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Canadian Rail 282 1975

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Canadian Rail 282 1975

Canadian Rail ~
No. 282
July 1975








..
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fr
Part I
THE FIRST FORTY YEARS.
George A. Moore
O
t is our pleasure to introduce to
our readers Mr. George A. Moore,
of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Mr. Moore
is a member of the Manitoba Histor­
ical Society and the two-part arti­
cle which is being presented is the
story of the development of rail­
ways in Manitoba from 1874 to about
1915. Mr. Moore began his research
some years ago and its completion
happily coincided with Manitobas
centennial in 1974. In May,of that
year, Mr. Moores article won an
Honorable Mention in the Margaret
McWilliams Essay Contest.
Mr. Moore is presently preparing
a pictorial account of the Canadian
ONCE UPON A TIME, BEFORE THE ADVENT OF THE ENVIRONMENTALISTS, THIS
utilitarian and essential convenience was an inseparable part of all
rural railway stations. Unfamiliar, today, to the majority of p~s­
sengers and railway enthusiasts, there was a time when it was an In­
despensable adjunct to the railway and the community. This station
outhouse at Elkhorn, Manitoba, on Canadian Pacifics main line near
the Manitoba/Saskatchewan boundary, is typical of the many hundreds
of such ladies/gentlemen from Newfoundland to the Yukon. When the
CPR station at Elkhorn was sold in January 1972 and dismantled, the
outhouse, too, disappeared. It is unlikely that any attempts to pre­
serve, restore and exhibit an example of this once-weI I-known struc­
ture have been made. The photo was taken in November 1971 by G.A.Moore.
~ THE FAMOUS PHOTOGRAPH OF THE ARRIVAL OF THE COUNTESS OF DUFFERIN BY
barge on October 9, 1877. The barge was pushed by the sternwheeler,
S.S.SELKIRK and docked below Douglas Point. Also-on board were six
flat cars and a van, all painted Canadian Pacific, although that
company had not yet been formed. After unloading, the train is said
to have steamed into St. Boniface, not Winnipeg, which was on the
west side of the Red River -and there was no bridge at the time.
Photo courtesy Archives of Manitoba.
.>:~!~f,i.
C(~ii,~
CANADIAN 200 R A I L
Pacific Railway Companys involve­
ment at Winnipeg Beach, Manitoba, a summer
resort established by the CPR
on Lake Winnipeg in 1903.
PROLOGUE
Occupying the northern section of the Western
Hemisphere lies Great Britains most extended
Colony, the vast Dominion of Canada, which
covers an immense area of the earths surface,
surpassing that of the United States and near­
ly equal to the whole of Europe. Its population
however, is not in accordance with its dimen­
sions, being less than 5,000,000 ,while the
bleak and inhospitable character of much of the
greater part of its area is likely to debar
it from ever having any other than a scanty
nomad population, fur animals being its
principal useful productlIt is, however, al­
ways unsafe to predict.
H~_~ Despite this rather pessimistic view of our country, Canada,pub-
. -lished at the turn of the Twentieth Century, the struggling young
nation proudly displayed the successful results of an enormous drive
to encourage immigration to and settlement of her bleak and inhos­
pitable lands. Wheat soon flowed forth in abundance from the rich
prairie soil and the prophecy that the country would never experience
more than a scanty nomad population had already been thoroughly
refuted. And the refutation of this myth had been caused primarily
by the railways.
DAWN OF AN ERA -THE 1870s
Although the Railway Era in the Province of Manitoba made its
first appearance about 100 years ago, a railway to the prairies, to
be built init~ally only as for as the Great Lakes, was postulated as
early as 1853 by the promoters of the Grand Trunk Railway Company,
following the completion of the St. Lawrence and Atlantic/ Atlantic
and St. Lawrence Railroad from Montreal to the eastern seaboard at
the city of Portland, Maine, U.S.A.
Early settlers in Manitoba came to the Selkirk Settlement by way
of Hudson Bay and the system of lakes and rivers, or overland from
the Great Lakes and Prince Arthurs Landing. By the 1870s, the need
for a suitable transportation route from the east to the west, through
the newly-formed Dominion of Canada, was of primary importance in
the minds of many eostern Canadians, particularly the members of Can­
adas parliament. The all-Canadian, pre-railway route necessarily in­
cluded the unpopular Dawson Route from Prince Arthurs Landing on
Lake Superior to Fort Garry on the Red River, which had been located
by Simon J, Dawson in 1857-58 and corduroyed in sections in 1868.
The Dawson Route to Lake of the Woods, and its continuation,the
Fort Garry Road, while a means to an end, required the traveller to
submit for some three weeks to an arduous trip from Toronto, first
by train to Collingwood on Lake Huron; by steamer thence to Prince
CANADIAN 201 R A I L
Arthurs Landing; by open boat and wagon from Prince Arthurs Land­
ing, through Lake Shebandowan, to the northwest angle of Lake of the
Woods and finally by cart or wagon -or on foot, when the track was
impassable to wheeled vehicles -over the remaining distance from
Lake of the Woods to Fort Garry. In view of the rigors of the Dawson
Route and its obvious deficiencies, it is not difficult to understand
why the early settlers elected to make their way westward by other
routes, particularly those through the neighbouring United States.
The route through the northern United States was of no avail in
assuring settlement of the Canadian mid-west, since the citizens of
the States through which the emigrants passed did their level best to
lure the potential settlers off the trains and boats, urging them to
locate in the central and northern United States instead of travel­
ling on to central Canada. Many European immigrants, in particular,
were besieged by hard-sell land-agents and were dissuaded in every
possible manner from completing their journeys to central and west­
ern Canada.
While our brave forefathers continued their arduous way west ,
Canadas Prime Minister John (later Sir John) A. Macdonald and his
Conservative colleagues, with the Province of British Columbias fu­
ture allegiance to Confederation in mind, conceived the Pacific Ra­
ilway scheme to bind Canadas provinces together. The government
granted a charter in 1872 for a then-unnamed railway, to build from
Lake Nipissing in Ontario to some point on the shore of the Pacific
Ocean … , and there is no need to dwell on the implications or con­
clusions of this modest proposal. This most ambitious project yet
attempted by the youthful nation was to unite east and west per-
manently. It was, eventually, an overwhelming success. The first
transcontinental passenger train arrived at Port Moody on Burrard
Inlet, British Columbia, late in 1885 and regularly-scheduled pas­
senger service between Montreal and the Pacific was inaugurated the
following year.
As far as Manitoba was concerned, the first definitive steps
towards communication by iron rail were taken exactly 100 years ago,
when, in 1874, a charter was granted to the Pembina Branch Railway.
Under the terms of this charter, the Dominion Government agreed to
construct sections and branches of the Pacific Railway, including
the first section to be built from Fort Garry south to Pembina, on
the International Boundary. The contractor was Joseph Whitehead and
the Pembina Branch was Manitobas first operating railway, being
opened in November 1878. It should be understood that the Pembina
Branch, as it was subsequently called, today part of CP RAILs sys-
tem, is not the oldest portion of this vast railway network. The
oldest portion of the Canadian Pacific Railway and CP RAIL is in
Quebec and was opened for service in 1847.
The steam locomotive used to haul cars during the construction
of the Pembina Branch and in its first months of operation has sur­
vived to this day, 102 years from the time when she was outshopped at
the Baldwin Locomotive Works, Philadelphia, PA, U.S.A. in 1872.Named
Countess of Dufferin by Whitehead, she was built originally for
the Northern Pacific Railway as their Number 56. She was purchased by
Joseph Whitehead and was brought to Winnipeg by barge down the Red
River, arriving on-October 9, 1877. When Whitehead finished with her,
she was sold to the Canadian Pacific Railway Company in 1883 and was
assigned the number 151. In 1897, the CPR sold her to the Columbia
River Lumber Company of Golden, British Columbia. The story is told
that, in 1908, City of Winnipeg Comptroller (later Mayor) R.D. Waugh
·
~.~I·
~,g~i I~~II ,~~~.
TABLE
A –
CHARTERS
GRANTED
TO
THE
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
RAILWAY
COMPANY
IN
MANITOBA
DESCRIPTION
Main
Line
Main
Line
Main
Line
Main
Line
Main
Line
Stone
w
all
Branch
Teulon
Ext.
Komarno
Ext.
Icelandic
R
Ext,
Pembina
Branch
SouthYJestern
and
Pembina
Mtn.
Br.
Selkirk
Branch
Souris
Branch
Glenboro
Ext.
Deloraine
Ext.
Pipestone
Ext.
LacDu
Bonnet
Branch
Varcoe
Branch
pheasant
Hills
Br
.
Molson
Cut-Off
FROM port
Arthur
E.
Selkirk
Whittier Stephen
St.
Winnipeg Rugby
Jct.
Stonewall 1eulon Komarno St
.
Boniface
Rugby
Jct
.
Rosenfeld Rugby
Jct.
Kemnay Souris Napinka Schwi
.tz
er
Jct.
Molson MacGregor Kirkella Molson
10
MI),i::S
§~~F
Rb~~o~tTY
E.
Selk
irk
410.0
1881-84
Feb
15
/8
1
St.
Bonifa-.:e
Stephen
St.
wpg.
Stn.
IISavonas
Ferry
Stonewall
20.19
L2 0.2
1257
.0
18.19
Teulon
19.~8
Komarno
8.09
Icelandic
RaJa:
29.21
Emerson
63
..
51
Manitou Gretna Selkirk Estevan Glenboro Deloraine Reston Lac
Du
Bonnet
Varcoe Rosyth Whittier
100.35
1
4.06 22.0
156
..
1
46.04 18
.39
30.96
22.0
55.
51
556
.9
36.0
1878 1882 18
82
1882-85 1
880
1
898
1905-06
1899
1906-10
Feb
15/81
1874-78 1881-82 18
82
1882-83 1
889
-92
1890-92 1892 1
892
1899-01 1899-06 1902-09 1906-07
No-rES Blt
by
Dominion
Govt.
&
transferred
to
LPR.
Built
by
C.P.R.
BIt
by
Dom.
Govt
••
&
transferred
to
CPR.
Blt
by
C.P.R.
BIt
by
Dom.
Govt.
&
trans.
to
CPR
in
1882
Built
by
C.P.R.
IN
OPERATIO
1
88
2
1
882
1882 1
682
1885
Sept,
18
8L
De
••
1898.
Aug.
1907.
Nov.
1910.
~Iay.
1880.
~)
~
c
.
1882.
Dec.
18
82.
De
c.
1883.
Aug
.
1892.
Dec
.
1892.
Aug.
1892.
Dec.
1892.
June
190L
June
1905.
Octobec
1907.


Virden
Branch
Virden
HC
I.u
ley
3
6
3
190
8
-13
Der:.
19
13
.
Souris
Branch
Reston
l.ntler
i.6
0
42
189
8
July
10
/
99
Blt
by
CPR,
pip
e
stonr
Extension.
J,me
1900.
pipestone
Ext.
Antler
Ar
c
ola
48.
11
1
89
9-01
Built
by
C.P.R.
Jun
e
1901.
A
rcola
Re
gina
11
3
.44
19
03-04
Selkirk
Branch
Lake
Wpg.
Ext
.
Selkirk
Wpg.
Beac
h
35
,0
3
19
0
1-03
May
7/0
0 ,
June
1903.

Gimli
Extension.
wpg.
Beach
G
i!l1li
9.
;:
1 1
90
6 Nov.
19
0
6.

Riverton
Ext.
Gimli
Ri
v
erton
26
.0 19
13-14
Jun
6/13
NOv.
191
~
.
Snowflake
Branch
wood
Bay
Mo
w
br
ay
26.0
8
190
0
-03
May
7/00
June
1
90
3.
Ext.
Mowbray
Windygates
6.5 1
908
-09
Ne
v.
1909.
Sour
is
Branch
Lauder-Westerly
Lauder
Alida
55.0
1902-12
May
7/
00
Built
by
C.P.R.
Nov. 19
12.
waskada
Branch
Deloraine
Ly
leton
37.46
1900-03
June
19
03
.
Darlingford
Branch
Rudyard
Kaleida
6.25
1905-06
Sec.
175
Beard
Cf
Rly
Comm~
Order
1058.
Rly
Act.
Blt
by
C.P.R.
A
pril
1906.
Boissevain-Lauder
Branch
Lauder
Boissevain
36.5
1911-13
May
19/11
Built
by
C.
P.R.
Dec.
1913.
Snowflake
Westerly
Branch
Snowflake
Fallison
1.0.0
1913
Jun
6/
13
May
1914.
FOOTNOTES:
1 –
Icelandic
River,
Manitoba
is
now
named
Arborg.
~
_
Canadian
Pacific
Railway
Company
Historical
Record
of
Subdi
v
isions,
Prairie
and
pacific
Regions,
in
chart
fo
~
m.
TABLE
B –
CHARTERS
GRANTED
TO
OTHER
RAILWAYS
IN
SECURED
TO
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
LIMITED
FROM
Man i
toba
Southwes
·t- 1
ern
colonization
Rly
.
Co.
Barnsley
Br.
Rugby
Jet.
Manitou Elm
Creek
TO Glenboro Deloraine Carman
102.70
1882

86
100.52
1884-85
12.49
1889-90
Leased
in
perp­
etuity,
June
1,
1884.
Leased
for
999
years
from
May
NOTES Woodma~
to
Murray
Park
revision
in
line
built
in
1946.
Dominion
Charter
was
granted
May
17,
1882.
Manitoba
&
North­
western
Rly.
Co
.
of
l.anada.
2
Portage
La
P.
Yorkton
222.96
1833-91
1
/1900.
The
Great
North
3
Vlest
Centra
l
Rly
.
Chater
Company.
Gautier
27.79
1889-90
Le
ased
in
perp

etu1ty
from
Apr.
confirmed
by
Domi.nion

Lenore
Exten
.
Saskatchewan
and
Vlestern
Railway.
Manitoba
Gr
ea
t 4
Northern
Rly
Co.
Winnipeg
River
Rai
lway
Co
,
Manitoba
& No
rt

Western
Rly.
Shell
River
Br
.
Gautier Hamiota Forrest Minnedosa Carman
Hamiota
23.40
1
889-90
Miniota
20.0
1900
Lenore
40.7
1
901

02
Gautier.
Jct.
17.97
1889
plum
coulee
27.5
1907
Lac
Du
Bonnet
Great
Falls
14.~
1914
Binscarth
Russell
11.54
1887
FOOTNOTES: 1 –
Absorbed
by
CP.R
.
Sept
.
26/57.
6th
,
1900.
Charter
May
22
/8
8.
Leased
to
M&NWR
Dominion
Charter
granted
99
yrs
May
28/87
April
14th,
1927.
Pur
c
hased
on
August
1,
1926.
Leased
for
five
yrs
Jun
e
1/53.
Leased
for
999
years
from
11ay
1st,
1900
.
Dominion
Charter
granted
April
14th,
1927.
OlE~;:;D
BY
CPR
Nov_ Jan. Nov.
18
86.
1886. 18
89
.
June
1900.
June
1900.
Ju
ne
IS03.
June
1900.
rt.ay
1907.
June
1953.
June
1900
.
2 –
previously
named
Westbourne
&
Northwestern
Rly.
Co
.
(Feb.
ll!.j80)
and
Portage,
Westbol1J:ne
an(l
Northwesterr,
Rly.
(May
17
/8
2).
3 –
previously
named
Souris
&
Ro~ky
Mount
ain
Rly
Co.
(1
880)
absorbed
by
C.P
.
R.
in
1957.
4 –
Originally
the
Midland
Railway
Co
.
cf
Manitoba.

I
~
• Inglis
, ~
I ~
I
,
I,
r
,
I
,
:1
-:=_-l..:Sou::.:.::th Jet. ,
——–
CANADIAN 206 R A I L
saw the locomotive at Golden and, recognizing her significance, per­
suaded the Columbia River Lumber Company to donate the venerable lo­
comotive to the City of Winnipeg. In any event, she was brought back
to Winnipeg and restored exteriorally.
The Countess of Dufferin has since become a landmark in the
City of Winnipeg and the prototype of the old-fashioned steom en­
gine in every Canadian school-childs history book. She was proudly
displayed in Sir William Whyte Park, across the street from the Can­
adian Paci fic station from 1910 to 1942. The Countess was then re­
located to a position outside the main entrance to the station for
the period 1942 to 1970. In all of these years, the historic locomo­
tive had not been immune to the ravages of time and the effects of
the elements and, in the 1960s, she had begun to deteriorate badly.
In 1970, she was quite literally beginning to fali apart, the rear
of her tender sagging to the ground.
Rescued yet again from destruction, she was given a complete ex­
terior restoration in this latter year by the City of Winnipeg,which
is her proud owner and, a living symbol of our proud heritage, she
is displayed in a tiny park at the corner of Main Street and the
Disraeli Freeway. Regrettably, the Countess is displayed out-of­
doors, near the Manitoba Museum of Man and Nature, completely ex-
.·;~;~;Rosed to the weather -and to vandalism. There is a proposal to re­
;:.,·:~l!;t>cate her to Assiniboine Park, to be displayed next to Canadian Na­
·.z.}ilI .}j::i.ne :ClS the .last re9ularlyscheduled steam locomotive to operate on .. –
Ca n a d ~ anN a t ~ 0 n aIR a ~ 1 way s •
Regardless of where the Countess may be placed, it is a little
doubtful that she can survive for another 102 years without some form
of indoor -or at the very least, enclosed -protection.
THE BOOM YEARS -THE 1880s
The Province of Manitoba grew to its present size after 1881 and,
prior to this time, was referred to as the Postage Stamp Province,
being but a tiny speck in the vast expanse of Canadas North West Ter­
ritories. The Province came into existence officially with the pas­
sing of the Manitoba Act on May 12, 1870.
The Dominion Land Survey began subdividing the prairie lands in
1873, in advance of the coming of the railways. The survey progressed
at a leisurely rate, anticipating the route of the Pacific Railway,
and was almost complete by 1881. The Canadian Pacific Railway Company,
incorporated on February 15, 1881 and granted Royal Assent the fol­
lowing day, was constructed in a bits-and-pieces fashion across the
greater part of the rolling prairies. As far as Manitoba was concern­
ed, by December 1882 there was a continuous line of railway from Win­
nipeg to Maple Creek, Saskatchewan, a distance of nearly 500 miles •
….. THE LOCOMOTIVE IN THIS PHOTOGRAPH IS SAID TO BE THE COUNTESS OF DUF­
ferin in the year 1877, as purchased from the Northern Pacific Rail­
way. The gentlemen are, from l~ft to right, Engineer John Cardell;
Fireman George Charles Swinbank; Mr. George Swinbank, foreman for Jo­
seph Whitehead, the contractor; John Lumley, timekeeper; John Clark,
assistant foreman and Alexander McCloy, roadmaster. A note on the
margin says that Mr. George Swinbank unloaded the Countess from
the barge on the Red River at the mouth of the Seine River in 1877.
Photo courtesy Archives of Manitoba.
· -.-.
CANADIAN 208 R A I L
Various branch lines were also being built by the Canadian Pa­
cific in Manitoba at this time and the work proceeded throughout the
1880s. For example, the Stonewall Branch, Rugby Junction to Stone­
wall, 18.2 miles, was completed; the Southwestern and Pembina Moun­
tain Branch, Rugby Junction to Manitou, Rosenfeld and Gretna, 125
miles, was opened. The Selkirk Branch, Rugby Junction to Selkirk, 22
miles, began operation and the Souris Branch, Kemnay to Estevan, Sa­
skatchewan, 156.1 miles, was completed. Further details on these and
other branch lines can be found in Table A of the Appendix.
There were, in addition, some private railway companies charter­
ed, which were eventually absorbed by the Canadian Pacific Railway
Company, either through lease or purchase. The Manitoba South Western
Colonization Railway Company constructed lines from Rugby Junction to
Glenboro (102.7 miles), Manitou to Deloraine (100.5 miles) and Elm
Creek to Carman (12.2 miles). The Manitoba and North Western Railway
Company of Canada started from. Portage La Prairie and built a line
to Yorkton, Saskatchewan, 222.5 miles, and a branch from Binscarth
to Russell, 11.0 miles, today the Russell Subdivision of CP RAIL. The
Great North West Central Railway Company was chartered in 1880 as
the Souris and Rocky Mountain Railway Company. A change in corporate
title occurred in 1886 and, in 1900, the lines from Chater to Gau­
tier and Gautier to Hamiota were leased in perpetuity to the Canadian
Pacific Railway Company.
The degree of optimism expressed in the corporate titles of th­
ese independent railways reflected great credit on their organizers.
Table B of the Appendix provides additional information on these ra­
ilways, including their acquisition by the Canadian Pacific.
In the first decade of its existence the Canadian Pacific was
vulnerable to competition from the railways in the adjacent areas of
the United States. Despite the Monopoly Clause in the companys ch­
arter, issued by the Government of Canada, the Northern Pacific and
Manitoba Railway Company, a subsidiary of the Northern Pacific Rail­
way Company of the United States, received a charter from the Pro­
vince of Manitoba in 1887 for a railway from Winnipeg to Portage La
Prairie. The Dominion Government immediately disallowed this charter.
Nevertheless, the Manitoba government persisted and the Conservative
federal government finally capitulated. The line from Winnipeg to
Portage La Prairie was completed and opened on September 1, 1889, as
was the line from Morris to Brandon. The colourful events surround­
ing the construction of this railway will be described in due course.
The 1880s in Manitoba were characterized by a rate of growth of
railways experienced only during two other periods in the history of
Canada. From 1855 to 1870, the Grand Trunk Railway, the Great West­
ern Railway and the Intercolonial Railway were completed and placed
in operation. From 1900 to 1915, the National Transcontinental, from
Moncton, New Brunswick to Winnipeg, Manitoba was completed and the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, the National Transcontinentals west­
ward continuation, was opened to Prince Rupert, British Columbia.The
Canadian Northern Railway, from humble beginnings in Manitoba, com­
pleted its trans-Cana~a railway from Qu~bec, on the St. Lawrence Ri­
ver, to Vancouver, British Columbia.
~ DECKED IN GREENERY AND FLAGS~ THE FIRST TRANS-CANADA PASSENGER TRAIN
of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company rolled into Winnipeg, Manitoba
on July 2, 1886. Photo courtesy Canadian Pacific Limited.

CANADIAN 210
R A I L
The Canadian Pacific land-boom of 1881-82 accelerated the fe-
vered rate at which the rails were laid across the prairies and the
City of Winnipeg became the undisputed centre of a rapidly growing
rail network in Manitoba. Following the boom of the early 1880s, a
decline in the rate of railway construction ensued and fewer immi­
grants came to Manitoba to seek their fortunes.
It is, of course, axiomatic that, west of Winnipeg, the Cana­
dian Pacific Railway dominated the railway scene in these years. But
a cursory look at the statute books of Manitoba and the Dominion of
Canada shows that, on paper, the Canadian Pacific was not without a few
rivals. During the 1870s, no fewer than 15 railway companies were
incorporated in law in Manitoba, but only four of these laid any
track. One was the Canadian Pacific. The figures for the years 1880
to 1889 are most surprising, as out of 40 incorporations, only six
railways were built. The best laid plans often failed to materialize,
under the baleful influence of the almighty CPR and its Monopoly
Clause.
Towards the close of the Eighties, there was a considerable out­
cry in favour of competition for the Canadian Pacific, which was en­
joying rapid, undisciplined growth in the shelter of their exclusive
charter. Among the clauses of the contract with the Government of
Cana~~.was one which guaranteed that no railway company would be c.hcir.
1:.i6.red to construct lines on either side of the CPRs main line
fOJ/Q.~~:;8eriod of 20 years. In response to the public outcry against
tht~~:;;fu~flnopoly, and in the hope of reducing freight rates to the east,
th~~M;hitoba government under the leadership of Premier Norquay, ra­
tified the incorporation of the Red River Valley Railway Company and
authorized the Railway Commissioner for Manitoba to build it from
Winnipeg to West Lynne (now Emerson) Manitoba. Subsequently, it was
to be turned over to a private company for operation. On September 4,
1888, the Red River Valleys name was changed to the Northern Pa­
cific and Manitoba Railway Company, while the line from Winnipeg to
Emerson, 65.81 miles to the south on the International Boundary, was
opened to traffic on September 1,1889. To no ones surprise, the
Northern Pacific & Manitoba turned out to be a wholly-owned subsid­
iary of the Northern Pacific Railway of the U.S.A.
The decision to award control of a Manitoba railway to a United
States corporation -for that was what it amounted to -brought a
storm of protest from citizen and corporation alike and the Manitoba
government faced a political nightmare. It was accused of having
disregarded its promise that the Red River line should be awarded to
the Manitoba Central Railway, a Canadian-owned company which later
went bankrupt in the 1890s. There were those who claimed that the
Manitoba Central should have been awarded proprietorship of the Red
River Valley line in direct return for campaign contributions made
to the Norquay cause.
Although a Royal Commission of Inquiry investigated the whole,
sorry mess, the charges could not be substantiated. The turmoil over
the Northern Pacific and Manitoba was just beginning.
The Canadian Pacific Railways response to the prospect of com-
petition on the prairies is best illustrated by the following ex-
CANADIAN PACIFICS FIRST PASSENGER STATION OF ANY SIGNIFICANCE IN
Winnipeg, Manitoba was photographed in 1884, with the local from Por­
tage La Prairie standing in the station.
Photo courtesy Archives of Manitoba.
. .. –
. _.
. ., .
. – –
. –
. –
~ :.. . –
.. . ~-…
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.
-.
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CANADIAN 212 R A I L
THESE SKETCHES OF THE INTERIORS OF A SLEEPING CAR AND A DAY CAR OF
the Canadian Pacific, made in the latter part of the Nineteenth Cen­
tury, show the primitive opulence of decoration which anticipated
the luxury which was to ensue. Photo courtesy Archives of Manitoba.
cerpts from Company President George Stephens statement to the
shoreholders on September 12, 1888:
It was deemed absolutely necessary to the procuring of the
necessary capital, to the safety of the capital to be in­
vested and generally to the success of the enterprise,that
the traffic of the territory to be developed by the rail­
way should be secured to it for a reasonable period; and
the term of ten years from the time fixed for the comple­
tion of the railway was agreed upon. Without this provis­
ion for protection, the necessary capital could not have
been secured and the railway could not have been made ..•
The same protection was insisted upon by the (Domin­
ion) government in respect of the C.P.R. when it was com­menced
as a public work, long before the company was thought
of …
Winnipeg at the time (mid-1870s) was a mere village,
and the settlements in Manitoba were mainly confined to a
narrow fringe along the Red River. The province hailed the
signing of the contract, and hardly a voice was raised in
objection to the so-called Monopoly Clause
The inevitable consequences of over-speculation have
been mistaken by people in Winnipeg and some other towns
in Manitoba for the need of railway competition… The
CANADIAN 213 R A I L
local political parties have vied with each other in se-
curing to themselves the support of the malcontents and
this has resulted in the undertaking by the Provincial Go­
vernment to construct a line of railway to the Inter­
national Boundary, where it has agreed to make a connect­
ion with a line advancing northward from the Northern Pa-
cific Railroad ••• The acts of the local government pro-
viding for the railway in question are in direct viola-
tion of the British North America Act •••
It would be absurd to urge that the completion of
the sixty-six miles of railway undertaken by the Govern­
ment of Manitoba would ruin the vast Canadian Pacific sys­
tem, but its construction would be a violation of the con-
tract with this company, and the Directors feel it to be
their duty to maintain the rights of2the company in the
matter, in every legitimate way •••
It was a forceful but unavailing argument. The Northern Pacific
and Manitoba received its hrovincial charter in 1888, with authority
to construct and operate t e Red R~ver Valley Railway from Winnipeg
to the International Boundary, from Winnipeg to Portage La Prairie
and from Morris to Brandon. Before it was completed, the railway
would be the cause of the Battle of Fort Whyte, an encounter which
possessed all the prerequisites for bloodshed.
By Friday, October 19, 1888, construction of the Northern Pa­
cific & Manitobas branch line from Winnipeg to Portage La Prairie
had progressed to a point south of the Assiniboine River, just west
of Winnipeg. Here, it would have to cross the tracks of the Canadian
Pacifics Southwestern & Pembina Mountain Branch. NP&M crews worked
all night preparing the grade on both sides of the diamond cros­
sing, today known in railway timetables as St. James Junction,there­
by setting the stage for the confrontation which was to follow.
The General Railway Act of Canada, in effect at that time, pro­
hibited any railway from crossing the tracks of another without first
having obtained permission to do so from the Government of Canada.
Further, the Railway Committee of the Government had the power to
hear and determine any application, complaint or dispute respecting
the crossing of the line of one company by the tracks of another. A
fina1
3
decision could thereafter issue from the Supreme Court of Can­
ada. But this was a time-consuming procedure and, frequently, one
of the contesting parties lost its patience.
At the crossing of the Southwestern & Pembina Mountain Branch,
the Northern Pacific & Manitoba decided not to wait for the necessary
permission to issue from the Dominion government. A decision was ta­
ken to proceed immediately with the installation of the diamond
This unilateral decision was at least partly attributable to the Hon­
orable Joseph Martin, Commissioner for Railways and Attorney-General
for the Province of Manitoba. He was, coincidentally, a Vice-Presi­
dent of the NP&M at the time. The decision to act, rather than to
wait for government approval and to ignore the terms and conditions
of the General Railway Act (51 Vic. Cap. 29), was in no way accept­
able to Canadian Pacific President William C. Van Horne and Super­
intendent of the Western Division William Whyte, who, both in Win­
nipeg at the time, took immediate steps to resist any attempt by the
NP&M to cross the track of their branch line, considering even the
intent as an outright act of trespassing.
The following day, William Whyte, accompanied by Magistrates and
Special Constables, journeyed to the site, which by this time had
CANADIAN 2 14 R A I L
~ AN EXCELLENT EXAMPLE OF THE EPITOME OF THE CAR-BUILDERS ART AT THE
TI end of the Nineteenth Century. The dining car VERSAILLES was built
for the Canadian Pacific by the Crossen Car Company in 1888. It had
a seating capacity of 36. Photo courtesy Canadian Pacific Limited.
~ INSIDE THE DINER, EVERYTHING WAS SNOW-WHITE NAPERY AND SHINING SILVER.
This dining car is unidentified. Courtesy Canadian Pacific Limited.
become rather facetiously knol-In as Fort Whyte, a somewhat dubious
honour for the CPR commander. Whyte ordered his men to derail an
old CPR locomotive onto the roadbed of the NP&M precisely at the
location of the proposed crossing. In addition, a somewhat formidable
force -in the circumstances -was assembled by the CPR, consisting
of some 250 men, mostly company employees, with orders to protect
the Companys interests. While Mr. Whyte supervised his troops from
the luxurious comfort of his private railway car which had been con­
veyed to the location for his convenience, the men were more simply
housed in six old colonist cars, brought down the line to a point
nearby. Commander Whyte, it seemed, anticipated a prolonged state
of siege.
Reacting to these preparations, the NP&M dispatched a special
train from Water Street in Winnipeg. News of the impending encounter
had travelled like wildfire through the Main Street bars and tonsor­
ial parlours. The train, consisting of three grossly overcrowded
flat cars, carried almost every red-bloded, able-bodied man left in
the city. They were exuberant with enthusiasm and numbered some 300
volunteers, including about 50 special constables hastily sworn and
authorized by Attorney-General Martin, mentioned above.
Action was not long in coming. During Saturday night, NP&M spe­
cial constables took up the CPR track and dragged the prefabricated
diamond rail-crossing into position with horses, spiking it firmly
in place. It is puzzling how the very presence of the NP&M workmen
failed to inspire the CPR forces to engage in a regular donnybrook,
especially with feelings running as high as they were. Perhaps the
CPR crews were all sleeping, after a hard days work watching the
crossing location. In any event, before the night was through, the
NP&M representatives were to have their own problems.

CANADIAN 216 R A I L
The NP&M diamond remained in position for a few hours at least,
with a small guard watching over it, but, alas~, with the coming of
the dawn, there also came Superintendent Whyte with his brave cohorts.
The normal Sabbath calm of Sunday, October 21, 1888, was completely
and utterly shattered.
Accompanied by harsh and vindictive exclamations, the NP&M cros­
sing was manhandled and torn from its resting place, while the twenty
or so NP&M guards watched the operation from a safe distance. Ac­
cording to some observers, the NP&M partisans were further embarras­
sed when the CPR men hoisted the captured diamond onto a flat car
and proudly and boisterously paraded the prize of battle through the
str~e:s of Winnipeg as evidence of their victory.
Following these Sabbath-day events, the CPR added to the size
of their force at the site of the crossing and kept a locomotive con­
tinually in motion across it for nearly fifteen days, steaming back
and forth over the location to prevent the installation of another
diamond.
Refusing to be outmanoeuvered, and in an attempt to reinforce
his position, Attorney-General Martin deputized another 130 special
constables on Thursday, October 24. To add to the tension in the
crowd gathering at the site, the regular troops of the Army and the
Militia were called out to keep an eye on the developments.
Fortunately, the Battle of Fort Whyte ended in anti-climax and
was recorded in history as a rather peaceful encounter, this,much to
the disappointment of the gallant opponents, who had answered the call
to arms of their respective companies and had hurried to the front,
anticipating a little action. To the disappointment of many, the ex­
citement of imminent battle gave way to the ultimate boredom of the
stand-off and the end came when the CPR employees were recalled to
their former jobs. The Battle of Fort Whyte came close to being
an exciting chapter in Canadian history books. However, there were
no casualties reported, to the joy and relief of the componies and
politicians who were responsible. It was not necessary to erect a
memorial to the gallant fallen at St. James Junction. What better way
for a battle to end.
The NP&M crossing was installed later, as almost everyone knew
it would be. The Supreme Court of Canada eventually rendered a de-
cision in favour of the Manitoba government and the NP&M, thus ending
the Canadian Pacifics precious lefal monopoly along its main line
west from Winnipeg to Brandon. In act, the monopoly was abolished
only in the immediate vicinity of Winnipeg; across the remainder of
the prairies west of Brandon and south of its main line, the Canadian
Pacific Railway Company was able to maintain a monopoly on rail
transportation. And its successor, CP RAIL, does so to this day.
If the fuss and feathers of the Battle of Fort Whyte and its
supporting Supreme Court decision were intended to lower railway fr­
eight rates, they failed entirely. One of the Government of Manitobas
prime reasons for building the Northern Pacific and Manitoba was to
lower freight rates and this did not materialize. In the event, the
added competition did little to lower freight rates and, in the end,
~ CONTEMPORARY SKETCHES FROM PHOTOGRAPHS BY BENNETTO OF THE RAILWAY WAR
in Manitoba and the Battle of Fort Whyte in 1888. The lower sketches
seem to be of Part I of the battle.
Photo courtesy Archives of Manitoba.

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CA NAD I AN 219 R A I L
there was very little difference in the rate structures of the two
companies.
At the close of 1889, the Northern Pacific and
Manitoba Railroad had 266 miles of road in op­
eration within the province, but the great ad­
vantage of competition and cheapening of the
rates, promised by the Company, scarcely ful­
filled the hopes of those who had so longed
for its advent. It was found that though the
small section of the country served by the sys­
tem derived the benefit of roil communication, 4
the country at large was not benefitted at 011.
Manitoba had won the Battle of Fort Whyte, but it hod lost the
war against the high freight rates~
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The author wishes to express his sincere gratitude to Mr. S.S.
Worthen, Editor of CANADIAN RAIL, for his assistance; to Mr. Barry
Russell and the obliging staff of Canadian Pacific Limiteds Re­
gional Technical Services office in Winnipeg; to Mrs. Barbara Webber
for the quickie course in creative writing; and to the Manitoba
Historical Society who provided the confidence and inspiration need­
ed to improve and develop further this article.
A special expression of thanks is due Mr. Rodger Letourneau for
his patience in eliminating any doubts regarding the actual location
of the Battle of Fort Whyte.
References
The Marvellous Achievements of the Nineteenth Century
(Author, Publisher and Dote unknown; co. 1900)
2
Steel of Empire Gibbon, John Murray pp. 319-320
The Bobbs-Merrill Company, New York, U.S.A. 1935
3
Ibid. pp. 327 •
4 History of the Northwest Begg, Alexander
(Publisher and Date not given.)
BERTON, Pierre
BERTON, Pierre
DONNELL Y, M.
DORMAN, Robert
BIBLIOGRAPHY
THE NATIONAL DREAM
THE LAST SPIKE
DAFOE OF THE FREE PRESS
McClelland & Stewart
Toronto, Ontario 1970
McClelland & Stewart
Toronto, Ontario 1971
MacMillan of Canada
Limited, Toronto 1968
A
STATUTORY HISTORY OF Canada Department of
STEAM & ELECTRIC RAILWAYS Transport: Queens
OF CANADA 1836-1937 Printer, Ottawa 1937
Imel.
SI.
James
Carman
. Junction
Presenl Day Winnipeg and
Ihe slle of
THE BATTLE
OF FORT WHYTE .
..
OCTOBER
1888
Scale:
1~4 In. = One Mlle.
George A.
Moore ,.,.
WINNIPEG
Fori
Garry
CANADIAN 221 R A I L
DOWLING, D.B. COAL FIELDS OF MANITOBA,
SASKATCHEWAN, ALBERTA &
EASTERN B.C. Canada
Department of
Mines: Queens
Printer, Ottawa 1914(R)
GIBBON, John Murray STEEL OF EMPIRE Bobbs-Merrill Company
New York, U.S.A. 1935
GRANT, Rev. George M. OCEAN TO OCEAN James Campbell, Toronto
Ontario 1873 (R)
Coles Publishing
Company, Toronto 1970
HAMLYN, Paul RAILWAYS Ian Allan Limited (R)
Shepperton England 1968
HARRIS, George H.
LIDDELL, Ken
MacINTYRE, D.E.
MORTON, W.L.
PATERSON, Edith
REEKIE, Isabel M.
SHIPLEY, Nan
GRAND TRUNK
RAILWAY JUNCTIONS IN THE Canadian RailNo. 205
WINNIPEG AREA Canadian Railroad
Historical Association
ILL TAKE THE TRAIN
END OF STEEL
MANITOBA – A HISTORY
WINNIPEG 100
ALONG THE OLD MELITA
TRAIL
ROAD TO THE FORKS
MAPS AND OTHER DOCUMENTS
Modern Press,
Saskatoon, Sask. 1966
Peter Martin Associates
Toronto, Ontario 1973
Univ. of Toronto Press
Toronto, Ontario 1957
Winnipeg
Free Press
Winnipeg, Manitoba 1973
Modern
Press
Saskatoon, S ask. 1965
Stovel-Advocate Press
Winnipeg, Manitoba 1970
PACIFIC
RAILWAY COMPANY
Employees Time Table
Number 1
September 21,
1908
PROVINCE OF MANITOBA
HUDSONS BAY COMPANY
CANADIAN PACIFIC
RAILWAY COMPANY
WARKENTIN & RUGGLES
Economic Atlas of Manitoba Department of
Industry and Commerce 1960
Sectional Map showing Lands
for Sale or Lease in the
Province of Manitoba.
Corrected to
August 1, 1929.
Historical Chart of Sub-(blueprint)
divisions, Prairie and
Pacific Regions.
Station Map, showing all
railway lines (Canadian
Pacific & Canadian National)
for Prairie & Pacific Regions.
Employees Timetables 1880s & 1890s
various
Historical Atlas of Manitoba Winnipeg 1970
July 1975
THE RECENT SURPRISE ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE BRITISH BOW-OUT FROM THE
Channel Tunnel proposal, to build a rail-road tunnel un­
der the 24-mile wide English Channel (La Manche) between
England and France, in con junction with the French government, took
our reader John Welsh quite by surprise.
The reason given by the United Kingdoms Secretory for the En­
vironment Mr. Anthony Crosland, was the escalating costs of con­
struction, which were reported to be likely to increase to as much
as $ 3.5-4.5 billion.
What disappoints John Welsh is the apparently inescapable con­
clusion that he will probably not be able to make his cherished dr­
eam come true: a journey by railway in one of those enticing, lux­
urious blue sleeping~cars of La Compagnie Internationale des Wagons­
Lits et des Grands Express Eurupens, all the way from Inverness,in
the north of Scotland, to Teheran, Iran, via London, Paris, Basle,
Belgrade, Istanbul, Ankara, Tatvan and Tabriz~
BILL MCKEOWN, THE ASSOCIATIONS FAR EAST REPRESENTATIVE, REPORTED IN
March 1975 that a third segment of Japans Shinkansen or
New Tokaido Line, from Okayama to Hakata, on the southern
island of Kyushu, was placed in operation on March 10 1975 at 0540.
Rail travel time from Tokyo, 668 miles to the north, was thereby re­
duced by more than three hours, to seven hours, plus or minus a few
minutes, principally through the use of the 11.7-mile long Kammon
Tunnel under the Strait of Shimonoseki, between the main island of
Honshu and the southern island of Kyushu.
The 23 fastest Hikari (Light) trains scheduled daily from To­
kyo to Hakata will make six intermediate stops (Nagoya, Kyoto, Osaka,
Okayama, Hiroshima and Kokura) and average about 95 mph., while the
Kodama (Echo) trains will make 28 intermediate stops.
The first portion of the New Tokaido Line, from Tokyo to Osaka,
was opened on October 1, 1964. The second portion, from Osaka to Okay­
ama, was opened in March 1972.
Other extensions are planned to Sapporo on the northern island
of Hokkaido, to the west, along the Japan Sea coast of H~nshu and
farther south on Kyushu to Nagasaki and Kagoshima.
THERE WAS A TIME WHEN THE TICKET ILLUSTRATED HEREWITH WAS CONSIDERED
a collectors item and might have commanded a price far
in excess of its actual purchase price.
Then, along came the Adirondack service and the .intrinsic val­
ue of this ticket suddenly disappeared. Today, it might not even be
honoured on the State of New York-Delaware & Hudsons Adirondack
for the Montral to Plattsburg, NY portion of the run~
CANADIAN 223 R A I L
As you might guess, April 30 1971 was the last day on which the
southbound D&H Laurentian operated. Some members of the Association
decided to participate in this memorable event. Memorable? Yes, until
August 6 1974. After that, it was a whole new passenger train service
on the D&H, which included dome cars.
And, in case you think that the D&H s Adirondack service pro­
vides just the same old ride from Montreal to Albany, NY, you are
hereby invited to purchase a ticket, one day, and ride in the dome. The
approach to the tunnel through the rocks at Willsboro and under
the rocky ridge at Fort Ticonderoga can only be described as start­
ling and the passage through these bores as intimidating~
Try it~ Youll like it~ Positively~ And theres no extra charge~
Wayne Hoagland.
lmitd by IlIllerrilil Junttlos. fly.
WJz~!~n.t~.~.~~9JllA,,!1.Ul
~
MONTREAL (Unit 3), p, Q.

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~
.~f~~oo~~r.Uo~t~I~~m~I~8o~1~v:.aP I.
~
subJect to Tula RtODlatioftS
NOT TRAN8PIRABLE
0000 IN OOAOH£8 ONLY
~CIrII
Printed ~/?e
~J.CI
n U.8.A.
~I
Oneck to btl taken up by FIh4 OonducIor
MONTREAL (Unit 3), P. Q.
C
~
To —.p~.NX.——
0:>
0000 IN COA HE8 ONLY
t.C NO Good for Paeaage
NOT TRANSPIRABLE
ForiI
luaod by N •• lenlil. J,ttI .. Ry.
~J-CA
Th. DELAWARE &1iiiiiSOii R. R. CcwocntJoa
THIS SPRING, BARRIE MACLEOD OF SYDNEY, NOVA SCOTIA, REPORTED THAT
DEVCO Railway had token delivery of a new -to them -die-
sel unit and was expecting delivery of a second. These
units, numbered DEVCO 214 and 215, are ex-Union Pacific Railroad RS
27s, rebuilt by MLW Industries, Montreal and derated from 2400 to
2000 hp.
Barrie also sent a roster of DEVCO motive power:
Rood
Type/
number Builder model Rated Note
20 EMD 40 300 hp
61 ALCO S 1 660 2,3
200 thru 202 MLW RS 23 1000 4 203
thru 212 ALCO RS 1 1000 5 300
ALCO RS 1 1000 5
214 thru 215 ALCO RS 27 2000 6
Notes:
–1.
Number 20 is one of 11 units built by EMD in 1940-43. It
was the first model 40 built and used by EMD. It was after-
words sold to McKinnon Industries and then to Lake Ontario
Steel, before being sold to DEVCO in 1969.
CANADIAN 224 R A I L
2. Number 60, not included in the roster, was an ex-Pacific
Great Eastern Railway unit, Number 553 in 1960. It was
sold to the Laurinburg & Southern Railroad in 1972 and became
their Number 107.
3. Number 61 is ex-Chicago & North Western Railroad Number
1202, acquired by DEVCO in 1961.
4. These units were purchased new in 1960, the only new units
ever acquired by the DEVCO Railway.
5. These RS 1 units were formerly Minneapolis and St. Louis
Railroad and Wisconsin Central~Railrod~ unit~, a~quired
in 1960-61.
6. These are ex-ALCO demonstrators, later Union Pacific
Railroad units Numbers 675 & 676, acquired through
MLW. They have been used as leased units by MLW from 1971
to 1974.
The cooperation of Ray Corley of Toronto in verifying this in­
formation is very much appreciated.
Barrie also reported that the Cape Breton Steam Railway had pur­
chased a wooden van from Canadian National Railways for use as a can­
teen at the end of the line at Port Marien. The van was repainted
a pale yellow colour, which was the paint scheme on the former Sydney
and Louisburg Railway.
THE DELIVERY DATES FOR CP RAILS SD 40-~ UNITS FROM DIESEL DIVISION,
General Motors of Canada Limited, are supplied by Pierre
Patenaude. These are CP RAIL class DRF 30m locomotives:
Road Builders
numbers numbers Deliver~ date
5800, 5801 A-3113, A-3114 7 December 1974
5802, 5803 A-3115, A-3116 9 December 1974
5804, 5805 A-3117, A-3118 11 December 1974 5836, 5676 A-3119, A-3121
13 December 1974
5677, 5678 A-3122, A-3123 16 December 1974
5675, 5680 A-3120, A-3125 17 December 1974 5679,
5681 A-3124, A-3126 19 December 1974
5682, 5683 A-3127, A-3128 20 December 1974
5684, 5685 A-3129, A-3130 6
January 1975
5686, 5687 A-3131, A-3132 8 January 1975
5688, 5689 A-3133, A-3134 13 January 1975
5690, 5691 A-3135, A-3136 14 January 1975
5692, 5693 A-3137, A-3138 15 January 1975 5694, 5695 A-3139, A-3140 17
January 1975
5696, 5697 A-3141, A-3142 20 January 1975
5698, 5699 A-3143, A-3144 23 January 1975
5700, 5701 A-3145, A-3146 25 January 1975
5702, 5703 A-3147, A-3148 27 January 1975 5704, 5705 A-3149, A-3150 29
January 1975 5706, 5707 A-3151, A-3152
31 January 1975
5708, 5709 A-3153, A-3154 4
February 1975
5710, 5711 A-3155, A-3156 7 February 1975
5712, 5713 A-3157, A-3158 12 February 1975
5714, 5715 A-3159, A-3160 15 February 1975 5716 A-3161 19
February 1975 5717 A-3162 27
February 1975
CANADIAN 225 R A I L
These units are based at Alyth Yard, Calgary, Alberta and are
used mostly west of Calgary. Numbers 5800 through 5805 and Number
5836 are LOCOTROL master units for use in coal unit-train service.
Pierre sends the accompanying picture of something old, some­
thing new on CP RAIL. Just-delivered SD 40-2s Numbers 5715 and 5714
left St. Luc Yard, Montreal, on freight Train 937 on 16 February 1975
in a lash-up with elderly FB 2 Number 4470.
PROPONENTS OF TORONTO, ONTARIOS TOUR TRAM OPERATION WERE SOMEWHAT
disconcerted in March 1975, when the proposal for summer­
75 operation was discussed, to find that revenue in 1974
was 61.6¢ per mile, compared with $ 1 per mile in 1973, while opera­
ting costs in 74 rose to $ 1.25 per mile. In 1973, Tour Tram car-
ried 20,451 passengers in 72 days of operation, while in 1974, the
total was 19,637 in 99 days of operation. Of course, it should be
recognized that the TTC suffered a work-stoppage at the height of the
74 season, during the Canadian National Exhibition; 121 days of
operation had been planned.
At the inception of the Tour Tram operation, the Toronto Tr-
ansit Commission agreed to run the service for two years without a
change in the routeing. However, the route for 1975 operation was
amenable to revision, if this was considered necessary.
As a result of several meetings, a new path for Tour Tram was
determined, which provided a 40-45 minute ride from May 17 to Sep­
tember 1, 1975, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays only. Exceptions to
this schedule were July 1, when Tour Tram would not run because of
a ma jor Canada Day parade in downtown Toronto. Instead, Tour Tram was
to run Monday June 30. In addition, Tour Tram would run daily
through the CNE fortnight, August 14 to September 1. Hours were set
at 1000 to 2100 on weekends and holidays, with 1000 to 1500 and 1900
to 2100 operation during CNE fortnight.
Tour Tram loading point was to be in front of Torontos City
CANADIAN 226 R A I L
Hall on Queen Street West, where ex-London, England double-deck tour
buses start -and terminate.
Large Peter Witt streetcar Number 2424, on lease by the TTC from
the Holton County Radial Railway was not planned to be used in the
1975 Tour Tram operation, although it was to be pooled with the
current Small Witts, if it was ready. Number 2424 was committed for
use in the transportation exhibit at the CNE, together with the
quarter-section, full-scale mock-up of the new Canadian Light Rail
Vehicle, recently previewed by Ontarios Urban Transportation Devel-
opment Corporation. E.A.Wickson.
—T—i
—-001:
Note preliminary turn via McCaul, Dundas and Church to
startinq point on Queen, to pick uo oasRengers who
missed Tour Tram. Thereafter, Tour Tram looos on
t1~C~~l Street 1000 to Dass startin~ noint, again
PlcKlng un late-comers. Three times and out~
– – – – – – – = TTC subway
THE OTTAWA JOURNAL OF MARCH 12, 1975, REPORTED THAT RESIDENTS OF
the Lucerne and Nepean districts of the Ottawa area were
continuing to agitate for a GO Transit type of opera-
tion to the city centre, using CP RAIL trackage and equipment. The
Lucerne group requested a commuter service from Aylmer, Quebec to
Scott Street in Ottawa, while the Nepean group wanted a commuter
service from Kanata to downtown Ottawa.
In both cases, CP RAIL trackage, presently sparingly used by
freight trains, would be utilized. CP RAIL officials, who had already
been consul ted, said they were anxious and willing to cooperate,
on condition that no operating losses would accrue to the railway.
Proponents of the scheme were temporarily stymied by the ina-
CANADIAN 227 R A I L
bility to find the necessary funds for the project, but the S 2 mil_
lion annual subsidy, allegedly paid to Torontos GO Transit opera­
tion, offered them some hope that the money could be found. Arguments we
re adduced that sovings would accrue to Ontario
through a reduction in probable essential highway construction. Also
noted was the policy of the Government of Canada to reduce parking
spoce for its growing number of employees. J.D.Welsh.
JOHN WELSH SENDS IN A CLIPPING FROM THE TORONTO GLOBE & HAIL IN
which it was announced that GO Transit had outgrown its
storage and equipment yard at Willowbrook (Hi mica) and
plans are under way to build a new ~ultiMillion_dollar replacenent.
Hr. William Howard, General Hanager, Toronto Area Transit Oper­
ating Authority, said that the new Maintenance yard and building com­p
lex must be ready by mid_1977, in order to accommodate the new dou­
ble_decker commuter roil cars, scheduled for arrival at that ti_e.
While the Willowbrook yards, six lIIiles frOIll Toronto s Union
Station, might be expanded and rebuilt, Hr. Howard also suggested
that another site, somewhere on one of GO Transits lines, night be
selected.
FOLLOWING THE FIRST USE OF PENN CENTRALS DETROIT RIVER TUNNEL, BE_
tween Detroit, Michigon and Windsor, Ontario by a Canodian
Notional/Grand Trunk Western freight lrain on February 20,
1975, what appears to be the lost trip, exclusively for CN/GTW of
the fo~ous 5.S.LANSDOWNE, now a barge and propelled by the tug MAR­
GARET YORKE, was mode on Horch 14 following, The Canodian Transport
Co~mis$ion ratified the ter~inotion of the cor_borge service using
the IOB-year-old ror~er cor_ferry.
The use of the PC connections and tunnel by the CN/GTW was
authorized by the Railroad Service Boord of the Interstate Commerce
Co.nission ond the Railway Transport Committee of the Canadian Trans­
port Commission simultaneously and took effect at 2359 on January 24,
1975.
In the State of Michigan, the CN/GTW will use PC trackage from
the vicinity of Bay City Junction yard to the International Boundary in
the middle of the tunnel; on the Canadian side, CN/GTW will use
PC trackage in Windsor to the junction with the Esse~ Terminal Rail­
way, which provides a bridge-line between PC and CN.
The LANSDOWNE, presently a cor-barge, may continue in service on
the Detroit. River, but leased by Detroit Barge lines, as previously
reported. The Tug MARGARET YORKE was to move to the Sarnia, Ontario_
Port Huron, Michigan run.
W.J.Bedbrook.
ON A DECEMBER DAY IN 1963, CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS HIXED TRAIN
M-243 from Halifax to Yarlllouth, Novo Scotia, doily except Sunday,
paused at liverpool, N.S. Mr. Maxwell l. Haclead captured it on
film, with units NUlllbers 1640 and 1633 on the point.
j

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Canacian Rail
is published monthly by the
Canadian Rairoad Historical Association
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TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
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