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Canadian Rail 280 1975

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Canadian Rail 280 1975

No. 280
May 1975

POWER
lor the People
Text Photographs
B.A. Biglow J.J.Shaughnessy
Y
oU could say that Canadian National
Railways were a little late in die­
selizing their pass~nger trains.The
steam engine was quite economical
for the tonnages and speeds prevalent
at that time and thus the multipur­
pose steam power was retained for
passenger trains and was also avail­
able for freight services, in emer­
gencies.
The diesel locomotive models designed exclusively for passenger
trains, such as the Es and PAs, were avoided, since the passenger
version of the 4-axle freight units had been developed when CN be­
gan passenger train dieselization.
Canadian National further avoided large numbers of carbody-
style units by using hood-type road-switchers on secondary branch
lines. For mainline trains, the Company bought FP 9 models from Gen­
eral Motors Diesel Limited of London, Ontario and FPA 2 and FPA 4 mo­
dels from Montreal Locomotive Works of Montral, Canada.
After almost twenty years, only one true FPA 2 unit survives,it
being on the St-Hilaire/Montral, Qubec commuter run, Trains 900/991.
This unit wos built with a model 244 prime mover, which model Can­
adian National found to be unreliable due to water leaks. Four other
units, Numbers 6758, 6759, 6658 and 6659 had the model 244 prime­
movers removed and the model 251 installed, making them equivalent
to the FPA 4 model. The prime-mover/generator assemblies removed from
these units were used to re-manufacture the four units of the RSC 24
model, CN unit Numbers 1800, 1801, 1802 and 1803, rated at 1400 hp.,
of which there are three surviving today. The other FPA 4 units were
purchased new. Details on these FPA units were given in an excellent
article by M.W.Dean and W.G.Blevins, Canadian National Railways FPA
2s and FPA 4s, October 1967, Number 192, pp. 214-19, CANADIAN RAIL.
CANADIAN NATIONAL FPA 4 NUMBER 6769 ON TRACK ONE AT THE DIESEL SHOP,
Pointe-St-Charles, Montral, on a warm August evening in 1974. The
A-B-A lashup, headed by Number 6769, was rostered for the overnight
Cavalier, Train 59, to Toronto, Ontario.
~JUST OUTSIDE CNS POINTE ST-CHARLES DIESEL SHOP IS A GROUP OF CANAD­
ian National FPA 4 units, ready to depart for Montrals
Central Station to power evening trains, east and west.
CANADIAN 136 R A I L
The MLW units have always been $econd sisters to the GM units
on CNs system, except in their stamping-grounds of the Maritimes.
West of Winnipeg, Manitoba, repair facilities for MLW units just did
not exist. Today, with a reduced number of passenger trains on the
average over the system, MLW units are frequently demoted tOo ex­
press freight runs, although the schedules of these latter trains are
often equivaelnt to or better than those of passenger consists.
The FPA 4s were popular units with the engine crews, when the
schedule called for many stops. These units were able to accelerate
a train very quickly away from a station. Crews have claimed time­
savings of 1 minute per stop. The MLW units were criticized because
of poor conditions in the cab. In summer, the heat from the engine
room kept the cab at a very uncomfortable temperature. When the cab
windows were lowered to reduce the heat, under the proper conditions
of adjustment, the exhaust fumes from the engine manilold could be
drawn forward into the cab, thus making things a good deal worse for
the crew. In the winter, there were the usual drafts from the panel
in the nose. In time, most of these peculiarities were eliminated.
While the MLW FPA 4s never made the mileages run up by the com­
petitors units on the transcontinental passenger trains, they have
worked their fair share of the system mileage, to and from the Mari­
times. And if you judge by longevity, they have been very successful
on Canadian National Railways .
…. IMAGINE THAT ITS A HARM EVENING IN AUGUST, 1974, AND THAT YOURE
standing just outside the Diesel Shop at Canadian Nation­
al Railways Pointe St-Charles complex in Montreal. Jim
Shaughnessy, that clever photographer, tells you to hold the flash
just a little higher, there is a blast of light, and here is the re­
sult~
FPA 4 NUMBER 6765 WAS ONE OF CNS CHRISTMAS PRESENTS IN 1958, BEING
delivered on December 12. Sixteen years later, on an August afternoon
in 1974, the hostler moves the unit into the Diesel Shop at Pointe-St­
Charles, Montreal.
A TRIO OF FPA 4s, NUMBERS 6770, 6778 AND 6787 IN FRONT OF THE DIESEL
Shop at Pointe-St-Charles, Montreal, on the same August 1974 evening.
THE FP A-B-A TRIO, HEADED BY NUMBER 6770, HAS LEFT THE DIESEL SHOP
at Pointe-St-Charles for CNs Central Station, to power Train 59, the
overnight Cavalier from Montreal to Toronto, on an evening in Aug­
ust 1974. Number 6778 is running in tandem with two GM units, the
B of which is Number 6638.
TWO CLASSIC FPA 4 UNITS FROM MLW MONTREAL. NUMBERS 6785 AND 6787 WERE
delivered to CN on April 8 and 20, 1959, respectively.
THE ELECTRIC HAULERS ON THE SIDING AT THE EAST END OF CNS CENTRAL
Station at Montreal cerfity that it is a summer Saturday and the len­
gth of Train 51, the morning RAPIDO to Toronto, confirms that it is
a busy weekend in August 1972.

NUMBER
678
.3 COMBINES WITH.

B
·
UNIT
NUMBeR
M32
TO
~QWERT,RAJiN
37
,
TO
Q:tt6~a
onan
afte~noon
;
i~
Al1g
,iJ~t19
,72.
;
Thet
o
rai
,h
is

~rossihg

th~
,cli.

u~ed
,
Lachin
·e
Canal
OR
;
the
.
c;leck
of
t~~

f
o
rfne
,r
twin-;,span
y,
ertical
Uft

bri
:dge,
now
chopp~d
down
~9
she.
Th:e;
girders
q
for
th~
wires
for

the
,
e~ectrifr
c
:
atio

R

w;
hich
used
toe
x
ten:Clfi:om
Cent.ial
Stati
,
on,
. M.on,
trea

J,
,
to
,
t
,
he
:;
E1e¢tr
:
i
~
Shop
,a;t .
.PQinte-St
-Ch
,ar:r
~
s
are
.
vis
:
ibJ,e
pi:
the
north
(far)

il
nd
~f
,
th
ii
b
,
ridge.

. ,
CANADIAN
NATIONAL
ENGINE
NUMBER
6788,
WITH
FOUR
CARS,
WAITS
PATIENTLY
in
the
station
at
Ottawa,
Canada,
to
return
to
Montral
as
Train
130
on
a Sunday morning
in
August 1972.
f~!
I
A
GLIMPSE
OF
S.S.Worthen
Illustrations courtesy of
Toronto Area Transit Operating Authority.
T
he newspapers of Toronto, Ontario, Canada had every
right to boast, early in 1975, that GO Transit was
the best thing in urban transit in North America.
Although this combined railway-highway bus service
for travellers to and from Toronto from neighbour­
ing cities could be said to be an expensive operation,
with a per-rider defecit of 33.9 cents, this fact
should be weighed against the estimated cost to build
sufficient expressway/highway capacity to handle the
6.5 million riders GO Transit carried in 1974. One ir­
refutable fact emerges: GO Transit is effective and
is greatly appreciated by millions of travellers -not
just commuters -in the Hamilton-Toronto-Oshawa lake­
shore residential areas.
Station parking lots, as might be expected, are an essential
component of GO Transits success; potential expressway drivers are
thereby persuaded to leave their automobiles at the station and to
use GO trains. Recently, Mr. David Sutherland, Director of Opera­
tions, Toronto Area Transit Operating Authority (TATOA), announced
that additional parking facilities would be constructed at Oakville,
Clorkson and Port Credit, Ontario, on GO Transit lines west of Tor­
onto.
But the increase of 16% in passengers carried during October,
1974 caught GO Transit quite by surprise. Since its inauguration,GO
Transits average annual growth rate has been 6%, but the recent
increase startled TATOA. November 1974 produced a comparable 13%
increase.
While GO Transits Lakeshore Line (Hamilton-Toronta-Oshawa)
accounted for the largest portion of the increase, the Georgetown,
Ontario service, introduced on April 29, 1974, carried 55% mare
passengers last October and now transports nearly 3,000 commuters
each weekday.
GO Transit plans to introduce commuter trains from Richmand
Hill, Ontario, 21 miles north of Toranto s Union Station in mid-
1976, with a limited service similar to the Georgetown operation,with
CANADIAN 145 R A I L
-GRAY COACH RESTRICTED AREA
t •• fRANSIT
System Map
—————–Rail
======== Bu.
three trains each rush-hour, five days a week. Rolling stock
been ordered from Hawker Siddeley and 30 new passenger cars
begin to arrive in the autumn of 1975.
ha s
will
During 1974, GO Transit exchanged a number of its light-weight
passenger cars for an equivalent capacity of CP RAIL bi-level com­
muter cars, used in the west-island commuter services in Montreal.
Both the passengers and TATOA were pleased with the results and
TATOA began studies with the Ontario Transportation Development Cor­
poration and Canadian National Railways, to develop final design
specifications for the new cars. These specifications will be ready
early in March 1975 and bids will then be invited from car-builders.
The contract should be let in mid-1976, with delivery to start ~n
mid-1977.
To suggest that GO Transits new dual-level cars will be sim-
ilar to CP RAILs bi-levels is risky, however. Since the design
specifications are being created from basics, there will be sub-
stantial differences in the two vehicle types, not the least of
which will be full double-deck construction, rather than gallery­
type, with a 75% increase in capacity over the 94-rider cars GO
Transit presently uses.
Ever conscious of its public image, GO Transit inaugurated two
programs in the last half of 1974, the first of which was designed
to identify GO trains positively to intending passengers. The sec­
ond program was designed to reduce motive power noise, particularly
in train-servicing areas, the most important of which is Willow­
brook, adjacent to a residential section of Toronto.
~ GO TRANSIT UNIT NUMBER 9805 -PRE-MODIFICATION -ON A WESTBOUND GO
I~ Train near M~rkham Road ~n the eastern part of Toronto, Ontario.1973.
GO TRANSIT NUMBER 9859, AN APCU, ON A GO TRAIN ARRIVING AT PORT CREDIT,
Ontario, inbound to Toronto. 1974.

CANADIAN 148 R A I L
The necessity to identify GO trains quickly and precisely ari­
ses primarily from the fact that GO trains use Canadian National
Railways tracks between Pickering and Oakville, Ontario, and thus
GO passengers can and do become confused in telling the difference
between GO and CN mainline trains. Since CN freight and intercity
passenger trains do not always stop at intermediate stations, it is
most important that GO Transit passengers on station platforms do
not stand too close to the track. Conversely, when GO trains do ar­
rive at stations, passengers should leave and board them promptly,
to reduce the trains stopping time.
In November 1974 three auxiliQry power control units ( APCUs,
to be described later~ were equipped with yellow strobe lights,
mounted on their rooves, while, at the same time, two control pas­
senger cars had gyralites installed on their front-end doors. The
strobe lights were permanent; the gyralites, borrowed from CP RAIL,
were temporary. GO Transits Rail Division and Canadian National
evaluated the results early in 1975. It is hoped that these or sim­
iliar identifying devices will help commuters to distinguish quick­
ly between types of trains on the Lakeshore Line.
Of more importance to the residents of one part of Toronto was
the noise nuisance at Willowbrook Yard, once part of Canadian Na­
tionals main Toronto freight yard. Just prior to the start of GO
Transit services in 1967, Willowbrook was selected to be the home
of GO Transits rail fleet. While the rumble of the prime-movers did
not at first seem to annoy adjacent residents, the shrill whine of
the diesel-powered auxiliary electrical generators, installed on
the eight original GP 40TC units, certainly did. These Detroit Die­
sel model 149-powered auxiliary generators provide the power for
heating, lighting and air-conditioning the GO passenger cars.
While silencers had been fitted to these engines, in practice,
they proved to be inadequate. As an initial solution to the problem
of noise nuisance, line-side power sources were installed and the
auxiliary diesel generators were shut down when their operation was
not required.
When GO Transit ordered four new GP 40-2 units from Diesel Div­
ision, General Motors of Canada, in 1973, they were specified not
to have these auxiliary diesel generators. Instead, GO Transit pur­
chased five trade-in FP 7A GMDL units from the Ontario Northland Ra­
ilway to house the,se auxiliary generator sets.
With Canadian National doing the design work and Ontario North­
land the physical portion, at its North Bay, Ontario shops, the aux­
iliary diesel generators were housed in the FP 7A carbodies, making
the model 149 Detroit Diesels much quieter than as though they were
mounted on the motive power units. These modified FP 7As were re­
named Auxiliary Power Control Units (APCUs) by GO Transit.
But the problem of noise generation still existed on the ori­
ginal eight GP 40TC units. Canadian National undertook to solve
the problem by modifications in three major areas. The sides of the
GP 40TC hood, originally louvered to provide air to the intake man-
ifold of the model 149 Detroit Diesel of the generator set, were
blanked off and lined with insulating material. Air intakes were
relocated to air boxes, specially designed with smooth ducts to
eliminate any whistling due to irregular air-flow patterns. The
colling-fan housing was re-engineered to reduce mechanical noise
from the auxiliary and the fan itself. Finally, better muffling was
applied to the Detroit Diesels exhaust. These modifications were
made at CNs Pointe-St-Charles Shops in Montreal.
CANADIAN 149 R A I L
GO Transit unit Number 9806, the first of the GP 40TC units to
be modified, went to Pointe-St-Charles on October 7,1974 and was
back in GO service by the following December. Number 9805 was next
on the list, being returned to service in February 1975, while Num­
ber 9801 went to the Pointe. Number 9807 joined Number 9801 early
in March and both were back in service by the end of the month .. It
was planned to have all eight original GP 40TC units modified by the
end of 1975.
One further noise-generating condition, that of cyclic vibra­
tion, was thoroughly investigoted at Willowbrook. The source was
finally traced to low-frequency noise waves generated by the idling
3000 hp. prime-movers. As stopping and re-starting these prime­
movers on a daily basis was impractical, it was proposed to erect
baffles around the units. This was ineffective, as well as imprac­
tical. The procedure finally adopted was to reverse the trainsets,
when they were stored, so that the diesel units were farther from
the residential areas than they were previously.
This solution proved to be effective and the practice was
stituted on a permanent basis, but not without causing some
plications. Lineside power installations and unit refuelling
cilities had to be relocated at considerable cost, but, in
final evaluation, the result justified the expense.
in­
com­
fa­
the
Early in 1974, GO Transit took delivery of four new GP 40-2
units from General Motors of Canada, the first of two orders, the
second of which will provide an additional three. These new units,
together with the eight rebuilt 1966 GP 40TCs, will provide the
power requirements for the existing GO Transit services, plus the
extensions planned for 1976.
Another most significant development in GO Transits
will take place in 1975. Studies began early in the year to
mine the need and the feasibility of introducing GO services
the Galt Subdivision of CP RAIL to Streetsville (21.2 miles)
Milton (31.7 miles). These studies, to be completed in Mayor
1975, will enable a decision by the Government of Ontario as
whether or not this service should be established.
gtowth
deter­
over
or
June,
to
A preliminary report for the Region of Peel predicted that a
service on this line, comparable to the existing service on the
Lakeshore Line would, by 1976, have an even greater potential than
that line.
No glimpse of GO, however brief, would be complete without a
glance at the GO Bus operations. Starting in September 1970, an
agreement was made with Gray Coach Lines to assume responsibility
for parts of the GO operation: Hamilton-Toronto, Oshawa-Toronto and
Newmarket-Toronto. At the same time, GO Transit established shuttle
bus schedules between Oshawa and Pickering and Hamilton and Oakville,
connecting with all GO trains and thus expanding rail routes at both
the east and west ends of the Lakeshore Line,
In January 1972, the routes of Travelways of Canada
Toronto and Richmond Hill, Ontario, became part of the GO
between
T ronsit
GO TRANSIT APCU NUMBER 9861 ON AN EASTBOUND GO TRAIN FROM HAMILTON,
at Bayview Junction, where Canadian National Railways main line from
Toronto to Londonorid Windsor, Ontario joins the line from Niagara
Falls and Hamilton,Ontario. 1974.

CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS NOISE-ABATEMENT ENGINEERS EXAMINE SOUND
emissions from GO TRANSIT unit Number 9806. Inside the open doors of
the unit is 0 Detroit Diesel model 149, used for generating auxiliary
power. The GP 40-1C s doors, once louvered, are now blanked off and
insulated. The auxiliary generator diesel now breathes through three
air boxes along the running board. The hood has also been lengthened
to accommodate new muffling equipment for the mechanical side of the
engine and cooling-fan. The protrusion on the roof accommodates si­
lencing accessories for the exhaust side of the d~esel engine. 1974.
GO TRANSIT GP 40TC NUMBER 9806 WAS IN THE MIDDLE OF A MAJOR REBUILD­
ing process on October 17, 1974, at Canadian Nationals Pointe-St­
Charles Shops, Montreal.
CANADIAN 152 R A I L
system and on April 28, 1974, when the Toronto Transit Commissions
subway was opened to Finch Avenue in the northern part of Toronto,
this service was converted to a shuttle schedule to the new subway
terminal.
GO Transit also has its own fleet of buses. With the delivery
of 14 model MC-8 buses, built by Motor Coach Industries of Winnipeg,
Manitoba early in 1975, the GO Transit bus fleet totalled 54 ve-
hicles. GO buses are assigned to Gray Coach Lines and Travelways for
use on GO services.
GO buses now carry about 14,000 people daily, while rail
vices carry 25,000 passengers each day. Studies are ongoing
facilitate ticketing of passengers, so that interchangeability
free transfer between GO Transit and other area transit lines
be achieved, thus providing greater flexibility in use of the
Transit system. The second study is looking at GO stations,
suitability of design and possible improvement.
ser­
to
and
may
GO
for
When GO Transit was established in 1967, it was considered on
experiment and therefore, capital expenditure, particularly in the
case of stations, was kept to a minimum. After seven successful years
of operation, GO Transit is definitely here to stay and certain fa­
cilities, particularly stations, must now be upgraded.
Is GO Transit really here to stay? Just ask any commuter. Or,
better still, ask any short-distance traveller around Toronto, for
GO Transit does not serve just commuters. It serves urban and inter­
urban travellers. And, as an index af its popularity, consider the
current increases in passengers carried and the potential of routes
scheduled for develop~ent.
No wonder GO Transits performance, and its prospects, are the
envy of every other large city in North America.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The author would like to thank Mr. Tom Henry, Information
Officer, Toronto Area Transit Operating Authority,Toronto,
Ontario, for his kind assistance in the preparation of
this article.
~ON NOVEMBER 26, 1974, GO TRANSIT UNIT NUMBER 9806, SHINING IN ITS NEW
paint scheme, awaited its first assignment-at Willowbrook Maintenance
Facility, Toronto.
GO TRANSITS NEW GP 40-2 NUMBER 9808 WAS PHOTOGRAPHED AT THE DIESEL
Division, General Motors of Canada Limited, London, Ontario, in Janu­
ary 1974. This was the first of four identical units delivered to
GO TRANSIT early in 1974. These units did not have the diesel-power­
ed auxiliary electrical generator units fitted on the original GP
40TC locomotives. Auxiliary electrical power is now generated in the
Auxiliary Power Control Units, built from ex-Ontario Northland Rail­
way trade-in FP 7As.
—–. -,—-,–_.,
, .,
CA NAD IAN 154 R A I L
GO TRANSIT
Rail Equiement Roster
Motive Power:
Year
Road numbers Builder Model built Number
9800
thru 9807 General Motors Diesel Limited GP 40TC 1966 8
London, Ontario
9808 thru 9811 Diesel Division, General Motors GP 40-2 1973 4
of Canada, Limited, London, Ont.
9812 thru 9814 Diesel Division, General Motors GP 40-2 1974 3
of Canada, Limited, London, Ont.
Self-Proeelled Cars:
9825 thru 9826 Hawker Siddeley Canada Limited RTC 85SPD 1967 2 (A)
9827
thru 9833 Hawker S iddeley Canada Limited RTC 85SP 1967 7 ( B)
Rollin~ Stock:
9900 thru 9931 Hawker Siddeley Canada Limited RTC 85 1967 32 ( C)
9932 thru 9945 Hawker Siddeley Canada Limited RTC 85 1968 14 ( C)
9946 thru 9975 Hawker Siddeley Canada Limited RTC 85 1973~74 30 ( C)
9700 thru 9729 Hawker Siddeley Canada Limited RTC 85 1975-76 30 (C, X)
9730 thru 9875 Hawker S iddeley Canada Limited RTC 85C 1967 8 (D)
Auxiliar~ Power Control Units:
9858 thru 9862 Ex-ONR FP 7A units; converted ACPU 1974 5 (E)
by Ontario Northland Railway
Double cab. (B) Single cab. (X) On order.
No control cab. (D) Control cab, one end.
°eerated
Numbers
1000
thru
1015 thru
1020 thru
1025 thru
Converted from ONR FP 7A units Numbers 1503,1505,1507,
1512, 1513. APCUs are equipped with 600 kw., 575 v., 60
Hz alternator sets for supplying auxiliary train power and
are used as remote-control position when train is
operating in push mode. They are not capable of In-
dependent movement.
Bus
Roster
b~ Gra~ Coach Lines Limited:
Builder Model Built
~
1014 General Motors Diesel Limited, 5305A 8/1970 44
London, Ontario.
1019 General Motors Diesel Limited 5305A 10/1971 46
1024 Diesel Division, General
of Canada, Limited
Motors
5307A 3/1973 46
1029 Diesel Division, General Motors 5307A 11 -12/1 973 46
of Canada, Limited
No.
15
5
5
5
CANADIAN 155 R A I L
1030 thru 1039 Diesel Division, General Motors 5307A 10/1974 46 10
of Canada, Limited
1250 thru 1263 Motor Coach Industries, Limited MC-8 3/1975 49 14
Winnipeg, Manitoba.
O[!erated
bl
Trvelwals of Canada Limited:
300 thru 303 Diesel Division, General Motors 5307A 10/1974 47 4
of Canada, Limited
NOTE: All buses are designed for a maximum speed of 80 mph.
– ——
J, GO TRANSIT UNITS NUMBERS 9812, 9813 and 9814 HURRY A CANADIAN NATION­
, al Railways freight through Clairville, on the northwest outskirts of
Toronto, to Toronto Yard, on December 3, 1974. The three GP 40-2s had
just completed their break-in runs and were about to be delivered to
GO TRANSIT. Their arrival allowed GO TRANSIT to return FP 7A units
Numbers 1504 & 1511, leased since late October 1974, to the Ontario
Northland Railway.
GO TRANSIT UNIT NUMBER 9810, ONE OF THE GP 40-2 UNITS DELIV~RED
early in 1974, pilots a GO train west to Hamilton, Ontario, through
Bayview Junction. These four units, with crew-comfort (safety) cabs,
were the first GO TRANSIT units to be painted in the current green­
and-white paint scheme. 1974.
GO TRANSIT NUMBER 1037 IS ONE OF THE LATEST ADDITIONS TO ITS HIGH-)::., .. ~.:.; ..•• ,:.~.: .•. way
motor coach fleet. This 53-passenger vehicle was delivered by.:
Diesel Division, General Motors of Canada, on August 30, 1974.·~,;·
The destination sign suggests that GO Transit may have plans
for a westward expansion, in the years to come.
Photo courtesy Diesel Division, General Motors of Canada.

MAY, 1975
THE SECOND MAJOR JUDICIAL BLOW TO LANDMARK PRESERVATION EFFORTS IN
New York City in less than a year was dealt by a decision
from Judge Irving Saypol of the Supreme Court of New
York in late January 1975. He invalidated the landmark designa-
tion of Grand Central Station, the Beaux Arts structure a virtual
symbol of the city for many decades and formerly the most famous
terminal of the many owned by the New York Central Railroad.
Judge Saypol s decision followed the invalidation of the land­
mark status of the J.P.Morgan mansion on Madison Avenue by the N.Y.
State Court of Appeals in July 1974.
The decision will allow the construction of a 59-storey office
tower on top of the terminal, which was originally proposed by the
Penn Central Corporation in 1967.
THE BITS AND PIECES FINALLY FELL INTO PLACE ABOUT JANUARY 21, 1975,
when it was announced that, after six months of secret
negotiations, control of MLW-Worthington, the Montreal­
based diesel locomotive builder and producer of diesel engines and
other products, is passing to Bombardier, Limited, the troubled sn­
owmobile-maker, that won the controversial contract for METRO ve­
hicles for the MUCTC, last year.
Now everyone can guess where Bombardier will build the
METRO cars. That is, if the Bombardier offer is accepted.
new
The announcement also said that the Government of Quebec and
the Government of Canada had been involved in the negotiations. The
Government of Quebec is interested in keeping MLW-Worthington work­
ing in Quebec; the Government of Canada is most anxious to repat­
riate control of the company to Canada and to maintain the firms
broad manufacturing abilities in the public transportation field,
thus protecting its interest in the export market.
Les Entreprises de J. Armand Bombardier, Limitee, the family
holding company, is to make a cash offer of $ 21 a share for MLW­
Worthington at the end of January, for all the 800,000 shares out­
standing, including the 30% holding by Studebaker-Worthington Cor­
poration of the United States. This offer is subject to the usual
90 percent acceptance by the shareholders. The boardroom recommen­
dation, which can hardly be against the offer in the circumstances,
will probably be made in the interval.
Mr. R.G.Gibbens the Montreal STARs financial editor, said
that MLW-Worthington had never been exactly a money-spinner,since
its earnings, volume and employment have varied with the Canadian
economic cycle.
Bombardier, struggling to escape from its dependence on
declining consumer snowmobile market, last May won the big
contract in competition with Canadian Vickers of Montreal.
the
METRO
Other companies which figured in the negotiations leading up
to Bombardiers bid were Dominion Bridge of Montreal, now an affil-
CANADIAN 159 R A I L
iate of Canadian Pacific Limited, through the latters control of
Algoma Steel, and other companies.
There may be other deals, said Mr. Gibbens, which will follow
if the theory about a big public transportation equipment building
enterprise is right.
The new streetcars needed by the Toronto Transportation Com­
mission in the immediate future may well be built in Montreal, after
all. S.S.Worthen.
STATISTICS CANADA RECENTLY RELEASED SOME RAILWAY STATISTICS FOR 1973.
John Welsh sent them in and compared them to 1972 figures.
Average passenger journey (commuter)(miles)
Average passenger journey (non-commuter)(miles)
Total revenue passengers carried (commuter)
1972
12 289 72.3%
Total TURBOTRAIN miles
Average
Average Average
cars per freighttrain*
freight train speed
cars per passenger train**
21,401
64.4
22.6
19.1
Average passenger journey on each tocket: CP RAIL
CNR
ACR
BCOL
Canada Southern
NAR
ONR
QNS&L
Other Class 1 Railways
56 123 110
141
17 92 265 218 16
Average cars
per freight*
Average cars Average freight
per passenger** train speed***
CNR
CP RAIL
ACR
BCOL
CanS ou
C&O S ys
NAR
ONR
QNS&L
63.3 67.9
56.4
49.7
59.3
55.7
51.7
43.4
135.5
26.2
5.4
6.3
2.2
2.0
2.2
5.7
9.1
* including passenger cars
** including freight cars
23.5
23.8
18.5
17.8 17.3
49.0
18.8
30.0
19.0
*** including stops, switching and delays en route
1973
12
281
74.5%
nil
65.6
22.5
21.1
CANADAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT, ACTING ON THE RECOMMENDATION OF
Mr. Otto Lang, Minister responsible for the Canadian Wh­
eat Board, has prohibited the abandonment of some 12,413
miles of railway lines in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta until
at least the year 2000. An additional 6,283 miles will be protected
until at least the end of 1976, while the remaining 525 miles may be
abandoned at any time, apparently.
Of these totals, Canadian National operates about 9,900 miles,
CP RAIL about 8,400 and Northern Alberta Railways about 900.
Concurrently, the railways are believed to have applied to the
Canadian Transport Commission for higher grain freight-rates. They
CANADIAN 160 R A I L
have contended that they lose money at the existing rate of half-a­
cent per ton-mile.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA HYDRO RAILWAY HAS PLACED AN ORDER WITH ELECTRO­
motive Division of General Motors, La Grange, Illinois,
U.S.A., for three MP 15 Diesel units. The MP 15, intro-
duced in 1974 by EMD, is a four-axle, four-motor unit, which com-
bines features of the switcher and road freight locomotive. It
utilizes the standard road-freight locomotive trucks and is powered
by the GM 645E-series 12-cylinder, non-turbocharged prime-mover. It
also incprporates current design modifications which have virtually
eliminated visible smoke and have substantially reduced gas emis­
sions. The cab improvements feature electrical heating.
1975.
Delivery to the BC HYDRO Railway is scheduled for the fall of
GM DieseLines.
SWITCH! THE TORONTO TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION HAS ANNOUNCED THE
placing of an order for sixty 53-passenger buses with
the Diesel Division, General Motors of Canada Limited,
London, Ontario.
The order had originally been awarded to Flyer Industries of
Winnipeg, Man~toba. However, labour problems there had de~ayed the
scheduled dellvery dates and the General Manager of Operatlons for
~he TTC.suggested that the TTC should not wait for the settlement
of these problems and recommended that the order be given to DD GMC.
The entire order for 108 coaches will now be built by DD GMC, with
delivery scheduled for the summer of 1975.
DD GMC have also received orders from the Red Deer Transit Sys­
tem (Alberta) for three 53-passenger models and from Medicine Hat
Transit System (Alberta) for two 45-passenger coaches.
GM DieseLines.
AS A RESULT OF LOSSES IN THE OPERATION OF ITS RAILROAD, THE NORWOOD
and St. Lawrence, during the past several years, the St.
Regis Paper Company recently decided to donate the rail­
way to the neighbouring Ogdensburg Bridge and Port Authority, which
operates the toll bridge across the St. Lawrence River between Pres­
cott, Ontario and Ogdensburg, New York.
The Ogdensburg Bridge and Port Authority has some experience in
railroad operation, since it has been providing freight service only
on the portion of the ex-Rutland Railroad from Ogdensburg to Norwood,
New York, for some years.
The Norwood & St. Lawrence Railroad Company started out as a
common carrier and was purchased by the St. Regis Paper Company in
the 1920s to haul pulpwood from Waddington, on the St. Lawrence
River to Norwood, New York, a distance of about 18 miles. Here,
it delivered loads to the New York Central for forwarding to St.
Regis mill. The phasing-out of this pulp mill, the lines chief
customer, precipitated operating losses in 1973 and 74 of the order
of $ 75,000.
At the end of 1973, the N&StL had two locomotives, shops, a
roundhouse and 18-plus miles of track, valued at $ 783,073. The two
diesels, Numbers 10 & 11, are GE 70-tonners and were built for the
N&StL. The railroad also has 15 employees.
The Interstate Commerce Commission ratified the gift, provi­
ded that service to the on-line customers would not be interrupted.
There is one industry at Norfolk, where the shops and general of·.
CANADIAN 161
fices of the N&StL are located, and a bulk animal feed depot at
Waddington. The siding at Chase Mills has not been used in quite
some time. John D. Welsh.
THE ISSUANCE BY CANADA POST ON 15 NOVEMBER 1974 OF AN 8¢ STAMP COM­
memoratlng the centenary of the birth of Gugliemo Marconi
the father of modern radio, prompted our member Major
C. Warren Anderson of Sussex, N.B., to look into his files of pic­
tures. Here, he found the photograph, reproduced herewith, of Sig­
nor and Signora Marconi on the rear platform of passenger car Num­
ber 4 of the Sydney & Louisburg Railway, at Glace Bay, Nova Scotia,
in 1902. _
We appreciate Major Andersons thoughtfulness in sending this
picture for presentation.
The first-day cover, also illustrated, was provided through the
kindness of Atlas Chemical Industries, Canada, Limited, Brantford ,
Ontario, to whom our thanks are due.
fiRST DAY Of ISSUE JOUR D[ MISSION
MULTICULTURE SERIES
0-lfon<,t;lZill9
MARCONI
/814-1937
GUGLIELMO JIA R CONI
Till },,1tT Pf1ItdJO.
,.-<{;
£:1· _-j-,,
~
,-. ,,
,;6 ,
o 1b.X: :;
ABBOTT L ,<.,c ;.{qa;E:,. ~T)1;;
:,00 ,;J; f .. : ~5t_f{D.
mON1 iI 1: L . ,_ SdS;~
A 11N,· $:R. ;:,. . IIOiU HEN File
PtRSONAl.
CANADIAN 162 R A I L
NO ONE WOULD EVER RECOGNIZE THOSE BLISTERED, BATTERED, BANGED-ABOUT
ex this, that and the other Baldwin RF-16 cabs, in their brand-new
colours, as outshopped from Colonie by the Delaware and Hudion~
After being all prettied up in pale blue, cornflower and dove grey,
Numbers 1216 & 1205 posed for their picture and thereafter went
down to Kenwood Yard at the Port of Albany, NY, to pick up the D&H
autotrain of trilevels loaded with Volkswagen automobiles. The RF-16
units took the train back as far as Colonie Shops, where alternate
power replaced the Sharknoses. All in all, a very successful trip,
duly recorded by expert photographer Jim Shaughnessy, on February 3,
1975. It seems likely that the RF-16s will be used on at least one
of the seven excursion trains to be oper~ted in 1975, as recently
announced by Tom OBrien, D&Hs Vice-President, Sales & Tndustrial
Development.
CANADIAN 163 R A I l.
IN A LATE JANUARY 1975 LETTER, PAT WEBB OF LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA RE­
marked that CP RAIL began operating groin unit_trains
with mid_train slave units out of Lethbridge in Novem­
ber, 1974. Semi_trailer trucks picked up grain ship~ents for about
lOO _i1es around Lethbridge.
On Decelflber 6, the Canodian paid a surprise visit to Leth-
bridge, due to a derail~ent on the main line near Medicine Hot. At 1
4:30, th& we~tbound train arriv&d with engineer Floyd Yeats of
Calgary at th& throttle. The consist was nine cars: twa coaches, de­
odheading west (the second a smooth-side, frOIR the Dominion, for­
Ilerly a day coach); the other seven cars were the usuol Canadian
equipment.
The crew worked through six subdivisions on the 230-mile from
Oun~are to Calgary. Orders read that the train was not to
ceed the ~Qximum of 45 .ph. on the freight-only line, which
it a long day for the crews. On the points were units Numbers
and 4069; both were fueled and watered at Lethbridge.

,-
lOIode 1409
NUllber
144, the ex-Canadion Pacific Railway steam locomotive,
presently leased to Canadian Pacific lillited, is in storage at leth­
bridge, in the roundhouse, under a plastic cover and looking fine. Number 144
arrived a couple of doys before Christ~os 1974 and spent
Decellber 25 autside the roundhouse, in compony with obout 15 diesel
units, looking very small beside the SO 40_2 units. ;
About Jonuory 1, 1975, while visiting Colgory, Pat sow nine of
the MLW Industries Qnits of the British ColUllbia Railway in Alyth
Yard of CP RAIL, Colgary, apparently on lease ta CP RAIL for the
durotion of the work stoppage on the BCOl. Dur
thanks to Pat for the aCCOllpanying picture of the Canadian
on its unellpected visit to lethbridge, Alberto.
1., ,ROM THE ARCHIVES OF THE DEPARTNENT Of TRANSPORT, MONTREAL ,JACQUES
11 Phorand rescued this print of engine Number 873 with two
platform cars. working on a coffer-doli! on the Lachine
flol at Cale_5t_Poul, Montreal, on August 15, 1909. Number 873 /loy
hove been a Grand Trunk Railway engine, although Jo(:ques thinks she
wos a Canadian Pacific Railway switcher.
Canadan Rail
is ptbIished monthly by the
Canadian Railroad Historical Association
p.o. BOO< 22,Staiion B. Montreal,Ouebec,CanacWH36 3J5
Editor;S.S.Worthen Production; p. MIxphy
AssociatiOn BfMChes
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN
L.I1.Unwin, S,cutory 1727 23rd. A~.nu. N.W. Calgary, AlIo,f2H

OTTAWA
W. II;.L i nley, S.~rUary P.D.Sox HI ,Station

OUOWII,Coodo

PACHlC COAST
R.H.tlty,r, Secutory P.O. Box l006,5totion

VonclluYer,B.C.V6C
ROCKY 1I000NUIN
J,H,I1,ikl.,S,cr.tory,P,O.Box 6102,5to1l0n C,Ed.onton,Allo.T58
~,
TORONTO /!. YORK DIVISION
P,Sh,rgold,Secr.toy P.D.Bo 58.9, Toreinol
,
Toronto, On t .H5W
,eo
AssociatiOn Representatives
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• More than lOOpiec:es or ~t on dispIir)/

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