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Canadian Rail 277 1975

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Canadian Rail 277 1975

Canadian Rail i
No. 277
February 1975

L
The Story of Passenger, Freight,
Ski and Other Trains from Montreal
to the Laurentian Mountains.
M. Peter Murphy
Part I -The Canadian Pacific Railway
T
hree evenings a week in 1973, at precisely
18: 15 hours, CP RAILs Train 167 eased out
of Windsor Station, Montreal, bound for
Mont Laurier, Quebec, 163 miles north into
the Laurentian Mountains. This RDC Dayliner
is the last of the multitude of passenger tr­
ains that the Canadian Pacific Railway used
to run to the Laurentian Mountains, long the
favourite holiday area for the citizens of
Canadas largest metropolis.
Montreals citizens are singularly fortunate in that there are
scenic recreation areas near the City in every direction. To the
east, the historic Eastern Townships; to the south, the Green Moun­
tains of the State of Vermont and the famous Adirondack Mountains of
northern New York State; to the west, the foaming rapids of the St.
Lawrence and the placid stretches of the lower Ottawa. And to the
north, the infinite variety of the Laurentian Mountains.
My acquaintance with these latter mountains and their valleys is
a happy one that dates from the late 1940s. And I envy anyone whose
recollections go back to the decades before those years. In the 40s,
many enjoyable weekends were spent with friends at Bevin Lake, near
Arundel, about 70 miles from Montreal. The quiet of the country us­
ually provided a disturbing contrast to the noise of the city and,
when bedtime came and sleep was slow in coming, the night noises
could be heard clearly through the open bedroom window. In the late
evening, the whistle of a train was audible. Was it the 6.45 Cana-
THERE WAS A TIME WHEN YOU COULD FLAG SKI TRAINS JUST LIKE STREETCARS
at the station at Val David, Quebec. In 1948, as the picture demon­
strates, you could try it~ Photograph courtesy Canadian Pacific Limited.
~ THE TRADITIONAL LOCAL – A 4-4-0, BAGGAGE CAR AND TWO OPEN-PLATFORM
coaches on the Canadian Pacific Railways Laurentian branch in 1898.
The location is near Ste-Agathe, which the railway had reached in
1892. Photo courtesy F. F .Angus from a book entitled Montreal.
CANADIAN 40 R A I L
dian National passenger train from Montreal, almost an hour late?
Or was it imagination? Silence. Perhaps it had stopped at a station.
Or was it indeed imagination? No, there it was again. By now, the
blurred exhaust of the steam engine was audible, but soon the blur
resolved itself into beats, punctuated ever and again by the melodic
chime of the whistle, echoing through the mountains. Could it be a
double-header? You could never be really sure until the train left
Weir. Then a stacatto of forceful, determined chuffs and puffs, some
of them annoyingly out of proper sequence. A double-header, indeed,
with one engine slipping on the grade. As she regained her feet, the
exhausts blended into a steady roar and, five minutes later, the two
locomotives would storm by, right outside the window.
After the night train had passed, there wos no possibility of
sleep until the lead engine had whistled for the crossing at Arundel.
After that, the northward progress of the train could no longer be
heard, and sleep -an unwelcome substitute -was not long in coming.
Ten years have passed since the last passenger train -diesel­
powered -rumbled north on the Canadian National, through the Lau­
rentian resorts of Weir and Arundel to the illogical terminal at
St-Remi dAmherst. The rails have been lifted and a superhighway and
bushes have variously repossessed the right-of-way. To the south,the
former grade has been obliterated over much of its length by the
graceful curves of the Laurentian Autoroute. But on the northern sec­
tion, the right-of-way is still in use, albeit by another ond quite
different transportation mode -the ski-doo~
CP RAIL, successor to the Canadian Pacific Railway, still pro­
vides the freight service essential to the basic economy of this part
of the Laurentians, but it is probably just a matter of time until
some drastic and final misfortune overtakes the present tri-weekly
RDC Dayliner passenger service which still survives.
Both CP RAIL and Canadian National Railways freight and passen­
ger services have seen better days. Sometimes, it is hard to remember
how two railways, let alone one, could profitably make a contribution
to the development of this area, operating as many trains as they did
in the hey-day of rail transportation and yet, ultimately, meet such
an unfortunate fate. Alas, this seems to be the sad history of most
railways in Canada in the last quarter of the Twentieth Century.
In the account which follows, we will consider the 96-year his­
tory of railways in the Laurentian Mountains, in the period 1876 to
1972. A review of these years never fails to evoke pleasant memories
for those who knew this region intimately and, for other readers not
so closely associated with the area, the charm of the perennial br­
anch-line railroad is always present.
Canadian Paci fic -CP RAIL: Histo~ Development.
The settlement of the Laurentian region, north northwest of Mon-
treal, wa~ not significantly different from that of other parts of
Canada at the beginning of the Nineteenth Century. The native in-
habitants welcomed the first white settlers who arrived on foot, by
canoe, by horse-team or other means of transport. The hardy newcomers
cleared the forested lands, built houses and barns and settled down
to a life of unremitting hard work, struggling for a bare living.
They were the pioneers.
For many years, the largest community in the Laurentian area was
only about 35 miles north of Montreal in the foothills region. The
focal point in the community was the to~n of St-J6r6me, located on
CANADIAN 41 R A I L
the North River and linked to Montreal by a primitive rood, over
which ron carriages in summer and sleighs in winter. The language of
the community was French, the religion predominantly Roman Catholic.
The community and the surrounding area enjoyed a slow but steady
growth, but the desire of the times was to promote colonization as
rapidly as possible, in order to retard or stop the emigration of
native Quebecois to the neighbouring New England States in the U.S.A.
To accelerate this colonization, the Government of Quebec instituted
agricultural reforms and grants of money in aid, and the Roman Ca­
tholic Church added its strong influence to counteract the exodus to
the south.
The parish priest or cure of St-Jer6me from 1868 to 1891 was a
remarkable man: Cure Fran~ois-Xavier Antoine Labelle (1833-1891).
Cure Labelle was the dominating figure in the community and that part
of Quebec, not only because of his overwhelming personality but also
because of his considerable physical size. He was over six feet toll
and weighed more than 300 pounds~ During his 25 years as parish pr­
iest, apart from his ecclesiastical duties he spent most of his time
promoting the colonization of the region. He personally founded some
60 communities in the Laurentians and, in 1888, he was named Deputy
Minister of Colonization in the Government of Quebec.
CANAD fijfpAc fFfc~AII WAYII
—–. —
MONTREAL, AND ST. JEROME
March, 1886
In order to hasten the process of settlement, Cure Labelle de­
cided to have a railway built into the district. The Montreal North-
ern Colonization Railway Company had been incorporated in 1869 to
build a railway from Montreal to the Laurentian foothills to the
northwest. Financial troubles beset this company in its formative per­
iod and its charter was subsequently sold to the Government of Quebec
in 1875. Despite bureaucratic corruption and other problems, Cure
Labelle spearheaded the drive to complete the railway to St-J6rome.
The reorganized railway became the Montreal and Western Railway, then
the Montreal, Ottawa and Western Railway (1875) and finally the Que­
bec, Montreal Ottawa and Occidental Railway Company (1875). In ad­
dition to the line to St-Jerome, this company had also built to Ot­
tawa, Canada, along the north shore of the Ottowa River and had pur­
chased the North Shore Railway Company, whose line ran from St-Mar­
tin Junction to Quebec City.
Much to the delight of Cure Labelle and his parishoners, on 16
October 1876, the first QMO&O train left Montreals Hochelaga Sta-
tion, bound for St-Jr6me. The arrival of this inaugural train at
St-Jerome evoked much fanfare and general rejoicing. The persistence
of Cure Labelle, Le Roi du Nord (King of the North), had been rewor­
ded. The priest himself rode the first train north on the newly-com­
pleted railway. After scarcely six years of independence, in 1882 the
QMO&O, including the St-J6rome line, was purchased by the Canadian
Pacific Railway Company. While early service on the St-Jerome branch
was limited to one mixed train doily in both directions, these trains
proved to be the priceless benefit to the community that Cure Labelle
hod predicted.
CANADIAN
42
R A I L
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28
May 10, 1897
Several years passed before the railway was extended north from
St-Jerome. While settlements had already been established to the
north, some as early as 1840, the time was only now opportune to
extend the railway and so stimulote further colonization.
The sale of the QMO&O to the Canadian Pacific in 1882 had not
included the portion of the railway under construction north of St­
Jerome. In 1891, the Montreal and Western was building what was to
become the most scenic portion of this Laurentian railway, from St­
Jerome to Labelle, a distance of about 67 miles. By August 1892, the
roilway was complete as far as Ste-Agathe and work was continuing on
the remaining portion to Labelle, the latter place named in honour of
the Cure who had been the driving force for many years.
Although this portion of the Canadian Pacifics present-day line
was built by the Montreal and Western, records show that service no­
rth of St-Jerome was operated by the Canadian Pacific from the out­
set and the first (CPR) passenger train passed through Piedmont, on
the way from St-Jerome to Ste-Agathe on 1 September 1892. Five years
later, on 25 March 1897, the Canadian Pacific agreed to purchase the
railway from St-Jerome to Labelle, payment to be made in 30 annual
instalments.
North F rom Labelle, the Northern Colonization Railway Company
continued the line. This extension reached Nominingue on 5 January,
1904 and construction was completed to its most northerly point at
Rapide de lOrignal (Moose Rapids) -now Mont Laurier -in 1909.
The first through train from Montreal to Mont Laurier ran on 15 Sep­
tember 1909. Meanwhile, the Canadian Pacific had leased the Northern
Colonization Railway in 1905 for the usual period of 999 years.
The Canadian Pacific Railways Passenger Deportment bulletin,
dated 13 September 1909, read in part as follows:
On September 15th., the extension of the Nominin­
gue Branch 35 miles to Rapide de lOrignal will
be opened for passenger traffic, new stations
being called Loranger, Hebert, Campeau, Routhier,
CANADIAN 43 R A I L
and Duhamel; Duhamel is located in that portion
of the municipality of Rapide de lOrignal on the
east bank of the Lievre River. The territory open­
ed up by this new line is an exceedingly attractive
one for sportsmen.
The dream of Cure Labelle was slowly coming true. More and more
settlers were taking up land in the area, the presence of the rail­
way simplifying their transportation problems. More and more jobs
were becoming available for residents of the region.
North of Labelle, several wooden trestles were built to carry
the railway over deep gullies. Subsequently, these trestles were fil­
led in with earth, eliminating the risk of their destruction by fire
and the high cost of maintenance. Early photographs of these wooden
trestles show passenger trains in operation, which suggests that
the new line was opened for revenue service as quickly as possible.
For many years, the Canadian Pacific enjoyed a brisk business
on its Laurentian branch. Southbound freight traffic included car-
loads of sawlogs, nough and finished lumber and other natural pro-
ducts. Northbound, the freights carried petroleum, machinery, build­
ing materials and less-than-carload shipments in an ever-increasing
volume. Passenger traffic prospered. The Big City was now within
easy reach of the country and the city dweller could readily enjoy
this Laurentian playground. Express, milk and mail added to the
railways revenues. All of this traffic required regularly-scheduled
trains of increasing length.
A campaign to stimulate passenger traffic, launched by the CPR
about 1911, resulted in an increase which persisted throughout the
pre-World War I years. The principle object of this campaign was to
persuade hunters and fishermen, as well as nature lovers and sports
enthusiasts, to discover this wonderful, unspoiled area, less than
four hours by train from Canadas largest metropolis.
In the earlier days of the branch, the motive power was largely
8-wheel 4-4-0s, but the longer and heavier trains soon required the
tractive effort of 4-6-0s, which thereafter handled most of the frei-
ght and passenger trains north. Later on, locomotives of many dif-
ferent wheel arrangements, from light to medium weight, were used,
D 10, mikado, hudson arid baltic types were variously used. The cur­
ves on the line seem to have posed more of a problem thah the
weight-per-axle of the engines.
Most of the large bridges on the Laurentian line were near Mon­
treal and were built to main-line standards, as they had also to car­
ry heavy trains for Quebec, Ottawa and western Canada. In fact, in
the 1890s, the Canadian Pacifics transcontinental trains departed
from Place Viger Station in east-central Montreal and travelled north
to Ste-Th€rese, before turning were to Ottawa over the North Shore
Line, formerly the Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa and Occidental Railway.
,AFTER THE LINE TO MONT LAURIER WAS OPENED THROUGHOUT IN 1909, THE
I~B&B Department turned its attention to filling in the wooden trestles.
These four pictures show the work in progress between Nominingue and
Mont Laurier, about 1910. Mr. Charron of St-Sauveur, Quebec, who loan­
ed these pictures for presentation, was a member of the gang who did
this work. He is today hale and hearty at 85 years of age.

,……-1

.,;.
I
CANADIAN 47 R A I L
On the Laurentian branch to Mont Laurier, the passenger trains
were made up of classic wooden passenger cars for many years. Some
of these cars had open platforms. Throughout the ski-train era of
the 1940s, some of these curious consists persisted, much to the
amusement of the skiiers and the delight of the railway enthusiasts.
The Ste-Agathe Subdivision was the last CPR line in eastern Canada
to use wooden equipment in regular service. The Winnipeg Beach oper­
ation in Manitoba used the last wooden passenger cars on the Canad­
ia~ Pacific Railway.
Over the years, passenger trains from Montreal to the Laurentian
Mountains departed from several different stations. In 1876, passen­
gers for points north of Montreal departed from Hochelaga Station in
the east-central part of the city. The Quebec Gate Station, later
named Dalhousie Square Station, was in use in 1882 and it was from
this station that the first CPR transcontinental passenger train
departed on 28 June 1886 for far-distant Port Moody on Burrard Inlet
in British Columbia. When Dalhousie Square Station was rebuilt in
1899, it was renamed Place Viger Station.
In the same year, Canadian Pacifics famous Windsor Station was
opened and some Laurentian trains originated there, travelling around
Mount Royal through Westmount, Montreal West and North Junction to
Park Avenue and a connection with the line from Place Viger Station
to St-Martin Junction, Ste-Ther~se and the Laurentians. During the
years that followed, little by little passenger services in all dir­
ections from Montreal began to be consolidated at Windsor Station.
Finally, on 31 May 1951, the last passenger train, the evening local
to Labelle, pulled out of Place Viger and the station was then clos­
ed. From that date, all CPR passenger trains departed from Windsor
Station.
~ WHILE THE SNOW FELL SOFTLY IN THE MOUNTAINS, THE WIND PILED IT
the cuts on the flat stretches between St-Jerome and Montreal.
Canadion Pacific plow extra had a terrible time in the winter
1898, plowing out the cuts between St-Janvier and St-Jerome.
INTO
This
of
Photograph courtesy Musee Historique de St-Jerome.
CPR 4-4-0 NUMBER 198 WAS BUILT BY SCHENECTADY IN 1900 FOR THE RUTLAND
Railroad as its Number 188. She was acquired by the Canadian Pacific
in 1902 and numbered 780; she was Number 298 in 1905 and 198 in 1912.
At one period, Number 198 was the power for the passenger train from
St-Jerome to Montreal and it is in this role that she is p~ctured here.
Photograph courtesy Musee Historique de St-Jerome.
DURING l ..JILDER tiINTER, CAfJADIAN PACIFIC 0-10 CtASS NUMBER 1088 HUS­
tles the afternoon wayfreight south through Piedmont Station in the
thick of a worsening snowstorm. The year is 1945 and the photograph
is presented through the courtesy of Mr. C.C.Sait.
SKI SPECIALS WERE THE THING ON THE CPRS LAURENTIAN LINE BEFORE AND
after World War II. Most winter weekends, you could see this or a
similar line-up of specials in the yard at St-Agathe waiting for the
southbound Sunday evening rush. Each trai~ consisted of one baggage
car for skiis and accident victims and about 10 coaches. The photo­
graph was taken about 1935 and is from the collection of Mr. L.O.Leach.

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CANADIAN 52 R A L
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WHILE THE WINTER MEANT SKIIERS, THE SUMMER MEANT FOREST PRODUCTS. ON
a day in July 1945, CPR 0-10 Number 1111 clattered south towards Sh­
awbridge, Qu~bec,. with two cars of veneer logs, amongst other things.
The photograph is presented through the courtesy of Mr. C.C.Sait.
WORKING UP THE GRADE FROM STE-MARGUERITE STATION, CPR MIKADO NUMBER
5192 hauls a six-car consist up the stiffest grade on the subdivision
on J summer day in 1946. Photograph courtesy Canadian Pacific Limited.
,-,i.
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WHEN
GANADIAN
PAqFtC!
S2
200
,
-SERftS
·.
cCh H
ES

W~RE
NEW
., TH::
PUBLICITY
people
topped.

off
.ddi:splqytrain
witi:t
Royal
Hudl;on Number
2856
, bhd
t~bk
tha
cdn~ist
u~
the~durentian
line
to
a
lotati6h
just
north
~f
.
Piedmont
st~tio~
for
the
official
photographer
to
shoot.
The
year

was
1948.
The
photograph
is
courtesy
of
Canadian
Pacific
Limited.
CA NAD I AN 5 4 R A I L
WIN A FEW -LOSE A FEW. RAILROADING ON THE MONT LAURIER LINE WAS NOT
always uneventful. In the picture below D-10 Number 1111 and 4-6-2
Number 2600 had a sad encounter one day near Mont Rolland, while in
the illustrations opposite, there was a midwinter derailment on one
of tha numerous curves on the line. On another occasion, two 5100-
class mikados, one was Number 5166, had an unresolved dispute about
the right-of-way near Ste-Marguerite Station. All of these photogra­
phs are presented through the courtesy of Mlle. G. Legare.

CANADIAN
Mont Laurier
Val Barrette
56 R A I L
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
Laurentian Division
Park Avenue Subdivision
Ste-Agathe Subdivision
Opened to St-Jerome in 1876;
Opened to Ste-Agathe in 1892;
Opened to Nominingue in 1904;
Opened to Mont Laurier in 1909.
lAnnonciation
Montfort Junction (1893-1898) ..
Canadian National
to Deux-Montagnes
Ste-Agathe
S te-Margueri te
Mont Rolland
Shawbridge
Canadian Northern Quebec Ry •
•• to Joliette & Quebec (abandoned).
~ Montfort Junction (1898-1962)
Station)

CANADIAN S9 R A L
MONT-LAURIER, LABELLE, STE. AGATHE, STE. MARGUERITE, ST. JEROME, MONTREAL TA8LE42
Eas(om Tim.
Heurodo I&sl
Alti·
tudo
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Fllolo! LAURENTIANS
464 452 454 462 456
*
458 460
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EXPLANATION or slaNS-~MO W&SI 01 Sle. Th616S0.
RENV~~Itu~lu~:M~,afh6~h.sO.
fflo/llST. LIN
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nl -US
/jl~ ~ 7.26
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——:-:–.. -rrS -.-. -9:40
.. 5.22 .. 9.47 .
… 5.30 .. 9.55
A.IIII. ,11. ,. …. ,. …. J,j.
* TRAINS 449-451-458
Subject to cancellation if
equipment required for the
movement of armed force,.
Peuvent eire supprimes sl
Ie materiel roulant est requis
pour Ie transport des forces
armees.
PARLOR CARS
Train 449-Fridays, to Labella
(First trip D~. 28)
Train 456-$undays, from Labelle.
!u~~:I/!/P Jail. 8, also TII~dlJ).
WAGONS·SALONS
Tfilln449-Vondrool;l Labello.
(PremicflXJYOge
tSdic,)
Train 456-Dimanch de labelle.
(Pumi fO)(Ige 6joll aus.si
mardi, lcr ian.)
(JStoP$lodetf~tnfovenuapas:sengefsfrom
(l Artlll pour lal&S(lrd8$C(lndro voyal&urs Pi-y3IlI.
The story of Canadian National Railways in the Laurentian Moun­
tains must now be told, but it should be recognized that the Cana­
dian Pacific Railway, the first railway to provide service into this
region, was initially a feeder for the first line of railway which
eventually became part of Canadian National. From 1895 to 1905, pas­
sengers intending for points on the Sixteen Island Lake line of the
Montfort and Gatineau Colonization Railway, later part of the 98-mile
Montfort Subdivision of CN, had to change trains at Montfort Junction,
a short distance south of Piedmont on the CPR_ The Montfort and Gat­
ineau Colonization Railway had no connection to St-Jer8me and Mon­
treal. Also, up to 1898, it was narrow-gauge.
But that is another story.
THERE WERE OCCASIONS, EVEN IN THE SU~MER, WHEN THE PASSENGER TRAFFIC
required one baggage and 14 passenger cars and a pacific plus a mi­
kado for power. The year was 1946 and the location on the banks of
the North River, south of Ste-Marguerite Station. The photograph is
courtesy of Canadian Pacific Limited.
CANADIAN PACIFICS LAURENTIAN DIVISION IS BEST REMEMBERED FOR ITS SKI
trains. Here is a prime example: mikado Number 5176 trails a plume of
white smoke, a baggage car and eight coaches past a cross-country ski­
ier, northbound through the rocky Laurentian landscape. The year was 1948
and the picture is courtesy of Canadian Pacific Limited.
HfllWARY 1975
KRAUSS-MAFFEI, THE WEST GERMAN COMPANY WHICH WAS AWARDED A $25 MIL­
lion contract by the Government of Ontario to build a
prototype magnetic-levitation train for the 1975 Canadian
National Exhibition at Toronto has a rival in the French firm of En­
gins Matra of Paris. Engins Matra propose to utilize proven tech­
nology -rubber-tyred wheels and conventional electric motors -as
opposed to Krauss-Maffei s unproven linear-induction motors and
magnetic levitation.
Engins Matra entered the urban transit field in 1969 and
claims to have two prototype systems in operation, one in Paris and
the other in Lille, France. The Matra syste~ emphasizes automatic
control of individual vehicles.
Engins Matra has formed a consortium with Bombardier,Lim-
itee, CAE Industries, Limited and Brown Boveri Canada Limited and
will shortly submit a proposal to the Government of Canada on the use
of rail lines in a total urban-transit plan.
This liaison may be the explanation for the awarding by
the Montreal Urban Community Transit Commission to Bombardier Limitee
of the contract for the new subway cars for Montreals METRO.
John D. Welsh.
IN AN OCTOBER 1974 REPORT FROM WINNIPEG, MANITOBA, JOHN WELSH NOTED
that Canadian National Railways contractors were working
on the preparation of the grade for the double-tracking of
the main line west to Portage La Prairie, but they were a long way from
having the road-bed ready for trqck-laying. Contractors were
also working on isolated stretches, which were estimated to total no
more than 10 miles, as of 1 October 1974.
DELIVERIES OF NEW GP 40-2 UNITS FROM DIESEL DIVISION, GENERAL MOTORS
of Canada Limited, London, Ontario to Canadian National
Railways were made os follows, according to Pierre Paten-
aude of Montreal:
9446, 9447 A-3024, A-3025 June 12, 1974 9448
A-3026 June 13, 1974
9449, 9450 A-3027, A-3028 June 12, 1974 9451
A-3029 June 13, 1974
9452, 9453 A-3030, A-3031 June 19, 1974
9454, 9455 A-3032, A-3033 June 20, 1974
9456, 9457 A-3034, A-3035 June 21, 1974
9458, 9459 A-3036, A-3037 June 25, 1974
9460, 9461 A-3038, A-3039 June 26, 1974
9462, 9463 A-3040, A-3041 June 27, 1974
9464, 9465, A-3042, A-3043

CANADIAN 6 1 R A I L
9466, 9467 A-3044, A-3045
July 5, 1974
9468, 9469, 9470 A-3046, A-3047, A-3048 July 10, 1974
9471, 9472 A-3049, A-3050 July 18, 1974
9473, 9474, 9475 A-3051, A-3052, A-3053 July 22, 1974
9476, 9477, 9478 A-3054, A-3055, A-3056
July 23, 1974
9479, 9480 A-3057, A-3058
Units Numbers 9446 through 9459 w.ere based at Montreal Yard,
St. Lawrence Region, while units Numbers 9460 through 9480 were based
at Symington Yard, Prairie Region.
A DISASTEROUS FIRE ON JUNE 20 1974 DESTROYED THE S.S. CASCA AND THE
S.S. WHITEHORSE, sternwheel steamboats which had been
beached at Whitehorse, Yukon Territory. These two ships,
together with a third which was saved from the fire, were used on
the Yukon River between Whitehorse and Dawson City, during the first
half af the Twentieth Century, but were retired in the mid-1950s.
Another sternwheeler, the S.S. TUTAHI, is beached at Car­
cross, Y. T., not far from the main line of the White Pass .:. Yukon.
THE DIESEL DIVISION, GENERAL MOTORS OF CANADA LIMITED, HAS
receipt of an order for four 3,000 hp. SD 40-2,
diesel units from the Quebec, North Shore and
Railway, for delivery in the spring of 1975.
ANNOUNCED
six-axle
Labrador
SALES FOR PASSENGER COACHES (BUSES) FROM THE FOLLOWING TRANSIT AUTHOR­
ities have also been announced byDD GMC:
Model
Authority Capaci~ Number
Commission de
Transport de la Rive Sud (Montreal)
London (Ontario) Transportation Commission
Metropolitan Provincial (Montreal)
Oshawa (Ontario) Public Utilities Commission
Belleville (Ontario) Transit Commission
Kingston (Ontario) Public Transit System
City of Peterborough, Ontario
Moncton (New Brunswick) Transit Limited
Brantford (Ontario) Public Utilities Commission
D.T.S. Buses Limited, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
order
53
45
53 45 45 45 from 45 45 45 45 50
25 5 5
2
increased
4 to 8
3
1
2
4
The above information courte~y GM DieseLines, DD GMC.
IN THESE DAYS OF LOGOS, MULTIMARKS, CORPORATE SYMBOLS AND DIVISIONAL
designs, the old-fashioned crest, whether it be that of
a city or a titled family is rather out of place.
In the case of a citys Coat of Arms, crest or symbol -whatever
the current description might be – a great deal of confusion seems to
exist, due to the consolidation of towns, each with its own crest.
The new city may design its own new crest, selecting elements of its
constituent components coats of arms, or it may design a completely
new one with modern symbols reflecting its new status.
Take the case of Windsor, Ontario. Windsor was surveyed as a
village in 1834, when its pooulation numbered 300 souls. These citi­
zens mostly traded with Detroit, Michigan, U.S.A., across the river
of the same name. Traffic grew to a volume sufficient to ~arrant two
steam ferries for the back-and-forth travel. When the Great Western
Railway of Canada reached Windsor in 1854, the town really began to
boom and rapidly metamorphosed into the Municipality of Windsor,
CANADIAN 62 R A I L
complete with Coat of Arms reflecting the erat Elements of the
sign included a steam locomotive and sidewheel ferryboat. It
included two durable symbols: the beaver and the maple leaf~
de-
also
The
motto, derivative from the steam locomotive and the ferryboat, was
Per Mare, Per Terras -B} Sea, By Land~
Some time later, in 1970, steam locomotives and sidewheel fer­
ryboats were somewhat passe and even though the beaver and the
maple leaf were too honest to be eliminated, the Coat of Arms was
definitely doomed. With what must have been a great deal of anguish
for some and great symbol-searching by others, a completely new Coat
of Arms or crest was devised, albeit keeping a stylized maple leaf
and adding the original date of incorporation of 1854.
Windsors new Coat of Arms or crest also includes what some
citizens are confident will be a ski hill. The eminence is known to
some as a sanitary land-fill project, a sweet-smelling rose atop it
and a prominently located gear-wheel, to represent, it is said, the
automobile industry in Windsor. To railway historians, a portrayal
of todays diesel-tug car-barge operation on the Detroit River
might be more appropriate. The least that the designers might have
done was to modify the wood-burning engine to a diesel:
Did or .does any other Canadian municipality or city contain ra­
ilway symbols in its Coat of Arms or crest? Enlightenment would be
welcomed.
Sources
The Star Windsor, Ontario
Canadian Gazetteer -1846
The Great Lakes Car Ferries -Hilton, G.W. 1962
W.J.Bedbrook.
Old city crest New city crest
ON PAGE 219 OF THE JULY 1974 ISSUE NUMBER 270 OF CANADIAN RAIL, WE
recorded an observation by Mr. John Welsh of Dorval, Que­
bec, on the Strathclair (Manitoba) Museum, which has been
developed in the farmer Canadian Pacific Railway station at that
place. Mr. George A. Moore of Winnipeg, Manitoba, hos written to say
that he visited the Strathclair Museum in late 1974 and had a most
interesting conversation with Mr. Bruce Parker, Chairman of the
Museum. The
Canadian Pacific Railways station at Strathclair was
built in 1900 and was sold to the Museum on June 14, 1972. One 6f
the first things that had ta be done was to organize the exhibits and
repoint the exterior, the latter task being completed this past sum­
mer. Mr. Parker would very much like ta acquire a station order-board
for the Museum, as well as a wall-clock and a pot-bellied stove of
the CPR variety.
CANADIAN
63 R A I L
The Strathclair Museum is open to interested visitors and
permission to inspect the exhibits may be obtained from Mr. Parker
( 365-5354) or Mrs. Velma Snowdon ( 356-2195 ). Donations are, of
course, welcome.
We hope to have further details on the Strathclair Museum
in a forthcoming issue of CANADIAN RAIL.
P.S. There are also station museums at Rocanville and Oxbow,
Saskatchewan, but the Editor has not been able to dis­
cover any details on these museums -yet~ Does someone
out there have further information?
AS A MATTER OF FACT ………. ..
Ken GoSIett insists that his candidate for the 1974 Pret­
ty Baby award (page 313, October 1974 Number 273, CANADIAN RAIL)
does not have what is presently referred to as a safety cab. Call
CANADIAN 64 R A I L
it anything else, but not a safety cab~
Roger TraviSS-hastened to point out that the ex-GWR (En­
gland) passenger carriage, presently running on the Cape Breton
Steam Railway in Nova Scotia, is properly described as a first and
second-class brake composite, or more appropriately a corridor br­
ake composite. Roger also claims that the nearest North American
equivalent is a combine car or combo, with a side-corridor and a
small office in the baggage area for the conductor. Like ……….. 7
IN AN OCTOBER 1974 ROUND-UP OF VANCOUVER ISLAND NEWS, JOHN HOFFMEIS­
ter of Victoria, British Columbia noted that CP SHIPS de­
cision to withdraw the Victoria-Seattle, Washington ser­
vice hitherto provided by the 5.5. PRINCESS MARGUERITE had worked
considerable hardship not only on the people of Victoria, but moreso
on the citizens of Seattle. A local campaign in Victoria had been
initiated to preserve the lovely vessel and, in Seattle, there was a movement
to insist that an alternate service be established to
continue the service which the S.S.PRINCESS MARGUERITE formerly pro­
vided.
CANADIAN 65 R A I L
John also noted that the life-expectancy of CP RAILs Baldwin
units was diminishing daily. Number B002 was in rough shape, and
the word was that, when repairs were due, that would be the end of
that unit. A guesstimate of units surviving into 1975 included
Numbers BOOO, B004, B009 and BOlO, as Numbers B001, B002 and B003
were acting up. John remarked that if enthusiasts wanted to see
and photograph the remaining Baldwins, they should not waste any time
in doing so. He also reminded the Canadian Railway Museum that if
they had any thoughts of preserving one of these units, they should
act as soon as possible.
John sent two interesting pictures. The first is a photo of BC
HYDROs recently-delivered SD 3B-2 unit Number 3B4 (EMD La Grange,Il­
linois, U.S.A.), BIN 74614, August 1974, taken on September 21,1974
at Queenborough Shops, New Westminster, B.C. The unit is unusual in
that it has no engine number or road designation (BCH) on the sides
of the cab.
In the second picture, John recorded CP RAIL units in Whatcom
County, State of Washington, U.S.A., on Saturday, May 1B, 1974. Two
CP RAIL GP 9 units Numbers BB11 and BB2B, spliced by PNC GP 9 Num­
ber 142 were dropping three loads to the Milwaukee Road at White
Station (far left of the picture). The units are at Sumas, Washing­
ton, on the former Northern Pacific Railways Sumas Branch, now BN.
Barely 0.5 miles inside the U.S.A., the CP RAIL units are about to
pass idling BN power headed by GP 9 Number 1916. Extra BB11 of CP
RAIL is a daily turn from Mission City, British Columbia, on the
main line 41.7 miles east af Vancouver.
INFORMATION ON SERIAL AND ROAD NUMBERS, AND DELIVERY DATES FOR THE
second order of M-420 units from MLW Industries for Can-
adian National Railways has been received from our cor-
respondent, Pierre Patenaude:
Road Serial Delivery
number number date
2530 M-60B1-01 03 Apr 1974 2531 M-60B1-02
04 Apr 1974 2532 M-60B1-03 05 Apr 1974 2533 M-60B1-04 09 Apr
1974
2534 M-60B1-05 10 Apr 1974 2535 M-60B1-06 1 1 Apr 1974 2536 M-60B1-07 12 Apr 1974 2537
M-60B1-0B 17 Apr 1974
253B M-60B1-09 19 Apr 1974 2539 M-60B1-10 20 Apr 1974 2540 M-60B1-
11 25 Apr 1974 2541 M-6081-12 03
May 1974 2542 M-60Bl-13 02
May 1974 2543 M-60B1-14
04 May 1974
2544 M-6081-15 05 May 1974 2545 M-6081-16 15
May 1974 2546 M-6081-17
11 May 1974
2547 M-60Bl-18 16 May 1974 2548 M-6081-19 18
May 1974 2549 M-6081-20 29
May 1974
2550 M-60Bl-21 30 May 1974 2551 M-6081-22
31 May 1974 2552 M-6081-23
31 May 1974 2553 M-6081-24 05
Jun 1974
2554 M-6081-25 08 Jun 1974
CANADIAN 66 R A I L
2555 M-6081-26 13 Jun 1974
2556 M-6081-27 19 Jun 1974
2557 M-6081-28 22 Jun 1974
2558 M-6081-29 28 Jun 1974 2559
M-6081-30 05 Jul 1974
All of these units were based at Montreal Yard, St. Lawrence Re­
gion, Montreal, Quebec.
Pierre sent the accompanying photographs, the first of which was
taken at the local yard, Montreal Yard, on June 15, 1974 and shows
new units Numbers 2545, 2552 and 2553 about to depart on Train 427
to Garneau, Quebec. The second photo shows a five-unit lashup at
the local yard, Montreal Yard, consisting of three MLW Industries
C-424 units Numbers 3225, 3235 and 3234, with two S-4 units Numbers 8028 &
8052, on June 2, 1974. Our thanks to Pierre for these photos.
~ IT IS REALLY AMAZING WHAT A LITTLE EXTERIOR RESTORATION WILL DO~ JIM
Shaughnessy took this excellent picture of Delaware and
Hudson Railways new Baldwin sharknose unit Number 1216
as it rolled out of the D&H s Colonie Shops on October 18,1974.
The ~ord is that Carl Sterzing, D&Hs President, has some more sur­
prises up his corporate sleeve, but no one can imagine what they may
be, in the light of the recent sharknoses acquisition.
CA NADIA,.. 67 R A I L
ON AUGUST 6, 1974, CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS ANNOUNCED THE INTRO_
duction of doily except Sunday TURBO service between Mon_
treal and Ottowa. Replacing conventional Trains 31 & 32,
TURBO was stheduled to cover the 116 ~iles in 119 ~inutes westbound,
leaving Central Station, Montral at OB:15 hours and arriving at Ot_
towa at 10; 14. In the eastbound direttion, TURBO deported Ottawa at
11:20, arriving at Mantrol at 13;30. The 11 odditionallllinutes in
the eastbound direction were occasioned by a scheduled stop at Alex­
andria and a conditional stop at Coteau.
The introduction of TURBO service between Montreal and
Ottowa put CN in direct competition with the new STOL (Short Toke_Off
& Landing) AIRTRANSIT service, established by Canadas nepartment of
Tronsport, using de Havilland Twin_Otter aircraft with a seating
capacity of 11 passengers.
AIRTRANSIT service, city-centre to city-centre, requires
about 75_80 lIlinutes, with a flying the of 45 minutes. AIR CANADA
flights to Ottowa take about 25_30 minutes flying time, with a centre­
to_centre total tillle of about 100_120 minutel, due to loading, unload­
ing and airport_tity transit times. For
es are another matter. AIR CANADAs rate is S 18 one­
way, AIRTRANSIT is S 20 one-way and TURBO is S 7 one_way.
ONCE UPON A TIME, THE DIAMOND AT lENNOXVILLE, QUEBEC WHERE THE CPR
trosses the CNR, with the Quebec Central getting into the oct on the w
est side, was a place par excellence to photograph trains. A suit­
able subject was CNs Train 17, Portland, Maine to Montr6al, at 2.15
p.m., on June 1, 1948. Philip R. Hastings, M.D. was there and took
this dramatic photograph.
Canadian Rail
is published
mon
bythe
Canadian Railroad Historical Association
P.o.BcI!22.SlatIone..MonIretI,0uebec.~H3B3J5
Editur;S.S.Wo Association Branches
CALGARY Ii. SOUTH WESTERN
L.tI.Un .. ;n, Secretory 1727 23.d. Ave .. . N.W. Col gory, AI to, T2II

OTTAWA
oj. R .Linley, Secretary P.O.Box ,Stlttlon

Ollov .. ,Canodo
PACHIC COAST
R.H,Heyer, S .. cutary P.O.Bo~ IOO6,Stptian

Vancouv •• ,8.C.V6C

0
MOUNTAIN
J.H.He;kl.,Se •• to.y,P.O.Bo. 6102,5tot;on C,Ed.nton,A!to,TSB
~,
TORONTO oS YORI( DIVISION
P,Sh.riold,Secretary P.O. Boo 589,T ••• i,,01

Toronto, Dnt.liS!
,eo
AssociatiOfl Representatives
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Visit the Canadian Railway Museum St.Constant;Quebe<:. Canada .
. More than 100 pieces 01 eQUipment on display-

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    Exporail, le Musée ferroviaire canadien est un projet de l’Association canadienne d’histoire ferroviaire (ACHF)