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Canadian Rail 285 1975

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Canadian Rail 285 1975

Canadian Rail ~
No. 285
October 1975
–.-
/
r iTI ;,
.,
~
,
PART II
G.A.Moore
Part I of Mr. Moores two-part article appeared
in the July 1975 issue Number 282 of CANADIAN
RAIL.
THE HARVEST RIPENS -THE 18905.
The number of people immigrating to western Canada declined sh­
arply in the early 1890s. This was the result of many factors, in­
cluding better times in Great Britain and increasingscompetition for
a share of the emigrating classes by other countries. In addition,
lower prices for farm produce in Canada acted as an additional de­
terrent. The weather also failed to cooperate;6there was a succes­
sion of dry seasons and damaging early frosts. A lack of available
land, south of Riding Mountain district, was another contributing
factor.
But, as the 90s unfolded, the situation improved steadily and,
once again, there was considerable activity in the construction of
new railway lines and the extension of existing ones. The Canadian
Pacific Railway opened the Souris Branch from Kenmay to Oxbow, Sask­
atchewan in 1892, this branch being the direct result of the failure
of the Northern Pacific & Manitoba Railway to honour an agreement
with the Government of Manitoba to extend their Souris Branch to the
coal fields in the southwestern part of the province. In 1890, the
Government of Manitoba asked the Canadian Pacific to complete this
railway.
TYPICAL OF HUNDREDS OF RAILWAY STATIONS IN MANITOBA ON BOTH CANADIAN
main-line railways was the Canadian Pacific Railway station located
at Elkhorn, Manitoba, 197.2 miles west of Winnipeg. Built in 1904,
this standard design station was closed when it was photographed
in 1971 and was subsequently sold on January 18, 1972 and thereafter
demolished. Photo courtesy of G.A. Moore.
THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAYS SECOND PASSENGER STATION AT WINNIPEG,
Manitoba, as it appeared in 1897, with a train of harvester excur­
sionists, apparently just arrived. A horse-drawn streetcar of the
Winnipeg street railway system has also arrived at the station. One
line of the street railway crosses the CPRs main line; the other,
not yet extended to cross the railway, is protected by a pair of ra­
ther inadequate stop-blocks. Photo courtesy Archives of Manitoba.
CANADIAN 296 R A I L
In addition, the Canadian Pacific opened the Glenboro Extension
from Napinka to Deloraine and the Pipestone Extension from Schwitzer
Junction to Reston, both in 1892. The CPR completed its Waskada Br­
anch from Deloraine to Waskada in 1899, extended the Arbourg Sub­
division from Stonewall (Mile 19.8) to Teulon in December 1898 and
the Snowflake Branch was opened from Wood Bay to Snowflake, in the
south-central portion of the province, in November 1899.
The subject of coal mining in Manitoba and its influence on
railway construction merits closer consideration. Although deposits
of coal were discovered in southwestern Manitoba and southeastern
Saskatchewan, the story of coal mining in the former area is brief:
In Manitoba, there was promise at one time of a
mine at the west end of Turtle Mountain, south
of Goodlands. About 1890, several holes were
bored and a shaft put down; for some reason the
industry was discouraged. South of Deloraine ,
coal has been token from a couple of thin seams
for several y,ars, but there has been no contin­
uous mining.
Despite the Manitoba governments request for railway lines to
transport the coal, no viable industry was ever established.
With the coming of the Northern Pacific & Manitoba, other rail­
ways soon appeared on the scene to compete directly or indirectly
with the Canadian Pacific. Before studying these additional lines,
. an ~~9mination of the NP&M in the 1890s shows that their Winnipeg-
1:.;P~r,f;~~e La Prairie branch was alr~ady in full opera~ion. The Hartney
_-:,Ju/11,c..ljl,:i},on-Argue branch, completed ln 1898, was the llne that event­
~:uamY:~lailed to reach the Manitoba-Saskatchewan coal fields •
. ::-,
The Great North West Central Railway Company, leased to the
adian Pacific in 1900, was opened for operation from Chater to
iota in 1890. This railway was chartered to build to Battleford,
atchewan, via Souris, but the CPR leased it before it was able
build that far.
Can­
Ham­
Sask-
to
The Lake Manitoba Railway and Canal Company amalgamated with the
Winnipeg Great Northern Railway Company in December 1898. The former
company had been chartered in 1889 to build a railway from Portage
La Prairie to Lake Manitoba and to improve water communication be­
tween Lakes Manitoba and Winnipegosis and the North Saskatchewan Ri­
ver. The railway portion of the enterprise was opened from Gladstone
to Sifton in 1897 and from Sifton Junction to Winnipegosis ln the
same year.
The Winnipeg Great Northern was originally organized in 1880 as
the Winnipeg and Hudsons Bay Railway and Steamship Company, to build
a railway from Winnipeg to Port Nelson on Hudson Bay. In 1887, the
and Steamship portion of the corporate title was dropped and, in
1894, the company name was amended to the Winnipeg Great Northern
Railway Company. Their line was opened for service from Sifton Junc­
tion to Cowan in 1898 and from Cowan to Swan River in 1899.
These two railways were destined to be of greater significance
to Canada than to Manitoba, for they were the two railways, amalga­
mated on 13 January 1899, which formed the first portion of the
Canadian Northern Railway Company, which was, by 1915, Canadas sec­
ond longest and most aggressive railway system.
The Manitoba and South Eastern Railway Company received its ch­
arter in 1889, to construct a line from Winnipeg in the direction de-
CANADIAN 297 R A I L~
scribed in its corporate title, towards the International Boun:dary
in the direction of the Lake of the Woods. It was, of course, a Mac­
kenzie and Mann (Canadian Northern) undertaking, intended to provide
the eastward main line from Winnipeg to Port Arthur and Toronto. Con-
struction began in 1898 and the line was completed and o~ened for
service over the 109.04 miles to the International Boundary near
Sprague on 2 December 1900. The Company was amalgamated with the
Canadian Northern effective 4 May 1900.
Immigration to Manitoba increased somewhat in the mid-90s, but
its traditional pattern had changed, with a significant percentage of
new Canadians now coming from countries other than the United King­
dom. Waves of Ukranian immigrants swept into Manitoba in 1897, 1898
and 1899, the people settling mainly in the northwest portions of the
province. By the end of 1897, available land was scarce and it grew
moreso as the turn of the century approached.
Railways were constructed rapidly across the prairies west of
Winnipeg and stations of varying shapes and sizes were erected along
the tracks. In the first few months after a new line was opened,
it was usually considered sufficient to ground an old boxcar on
the station site, providing the bare necessities for the agents sur­
vival and the care and handling of passengers, their baggage, express
and freight. A pioneer of the era recalls:
The station on wheels soon arrived and was placed on a small
tra~k behind the platform; apparently an old boxcar converted
for use by the B&B gang.
It had an office at one end,a bedroom at the op­
posite end, and the space in the centre was intended for
use as a passenger waiting room and storage for freight
and baggage. The total length of the car was about 36
feet. Two bunks in the sleeping quarters were torn out
so that it could be made into a regular bedroom. When
the two bunks were ripped from the walls, thousands of
dead bugs fell to the floor, the result of a previous
fumigation.
A sec~nd boxcar reached Pierson soon after and was
placed at the end of the first car to be used for stor­
age of freight and baggage.
The two cars served as a railway station for two years
when a nice station was built in 1897 with good living ac­
commodation.8
Canadian Pacific Railway records show that, with the ex­
ception of principle towns and villages, very few permanent stations
were built prior to 1900. Most were built after that time.Many towns
depending of course on their state of prosperity, local politics and
sundry other matters, were awarded beautiful station structures,sur­
rounded in time by lush floral gardens and trimmed hedges, the re­
sult of scrupulous maintenance by the agent. Other towns made do,
through the years, with the aforementioned old boxcars or other por­
table structures, converted to suit the needs of the railway, not the
aspirations of the citizens.
The basic collection of station plans of the Canadian Pacific
Railway was large and the imagination of the station designers pro­
duced some very interesting results. The roof of the station at Hart­
ney, for instance, was a sight to behold, with its tear-drop style
peak. The mojority of these fine buildings stood in lonely splendour
in many towns, the most striking building for miles around.They were
. I
; ~
CANADIAN 298 R A I L
frequently built with the finest British Columbia timber and, in some few
instances, this is the case even today. Following the decline of
the branch-line passenger train however, the railway station hod
outlived its usefulness and today is fast disappearing from the pr­
a~r~e landscape. Fortunately, some of these stations have been pre­
served as museums, community halls or even as private dwellings, but,
alas, these preserved stations are very few indeed.
Tor e cop i t u 1 ate: the 1 890 s 0 r G a y 90 s as the y we rep 0 p u 1 a r 1 y
called, represented a period when first-closs railway travel meant
precisely that and was unequaled in its plush and panelled elegance.
Sleeping cars, a popular innovation on medium-distance trains, were
being built as fast as the car builders could turn them out and tr­
avel on luxurious transcontinental expresses promised pleasures nev­
er to be exceeded in the decades to come.
THE TWENTIETH CENTURY -THE 1900S.
The Twentieth Century brought yet another boom to western Can­
ada, with the majority of new immigrants travelling right through
Manitoba, seeking their fortunes in the country further west. Des­
pite this inevitable circumstance, since available farmland was fast
disappearing in Manitoba, the province did receive a proportion of
the new Canadians.
In the decade 1900-1910, more miles of railway were constructed
in Manitoba than in any other similar period. Branch lines were lo­
cated and built primarily to encourage settlement on the prairies
and to transport the agricultural products of these new areas. This
is not to say that agriculture wa6 the sole justification for these
new lines; minerals, mainly cool, in the period about 1900 were also
a justification for these new lines.
The CPR further extended its Pipestone Branch from Reston to
Antler, Saskatchewan in 1900 and began construction of the Lauder-
Westerly branch from Lauder to Alida, Saskatchewan in 1906. The
Waskada Branch from Waskada to Lyleton was opened in 1903 and the
Boissevain-Louder Branch from Songer to Louder commenced operation
in 1913. The Varcoe Branch grew from McGregor to Wellwood in 1901,
Wellwood to Brookdale in 1903 and Brookdale to Varcoe in 1905. The
Virden Branch was opened from Virden to Two Creeks in 1910 and the
Pheasant Hills Branch from Kirkella to Neudorf, Saskatchewan was com­
pleted in 1904. The Kalieda Branch was opened for service from Rud­
yard to Kalieda in 1906.
As previously mentioned, the Northern Pacific & Manitoba Rail­
way extended its line from Argue to Hartney in 1900. The main line
of the Great North West Central Railway, leased to the Canadian Pa­
cific in the same year, built from Hamiota to Miniota in 1900 and
its Lenore Extension was opened in 1903, from Forrest to Lenore.
The Morden and North Western Railway Campany, incorporated 29
March 1901 and amalgamated with the Canadian Northern effective 21
THE WINTERTIME-1896 ARRIVAL OF THE FIRST TRAIN OF THE LAKE MANITOBA
Railway & Canol Company at Dauphin, Manitoba, created quite a stir
among the youngsters. The LMR&CCo. was one of the components of the
Canadian Northern Railway Company, subsequently.
Photo courtesy Archives of Manitoba.

CANADIAN 300 R A I L
RAILWAY
Northern pacific
& Manitoba R1y.
Lake Manitoba Rly.
& Canal Co.
Winnipeg Great
Northern R1y.
Manitoba &
Southeastern Rly.
Morden & North­
western R1y.
portage & North­
western Rly.
Western Extension
Railway
Mi~land R1y. Co.
of Manitoba.
Brandon, Sasr.atch­
ewan & Hudsons
Bay Railway
Grand Trunk pacific
Railway
Canadian Northern
Railway
TABLE C -CHARTERS GRANTED TO RAILWAYS IN MANITOBA
FROM
Morris
Winnipeg
Hartney Jct.
Argue
Gladstone
Sifton Jct.
Sifton
Sifton
Jct.
Cowan
St. Boniface
Marchand
Sprague
Hallboro
Neepawa
Portage L.P.
portage L.P.
Oakland
Greenway
portage L.P.
Thunderhill Jct.
portage L.P.
Haskett
TO PLACED IN
OPERATION
Brandon 1889
portage Laprairie 1889
Argue
Hartney
Sifton
Winnipegosis
Sifton Jct.
Cowan
Swan River
Marchand
Sprague
Rainy River
Neepawa
Clanwilliam
Beaver
Oakland
Delta
Adelpha
Brandon Jct.
Sask. Bdry.
Gretna
Morden
1898
1900
1896
1897
1896
1898
1899
1898
1900
1900
1902
L903
1900
1900
1900
1905
1905
1906
1908
International Bdry. Brandon
1908
Winnipeg
P. La Prairie
Swan River
Carman Jct.
Beaver
North Jct.
P. La Prairie
Birney
Carman
Neepawa
Grandview
portage La Prairie
Sask. Boundary
Erwood, Sask.
Carman
Gladstone
Grandview
Delta
McCreary Junction
Leary!;;
MCCreary Junction
Kamsack, Sask.
1909
1907
1900
1901
1901
1902
1900
1903
1903
1903
1904
I
(
CANADIAN 301 R A I L
OTHER THAN CANADIAN PACIFIC (1870 TO 1910)
DATE OF
AUTHORITY
1889
1889
1880
1889
1901
1899
NOTES
A subsidiary of Northern Pacific (USA), assumed operation
of the Red River Valley Railway in 1888. 1
Amalgamated in 1898 with Winnipeg Great Northern Rly.
under new name of Canadian Northern Railway.
Original charter granted to Winnipeg & Hudsons Bay Rly.
& Steamship Co. Name changed to wpg. Great Northern in
1894. Amalgamated with Lake Manitoba Rly. & Canal Co.
and named the Canadian Northern Rly. in 1899.
Amalgamated with Canadian Northern in 1901.
Amalgamated with Canadian Northern in 1903.
A subsidiary of Northern pacific (USA), turned over to
Canadian Northern under long-term lease in 1901; assumed
by successor CNR in 1919.
1
1903 Amalgamated with Canadian Northern in 1903.
1903
1903
1903
1899
Jointly owned by Great Northern and Northern pacific (USA).
Purchased by Manitoba Great Northern July 1/09.
Subsidiary of Great Northern (USA).
Turned over to Canadian Nationai
Railways in 1919.
Originally formed through amalgam­
ation of Lake Man. Rly. & ~anal ~O.
& Wpg. Great Northern in 1899. Con­
solidated with other railwaya to
be<.:ome Canadian National RaihoJays i~)
1919.
CANADIAN 302
winnipeg & Northern
Hartney
Clanwilliam
Brandon Jct.
Learys
Brandon
Emerson
Rossburn
Swan River
st. Boniface
Russell
Ochre River
Moore
Railway Co. Parkmount
Grand Marais
R A I L
Virden
Rossburn
carberry Jct.
Somerset
McCallum, Sask.
S.outh Junction
RusseJ.l
Benito
Dundee Junction
Calder, Sask.
Ste. Rose du Lac
Oak point
Grand Beach
Victoria Beach
1905
1905
1905
1905
1907
1907
1
908
1908
1909
1910
1910
1905
1914
1916
Source: Canadian National Railways -Volume II by G. R. Stevens.
NOTE 1 _ Order-In-Council Dec. 22/02 approves amalgamation of portage
the winnipeg Transfer Railway Co. and the Waskada and North
~~~: :-.);-i~!!!. ; … g~~.-. ————————————–­
;4(:·:::iflE(~ruary 1903, was opened from Carman Junction to Sperling on 5 Oc­
·?(:>t:?!-iqer 1901 and Hallboro to Neepawa on 13 November 1902. The exten-
:,,: ·.-;h; Junction to Clan William (20.2 miles) were opened on 12 July and 22
November 1903, respectively, after amalgamation with the Canadian
Northern.
The Canadian Northern, chartered by the Government of Canada in
1899, resulted from an amalgamation of the Lake Manitoba Railway and
Canal Company and the Winnipeg Great Northern Railway Company, as
noted above. The new Company lost little time in establishing its
presence in Manitoba. It built new lines and extended existing ones.
A complete list of its lines is too lengthy to detail here, but a
listing for the first decade of its existence is given in Table C
of the Appendix.
The Western Extension Railway Company was incorporated by the
Government of Manitoba on 18 March 1903 and was amalgamated with the
Canadian Northern in Octaber of the same year. Construction progres­
sed from Portage La Prairie to M&B Junction, near Brandon, and this
77-mile line was opened in May and October 1905. The portion from
Greenway to Adelpha and Thunderhill Junction to the Saskatchewan bo­
undary was opened for traffic on 1 April 1906. Although beyond the
1910 limit of this study, the last line built by the Western Exten­
sion was from Hallboro to Beulah, opened on 24 June 1911. The station
at this latter place still stands, a few hundred feet from the end
of track. The original plans for the Western Extension were very am­
bitious; however, it entered the scene of competitive railroading too
late to achieve any real success and it never fulfilled the stated
aims of its charter which read, in part:
to build from Sperling on the Canadian Northern
Railway southerly and easterly to Morris, then to a
CANADIAN 303 R A I L
1906
(Toronto 1962).
& North western Rly. Co., the Northern Pacific & Manitoba Rly.,
Eastern Rly. Co. under the name of Manitoba Railway Company.
point on the Canadian Northern Railway between Ste.
Ann and the northern boundary of the province; from
a point on the Manitoba Railway between Winnipeg and
Portage La Prairie to Brandon; from Swan River along
the valley of the Swan River to the western boundary
of the province; from Minto to Melita, etc.; from
Greenway to the International Boundary; from Fairfax
to Souris, etc.; from Neepawa to Brandon and from
a point on the Canadian Northern Railway Company sou-
th of Neepawa to the western boundary of the pro-
vince, etc …
The Midland Railway Company of Manitoba, incorporated provin-
cially in 1903, was a venture in joint ownership by the Great Nor­
thern and Northern Pacific Railways of the United States. Lines were
built from Portage La Prairie to Gretna and from Haskett to Morden.
On 1 July 1909, the Midland was purchased by the Manitoba Great Nor­
thern Railway, mentioned above. The Midland retained its switching
trackage in Winnipeg and subsequently obtained running rights over
the Canadian National Railways line from Portage Junction (Winnipeg)
to the International Boundary at Emerson.
The Brandon, Saskatchewan and Hudso~Bay Railway was also char­
tered in 1903, building from the International Boundary at Range 16-
18 to Brandon in 1908. This company was a subsidiary of the Great
Northern Railway (USA) and was admirably described by Mr. John Todd
in his article Jim Hills Canadian Railway in the August 1975 is­
sue Number 283 of CANADIAN RAIL.
During the ensuing years, the importance of the branch lines
criss-crossing the southern half of manitoba diminished considerably.
Passenger service on all of the branch lines described in this study
is now non-existent, a situation which is directly attributable to
the automobile and the modern highway system. Farmers are, in the
t
IN THE EARLY PART OF THIS CENTURY, PRAIRIE
cars at a multitude of sidings. One of the
luth,Winnipeg and Pacific Railroad and the
Northern Railway cars. Photo CP Limited,
GRAIN WAS LOADED INTO BOX
boxcars is from the Du­
other two are Canadian
coll. G.A.Moore.
majority of instances, now trucking their grain to elevators located
on secondary or primary main-line sidings and, because of the heavier
weight on axles of loaded covered hoppers, old grain elevators are
disappearing from branch lines that cannot support these heavyweight
cars at a steady rate. Some of the branch lines have not seen a tr­
ain in years and such is the fate of Canadian Pacifics Carman Sub­
division, between Carman and Kronsgart, which has not been used since
1964, although it is still included in the 27 October 1974 CP RAIL
employees timetable.
On 1 January 1896, Charles Melville Hays was appointed General
Manager of the Grand Trunk Railway Company of Canada. Tragically lost
in the S.S.Titanic disaster of 1912, Mr. Hays had been proposed as
the president and general manager of a new transcontinental railway,
to be built from Moncton, New Brunswick to Winnipeg and onward to
Port Simpson on the Pacific Ocean, north of todays Prince Rupert.
The entire line was to be known as the National Transcontinental Ra­
ilway and was to have an eastern division and a western division.
The National Transcontinental Railway Act was promulgated in
1903 and the western division was incorporated in the same year as
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company. The first sod in the con­
struction of the GTP was turned at 0600 hours, 29 August 1905, at a
point described as being some 15 miles north of Carberry, Manitoba.
Although the various construction contracts stipulated that the
GTP was to be ready for operation by 1 December 1908, a shortage of
manpower was the main cause for delay. By the terminal date, the
roadbed had been completed from Winnipeg to Wolf Creek, 121 miles to
CANADIAN 305 R A I L
the west of Edmonton, Alberta. Difficulty had been experienced in
obtaining rail and train service between Manitoba and Alberta did
not begin until 12 February 1911. The first regular service between
Winnipeg and Portage La Prairie began on 2 January 1909, although
service between Portage La Prairie and the Saskatchewan boundary had
started somewhat earlier in 1907.
Unlike the Canadian Pacific and the Canadian Northern, the Grand
Trunk Pacific was built without the benefit of land-grants from the
federal government, but the latter did offer other concessions. The
GTP and the NTR were generally acclaimed as the finest long-distance
railway ever built in North America. Eighty-five-pound rail was used
throughout, instead of the more generally used 65-pound-per-yard type
of that day. The prairie portion of the GTP had a maximum eastward
grade of only 0.4% and a westward maximum of 0.5%.
The Grand Trunk Pacific adopted a remarkably simple procedure
for naming the towns, sidings and operating points along its main li­
ne west. West from Portage La Prairie, they were assigned names in
alphabetical order from A to Z. This unique situation was described
in detail in the article Alphabetical Station Stops by S.S .Worthen
in the July 1974 issue Number 270 of CANADIAN RAIL. An inspection of
a modern map of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta will reveal that
there are still a few stations on the CN main line in their nearly
original order, with the alphabetical cycle, somewhat fragmented,
being repeated three times from Portage La Prairie to Edmonton.
~ PAINT IS PEELING FROM THE WALLS OF THIS CLASSIC NATIONAL TRANSCONTI­
nental Railway station at Elma, Manitoba, east of Winnipeg. This part
of the NTR was opened in 1910. The photograph was taken in October,
1973 by G.A.Moore.
CANADIAN 306 R A I L
Although it planned to build branch lines 1 the GTP never con-
structed any in Manitobo
l
probably because of the lack of financial
support from the provincial government 1 the latter being already
heavily committed to support the rival Canadian Northern Railway.
By agreement
l
the GTP shared the Canadian Northerns extensive ter­
minal facilities in Winnipeg
l
the present Union Station being com­
pleted in 1911.
The name Canadian National Railways was authorized by the Gov­
ernment of Canada in 1918 to d~signate operating procedure of the
Canadian Northern Railway Company and the entrusted Canadian Govern­
ment Railwaysl the latter composed of the Intercolonial
l
National
Transcontinental and sundry other small railways in the Maritime Pr­
ovinces
l
Qubec and Ontario. The Cunadian National Railway Company was
incorporated on 6 June 1919 for the purpose of consolidating the
above railways. The Grand Trunk Railway Company of Canada was amal-
gamated with the Canadian National Railway Company on 31 Ja~uary 1923.
EPILOGUE.
During the forty years from 1870 to 1910
1
most of todays rail­
ways in Manitobo)Yere built and this pe_-riod rightfulLy deserves the
title of the Railway Era in Manitoba. New lines were built/through
the years
l
with perhaps the most ambitious project being the Hudson
Bay Railway from The Pas
l
Manitoba to Churchill on Hudson Bay. The
509.89-mile line was completed by the Canadian National in 1928-1929
and the first train over the whole line operated on 14-16 Septemberl
1929. This remarkable railway has added new branches over the years
l
to serve new mining communities in northern Manitoba.
The experience gained in the construction of the Hudson Bay
Railway is being used today to evaluate the possibility of building
a railway down the Mackenzie River Valley from Hay River to Aklavik
in the North West Territories.
Several smaller railways were built subsequently in Manitoba to
serve power projects along the Winnipeg River and to assist in the
construction and maintenance of the City of Winnipegs aqueduct from
the Lake of the Woods.
The diminishing importance of branch lines to the ~gricultural
industry of Manitoba has already been mentioned. There ~Sl however 1
a new emphasis on more diversified industry for the province/of both
primary and secondary type. Indeed
l
new industry has been established
in various sections and
l
in some instances 1 this has led to a recon-
sideration by the railways of their abandonment proposals 1 thereby
stimulating further studies to determine whether or not existing
branch lines should be retained and rehabilitated. The final decis­
ion to abandon branch lines -and it would appear that close to 90%
of all such lines in Manitoba have been petitioned for abandonment -_
should not be made in haste. Both federal and provincial governments
ALTHOUGH NOT POSITIVELY IDENTIFIEDI THIS APPEARS TO BE A $00 LINE
passenger train southbound across the International Boundary at
Emerson
l
Manitoba
l
about 1910. The white sign
l
beside the track
l
apparently marks the boundary line. Photo courtesy Archives of
Manitoba.

..
CANADIAN NATIONALS STATION AT WAWANESA, MANITOBA, WAS BUILT ORIGIN­
ally to serve the Northern Pacific & Manitoba Railway, on their Mor­
ris to Brandon branch. It is still in use. Photo by G.A.Moore.
seem to be adopting a responsible attitude to this important question
and, -although a temporary government moratorium on railway abandon­
ment came to an end early in 1975, there is every indication that
its intent will be respected and perpetuated.
Times change, as the railway companies well know. The Canadian
National, for instance, is presently double-tracking its main line
from Winnipeg to Portage La Prairie, after having abandoned their
grode-separated dual line a few years ago. CP RAIL is also consider­
ing the feasability of rebuilding its double-track west of Portage
La Prairie, abandoned some years since. Both railways are actively
examining the possibility of relocating their freight yards in Win-
nipeg, in order to make available for development valuable tracts
of land hitherto occupied by rail facilities.
The economic bose of Manitoba is changing and the r.o.ilways, th­
rough innovative consideration of both main and branch lil1.e service,
have on important role in the development and prosperity 6f new,
diversified industry. .
While the railways of Manitoba have come full circle in th~
short span of 100 years, their most prosperous era did not end in
1910 and has not yet really terminated. They will continue to write
their own story in the history books throughout the next 100 years
and beyond, no doubt with special mention of their continuing, im­
portant emphasis on energy conservation and environmental protection.
A PORTION OF THE TOWN OF RAT PORTAGE, ONTARIO, ABOUT THE TURN OF THE
century. The Castellated Canadian Pacific station and yard was photo­
graphed from the overbridge just west of the station. Later on, this
western Ontario town was renamed Kenora.
Photo coll. Mr. Barry Russell.
·r
I
CANADIAN 310
R A I L
Footnotes
5 By Section, Township and Range -Tyman, John L.
Assiniboine Historical Society, Brandon, Manitoba, 1972.
Chapter VII, p. 56.
6 Ibid.
7 Coal Fields of Manitoba, Saskatchew,an, Alberta and East-
ern B.C. -Dowling, D.B., Canada Department of Mines;
1914, p 7.
8 Along the Old Melita Trail -Reekie, Isabel
Saskatoon, 1965: Memoirs of G.F.Morrison, first Canadian
Pacific Railway agent at Pierson, Manitoba.
(Author unknown)
Hopper, A.B. & Kearney, T.,
B. Eng.
Stevens, G.R.
Tyman, John L.
Bibliography
The Marvellous Achievements of the Nine-
teenth Century -ca. 1900.
Frontispiece missing; identity of author
and publisher unknown.
Synoptical History of Organization,Cap­
ital Stock, Funded Debt and Other Gen­
eral Information: Canadian National Ra­
ilways: as of December 31, 1960.
Canadian National Railways: Volume II,
Towards the Inevitable (1896-1922)
Clarke, Irwin & Company, Toronto, 1962.
By Section, Township and Range
Assiniboine Historical Society, Brandon,
Manitoba: 1972.
~ IN 1904, THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY BUILT THE MONUMENTAL STATION IN
Winnipeg which has become so well-known to travellers. This view of
the stations imposing facade was taken from Sir William Whyte Park,
longtime display site of Joseph Whiteheads equally famous Countess
of Dufferin. Photo colI. Mr. B. Russell.

Text &
Photographs
by
Jim Shaughnessy
lr 111t¥l ~
I-~
fter the tremendous, stupendous trip of ex-Nickel
Plate Berkshire Number 759 to Promontory, Utah
~ in 1969, most enthusiasts concluded that any other
special trains powered by this famous locomotive
would be a little anticlimactic. It was with regret,
intermingled with relief and peace of mind, that the
news was received that Number 759 would be returned
to Steamtown, U.S.A., near Bellows Falls, Vermont,
for display.
II
o
What no one could have anticipated was the energy and persis­
tence of those steam locomotive enthusiasts who were determined to
put Number 759 back on the main line somewhere, just one more time~
They finally did it. On October 27, 1973, Number 759 and train
headed north from Boston, Massachusetts, over the rails of the Bos-
ton and Maine Corporation, to Concord, New Hampshire and White
River Junction, Vermont, with a full load of wildly excited en-
thusiasts. Complete with extra tender, Number 759 layed down a
long cloud of bright, white smoke and steam, along the edge of
Mascoma Lake, New Hampshire, on the way north.
At White River Junction, Number 759 rolled north on the B&M
iron across the White River into the Town of Hartford, Vermont, in
the processing of wyeing the train for the run north. She was photo­
graphed in a foreground filled with ex-Boston and Maine Railroad
4-4-0, Number 494 -and her caboose -for many years a static dis­
play in Hartford.
Without doubt, the most magnificent view of Number 759 and her
train was that obtained from the east bank of th~ White River at West
Hartford, Vermont, the following day, after the special had run north
to the State Capital City of Montpelier, Vermont. On the historic br­
idge 7.3 miles north of White River Junction, the Central Vermont Ra­
ilways main line crosses the White River. In the afternoon sunshine,
the 759 Special rumbled over this famous bridge, on and over the
original piers which, in the 1850s, supported a multi-span, wooden,
Howe-truss bridge.
Not much less impressive was the scene at the through-truss cr­
ossing of the Dog River at Northfield, Vermont, on the southbound
run on October 28. Number 759 moved her train up to the summit be-
yond Northfield at a grisk rate, her white flags snapping in the
wind.
Although some people thought the cost of a seat on the
Special was a little steep, the two-day venture over the 8&M
CVR lines was a great success, which suggested that in 1973
popularity of the steam engine and steam-hauled exc~rsions w;s
great as it ever was.
759
and
the
as
In the intervening months, many other things have happened. The
D&H has acquired two Baldwin sharknoses, now in freight and ex-
cursion service. The American Freedom Train has visited most east-
ern state capitols with ex-Reading steam engine Number 2101 on the
head-end and the four famous D&H PA Is are on their way to becoming
PA 4s, with Number 16 leading the way.
And on June 21, 1975, ex-NKP Number 759 paused in Mechanicville,
NY, returning to Bellows Falls, VT, via East Deerfield and the 8&M ,
after an extended stay at the D&H roundhouse at Rouses Point, NY.
It is thus reasonoble to suppose that some enthusiastic rail-
road society will haul Number 759 out again, one of these days, pol-
ish and fire her up and take her out on the high iron -just one
more time~

October
W!IBILLS
WHEN THE NEW SYSTEM PUBLIC TIMETABLES FOR CP RAIL AND CANADIAN NA­
tional Railways emerged in April 1975, Mark Paul, our mem­
ber in Vancouver, B.C. was mystified to find that CN seem­
ed to have reverted to their August 1936 transcontinental times for
Trains 1-2, the Supercontinental and Trains 3-4, the Toronto por­
tion thereof. Responding to a question, a spokesman for CN said that
extensive track maintenance work in central and western Canada neces­
sitated a reduction in the average speed of the Supercontinental
for this summers operation. It is expected that the total time from
Montreal to Vancouver will be reduced when the maintenance program ~s
completed.
CP RAIL has rescheduled the Canadian to a morning departure
from Montreal and a similar increase in total transcontinental time
to Vancouver. This new schedule was advertised as providing more con­
venient rail service to Ottowa, with an early afternoon arrival, and
the earlier schedule through the Rockies and Selkirks, west of Cal­
gary, with the opportunity of seeing more of the Rockies, was featur­
ed.
Both railways had distances in the system public timetables in
miles and kilometers, but not in the Montreal commuter schedules,wh­
ich clung tenaciously to the English system.
John Welsh noted at once that CNs new folder did not show Tra­
ins 18-19, the Chaleur, so it appears that the Scotian, Trains
11-12, will continue to handle the traffic, in sections if required.
Rumors are flying that, come October 1975, CNs Scotian will
travel to Halifax via Sherbrooke to Lennoxville, where it will take
CP RAILs Short Line to Megantic, McAdam and Saint John, New Bruns­
wick, regaining its own rails for the trip to Moncton on the main
line for the onward trip to Truro and Halifax. This would allow CP
RAIL to withdraw the Atlantic Limited, Trains 40-41, for the winter
months. It is probable that summer 76 passenger traffic will re-
quire the restitution of the Atlantic Limited on CP RAIL and the
rerouteing of the Scotian via Levis and the Matapedia Valley-Camp­
bellton route.
In the meantime, the rumor mill continues to grind out dire pre­
dictions for transcontinental train service on both CN and CP RAIL,
but it is likely that travel to and from the summer Olympic Gomes in
Montreal will dissuade Transport Canada and Minister Jean Marchand
from taking any definitive action until summer-77 at the earliest.
PREMIER DAVIS OF ONTARIO SAYS TORONTOS UNION STATION WILL BE EXPAN­
ded to serve as a new transportation terminal for metro­
politan Toronto. Mayor David Crombie, committee member,
said that the original proposal for the $ 1.5 million Metro Centre
development is dead.
CANADIAN 319 R A I L
DURING THE EARLY PART OF JULY 1975, MLW INDUSTRIES DELIVERED EIGHT
M-420 B units to the British Columbia Railway; they were
assigned rood numbers 681 to 688. These are the first
booster type units delivered by MLW Industries and are intended
to be used as mid-train helpers: hence, the letters RCL before the
rood number, meaning radio-controlled locomotive. Pierre Patenaude
photographed Number 685 at Montreal Yard, CNR, on 5 July 1975.
BRITISH COLUMBIA RAILWAY REPORTED ON 28 MAY 1975 THAT THE FIRST TWO
of 400 wood-chip railcars rolled off the production line
at the new Squamish, B.C. plant. The wood-chip cars are
to be followed by 500 bulkhead flatcars to transport lumber products.
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS HAS APPROACHED THE CITY OF EDMONTON ABOUT
the development of 85 acres of CN property in downtown Ed­
monton. Tentative plans for the property include a trans­
portation corridor to protect passenger train access to the station
and provide a right-of-way for the projected northwest arm of Ed-
montons rapid-transit system.
CANADIAN NATIONALS COWICHAN SUBDIVISION ON VANCOUVER ISLAND APPEARS
to have suffered additional erosion from highway con-
struction, IHites John Hoffmeister of Victoria. On a
Tuesday in April 1975, the Tidewater Subdivision, Cowichan Bay to
Deerholme and that port of the Cowichan SiD from Deerholme to Youbou was
still in operation, with a roughly semi-weekly freight making the
turn, handling about 20 cars per week or less.
CANADIAN 320 R A I L
Power on the Island is generally one of the G-12s, Number 991 or
992, but, once in a while, an SW-9 appears.
The Victoria-Deerholme portion of the Cowichan SiD is severed in
four places by road construction, resulting in three completely iso­
lated sections of abandoned railway in the first 10 miles, disused for
nearly 10 years and heavily overgrown with weeds and bushes. The
equipment of the Victoria Pacific Railway, the tourist line which used
to operate on this stretch, is trapped in one of these segments.
John wonders why 10 miles of salvageable rails have been left
in place for so long. Further north, towards Deerholme, two bridges
have collapsed; it is probable that the entire Cowichan SiD from Vic­
toria, 58.2 miles north to Deerholme, will never be re-opened.
LATE IN JULY, MLW INDUSTRIES COMPLETED AN ORDER FOR FIFTEEN M-420 TR
diesel units for the Ferrocarril Del Pacifico (1800 hp.)
These units are equipped with Adirondack AAR Type B
trucks and control stand located on the left side of the cab. Here
is FCP Number 523 dead in a train at Montreal Yard on 20 July 1975.
Pierre Patenaude sends the picture and the information.
NOW THAT THE BALDWIN UNITS OF CP RAIL HAVE LEFT VANCOUVER ISLAND,THE
Nanaimo CP RAIL ALCO switcher, Number 7112, a sister unit
to Number 7115, the power for WORK-TRAIN TO TYE by Hal
Riegger in the March 1974 issue Number 266 of CANADIAN RAIL, handles
maybe a dozen cars a week from Osborne Bay Junction, CP RAIL, to the
large pulp mill of British Columbia Forest Products at Crofton,a bit
more than 2 miles away. Because of weight restrictions on the spur,
CP RAIL GP 9s are not permitted to work portions of main-line Trains
51 & 52 over the spur. Rail service to the mill is only required once
CANADIAN 321 R A I L
or twice a week, since most of the traffic moves directly from BCFP
facilities at Crofton by cor-barge.
LOGGING OPERATIONS AROUND CHEMAINUS, LADYSMITH AND CROFTON ON VAN­
couver Island sure arent what they used to be, observes
John Hoffmeister. Until December 1969, logs from MacMil­
lan Bloedels Nanaimo River Camp were hauled over their own terminal
railway 16.5 miles by steam locomotives to the junction with the
Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway (CPR) at Ladysmith, where the CPR picked
up the loads for the intermediate 9-mile haul to Chemainus,where an­
other M-B steam engine took them down the switchback to the log­
dump. Today, only Crown-Zellerbach schedule log-trains in this area,
using one ex-Delaware & Hudson RS 3 for motive power.
THE CANADIAN TRANSPORT COMMISSION AUTHORIZED CANADIAN NATIONAL RAIL-ways on
21 July 1975 to abandon (a) the Pickering town
spur at Mile 311.1 of the Kingston SiD and about 6.5 miles
of the Penetang SiD, from Hendrie to Elmvale, Ontario. The Pickering
spur is 0.7 miles long and is unusual in that it is one of two roil
lines which cross Highway 401 -the Macdonald-Cartier Freeway -at
g ra de.
FROM CAPE BRETON ISLAND, BARRIE MACLEOD WRITES THAT MORE NEW DIESELS
have °arrived at Sydney, this time for the Sydney Steel
Corporations internal railway. The first one to arrive
was a 36-inch-gauge GE centre-cab unit, resting comfortably on a
flat cor in the consist of CN freight Train 410. According to the
builders plate, this unit was built by GE in 1952 and rebuilt in
February 1975. The unit has two GE 741 prime movers.
DOMTAR SW 2 WAS ONCE CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS NUMBER 7961,B/N 5157
built 28 November 1947. The unit was sold to DOMTAR in November 1966,
and was captured on film at Montreal Yard, in transit, on 1 March 1975.
Pierre Patenaude sends us the picture and the information.
CANADIAN 322 R A I L
ROLLING DOWN THE HILL TO BAYVIEW JUNCTION, AT DUNDAS, ONTARIO, TEMPO
Train 146, CNs flyer from Windsor and London to Toronto,
was snapped by H.L.Holland of Hamilton on 1 March 1975.
JEAN-MICHEL LECLERCQ, OUR EUROPEAN REPRESENTATIVE, REPORTS THAT AFTER
1 September 1975, the French National Railways will place
in service TURBOtrains between Geneva,Grenoble and Valence.
At the outset, there will be three Geneva-Valence trains, with one
from Geneva to Grenoble. In the northbound direction, there will be two
Valence-Geneva trains and two Grenoble-Geneva trains, the latter
taking 2.02 hours. After 28 September, the Catelan express from Ge-
neva to Barcelona will run via Lyon and not via Grenoble, with a
consequent acceleration of 30 minutes in its schedule.
THE GLOBE & MAIL OF TORONTO SAID ON 2 AUGUST 1975 THAT ONTARIO CANNOT
wait for the federal government to make up its mind whe­
ther or not it will partially pay for the new double-deck­
er coaches for GO Transit. John Rhodes, Ontarios Minister of Trans­
portation, said that Ontario would just have to find the money some­
where else for the 80 double-deckers, costing upwards of $ 25 mil­
lion, to be added in mid-1977 to increase the lines capacity by 75%
while not adding to the length or number of GO trains. Contracts for
these cars were to be awarded in September; tenders have been re­
ceived from Hawker Siddeley Canada Limited of Thunder Bay and Canadian
Vickers Limited of Montreal.
PIERRE PATENAUDE SENDS US COMPARISON PHOTOGRAPHS TO ILLUSTRATE CANAD­
ian National Railways new paint scheme for its units. The
cabs are bright orange-red, with the CN logo on the nose;
the long hood has black and white stripes, with a yellow reflector
band on the frame. RS 18 Number 3117 posed at Montreal Yard on 9 March
1975, while M-636 Number 2310 was photographed by Pierre at the
same location on 28 March 1975.
ON BEHALF OF THE OFFICERS AND MEHBERS OF THE ASSOCIATION, THE STAFF
of CANADIAN RAIL would like to congratulate Mr. Morvin A. Davi$, the
Chief Rood Foreman of Engine, for the Delaware &. Hudson Railway, who
has
been honoured by hi. Co~pony by having the rebuilt PA 4 diesel u
nit Number 16 named after hill. Mr. Dovi$ has been with the D&H for 34
years and Mr. Bruce Sterzing, President and Chief Executive Of_
f
icer of the D&.H was very pleosed to recognize Mr. Oovisocco.plish­
lIents in this fashion. Jim Shaughnessy took Hr. Davis photograph in
the e
ngineers ,eat of NUliber 16.

Canadan Rail
is published monthly by the
Canadian __ icaI Association
P.o. 8o.r. 22, Station B, Montrell.~CanedlVH38 3J5
Editof;s.s.~ Production; P.1AJIl>hy
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CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN
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OTTAW
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PACIfIC COAST
R.H.Hey S,crlla) P.O,!. l006,Stotion A Vantowv.t,B.C.V6C
,
ROCKY IlQUNUlN
J ..lIei ~ 1.,5 Ie utory. P. O. Box 6102,5 tat ion C, EdOlonton,Al to. T SB 4XS
TOROJITO 4 YORK DIVISlON
P,Shugold,Secutory P.O. Box 589, Teulnol A Toronto,Ont.tI!!iW

Association Representatr,es
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