. It was the end of successful and un­
successful charges at the Lac Chevreuil grade. It was the end of ac­
commodating wayfreights that would wait on the main line at any lo­
cation, while the cottage-builders unloaded half-a-boxcar of lumber.
It was the end of possenger trains that stopped beside a friends
house at Bevan Lake to let me off at the door~ It was the end of the
useful branch line which had, over the years, found a particular
place in the affection of every person who rode it. It was the end of
plans to develope the country from the Riviere Maskinonge to the Riv­
iere Lievre, by means of the railway. And it was the end of free tr­
ansportation to the Lourentians for the CN pass-holders~
INTREPID ASSOCIATION PHOTOGRAPHER PAUL MCGEE SNAPPED A PICTURE OF
of all things – a Central Vermont unit, Number 3901, at Lac Remi in
1956. Number 3901 pulled the first of two southbound trains that Sun­
day nighti the second section was headed by double-headed steam~
Photo courtesy Paul McGee.

CANADIAN 366 R A
MONTREAL (Tunnel Terminal), H.UBERDEAU, LAC REMI
i~, E • G92 H
Spl 93 91 95 99 MOD. 100
-r——
MUe8
TABLE No. 10 Alt!. ~.~
· Fri. J}!~. Sst. Suo. MllIes BTA.TION&-GARES tudo Lun Sun. •
~ ~~. I~;:fr: tf:f1:. £,~. ~:i :8~. a
L
..
Ski
Sp
• uul. Jcu. seW. sew. Sam, seuJ. :
~aF~ )~SO rOO 7 00 D.p MONTREAL Ter Arl. 69 .1145 945 ~~ roo
e r 8 ~ 65] ) 59 209 2 ~ 39 . Mount (Mont)fWo)al (A) 16311@, 936 e I: 651
~ E 9 7.05,: n I~ n 19 T J ~ ~~. ~ol:~vl.Y. . . . B8 I / ,; ~~ ~ E 6 4~
o • . 14 25 /2 35 19 ~ 16 2 St. Ooroth6o (I,r .. m.r.) 96 II 19 O ~. /42712 !7/9 a 161. unl Llnlu (Club Lual) . 941111/907 Z:J
e. . 14 29/2 8/9 16 6 L.a(;:I~:~t!.~~Q0 94 11/06 /9 06 e ~a.. : i~ ~:~ ~ ~ g,A .. :.J!;.Ei:!:~~… .~ [~~~ : ~~ ~~
c5 •…. , ….. /44712 57/958 26.6. . .St. Augustin……… . .. IO/4i /8 46 C c
· c.. . .. , .. /451/30110/02 29.2, …. D,u1 Mont.agno….. 184 1841 N IIiI
c~ …… /459/309. 34.8 ….. Papln .. u…. .11 i-
;N . 35.6 ,.Rlnfrot…. • I ~ . .N
• ~ 9 SI 8 00 5 10 3 20 IOq~ 38 3 . St . .»r&mo all 10 8 25 …. E~ 5 50
c E 18 IllS 23 /l 33 ~ 44 2 , Filion 605101~ 18 07 •
,;; 10 ~ 18 20 IS 30 IJ 0 I f. 4:7 4 . Sawbrldgo 654 WSs 800 §;; 5 11
~ ~ o~~ I: J~ I~ ~ij I) ~~ s6 492 Arr. JUC Marol. .. {Dop. . I ~ ~ ~ij uq: ~ ~~
t: 8 8)0 5 40 3 50 ~ 50 61 6 D.p. St ~uvour, . Arr, 726 ~ ~ 7 50 od • 5 00
l ~ 1°/
1
I~ ~~ I~ ~~ I~ ?~ II gg ~ . ~.o:2,~:::~,~ . … l~g f1) ~7 h ~: ~ ~ I~ ~~
It ~ 18/ 18 38 15 48 13 58 1164 3 . Chrlltlovlll. 178 I~ 4,17 43 oJ ~ 14 52
0 … 110 !9 80 16101420 I 618 Ofphellnat (Orphanage) ……. f9 2417 24 …. ·f4 11
i~ f 0 ~ ot I~ l*/~ ~t II ~ g ~.o:~~,: .. :: .~~~ f~ ~ ~ 1~ ~a.~.~?
~l . ~;n}tU~:~~H~l ~g t:k:b,ap.au·· l~HoIHg:~::::::
… I:J • • ••••• 16 17 14 47 . …. 69.8 ….. Lak, Wonlsh , , … .. .. …. 981 1152. …. _ I:J
£ ,E ::~~/:~/~:~l~/l~ ~t:~:::::~o~~::….. ~~/C Itn iE.
i~ ./9.0/650/500/59 72.1 , …. Pln.L.8ko (Lao des Pltl.) .. 9711 ~/645:e ~
o Q . 19 56 /7 06 15 16 12/15 76.2 … ,. BatMyllle.. 605/9 16)0 00
,~ .. ::: fg/~~? n ~~ it !~~~ ~ij ::::::~~~~~:I~.k~·.·: gf~ ~i ~ ~i n §
…. …1012 722 5)21232 80.7 …. Hub~rd.au 616 819 619 II)
. 10/26/7 36/54612/46 86.9 ….. Gra,. Vall.y… · .. ··19 H 160)
.10131 n 41/5 5112151 88.0 ….. Rookway. . 663/1 IS 59
l~~ If ~~ i fi~ If/~ ~:~ A,,: ~~IFiEMi: ~ ….. O.p. ~ I l ~~!
~. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
EQUIPMENT-Table10-MATERIEL ROULANT
MONTREAL-LAC REMI
CoaGhe. on all tran,
Parlor Car-
halo No. 92–8aturdays, Deo. 25th, 1937 to Mat. 26th, 1038.
1raln No. 03-Ft1days, Dec. 24th, 1937 to Mar. 2b~h. 1938.
Train No. 06-sat~I~~a~ld~~J::.h24tg3:n~3:tt~io~~h. 1938.
Tra.I.n No. 99-SUndayl, Dec. 26th, 1937 aod Jan. 2nd, 1938.
lraln No. lOO-Sundayll. Dco. 26tb, 1937 to Mar. 27th, 1938.
LlJnoh Countef Cal-
~ ~::: ~~: :~} sund::~d~: ;:~~2::3~ ~;!.s:t~~~:;:. Qod

Voltur •• d. pr.mlho. tOUt J •• trains
Wvon-ulon –
1raf.n 92-8amedla, 26 dec., 1937 au 26 mars. 1938.
lratn 93-Vendredta, 24 doo., 1937 au 26 mara, 1938.
lraln 96-&.mcdta, 25 d~e .• 1937 au 26 mars, 1938, aw:sl leI!
vendredl.9, 24 et 31 d~c .• 1937.
lraio 99-DLroanchcs, 26 doo., 1937 et 2 JaD., 1938.
Train lOO-Dlm$oobes, 26 d60 .. 1937 au 27 man. 1938.
WlIgon·,utau,lInt (upas au oomptolr)
~~::I ~a:t8!~CWS} D~.:a~~~e!.6 2 dJ~~. ~~3~ :8::.~~;:. at
The Laurentian Railways Today.
. Pt.
Canadian Notional Railways Montfort line today terminates in
a gravel-pit about 2 miles north of St-Jerome, but the southern por­
tion of the line has considerable freight traffic. With the con­
struction of the St-Jerome Industrial Park on the northwest side of
the city, considerable business has been developed for the railway,
despite the proximity of the Autoroute des Lourentides. Several in­
dustrial spurs have been built to local companies and, more often
than not, there are one or two cars on most of them.
South of St-Janvrier, the CN main line to St-Jerome ran through
a stretch of flat country, near St-Scholastique, which, a few years
t
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAYS TRAIN 164, OTHERWISE BUDD RDC DAYLINER
Number 9114, arrives at Windsor Station, Montreal from Mont Laurier,
164 miles north, at about half-past twelve on July 25, 1964.
Photo courtesy Robert Half yard.
ago, was s e 1 e c ted as the sit e 0 f M.o n t rea l s j u m b 0 -jet air p or t, M i r­
abel, called by some St-Scholastique International Airport. As a
consequence, CN was obliged to relocate several miles of the St-Jer­
ome Subdivision in May 1972. This portion of railway is now in a very
good position to benefit from the activity generated by the new air­
port.
Recent press reports state that there will be a high-speed rail
passenger service from Montreals Central Station to the jetport,and
the CNs line will be redesigned to suit this purpose. While the sub­
division will continue to handle freight shipments, passengers will
ride to and from Montreal in new, high-speed electric rapid-transit
cars.
In addition to its daily freight service to St-Jerome, CP RAIL
today runs a freight every other day to Mont Laurier. Its Monday­
Wednesday-Friday RDC Dayliner is the only remaining passenger tr­
ain to the Laurentians. The triweekly northbound Budd is Train 167;
the Tuesday-Thursday southbound is Train 164 and the Sunday night
southbound is Train 172. The Dayliner is scheduled to cover the
163.8 miles to Mont Laurier in 4 hours 35 minutes. How long this ser­
vice will continue is anybodys guess, but its discontinuance will
have to be ratified by the Railway Transport Comittee before it is
terminated.
CANADIAN PACIFIC DAYLINER NUMBER 9022 BURSTS THROUGH AN IMPRESSIVE
rock-cut north of Ste-Marguerite Station on a special Association tr­
ip through the snowy Lauretians. Photo courtesy Peter Murphy.

THE
LAVRENTIANS

LES
LAVRENTIDES
MONTREAL,
ST.
JEROME,
STE
.
AGATHE,
LABELLE
&.
MONT-LAURIER
1960
READ
DOW
N –
LIRE
DE
BAUT
£N
B
….
S
READ
UP

LIRE
DE
BAS
EN
B
AU
T
179
I
:n

169 169
lSI
167 137
In
173
III
175
163
180 166 132
170 138
174
0
184
g
164
OAn.lNER
O
….
YUNtR
]–i
E:l:c. OAYUNER 04YUNER. —
&l
l
.c.:.
~
DAYuNER
OAYUNER
–~
OAfLlN(R
O
….
YtmER
~–:–~
OAYUNER
!::iy
DnlJY
~
%Jiy:
~
~r
d:
Exc.
Sul
.
&t
o
~
~c&
~~
TA:t~
4
AJtl-
~o&
Sat.
DoJly
ea:er.o.&
Sat. Sat.
~
;
~
~
Dally
#1:t
1:
~
~
~
Sun.
SUo.
oo.y
olllY
~frl,.
DwJlY
Sun.
only
MU
CI:l
TA
U
tude
Sun.
ocly
SUn. only
onJ.y
g
$::T
.:
~
N(J~
ToW!
~
N(J~
~
No~
~
..
&
~~
Tous
Sam.
&.
Srun.&
~.&
Tow
&uD.&
~
N~
~
f~
~
. I
.
34
17
~
DAYUNER SUn,
Du!Jy
only
S
VO!, NoU
To,,
Ie.
Dwn,
oun
oe
uJ,
..
.
..
… t
…..
.
~:
J~
U)
::~::
~:
~~.
~.
~:
=:
~..
J~~
~~.
~~
:
~~.
~
..
J~~
~if
~
:
~
:
~
~~:
~
1~:S

–,,-~p;-~
PI!
–;;——–pw–.&I
tJI

-,—
..

..

MONTREAL
.III
———–Pl—P;-~-;-~
PII
PII PII
!:!
630
4.55 – 4
.27:
4.2
7 4.
27
%
4.04
12
.
05
11
.
20
8.
35
8.30 B
jO
7.45
0.0
Dep
.
Wlnd$orStn.+
tOO
j
2O
j
2O

8.50
1.00
3.20
4.55.
6.05
I;
7.05
8.00
9.
55
~
6:35 5.
00
~
4.n.!~
43)
4))
%409
12
.
10
11.
26 8.41
8.35
8.5
7.50
2.0
W(lltmou~..
15,2
.12 .
12
1.43
12
.53
3.13
4.
47i
5.57=
6.57 7.
53;!
9.47
-,
__
,,_,,_
~;~~

~.~~__

_S_~
~.;_8_

_
:
___
8_
,
_
a
_~
47
MontlQl
crt
15
7.05
__

,O
_S
___
_
,
_3
6
_
~~~~~i~~
~~~
a::
65S
520.i
4
55:0
4
55;
4
55
%
4
26
1227
IL
SO
9.
05:

53
8.42
B.
07
11.8
PnrkAvonuo
(Jc:lOTaJon
).
.
191
6.50 6.
52
10.22 12.33 2.
53
4.2.5
5.
35=
0
6.)1
7.33
0
9.
25
o
~7:00
/5.24
t!:
5(l2~
0
502
0
502
::;;4.
30
112.31 11
.55
9.
10
8.57
8
.46
as
.
I
15.;
;
BOrdOd
ux

.
d
76,
6.40
6.45
110.14
m12.27
12
.
47
4
.
IS-;m5
.
2S~D
m6.29
0
7.27
~
m)
.
16
~
cf
5.04
; .. ,
S.04~
f
5.
04
•.
~f
9.
12
-:
H~
~:M~r-tinj~~
.
l
~
t·~~
/6.4
3
-;
..
:-
~
..
X.
17:10
fS:l4
0
517~~
517;
517
fl
ros
J;
9:24~
b9
:07
18
:57
a
8:23
22
:
.9
S!R~o.
9,0
,
r
6:27
6:~
110
04
112:
19
,f
oz
:
S:12~~
1
:19
07
<18
~
(I
1
7.12
/5.36
5.19
Q.
S.19~
5.19
..
..
/12
.
10
c
9.?tl
o
b9.09
1.
58
.
23.
Ro.otmoro


/6
.24
16
.
/1
/12
.
18
..
13.59
:15
.
09
Q.
6.18
..
Q.
..
; 7.
15
5.39
g
5.2

(I
S
.ZS
o.
5.
25
4.43 12.47
12.15.
9 .
.$J:>-
1!
1
~.02
a
8.30
2$
.6
Sto-Th6ro.o.
Det>.
121
6.20
6.
a
1
8U
12
.
15
2
.3
5
3.SS!!:
5
.05
;
(I
6.15
7.
15
9
00
~–,
.
-,,-

–~–s.2s;~-
-~
—-:US—I2.iS;
~~

-,,-~
a8.30
2.;.6
Dcp
.
St
o-Th00-6lo..
.A:rr.
12~

,,
-~–
,,
-~–,,-3.55~5.0sj~–,
,
-,,-
—~~
3:
..
~f
S.39g
~
-;
:
:J~
::
3~
~J
~
~
::
::
..
~
t~
~-J~~~~r
: .
~S
~ ~:T
§
..
J
~
:
44
i~
~J~
i
:.
..
:..
C
::)4
..
i
r~
:
n~–g
a
~tn
..
11~
:
~~
I
Jf89
:
6~
~
..
J~j~
,~
:
48?
~:~
~:oR.~
~
E
.
~~~
I~:~
..
,1Lz~
..
f~
:
f~~!t~~~
~:49
..
~
f:
:
~
/7.48
T
;a
blo
r-
6
.
14~~

nS.15
T:.bo
/12.540) I.·be
Tabla
/9.4
1 r9
6
-17
.
.5
Shflw~>rJdgai-Sa

.
!l9l
/5.
56
Tablo
III
.4!
Tablo
13
.
10~
4.
2.03-
/5.
34
T.blo;
18
.
21
g
J 7.57
2;
6.2.4:;;!
~
n
5.
25
2 /1.04
~
/IO.2b
~
2
/9.52
r 9
….
.51.7
P
;~~t!Z~
rLcl)
UlCUr)
..
5-1;7
/5.49
2
11
1.33 2 f 3.
01
~
4
.
rr~
~
15.25
2
~
18.12
.,
/8
.
04
t
6.34c.:

15
.31 1.12::1 10.3100 /10.02 19
.1
7
54.7
Mant-Rollilnd{Stc-A
aeJe
)..
632
1543
11
.28
2.5434
.
04UC
5.20
c;
8
05
~
/8.
12
Q.
6.45~;
M
n5
.39
/I
.
ZZ

/1
0.4
;
/10
12
T9
.
27
59
.3
Sto-MarguoriUo.
900
/5f!
/1119
12.44
l.54;~
/5.11
~
17.
55
.r:
I
8.22
~
7.02;;

n
5.4
9 /
J
.)8

1
0.
: 110
T
9.4
1
6.5.2
VIII DOIvld. .
10,)1
/
/11
12
.
)0
3.40.
1500
/74)
:.
/8
.18
0
6.
56

0
nS.4S
/1
.30E
II
O.500
/1020
,9
.34
6.1
.0
Val
Morin
.
lO!S
/I!
I~
12.
36
3.46~o
15
.0
4
/7
.
47
:
..
1i/7
.08;~
~
nS.S3
II.:
S::!I
:
.
~~
118~
r9.46
fo
A
Pr6~oA~l!}OH·E+
··
1C~~
.. / I
..
III
4
..
12.2Si/).3s!:!!
14
:
56
17
:39
j
I::~

::
-~~~~-::-~-
::

~;;;~

::
-~~-7-1–
::

-::-5- ;I;;~~
n~i
~;~~I
..
;;
; —
I~
.
~~

——

-~~~~:
,::::

~
~~:i~
~
16:57
1
~
c
~t~f
Ii:
~ig
:~
~
:
~
~:
.F
~~~ln·ciaC~
)
:
g~
14:50
..
~=
}f~:
~
~
~
:
b:
~
/9:13
~

~
t~~
Ilf~4
~
:
~
~~~~I:~:
: . . . . .
ro~
~
tf?
3 d
~
4
:14
~
16:53
~
I
~
:2.3:
f
~:~
.. ..
.:44
3gj
~Onnet;:tl:~~
I
..
nt
.
n5
~
:
:
~
!
~
4.05
16
.
43
9.4i.1
___
~__
_
_~___
_
_
__
,,
__
_ ..
_
~105.
8
LABELI.[.
749
4.15
___________
~
__
l
:3:
52
~
6:30
e
~
r1~
..
..
~tl:n
n~:~
~~r:~I.tio;,
.
:
~~
;
e
1
jj
~
}
:
.
~~
I
7.32
I
IU
~5
122.0
Llleo.to.
SM
-,
.
16
:03
}
~:
~~
~lL
3~
:~
J
::I~or~i:.g~
~
~
I
rr2
}
~~i
E
18.01
/11.
54
1
40
.2
ucs.gu.,.
. IOi8
..
L
1)
00
/5
37
~
~
g:1~
}:~
:
n
tll
:
~
~:=o
: . .. .
..
.
Ij~
]
~
}
~:j:
}
ff~
PM
Ai
I
p..j
Pi Pi
~4D
Ft.
P1i
AI
AM
ill
?35
163.8
AlT.
MONT·LAURIER
Det!.
733
AM
Ali
i.i
Ai
j;W
Pi
.
Pi
~
~
25
Pi
~OO
Llght
l1guree
denote
A.M
.
ume.
Dark
figure.
donoto
P.M
.
tlmo
.
Lea
chLlIrul ICgc
ra
LndlQu
e.n
t A.M.
Lei
ehlHrn
gr:u
IndlQu.nt
P.M
.
RENVOIS
:
Arret
Bur
IllgolLI
p
our
prendre
Toy~eura
p:Y3.nta
Allant
au
nOrd
de
Stc-
Agat.hc
se
ul
cment.
~
?J
~~,~~~.DOr%=~~
~fJ:~~~nfr:ti~J:~
~~;fs~ed:
!~:~~~~:}~::~::;;
IU~1ir~~
~~~SJ~
~~
g~~
g~~~~
~~J~~~
g~~~~T~~~.noL~tsfft;~g~.
a~9J
~~ney
~~~~DJ:{
:~t
~~~
lab
~
~8=
D~~9V~p~1~;
~:~~
~f~~a~e~~~Jgx8~tga~
~~c~~t~
d~l~~lg:~
~a~r
J~~y::~
S~
~:
~
D
~
ru~o
~~
e3g~r:.Of:f~
~
nArret
aur
sJa:uaJ.
du
25 tlvr!l
au
9
lulu
me.
ct
apr
Cs
Ie 9 IJept.
Du
10
juln
au
9
ecpt.
In
c ..
.uret
sur
~Ignal.
Vetlc1rad
i
~~~rtDdr~;~;:e~a~~~
~J~t
Ua~2
~~~
~eCs~~~~~
!c~~
~e;:~
~J~~r:n~~
~tD~
oi~~~~
~o;J
banllouo en
t:e
Montreal. Weatmouct. Montr6U-Ou
C8t
.
J
A1e
nu
c
du
Pare
(Jean
Talon)
et
Bordeaux.
.,BUllet
A
In
I:;llr
O.

Autonll
DIt.&C1
eJlJJlaUSl:.
.AUCI,lD
bsgn&c
enreg1str6.
CANADIAN 370 R A L
Montreal I St. Jerome I Ste. Agathe I Mont Laurier
Read up
De bas en haul
1 9 71
164.172_
Read down I
De haul en bas I —
… ~-:-:-.-~:::s
&F ThUl. only.
Wed. I
lun. 3
I
Mer. & Mar. & Dim.
Van.
Joudi seul.
——–1—-
—-I GaroWrndsor SIn.
o. 1815 0.0 Cp Monlreal. .. Ar 1235 2100
.. 81820 2.0 Weslmount. 1227 2052
81825 4.7 MonlfeaIWesl… 1220 2045
———..,,—,——,.,.—::-:-:-I-,7::–I-=-:::–
e 18 38 11 .8 Palk Avenue (Jean Talon). 12 07 20 32
01843 15.5 Bordeaux.. 11159 12024
iJ 1854 22.9 Stc-fiose.. (,, 49 12014
81856 23.6 Rosemefo…. 11148 12013
a1858 25.6 ArSte·ThGICse …….. Dp 1145 2010
19 00 25.6
{1906 29.8
f191D 32.8
1918 38.9
11932 47.5
/1938 51.7
Dp Ste-lhilrllse ……… Ar 111 45
Bouchard. . . . . . . . .. I 11 37
51-JanVier. . . ….. , I 11 33
51-Jerome. . . . . . . . . 11 25
Shawbridge. … .. I 11 11
Piedmont (St·Sauveur).. {II 04
(Monl-Gabriel)
2010
12002
{ 1958
1950
{ 19 36
{ 1929
19 44 54.7 MOn!-Rolland (Sle-Adele) 10 58 19 23
f 1953 59.3 SI9-Marguerite. 11049 11914
. 11959 63.0 VIMorm.. /1042 11907
.. 12003 65.21 Val DaVid. 11038 11903
.. 2015 69.4 Slo-Agalhe.. 1030 1855
———,-:…,…,-,—::-……-·I-:-:-=-:-:–
. f 2040 82.8 SI-Feuslin (Lac Caue) . I 1005 I 18 30
. 1204788.3 MOllison…. 10958 11823
. 12055 90.8 SI-Jovue.. 10950 11815
12104 96.3 Mon(.fremblant. If 09 40 11805
2117105.8 Labelle. 0927 1752
—,-,-, -35–11–.0—A-n-no-n-d-,,-o-n-.. —+-::0::-0::::–I 17 32
12142122.5 Lacoste. 10901 11726
12154 129.3 Nommmgue… f08S1 /1716
{2211 140.2 lac Saguay.. {08 35 117 CO
2250 163.8 At Monl·laUlier.. .Dp 0800 1625
12236155.4 BaueI1B.. {0811 {1636
The Ste-Therese/St-Jerome/Mont Laurier branch of CP RAIL is well­
maintained, but lineside structures and operating points have been
eliminated in many instances. Agents have been removed from all sta­
tions north of Ste-Therese, except St-Jerome and Mont Laurier. Most
of the stations that have been closed have been sold or are available
for purchase. Freight operations have been centralized in Montreal and
on the RDC Dayliner, the conductor sells, collects and punches the
tickets in one operation~
The many outdoor attractions which once enticed visitors from
the city have also changed. The Big Hill at Shawbridge, once the
sternest challenge that a skiier could undertake, has been abandoned
by the fraternity and is gradually losing its identity in a fuzz of
second growth. Cross-country skiing, having waned in its popularity,
is now enjoying a resurgence, as some skiiers seek to avoid the hills
and crowded ski-tows. Old trails have been re-opened, using the sites
of former railway stations as rendez-vous points, mainly because these
were the traditional points of departure twenty years ago.
Cure Labelle would certainly be shocked by the appearance af St­
Jeromes CP RAIL station. Although it is still open for business, it
shares its facilities with a meat-packing company and the passenger
waiting room is used by a competing bus company~
There are still quite a few passengers on the Budd car,especial­
lyon weekends. The Dayliner presents a reassuring sight on winter­
time Sunday nights, particularly if there is a blizzard blowing.
Usually, two RDC cars are operated on weekends, but in stormy weather,
the passengers are squeezed in much the same as they used to be on a
streetcar in the rush-hour. The platforms, too, are often occupied by
standees and the engineer may be required to share the privacy of
his vestibule cab with the customers. However, heavy traffic runs
1
J
CANADIAN 371 R A I L
are infrequent and this sort of cab riding is now expressly prohibit­
ed by regulation of the Board.
While the Laurentian railways may have seen better days, the
summer and winter scenery from the Dayliners picture-windows is
still superb. There is still a reminiscent thrill as the Budd throbs
up the grade at Ste-Marguerite. A trip over this remarkable line is
certainly recommended before the present passenger service disap­
pears. It is unquestionably the most enjoyable train ride out of Mon­
treal today.
ACKNOHLEDGEMENTS
The Author would like to thank the following persons and organ­
izations, without whose help this three-part article could not have
been written:
Information, Photographs, Timetables, Etc.
Angus, F. F. Westmount, Montreal, Quebec
Calder, G.F. Sixteen Island Lake, Quebec
Canadian National Railways Montreal Quebec
Canadian Pacific Limited Montreal Quebec
Chgrron, Monsieur St-Sauveur Quebec
Ducharme, Pere Montfortian Fathers Montfort
Guindon, Pere Henri Archivist, Montfortian Fathers
Musee Historique de St-Jerome St-Jerome Quebec
Information:
Montreal Quebec
Quebec
Ottawa
Beatty, J.A.
Latreille, Monsieur
Morrison, Mrs. Donald
(retired CNR agent) St-Sauveur Quebec
Arundel Quebec
Photographs:
Canadian Railroad Historical Association: E.A.Toohey Collection
DeBassecourt, M. Guy Mont Olympia, Piedmont, Quebec
Gagne, M. Jean Sixteen Island Lake, Quebec
Half yard, Mr. Robert Montreal Quebec
Leach, Mr. L.O. Chomedy, Cite de Laval Quebec
McGee, Mr. Paul Edmonton Alberta
Provencher, Mme. Montfort Quebec
Sait, Mr. C.C. Huntingdon, Quebec
Album Souvenir
Montfort Farewell
Montfort Story (The)
Principal Sources:
St-Sauveur des Monts Quebec
CANADIAN RAIL No. 134, June, 1962.
O.S.Lavallee, CANADIAN RAIL No. 135,
July-August, 1962.
Montreal STAR (The) Mr. Fred Roberts column, various dates.
Official Guide of the Railways various issues
Passenger Bulletins, Canadian Pacific Railway various issues
Personal communications
The Tweedsmuir Village Histories-1954
The Author acknowledges with thanks the assistance of Mr.
Denis Latour in the translation of various publications.
SNOWFIGHTING 1971 STYLE: A CANADIAN PACIFIC ROAD SWITCHER NUMBER 8773
heads north with plow extra at Piedmont, Quebec. Phato by the Author.
.
~
~
~
~
~~~ ~~ ~~ ::
g g
~
H

== == == —

!I~
i~~
laWIITHA~
The Ontario & Quebec Railway
David Hales
Photographs by the Author
[I ven though Canadas main line railways
: are generally given all the glory and
= arbitrarily take all the praise just
as if it were their proper due, the
many branch lines which criss-cross our
country have a character and an impor-
tance,as well as a significance of
their own.
One
railway thot might be selected for examination, out of the
many which merit consideration, L,s CP RAILs Havelo_ck Sub.division,
from Glen Tay, west of Smiths Falls ond Perth, Ontario, to Kennedy,
about 12 miles northeast of the Queen City of Toronto. This line was
built under the charter powers of the Ontario and Quebec Railway Com­
pany in 1883-84 and was leased to the Canadian Pacific Railway Com­
pany for 999 years from January, 1884. The O&Q was the Canadian Pa-
cifics successful attempt to break the monopoly on passenger and
freight traffic between southern Ontario and Montreal which, prior
to that time, had been held by the Grand Trunk Railway Company of
Canada.
The Ontorio & Quebec was originally incorporated in 1871 to con­
struct a line of railway between Toronto and Ottawa, via Peterborough,
Madoc and Carleton Place, but it was not until 1881, with George St­
ephen and Duncan McIntyre -both of whom were directars of the Can­
adian Pacific Railway Company in the same year -amang the directors
of the Ontario & Quebec, that construction actually began.
Initially, the O&Q was built from West Toronto to Perth, Ontar­
io, connecting at the latter town with Duncan McIntyres Canada Cen­
tral Railway from Smiths Falls, Carleton Place and Ottawa. Access to
Montreal was obtained by a bridge over the Ottawa to Hull and a
connection there with the Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa and Occidental Ra­
ilway, today CP RAILs North Shore Line between Ottawa and Montreal.
The Ontario & Quebec was opened for business in May 1884 but, as
it was already leased to the CPR, it never purchased any rolling st­
ock or motive power. This was all furnished by the lessor, some of
it being sub-let from the Canada Central Railway. What did it matter?
The revenues all went into the same pocket, that of the CPR.
r
CANADIAN 374 R A I L
The total length of the O&Q s main line from West Toronto to
Perth was 184.1 miles, some of it hard going, as it meandered across
the scenic Lake Ontario escarpment. It was likely these operating
difficulties, together with the lack of population in the territory
through which it ran that encouraged the CPR to look for an alternate
location for its Toronto-Montreal main line and this it found early
in 1913.
The new Lakeshore Line / via Bowmanville, Port Hope and Belle-
ville/ was completed in 1914. Parallelling the Grand Trunk for the
distance from east of Bowmanville to east of Belleville, it then
swept north from the lakeshore to a junction with the O&Q at Glen
Tay. The distance from West Toronto to Perth via this new route was
still 185.4 miles, but the curves were easier and the grades less
steep. And the centres of population along the track were larger.
When the Lakeshore Line was opened for traffic, the O&Q lost
much of its main-line status. Today, the on,ly active portion of the
Ontario and Quebec is that from Kennedy (Toronto) to Tweed, Ontario,
31.2 miles east of Havelock.
Reasonably soon after the main line of the O&Q was opened for
business, the Canadian Pacific began building branches to the north
and west; to Lindsay and Bobcaygeon; to Orillia and Port McNicoll on
Georgian Bay. Another branch was built from Havelock to Blue Moun­t a
in / v iaN e p h ton / but t his was not add e dun til the 1 950 s / 1 954/ to
be precise. The Port McNicoll Subdivision left the O&Q at Bethany
Junction (Dranoel) and the Bobcaygeon Subdivision branches off at
Burketon Junction (Burketon). Today, only the Lindsay and Nephton
branches still have train service, with the employees timetable sh­
owing No regular trains.
Speaking of junctions along the line, one of the more unique was
the encounter with the Kingston and Pembroke Railway at Sharbot Lake.
Once a comparatively busy station on the O&Q/ nothing but memories
remain today.
An interesting feature of the service to Bobcaygeon between the
wars was what was sometimes described as the Bobcaygeon Special .
This was a summer only, weekend service direct from Toronto to Bob­
caygeon/ on the shores of Sturgeon Lake, one of the most beautiful of
the Kawarthas. The train always departed from Toronto Union Station,
but, at one time, the return service on Sunday night operated via
North Toronto.
Initially, there were two night passenger trains each way over
the O&Q/ one from West Toronto to Montreal and the other from Tor­
onto Union Station to Ottawa, via Carleton Place. The former service
was a victim of the Depression Years and the latter made its last
IN THE DAYS OF STEAM, CANADIAN PACIFIC ENGINE NUMBER 1231 WAS THE MO­
tive power on Train 35 At Kaladar, Ontario. 8 December 1952.
Photo Paterson-George Collection
CPR 4-6-2 NUMBER 2224 HEADED AN EXTRA FREIGHT AT HAVELOCK ON AUGUST
9, 1958, before the line was dieselized. Photo Paterson-George ColI.
TRAIN 36 OF CANADIAN PACIFIC, FOR PETERBOROUGH AND HAVELOCK, STORMED
up the hill through Leaside, Ontario on a day in 1940, powered by
engines Numbers 3724 and 2200. Photo Paterson-George Collection.

CANADIAN 378 R A I L
28
WESTWARD TRAINS INFERIOR DIRECTION
SICOND CLASS fiRST CLASS
91 383 381
flrhi PnHnltl pusan,.,
Oallr Sun.onl, o.lIr
u.Sun.
——
f.—–
—–, .
.. __ ….
…………. …………
—-…………….. .. _ …….. …………
……………………
,:.::::.:.:.:..
———
•• 0-•• _ …. .. __ ……
………… . . . . . . . . . . . .
—-….
…………
1900 1645 0510
1915 F1655 F0520
1940 F1707 F0532
1959 81720 80545
2014 F1733 F0558
2023 F1742 0607
………… ………… F1748 F0613
2037 F1754 F0619
2054 F1806 F0631
2124 . F1818 F0643
2140 F1824 F0649
2211 F1832 F0657
2225 F1842 F0707
2235 1850 0715
…. …… ………… ………… . ………..
.. _ …….. …. _ ….
….. …….
………… ………… S1855 80720
1857 0722
Dally SlIn. only O.lIy
n.Sun.
91 383 381
TIME TABLE No, 41. APRIL 29th. 1973
~
i

~
,i
,.
HAVELOCK
SUBDIVISION
STATIONS
.~
i 5~
~i ~I
EASTWARD TRAINS
SUPERIOR DIRECTION
Flltsr CLASS FOUITH CL.A.S.J
380 382 90
u.s,nllt Paulnr Fe1eht
D.lly
u.Sun.
Sun. only Dally
–1———1——1——
62.5
66 …
.TWEI!lO ..
. .. sulik
5.
… z …… 4)
……•..•… Nil
IVANHOE…… l8
-.:.:..:.:…I:.. .. ~.:.. .. .:. .. ~.:.. .. .:. .. ~.BO.:.:.:,N=~W ………… Z …… 38
7 1.8
80 …
89.7
9).7
99.8
108.2
118
.0
121.0
132 …
1l5.2
1
39. I
148.0
. ………… SLAriitoN . . . . . . . . .. . .. …… 19
.0
••..•..•.. HAVELOOB: ..•.•. , .. KZ s
let. Nephton SUb.
6.1
96
••…••…•… NORWooD ……•• ….. . . . . • . 2
9.
o ••••••••••• DmIAN RIVER…. . . . . . .. .. …..• ..
.8
.••••…….. PEIERBORO ….. … KZ B 0 20
.0
…..•…••.••.. OAVAN …• ,. ….••..• ..•… .2
…………. DRAMEL. .RYZ Nil
Jet. BobcaYleoo Sub .
…….. · .. ~::.: .. :… .. :.:.. .. ·:.:..·.:.:..:..:.:I=:.:..
. ………… PONTWooL ….. . . ..••.. 38
Nil
9.
o •••••••••••• BURltETON .•••• …… 15
.J
i9iiO 2259 0130
F1850 F2247 0120
F1840 F2235 0105
81825 82220 0040
1806 F2209 0010
F1759 F2200 0001
1736 F2136 2330
…………… MYRTLPJ.-=.:.. .. .:. .. ~.:… ==:1:::: 11
………. DA6~… ::::::~ ::::::~I.:..==c:….l-=c::..·I:;=–
151·3
161.0
F1724 2124 2315
1719 2119 2305
………… OL~ONT…. 10
7.5
..•…….•. LOOOBT BII.L …. , …… .
_____ … TAPE1diTr ……….. RZ
I.
_____ … TORONTOYARD ….•.. DKW y A
1.2
~ {::~:::~3E;.: … ~:::.:::::~ :~:~:
166.2
173.7
178.9
180
.3
,81. S
181. 6
182 …
Nil
11711 F2111 2255
1710 F2101 2245
1653 2053 2235
Yard-
Yard
Yard ….. . ………..
81648 82048
1646 2046
Rule 939 applles.
D.lIy
n.Sun.
Sun. only Dilly
betw!~I~!~I~~~ :!3~ed.
380 382 90
:run at the conclusion of the Pool-Train service with Canadian Na­
tional Roilways in 1965.
In addition to the through trains, passenger services provided
by the 0&0 over the main line included a Toronto-Tweed local, which
was subsequently cut back to Peterborough. The run was afterwards ex­
tended to Havelock in 1958, when the steam-hauled passenger train was
replaced by BUDD RDC Dayliners,
In the post-World War II era, there were as many as five passen­
ger trains each way daily on the 0&0, despite its quasi-branch-line
status. These included the Havelock-Bobcaygeon mixed, which rattled
over the 18.1 miles to Lindsay .
.. CANADIAN
train at Bobcaygeon,
PACIFIC TEN-WHEELER NUMBER 484 WAS THE POWER FOR THE
Ontario, on a day in july 1959.
MIXED
Photo Paterson-George Collection.

~ THE YARD AT HAVELOCK, ONTARIO, IN OCTOBER 1959 BOASTED OF TWO PASSEN­
ger trains on weekends. On the right is Canadian Pacific Railway Tr­
ain 35-36, the Sunday-only passenger to and from Toronto. On the left
is the Toronto-Peterborough-Havelock local. Not surprisingly, in 1973
the coal chute no longer exists.
Daytime passenger services used to consist of one through train
from Toronto to Montreal, which ran until April 1960, and later, a
curious service between Toronto and Ottawa, which ran for three mon-
ths only in 1965-66. Local services were provided between Toronto
Union Station, Pet-erboro9h and·-Hcivelocl<. For the most-part, this
service continued until 1958 on approximately the following schedule:
7.10 a.m. LV Peterborough AR 8.40 p.m.
9.15 a.m. AR Toronto Union LV 6.30 p.m.
After 1958, the passenger trains terminated at Havelock, 24.3
miles east of Peterborough, presumably for opera~ing reasons, os the
crews were paid mileage. From 1954 to 1969, on additional passenger
service was provided by a fast Budd RDC Dayliner run of 80 minutes
for the 76.4 miles between Toronto Union and Peterborough.
Todays passenger services on the former 0&0 consist of a two­
car RDC Dayliner train, with the majority of passengers travelling
to Toronto from the suburban areas served by the railway. But the
weekend passengers to the Kawartha Lakes area account for the lar­
gest portion of the passenger-miles. On holiday weekends, the con­
sist of this train is usually augmented to three RDC Dayliners.
Over the years, the major portion of on-line freight traffic
has consisted of a large volume of the mineral, nepheline syenite,
from the mine and plant of International Chemical Corporation (Can­
ada) Limited at Nephton, Ontario, 16.3 miles northwest of Havelock
on the Nephton Subdivision. Today, the freight run between Toronto
Yard and Havelock is mode behind a trio of DRS 10 & 12-class units.
CANADIAN 381 R A I L
Frequently in winter, a DRS 18 appears in the lash-up. Although it
is not indicated in the timecard, there is still a daily freight ser­
vice from Havelock to Tweed, 31.2 grass-grown miles further east, with
forest products forming the largest part of the freight traffic.
The O&Qs operating history has not been without incident. In
each of the last two years, service has been interrupted by severe
snowstorms in the winter months. In June 1972, there was a train-
truck collision at a level crossing, which put the two-car RDC Day­
lin e r t r a i n in the d i t c h. The I e a dun it, N u m b e r 9052, had its un –
derframe broken so badly that the unit was scrapped.
While Canadian Pacific Railway RDC Dayliners first appeared
on the O&Q with the introduction of the fast service to Toronto in
1954, today it is hard to say what the future holds for the remain­
ing portions of this pioneer line. The proposed new jumbo-jet air­
port at Pickering will probably take over a good part of the right­
of-way around Claremont and anything which remains in this area will
be engulfed by the new satellite city, expected to be built to the
south.
There is a trend in this age away from the megalopolis to small­
er and less complex centres, with necessary and desirable transport­
ation corridors to the core of the city. GO TRANSIT, with its co­
ordinated passenger services, seems to be evidence of this inclina­
tion. If this concept is adopted, it is reasonable to suppose that
at least a part of the historic Ontario and Quebec Railway will con-
CP RAIL HOLIDAY EXTRA STANDING IN THE STATION AT PETERBOROUGH, ON­
tario in August 1970. RDC ·Dayliners Numbers 9052 and 9063 were the
train. On holiday Mondays, this train operated as an extra.
CANADIAN 382 R A I L
tinue to survive and to offer its important services to the travel­
lers in this part of Ontario .
.. AT THE END OF THE TRACK AT HAVELOCK, ONTARIO, CP RAIL KEPT A SE-
lection of power for the freight trai~s. Units Numbers 8164, 8762
and 8144 burble in the sunlight.
ONE UNLUCKY DAY -17 JUNE 1972 -TRAIN 381 COMPOSED OF RDC DAYLINERS
Numbers 9052 and 9057 was hit by a truck at a level crossing near Pe­
terborough. The point of impact on the side of the first unit is very
obvious. RDC Number 9052 was afterwards scrapped.
NEPHELINE SYENITE IS LOADED INTO COVERED HOPPERS AT THE NEPHTON MINE
of International Chemical Corporation at Nephton, Ontario. The adja­
cent boxcars are used for other commodities to and from the mine.

December 1975
W!YIItLS
SOMEONE ONCE (MISTAKENLY) SAID THAT COMPETITION IS THE ESSENCE OF
business~ In 1974, the OPEC countries effectively dis-
proved this antique axiom. In the first quarter of 1975,
several companies and/or agencies in Canada were re-disproving it
allover again. Air Canada, Canadian National and Airtransit were
all hard at work competing for passengers between Montreal and Otta­
wa, while Rapido, Turbo and Rapidair kept hacking away at each other
for the Montreal-Toronto passenger business. In southern Ontario,
hardly anyone noticed CNs TempoTrains trying to make a go of it
against highway bus and Air Canadas intercity jet services.
With Canada Post becoming less and less reliable,Canadian
National introduced RAPIDEX on March 24, 1975, between Central Sta­
tion, Montreal and Union Station, Toronto. This new rail express ser­
vice was for piece shipments -parcels to you and me -weighing 50
Ibs. or less. If you wanted to send a parcel containing just about
anything from a letter to a litter, you just took it to CNs Central
5 tation between 0800 and 2000 and, 10 and behold., it was at the
pick~up counter in Union Station, Toronto, as early as 0900 the
following morning. And, of course, vice-versa.
RAPIDEX-PLUS, introduced 14 April, provided second-day
service between Montreal and Halifax, N.S. and St. Johns, Newfound­
land (so it said) as well as from Toronto to Winnipeg, Edmonto nand
Vancouver. Third-day service, weekends excluded, was assured between
western air-head points and Montreal and between Toronto and air-head
points inthe Maritimes. J.M.Ford, CNs system manager of express
marketing, said that RAPIDEX-Station rates were not only competitive,
but, in some cases, were cheaper than other similar services now
provided between Montreal and Toronto. Obviously, RAPIDEX-Station is
a CN service, while RAPIDEX-PLUS is a joint CN-Air Canada venture.
The Competition could be CN Express, CP Express, private highway and
air express companies or Canada Post, with the latter (dis)organiza­
tion currently most vulnerable.
This highly competitive situation, apparently ratified
by the Canadian Transport Commission, seemed to be somewhat at var­
iance with Transport Minister Marchands objective of rationalizing
rail passenger services, to eliminate unnecessary competition for
transcontinental passengers, not wishing to travel by Air Canada;
such passengers do qualify Canadas two major railways for federal
government subsidies for essential passenger train services.
S.S.Worthen.
GO GOES~ AT THE BEGINNING OF APRIL 1975, GO TRANSITS BARRIE-
Toronto, Ontario, passenger service was averaging twice as
many riders each way as when it started a year ago. The
number of riders had risen to 190 each way, compared to the 95 rid­
ing the train last April. There are six stops on the 63-mile route.
More passengers, and perhaps more stops, are anticipated.
Dave Scott.
CANADIAN 385 R A I L
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS HAS RECEIVED PERMISSION FROM THE CANADIAN
Transport Commission to abandon the Blewett SjD, 20.8 mi­
les from Luxton (junction with the Lampman SiD) to Blewett
in southeastern Saskatchewan. Lampman is on the CN s main line from
Northgate to Regina and Saskatoon.
THE TORONTO TRANSIT COMMISSION SIGNED AN AGREEMENT IN AUGUST 1975,
for the purchase of 200 modern streetcars, to cost $ 98
million. The detailed design and first 10 cars were to be
produced in Switzerland, with eight Canadian companies bidding on the
production of the remaining 190 vehicles. The streetcars were to be
designed and constructed with a propulsion system for use on private
rights-of-way at speeds up to 70 mph., according to the Toronto GLOBE
& MAIL. The initial 10 vehicles were to be delivered in 1977 and the
remainder by 1979. The new cars were expected to be used first on the
prw from the new eastern terminal of the Bloor-Danforth subway line
at Eglinton and Kennedy Road to the Scarborough Town Centre.
The Ontario Ministry of Transportation and Communications will
purchase 75 of the 200 new cars, leasing them to the TTC for five
years at $ 1 per car per year. The TTC will purchase the remaining
125 streetcars assisted by a 75% subsidy from the Government of On­
tario.
SINCE APRIL 28, 1975, NATIVE STUART-TREMBlEUR CANADIANS HAVE BLOCKED
the main line of the British Columbia Railways Dease la­
ke line near their village, about 120 miles northwest of
Prince George, British Columbia. A great deal of controversy has
surrounded the location of this railway since it was proposed and
inadvertantly, the route selected crossed seven small reserves with­
out signing a formal agreement with the owners of the land.
Before the line was built, the BCOl offered the Canadians a
land exchange, more than 300 times the 300 acres taken by the rail-
way. The land-owners agreed to this, but the havoc caused subsequent­
ly by the railway builders made the land-owners reconsider this deal.
The agreement was signed in 1969 and the railway was completed
through the reserves in 1973. The land-owners claim that the original
agreement was only an agreement in principle and should now (1973)
be renegotiated. After four different provincial ministers had tried
in vain to reach an agreement with the land-owners, the barricade on
the railway went up on April 28 1975.
Alfred Nunweiler, Minister responsible for Northern Affairs,did
not attend a meeting scheduled for that date and that was when the
barricade was erected.
On 15 August 1975, the B.C.Government threatened to open the
rail line by other means. The land-owners capitulated. The Province
has set a deadline of August 15 for acceptance of the land exchange
offer and $ 50,000 for damage caused by rail construction. The Na­
tive Canadians think the value of resources opened to the railway is
about $ 7 million and thats what they are asking the Government of
British Columbia.
The three-and-a-half month blockade has caused embarrassment to
the BCOl and financial apprehension to the various industries located
along the line.
While the tracks are clear once more, the native Canadians have
passed a bylaw fining trespassers ( i.e., BCOl crews) on these re­
per­
the
serves $ 100. This could cost the BCOl $ 700 for a single run if
mission to cross the reserves was denied. The next move is up to
British Columbia government.
CANADIAN 386 R A I L
FROM SYDNEY, NOVA SCOTIA, BARRIE MACLEOD WRITES THAT THE LABOUR DAY
excursion on the Cape Breton Steam Railway and Canadian
National Railways from Glace Bay to North Sydney was a
HUGE success. CBSR steam engines Numbers 42 and 926 brought three
cars out of Glace Bay at 1300 and picked up an additional four cars
at Sydney for the balance, of the run to North Sydney. There were
more than 300 passengers on board.
The next long run for the CBSR equipment will be on Oc­
tober 13, 1975, wh.en a special train will be run from Glace Bay/S ydney
to Iona on Grand Narrows, about 55 miles west of Sydney.
Barrie also tells us that during August 1975, DEVCO RS 1 was
severely damaged by fire while working in Assembly Yard, which
is located midway between Sydney Junction and Victoria Junction. The
fire started in a traction motor of Number 207 and spread through the
engine. In September, no decision had been taken as to the disposition
of the unit.
REFERRING TO THE ARTICLE ON THE BRANDON, SASKATCHEWAN AND HUDSON BAY
Railway by John Todd in the August 1975 issue Number 283 .
of CANADIAN RAIL, Mr. B. Biglow of Montreal notes that
the BS&HB may have owned the first gas-electric locomotive in west­
ern Canada. A thesis written by Mr. R. Noonan in 1933 for the De­
partment of Electrical Engineering of the University of Manitoba dis­
cusses a Great Northern Railway locomotive operating between Devils
Lake, North Dakota and Brandon. The engine had one 8-cylinder 800 hp.
1200 rpm. gas engine with General Electric (lemp style) generator and
traction motors. ..
It would be very much appreciated if any reader who has
additional details on this unit would send them to the Editor for
publication in a future issue of CANADIAN RAIL.
THE MICHIGAN CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY, UNWILLINGLY A PART OF THE
ailing Penn Central Transportation Company, has been au­
thorized by the U.S. federal government to initiate stud­
ies of the possibility of leaving the Penn Central system either to
pursue an independent existence or to join some other solvent rail­
road system in the United States. The l,007-mile Michigan Central is
one of the most profitable portions of the Penn Central and much
0f its trackage is scheduled for inclusion in the U.S. federal govern­
ment~s proposed Consolidated Rail Corporation.
RIDING THROUGH KINGSTON, ONTARIO ON CANADIAN NATIONAl RAILWAYS TURBO
late in April 1975, John Welsh noticed that the rails laid
on concrete ties on the new S-curve just east of the sta­
tion at Kingston Junction were still rusty, suggesting that nothing
very heavy or very frequent had yet run over the Kingston Kink as
yet. The new station at Kingston, some distance to the west at the
intersection of Counter and Kings Streets was ready for business,
with the parking lot paved and white lines painted. Perhaps one of
our members in the area can supply the date the new station and di­
version were opened and the first passenger train to use same.
REMEMBER THE TORONTO, HAMILTON & BUFFALO RAILWAYS FREIGHT WRECK NEAR
Welland, Ontario in December 1972, when 23 cars left the
rails? Some of the tank cars contained sulphuric acid and
about 200,000 gallons of the highly corrosive liquid spilled onto
adjacent farmlands, effectively poisoning the soil until snow-melt
and spring rains had diluted it to a no effect level.
,
CANADIAN 387 R A I L
On April 21, 1975, the Roilwoy Tronsport Committee
that no couse could be deter~ined for the derail~ent. However,
missioner John Magee said that he wos inclined to believe that
wheel from one of the tank_cors was badly ~ounted (?) Clnd ~ay
fallen off (?) when the brakes were applied, causing the wreck.
soid
COIII_
o
have
The TH&B ~ointoined that the wheels, mounted by Hawker
Siddeley Canado Li~ited, Trenton, Novo Scotio, caused the accident.
Hawker Siddeley Canada said that the wheel come loose as a result of
the derailment. Simultaneously, lawyers representing two formers wh_
ose land wos poisoned said that civil action for damages hod been
storted, but Mr. Lawrence West, representing Mr. Bertram Poth, soid
that the Province of Ontorio had refused his requests in the lost .5
years to see the Provincial Government report on acid damage to the
soil. Hamilton Spectotor via John Welsh.
PIE
RRE PATENAUDE REMINDS US THAT CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS ORDER
for 35 GP 40-2 (L)(coillfort cob) units from Diesel Division
of General Motors of Conoda Li~ited was delivered between 24
February and 27 March 1975. The builders nVllben were A-3166 th_
rough A_3200 and the rood nUilIbers were·9531 through 9565.
CN designated these units closs GF_430c and assigned Num­
bers 9531 through 9554 to Toronto Yard and Numbers 9555 through 9565
to Montreal Yard.
Pierre photographed Number 9542 at Montreal Yard on Horch
9, 1975, less than two weeks out of GM of Canadas Diesel Division
shops at London, Ontario.
-::.;::.—-
===
~ THIS INTRIGUING PICTURE FROM THE PUBLIC ARCHIVES OF CANADA IS UNFOR-
tunately incorrectly identified as Crow Eogle_Piegon, from E.S.Cur­
tis book The North American Indian. The Indian looks like a Bold­
~in 2-6_0, posslbly norrow-gouga. Any reader who can supply a more
positive identification is urged to write to the Editor so that addi­
tional information may be published in a future issue of CANADIAN
RAIL. Photo C 198B5: Public Archives of Canada.
I
Canadan Rail
is pOOIished monlhly by the
CMadian Railroad Historical Association
PQ.8 Editor;S.5.Worthen
Association Branches
CALGARY & SOOTH WESTERN
L.H.Unin, Secretary 1727 23rd. Av,ne N.W. Calgo.y, Alto,T2K lV6
OTTAWA
W.R.Linley,SecretaY P.O.llo 141,5toton A Otto,o,Conodo K1N 8Vl
PACIFIC
COAST
R,H.Heye, Secr .. tary P.D,lla~ l006,StoHan A Vanca,ve.,8.C,V6C 2Pl
ROCKY HOONTAIN
J .H.Helk Ie ,Secretory, P. O. Ilo~ 6102,5 tot ion C, Ed.onton, Al to. T 58 4K5
TORONTO &. YORK DIVI5ION
P.5huIIOld,Secutary P.D.Bu 5849,Teulnal A Toronto,Ont,H5W lP3
VlSitlhll Canadian Railway Museum St.ConsIant,OueOe<;,Canada.
-~ than IOOpieces 01 ~ on disPlay-

Demande en ligne