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Canadian Rail 276 1975

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Canadian Rail 276 1975

Canadian Rail
~
. ~….. -.. ~ – -.:00(_.
No. 276
January
19 5
> .•
t ..
—-~. -.

N-TleaA
I
#
Part I
Hal Riegger
Photographs by the Author
T
his is 0 story about model roilroading in N-scale.
It wont be the usual kind of article on model­
ling, you can be sure, for it is about some facets
of railway modelling that dont often appear in print.
Correctly speaking, the model we are talking about might more
precisely be called a module, since it is one of many that have been
put together into a large 18 by 68 layout that is called NTRAK –
a
name obviously derived from AMTRAK -and representing the combined
effort of several model railway clubs and a number of individuals.
The purpose of this considerable effort was to demonstrate the real
possibilities of modelling in a small scale.
Enthusiasts in Canada and the United Sfates cooperated to com­
plete the project and its first complete showing was at the NMRA Na­
tional Convention at San Diego, California, in July, 1974. The im­
mediate popularity of NTRAK was demonstrated by the number of awards
the exhibit received. The models received three first prizes, one
second and one third in the rolling stock classes, four honorable men-
tions and two special awards. The staid HO modellers were severely
shaken~
The basic features of the NTRAK layout are two main-line tracks,
an east and westbound, plus what is called a collector track, that
encircle the entire assembly of modules and provide between six and
seven scale miles on which to operate. The main-line tracks encircle
the layout on the outside edge, nearest to the viewers, while the
collector track is inside the main lines and provides a connection to
the various spurs to a variety of operations on the many different
modules.
NTRAK allows considerable individuality in modelling, as each
modeller builds according to his ow~ interest and in his own par-
ticular manner. Some modules are 8 feet in length, while some few
may be 4 feet. All are the same 2 feet in depth -or width. Height
is consistent in all modules, with fine adjustment for occurate match­
ing being built into the legs. At least eight main-line sections are
provided, each with its separate cab and each modules (or dioramaS:
.A CANMORE MINES LIMITED GE ELECTRIC LOCm10TIVE NU~IBER 1, Ar~ 0-4-0 TYPE
~I used for hauling the mine cars from the mine adit to the grader-wash­
er, some distance from the mine.
~ EMPTY MINE COAL-CARS WAIT ON THE EMPTIES SIDING AT THE MINE EN-
trance to be lowered down the main shaft by cable.
——–
CANADIAN 4 R A I L
trackage is insulated from the collector track and can be
independently.
operated
The background panels for the individual diorama are consistent
in height and sky colour is a standard satin vinyl paint available
anYHhere thraugh nationally established retail and mail-order houses.
There are two crossovers on the main line, permitting complete
flexibility of operation and access to any diorama via the collector
track. One of the possibilities achieved in actual operation was to
run N-scale locomotives singly, or double or triple-headed, hauling
very long freights.
So much for the NTRAK project, except that one should add that
a variety of railroad subject-matter was constructed, ranging from
logging operations, through classification yards, to medium-sized
town and industry and including particular prototype structures and
mining and countryside. A patchwork-quilt-like layout emphasized the
variety of approaches to scale modelling, while other aspects of
NTRAKs design unified the various dioramas.
The specific module described in this article is one which I
built, the 4 dimension being dictated by the size of my car, in
which the module was necessarily transported. The ideas incorporated
in the module were loosely taken from several sources, the intent
being to model a coal-mining operation. Among these sources were the
Canmore, Alberta, coal mines, located on the eastern slope of the
Canadian Rockies, which once supplied coal for the steam engines of
the Canadian Pacific Railway. There was also the Milwaukee Roads
Rocky Mountain Division at its western end and where it crosses the
Bitteroot Mountains in the State of Idaho, between Avery and Alber-
ton, Montana. The geology and geography of bath of these areas are
similar and possess the quality of real mountain railroading. The
Milwaukee Roads main line through this division was electrified ~n
1917, but seem to be destined to be dieselized very soon.
During the summer of 1973, when I was teaching at the Banff
School of Fine Arts, Banff, Alberta, I had plenty of time to examine
the operation of Canmore Mines Limited. Permission was secured to be
on the property and to take photographs. Some information about the
history and operation of the mine was obtained from conversations
with one of the management representatives, data that will be of in­
terest to both railway enthusiast and modeller.
Canmore, Alberta, is the site of one of the few -if not the on­
ly -hard coal deposits in the far western portion of Canada. It is
roughly 15 miles east of Banff and perhaps about 50 miles from the
famous Spiral Tunnels of CP RAIL near Field, British Columbia. At one
time, Canmore was an important railway town, but today, nothing re­
mains of the original steam locomotive servicing facilities that once
existed. There is no station; there are no division-point associated
activities at Canmore o?ymore and consequently no structures of any
kind to catch the modellers eye. There is a siding with several
spurs and a connection with about two miles of standard-gaug~ track
that Canmore Mines owns and uses between their mine-transfer facili­
ties and CP RAIL. As they are filled, coal hoppers are brought from
the mine to the interchange track and siding, where they accumulate
to an apparently predetermined _ tonnage, before they are picked up
by a
westbound freight. This seems to occur about 4 to 5 times a
week. This coal is now shipped to Japan.
Prototype data is always of interest to the rail enthusiast or
historian. For the modeller, it may not seem pertinent, yet I believe
J~Ojl
CA NADI AN 5 R A I L
y,
–;>
1(./ t,.;,. INp INC-iJ ….. ,.1
C~,NTI?{..L ::,,.,.LI)tVC.
that the more knowledge one has about what he is modelling, the
ter his model will be. The following, although rather sketchy,
give a little more information about Canmore Mines Limited.
bet­
does
It begins, alas, with what may be an unpleasant statement for
Canadians. Canmore Mines Limited is owned by the firm of Dillingham,
makers of barges and other heavy equipment, of Los Angeles,California.
Canmore Mines was formed in 1886 and owned four mines, one of which
has now been exhausted. This latter was a strip-mine, located nearer
to Banff. The Company owns 6,000 acres between Canmore and Banff and
appears to have an ample reserve of coal, as yet untouched. Canmore
Mines ships 250,000 tons of coal annually to Japan only, via CP RAIL
and Port Moody, but not in unit-trains. When the Canadian Pacific
dieselized, Canmore found a new customer in Japan.
From the surface, the mine shaft and tracks descend diagonally
some 2,500 feet, to a depth of about 750 feet. Beyond this level,
the presence of coal-gas makes mining unsafe. In the drifts or side-
THESE LOADED MINE COAL-CARS HAVE JUST BEEN BROUGHT UP OUT OF
by cable and are coasting back down to the yard track. The
man unhooks the cable from the lead car and then throws the
for the yard, a very fast operation~
THE MINE
switch­
switch
LOADED COAL-CARS ON THE SIDING AWAIT TRANSIT FROM THE MINE YARD TO
the grading-washing operation, at some distance from the mine adit.

CANADIAN
8
R A I L
————
I
f
I
I
!
!
CANADIAN 9 R A I L
~ CANMORE MINES LIMITED GENERAL ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVE NUMBER 1 DRA~IS ITS
power through an overhead slider trolley. It was built in April,
1952.
t
A DETAIL SHOT OF ONE OF THE MINE COAL-CARS. THESE CARS ARE
by a link-and-hook arrangement.
COUPLED
AN 0-4-0 COMPRESSED-AIR LOCOMOTIVE, USED IN THE MINE DRIFTS TO BRING
the loaded mine cool-cars from the working face to the main shaft.
tunnels, some AC motors, fully protected against spark emission, are
used, together with some compressed-air motors. The shuttle between
the mining face and the main shaft, in addition to the coal excava­
tor, are operated by compressed air and their storage tanks can be
re-pressurized at any of a number of compressed-air outlets in the
mine. The compressed-air motor is used, of course, for safety reas­
ons. Mine coal-cars hold 1t to 2 tons and are hauled up the main
shaft to the surface by cable. At the mine adit, they are unhooked
from the cable and are allowed to coast backward by gravity, down a
grade, to be switched into the holding yard. From this yard, they
are hauled about two miles by a GE electric locomotive with a trol-
ley overhead to be emptied. The cool is graded, washed and trans-
ferred to standard coal or hopper cars, for delivery to CP RAIL.
Canmore Mines Limited design their own mine cool-cars, which
most be specific to mine clearance and load requirements. These cars
are made by an outside manufacturer, under contract. Some of them,
as can be seen from the accompanying photographs, are 50 years old.

.. THE STARK CLIFFS PROVIDE AN IMPRESSIVE BACK-DROP FOR THE MILWAUKEE
Roads bridge across the Columbia River at Beverly, Washington, ln
1973 .

THE SETTING SUN HIGHLIGHTS CLOUDS OF INSECTS IN THE STILL AFTERNOON
T air at Avery, Idaho, the western terminus of the Milwaukee Roads el­
ectrified trackage from Harlowtown, Montana. (1973)
The location of Canmore Mines Limited is in the beautiful Can­
adian Rockies and thus is an ideal subject in an ideal location for
the modeller to work from, since it is a vertical terrain and most
advantageous to the construction of models in a restricted space, a
condition usually imposed on modellers.
While Canmore Mines was one source of inspiration and data for
my NTRAK module, the other stimulus was the electrified portion of
the Chicago, Minneapolis, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad, generally
known as the Milwaukee Road, in the State of Idaho. Although the
electrified portion begins at Harlowton, Montana and extends some 440
miles to Avery, it was the portion in the State of Idaho that stimu­
lated my imagination. The climate here is somewhat drier than that
of the foothills country of Alberta, but the setting for railroading
is somewhat similar. Moreover, the Milwaukee Road is overhead-elec­
trified, a fact important to me, for I am attracted by electric rail­
roading more than I am by other present-day types. Though my love
for steam is undoubtedly no less than that of many other enthusiasts
and modellers, it is my belief that prototype electric locomotives
t
A THREE-UNIT MILWAUKEE ROAD FREIGHT, ASSISTED BY A LITTLE JOE ELEC­
tric on the point, grinds up the canyon of the Little St. Joe River,
on the way to St. Pauls Pass in the Bitteroot Mountains of eastern
Idaho.
THE MILWAUKEE ROAD DIVISIONAL POINT AT AVERY, IDAHO, WITH HALF OF
the yard-tracks in the picture. Here, box-cab electrics and Little
Joes today surrender their tonnage to diesel units, westbound. On
this day, a Milwaukee boxcar split a switch in the yard, a rather ex­
traordinary occurrence.
can be reproduced in scale more convincingly than other types of
motive power i they are the same, essentially, except for size.
It is ironic that the Milwaukee Road, first in North America ta
electrify main-line trackage on a large scale, is presently begin­
ning to dismantle its electrified portions in favour of diesel oper­
ation of these segments. Concurrently, other North American rail­
roads, notably CP RAIL, are studying the possibility of electrifying
portions of their main lines in the Rockies and have installed test
segments of catenary to observe the effects of snow and ice on var­
ious suspension systems. It will be interesting to see how these pro·
posals are evaluated, particularly because the portions proposed for
electrification are in areas where hydroelectric power is readily
available.
The accompanying diagram and photographs portray the various
stimuli which generated the ideas for my NTRAK module. In the next
portion of this report, we will examine how these ideas were consol­
idated and translated into the reality of a prize-winning NTRAK
diorama.

The Golden Days
Of Railroading r
R.F. Hartney
Photographs by John Nash
W
hile some authorities differ, it has always seemed to
me that the grandest days of railroading in Canadas
Prairie Provinces were the first two years of the
1930s. To convince you on this point, I would like to
take you back in time to the last of the golden days of
railroading, the time of the steam locomotive, wooden
and steel-sheathed passenger equipment and 36-foot box
cars. This process will be undertaken through the pre­
sentation of some reminiscences and a series of tables
showing the trains scheduled in and out of Saskatoon,
Saskatchewan, in the summer of 1931. The recollections
of these happy days will be reinforced and amplified by
showing the consist of these trains.
Logically, the year 1930 was even better for train-watching than
the year 1931, there being less equipment used in the latter year on
account of the deepening economic recession initiated by the Autumn A
ffair in the countrys stock exchanges in October 1929.
Canadian National Railways Trains 5 & 6, in 1930, carried a
steel colonist car; Trains 7 & 8 included a Regina-Prince Albert sle­
eper, in addition to two Regina-Saskatoon sleeping cars. Trains 27
& 28 had a 3700-series coach and an S100-series baggage car to set
off at Tichfield, Saskatchewan. Trains 29 & 30 had a 6300-series coa­
ch, in addition to the 3700-series coach and, west of Saskatoon, a
parlor car formed part of the consist. Trains 59 & 60 had a parlor
car.
After reading these two paragraphs, you may be wondering where
all this detailed information came from. When I was watching these
trains, I kept careful notes and I have continued this specific ac­
tivity for more than forty years.
Canadian Pacific Railways Trains 51 & 52, the Great West Ex-
press of 1930, had a 12-section/drawing room sleeping car, which
was discontinued the following year. CPR Trains 303 & 304 had a wood­
en first class coach and a wooden colonist car in 1930, but the next
year the train numbers were changed to 331 & 332 and the wooden colo­
nist car was withdrawn. Trains 437 & 438, as well as Trains 449 & 450,
had a combination baggage/coach in the following year. Trains 305 &
306 were hauled by a class E-5, 2000-series 4-6-0 locomotive.
Trains 3 & 4, the Confederation, of Canadian National Railways
from Montreal to Vancouver, were operated in 1930 but did not survive
~ IF CANADIAN NATIONALS MOUNTAIN-TYPE STEAM LOCOMOTIVES LOOKED GOOD ON
the Cornwall, Ontario-Coteau, Quebec speedway in the east, they were
every bit as attractive out west. Number 6062, with Engineer Lee at
the throttle, was skimming through North Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, at
the head of Train 9, in the winter of 1959.


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CANADIAN 1 7 R A I L
into 1931. When they ran, they did not follow the CN main line west
of Winnipeg, Manitoba through Dauphin and Kamsack, Saskatchewan but
fere routed via Brandon and Regina, the latter Saskatchewan s c~pital,
~n order to capture some of the Toronto-Regina and Regina-Vancouver
traffic from the Canadian Pacific.
This new name train was advertised in the timetable of April
26,1931, for the first time and made its maiden voyage from Tor­
onto to Vancouver on June 19 and in the opposite direction on June
21, 1931. A,!lOn~ th7 specializ
7d
equipment advertised were the Bay
cars: ~olar~um/r~d~o lounge/l~brary/buffet/bath, and the 2155-series
6-sect~on/1 draw~ng room/3-compartment/1 chambrette cars. When this
train was discontinued, some of these Bay and Port cars were
assigned to Trains 1 & 2.
The stations of Canadian National and Canadian Pacific Railways
in Saskatoon were, in those days, about a quarter-of-a-mile apart,
and my quickest form of transportation was my bicycle. It was a good
thing that the streets of Saskatoon were not crowded with automobiles.
The average day of train-watching generally began with a trip to the
CPR station to watch Train 331 pull in from Lanigan. This was followed
by a rapid run to the CN station to watch Trains 7 & 29 arrive and
Train 295 depart for Dalmeny and Carlton.
Sometimes I would linger at the CPR depot to watch Train 306 de­
part and when I did, I invariably missed CN Trains 7 & 29. There was
yet another complication. If I watched CN Train 77 leave, I missed
CPR Train 437. It was always possible to see CN Trains 10, 6 & 60
arrive and then dash madly over to the CP station in time to see
Train 52, the Great West Express, and then return quickly to the
CN depot to see Train 1, the Continental Limited, arriving, coming
all the way from distant Montreal.
Waiting to record the consist of CN Train 296 meant that I would
let CPR Train 51 go unobserved. By the very closest timing -and
plenty of hard work pedalling -it was possible to see CN Trains 9,
5 & 8 after CP Train 51 had arrived and then observe CP trains 450
or 438, followed by CN Trains 2 & 59. A hurried trip to the CP sta­
tion caught Train 305 or, if I stayed with CN, Trains 78 & 71 were
next scrutinized. As can be imagined, these manoeuvers required that
most of the trains be on time and that these quarter-mile station­
changes could be made promptly.
The last train recorded, during a complete day of train-watching,
was CN Train 30 from Edmonton & Lloydminster. This brought the day to
a close at 9.30 p.m. The only time that CNR Train 3 was recorded was
if I was with an adult, as it arrived in the dark of the night. De­
parture times for CN Trains 30 & 8, as well as CPR Train. 332, were too
late for my attendance. They left way past my bedtime. Equally out
of the question for observation was CN Train 4, which arrived about
2.00 a.m.~
CN PACIFIC NUMBER 5148,
Saskatchewan, kicked up mer
of 1957. A few days
by Budd RDC cars~
THE POWER FOR TRAIN 5, SASKATOON TO REGINA,
a little dust leaving Saskatoon, in the sum­
later, Number 5148 and train were replaced
J-4-C CLASS PACIFIC NUMBER 5090, AN MLW-MONTREAL PRODUCT OF
the Canadian Government Railways, hurried Canadian National
into Saskatoon on a hot summer day in 1959. Frequent boiler
downs leave their traces on the rear driver.
1918 FOR
Train 7
blow-
.. ~ . .
;.-
1-
~ , .. ….
CANADIAN 20 R A I L
The village of Sutherland was just three or four miles west of
Saskatoon, so, on some afternoons, there would be a trip on my bike
to this station, to watch Canadian Pacifics Train 51 change engines
and, later, to visit the CPR roundhouse. Other days, there would be
a trip to Canadian National Railways Nutana roundhouse to see what
was going on there.
I am told that roundhouse inspection is even today a routine ac­
tivity for the more dedicated railway enthusiast, only nowadays one
visits the diesel shop. The exhibits may be different, but the custom
remains unchanged.
Nutana, Saskatchewan, was invariably a lively spot. To reach the
Canadian National main line from Nutana roundhouse meant another pe­
dal of at least a mile. I was much more fortunate when, of a summer
evening, my parents would drive out to South Saskatoon which was on
the CN main line and, if I was lucky, we would see a long manifest
freight with a 3500-series engine on the head-end. These 3500s, which
sure seemed to me to be a big locomotive, often were assigned to main
line passenger extras. I can recall vividly the Pintsch gas storage
tank over in Sutherland and its unique odour.
Incidentally, the Canadian Pacific had a wooden car-maintenance
shed at Sutherland, where the baggage and first-class car off Train
331 spent the day. The procedure was that, when Train 331 arrived at
Saskatoon from Lanigan, the baggage and passengers would be unloaded
in the station and then the engine and the two cars would back out to
Sutherland, where they were stored for the day. The two sleepers were
kept at Saskatoon, on a spur with a wooden platform, just north of
the station. Equipment off the mixed-train runs also spent its idle
hours under the shed at Sutherland.
Officially, these mixed trains terminated at Sutherland and then
ran as extras into Saskatoon. In the winter months, the equipment of
Trains 305 & 306 would spend the cold nights under the train-shed at
Sutherland. Train 305 would detrain passengers and baggage at Saska­
toon and then the whole train backed out ta Sutherland, 3.8 miles.
Next day, the same equipment was backed into Saskatoon station as
Train 306.
The itineraries of mixed trains of the 30s originating in Sask­
atoon were indeed sometimes very puzzling. One peculiar schedule was
that of a 3-car local on Canadian National Railways, running between
Saskatoon and Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, via Totzke, in 1930. The
train was not fated to last very long and was dropped from the time­
table shortly after April 17, 1930. This peculiar train made one
round-trip from Saskatoon to Prince Albert each Monday and Thursday,
returning to Saskatoon in the evening:
6.30 a.m. 0.00 LV Saskatoon
14.00 Warman
8.30 a.m. 55.00 Ar Totzke
8.35 a.m. Lv Totzke
71 .00 Cudworth
103.00 St. Louis
AR
Lv
Ar
9.05 p.m.
7.05 p.m.
7.00 p.m.
11.15 a.m. 128.00 AR Prince Albert LV 4.20 p.m.
In the 10 years between 1930 and 1940, many of these mixed-train
services on Canadian National Railways from Saskatoon were discontin­
ued. Despite the return to a relatively prosperous economic situation
and the later frantic demands of World War lIon the productive capa-
city of Saskatchewans wheat fields, most of the CP and CN branch-
line services eventually succumbed to the rubber-tyred vehicle.
t HALTED MOMENTARILY BY THE SIGNAL INDICATION AT LOOP JUNCTION, SASKA­
toon, Saskatchewan, Canadian National consolidation Number 2140 re­
starts the freight extra. It is the month of October 1959 and the
dunnage-bag on the pilor is unexplained~
While they lasted, they were all very individual and very inter­
esting and were, in fact, the last refuge of some unique pieces of
rolling stock, which continue to be of considerable interest to the
railway enthusiast and modeler specializing in this particular aspect
of Canadian railroading.
Train-watching in those days was great fun and it can be said,
without fear of contradiction, that there isnt anyone who, given the
chance, wouldnt do it all over again~ And this includes the author
of this article~
CANADIAN
NATIONAL
RAILWAYS
Sas
k
atoon,
Saskatchewan
Timetable
effective
April
26,
1931
Train
7
29
295
77 72 10
6
60
1 27 28 296 9 5 8 2
59 78 71 30
NOTES:
Arrive
6.30
a.m.
7.00
11.00 11.20 11.45 12.25
p.m.
3.35 3.55 4.15 4.40 4.50 5.40 7.45 8.00 9.30
From
Regina Melville
&
Winnipeg
Calgary Lloydminst
er
&
Edmonton
Prince
Albert
CONTINENTAL
LIMITED-Montreal
Tichfi
e
ld
&
Kindersley
Dalmeny
&
Ca
rlton
Depart
7.20
a.m.
8.00 7.00 8.00 9.05
12.05
p.m.
12.00
noon
12.45
p.m.
1.20
Kamsack
&
Winnipeg
5.05
Regina
&
Winnipeg
6.05
Prince
Albert
11.57
CONTINENTAL
LIMITED-Vancouver
6.00 6.25
Wainwright
&
Edmonton
Tichfield,Moose
Jaw
&
Regina
Llaydminst
er
&
Edmonton
10.45
All
trains
doily,
unless
otherwise
noted.
1.
Daily,
except
Sunday.
2.
Mixed,
Tuesday
&
Friday.
To
Prince
Albert
Lloydminster
&
Edmonton Dalmeny
&
Carlton
Wainwright
&
Edmonton
Tichfield,Moose
Jaw
&
Regina
Kamsack
&
Winnipeg
Regina
&
Winnipeg
CONTINENTAL
LIMITED-Vancouver
Tichfield
&
Kindersley
Calgary Lloydminster
&
Edmonton
Regina CONTINENTAL
LIMITED-Montreal
Prince
Albert
Melville
&
Winnipeg
3.
Tuesday,
Thursda
y
and
Saturday.
4.
Arrives
from
Calgary
daily;
departs
for
Kamsack
&
Winnipeg
daily
except
Sunda
y.
5.
Monday,
Wednesday
&
Friday.
6.
Arrives
from Kamsack
and
Winnipeg
daily
except
Sunday;
departs
for
Calgary
daily.
II I,
Note I
!II

I
1
0
2
:l> Z
1
:l>
3
0
4
-:l> Z
5
IIII
3 2 6
t.) t.)
1
III
II
1 5 1
II
:u :l> r
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
RAILWAY
Saskatoon,
Saskatchewan
Timetable
effective
August
16,
1931
Train
331 306 437 449
52 51
450 438 305 332
NOTES:
Arrive
6.20
a.m.
12.00
noon
3.55
p.m.
5.20 5.20 7.45
Lanigan GREAT
WEST
EXPRESS-Edmonton
GREAT
WEST
EXPRESS-Winnipeg
Perdue
&
Rosetown:
mixed
troin
Sonningdale:
mixed
train
Lanigan,Regina
&
Moose Jaw
All
trains
daily,
unless
otherwise
noted.
1.
Daily
except
Sunday.
2.
Mixed
train;
Tuesday
&
Friday.
7.
Mixed
train;
Wednesday
&
Saturday.
8.
Mixed
train;
Monday
&
Thursday.
Depart
7.00
a.m.
8.00 8.30
12.25
p.m.
4.35
11
.55
Lanigan,Regina
&
Moose Jaw
Sonningdale:
mixed
train
Perdue
&
Rosetown:
mixed
GREAT
WEST
EXPRESS-Winnipeg
GREAT
WEST
EXPRESS-Edmonton
Lanigan
In
1930,
Trains
303
&
304
had a
baggage
car,
a
colonist
car
and
a
first-class
coach,
with
two
sleeping
cars,
Saskatoon
to
Regina
and
Moose
Jaw.
In
1931,
Trains
331
&
332
had a
baggage
car
and
two
first-class
coaches,
with
two
sleeping
cars,
Saskatoon
to
Moose
Jaw.
1
7
8
2
7 1
o ~ Z ~ o ~ z
III t-) Co) III
::0 ~ r
CANADIAN
NATIONAL
RAILWAYS
Resume
of
Train
Consists
Baggage
Colonist
1st.-class
Tourist
Dining
Sleeping
Date
Train
En~ine
~
Car
Car
Ps~r.
Car
Sleeeer
Car
Car
No.
Other
6
July
6050
4-8-2
8718~72~
2920 5096 2231 1299
Granby
1622 1931 8767
60
2242
Seaforth
1676
(note
A)
Lake
Miltona

Pullman
Galt
1651
Port
Hawkesbury 2161
0
James
Bay 409
:l>
7
July
2
6056
4-8-2
8621~72~
2877 5102 2248 1299
Dartmouth
1618
2
1931
8764
60
2219 Lake
Irvin
Pullman
:l> 0
(note
A)
South
Devon 1680

Rosetown 1670
:l>
Port
Bolster
2156
2
Caraquet
Bay 402
1111
27
June
5 5549
4-6-2
9514~60~*
-5010
Innisfree
1455 1931
8364
71
**
Mira
722
27
June
6 5547
4-6-2
9512~60~*
-5022
Alberta
1450
…,
1931 8353
60
**
Assiniboine
655
.,.
21
August
7 5618
4-6-2
8151(59)*
3729**
Ingersoll
1569
Note
B
1
111
1931
Tupper
1663 Note B
Saguenay
830**
Note
C
20
August
8 5619
4-6-2
8510(71)**
-3720**
Saguenay
830**
Note
C 1931
16
June
9
5096
4-6-2
8052!59j~Bl
2820 5059
Chilcotin
809**
Note
B
II;
1931 8203
59
* C
Coppermine
808**Note
C 9540
60
X Borden 1558 8373
71
**
II
r
16
June
10
5094
4-6-2
8202!59j(8l
2816 5012
Cloquet
806** 1931 9523
60
*
North
Bay 1548 8266
59
* (C) 8628
72
2
July
28 1332
4-6-0
7714(71)**
3733** 1931
8266~59r 8351
71
** 7297**
baggage/passenger:
last
car
on
train.
NOTE:
Train
27
used
the
same
equipment
as
Train
28.
4
July
1931
4
July
1931 29 5095
30
5095

__
_
~
_
6
,
__
.

~
~-==
…..
~
~~
CANADIAN
NATIONAL
RAILWAYS
(
continued)
Antrim
962** Note B
4-6-28078(59)*(C)
-3740**
8207(59)*(C)
(Car
8207 7733 RPO!BG**(B)
8311(71)**
had open
vestibules
both
ends)
4-6-2
8094~59~* 8064
59
* 8381
71
** -3724**
(Note:
Train
30
arrived
(Car
8094
formerly
RPO/BG
car
and had a
regular
mail
door
and two windows
next
to
the
door,
then
a
bag­
gage
door
on
the
other
end.)
from Edmonton,
Alberta,
set
our
cars
8094
&
8064
and
pic
ked
up
7733
&
962.)
23
June
1931
3
June
1931
3
June
1931
3
June
1931
13
Jul
y 1931
13
July
1931
Notes:
60 71 77
78
295
296 1331
4-6-0
7658(59)(X)
2770 4052**
8417(59)*
(Train
59
used
some
engine
&
equipment
as
1381
4-6-0
8165(
59)*
4-6-2
7735(71)*
* _
7307
BG/PSGR
**
5624 5622
4-6-2
7709(71)**
_ 7316
BG/PSGR**
1289
4-6-0
51624
Water
Car
_ 404070
Bo
xc
ar
36
7232
BG/PSGR
** 76842
Caboose
1289
4-6-0
51624
Water
Cor -5493
lOX
Tank
Car
417029
Bo
xc
ar
36
430734
Boxcar
36
7232
BG/PSGR**
76842
Caboose
Train
60.)
4053** (Train
72
used
same
engine
&
equipment
as
Train
71.)
4093**
Official
Car 50
4018**
Official
Cor
50
NOTES: F1gures
in
parentheses
after
car
number show
length
of
cor.
Cars
9514, 9512,
9540 and 9523
were
Railway
Post
Office
ca;s.
Cars
7733, 7658,
7735 and 7709
were
RPO/Baggage
cars.

Aj
Steel
car,
4-wheel
trucks;
see
8767
&
8764,Trains
Number
7714
was an
RPO/BAGGAGE
car.
*
=
Wooden
car,
4-wheel
trucks.
**
=
Wooden
cor,
6-wheel
trucks.
All
other
cars
steel,
with
6-wheel
trucks.
B
Car
set
out
of
train
at
Saskatoon.
1
&
2.
C
Car
picked
up
by
train
at
Saskatoon.
X
Steel
60
Railway
Post
Offi
ce
car,
4-wheel
trucks.
() l> 2 l> o l> 2
II
I
10.) Ut III
: r
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
RAILWAY
Resume
of
Train
Consists
Baggage
Colonist
Psgr.
Tourist
Dining
Sleeping
Car
Date
Train
Engine
~
Car Car
Car
3
July
51
2533
4-6-2
3770(60)@
2771 1931
4409(79)
1430
3
July
52 2571
4-6-2
3762(60)@
2753 1931
4366(78)
1458
4
August
305
2647
4-6-2
3452(59)*@
1151* 1931
4087(
59
) * 622*
4
August
306
6832
0-8-0
3452(59)*@
1540**
1931
3912(59)*
1164*
(The
third-trick
switch
engine
at
Saskatoon
handled
Train
8
July
1931
331
9
July
331
1931 2635
2635
engine
came
on
the
train.)
4-6-2
4002(59)*
1571**
4-6-2
4002(59)*
1571**
Car
Car
Number
Other
6214
Belvoir
Fort
Coulogne

6230
Balmoral
Fort
Simpson
306
to
Sutherland,
where
the
road
Hamilton Gatineau
(The
fact
that
and
passenger
Train
331
operated
on two
consecutive
days
with
car
proves
that
this
equipment
operated
between
Gladstone Gladys
the
same
locomotive,
baggage
Scskatoon
and
Lanigan
only.)
4
July
437 1931
4
July
438 2083
4-6-0
415361
Water
Car
-1626*
2083
4-6-0
96516
Boxcar
36
46360
Boxcar
36
46234
Boxcar
36
80314
Boxcar
36
96546
Boxcar
36
3868(59)* 435518
Caboose
(Passenger
car
1626
followed
baggage
car
3868
with
Caboose
435518
on
the
rear.)
415361
Water
Car
-1626*
92242
Boxcar
36
146922
Boxcar
36
(Passenger
car
1626
followed
baggage
car
135116
Boxcar
36
74624
Boxcar
36
3868
with
Caboose
435518
on
the
rear.)
80314
Boxcar
36
48284
Boxcar
36
96546
Boxcar
36
3868(59) 435518
Caboose
o ~ Z ~ o ~ z III t-.) go. III
;u ~ r
6
July
449
2083
4-6-0
1931
7
July
450
2083
4-6-0
1931
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
RAILWAY
(continued)
415361
Water
Car
1626*
ti,7874
Boxcar
36
88686
Boxcar
36
(Passenger
car
1626 was
between
baggage
3868(59)*
car
3868
and
caboose
435518.)
435518
Caboose
415361
Water
Car
1626*
212580
Boxcar
36
57950
Boxcar
36
(Passenger
car
1626
followed
baggage
car
3868(59)*
3868
with
caboose
435518
on
the
rear.)
435518
Caboose
(Trains
437,
438,
449
&
450
used
the
same
locomotive,
water
car,
baggage
car,
passenger
car
and
caboose.)
NOTES: Figures
in
porentheses
after
car
numbers
indicate
length.
@
=
RPO/baggage
cars
*
=
Wooden
car,
4-wheel
trucks.
**
=
Wooden
car,
6-wheel
trucks.
Other
passenger
cars,
colonist,
tourist,
dining
and
sleeping
cars
were
steel
with
6-wheel
trucks.
~
CANADIAN
NATIONAL
RAILWAYS
TRAIN
7
SLOWS
FOR
LOOP
JUNCTION,
toon,
on
her
way
west.
Engine
Number
5080,
the
first
of
the
class
and
an MLW-Montreal
1914
product,
headed
the
train
on
ber
5,
1959.
SASKA­J-4-o Decem-
o » z » o » z
III …, …..
III
::u » r

THE L~ST FAREWELL~ PIPPA N~S~ WAVES GOODBYE to CANADI~N NATIONALS TR­
ain 10, leaving Saskatoon 0n April 16, 1960. Engine Numbe~ 6062, pic­
tu~ed els~where, was on the head-end.
January 1975
WIJI!LLS
DURING A PRESS CONFERENCE IN WHITEHORSE, YUKON, IN APRIL 1974,CHAIR­
man of the Board of the White Pass & Yukon Route Mr. S.A.
Searle, jr. said that he could not say exactly when the
extension of the WP&YR from Whitehorse to Carmacks and Pelly Cros­
sing would begin, but when it was, it would be built narrow-gauge
the same as the rest of the road. At the same time, the curves and
grades would be built to comply with the Association of American Ra­
ilroads standards to that, if necessary, the gauge could be widened
to 4 feet St inches. Meanwhile, the WP&YR Corporation Limited is hav-
ing an environmental impact study made on the alternate northern
routes.
A statement made recently by the Government of the Yukon
said that 600,000 tons of ore concentrates are moved annually over
the Carmacks-Whitehorse road by truck and thence to Skagway, Alaska
by rail. Cast of transportation by road is 7¢ per ton-mile and by
rail is 2¢ per ton-mile.
These figures, together with the possible complications
should the British Columbia Railway propose to build north of Dease
Lake to Watson Lake, across the provincial-territorial boundary,com­
pel a serious consideration of the advantages of a standard-gauge
extention of the WP&YR south from Whitehorse to Watson Lake and
an end-on connection with the British Columbia Railway at the boun­
dary. This would provide an all-weather, all-rail route from the
mines of central Yukon to the rest of North America and would elim­
inate the clever but limited-capacity container op~ration presently
being op:~rated by the WP&YR, The Container Route over the spec­
tacular White Pass.
MID-WAY IN 1974, MURRAY HILL LIMOUSINE SERVICE OF MONTREAL HELD A
gala preview at Place Ville Marie, Montreal, of their most
recent addition to their fleet of specialized motor coaches
for sightseeing in Montreal. This was Olympique 76, an air-condi­
tioned, swivel-seat autobus, whose very large circular windows re­
flected th~ motif of interlocking rings which is the universally re­
cognized Olympic symbol.
The autobus, Olympique 76, was conceived and designed
by Mr. Charles Hershorn, President, Murray Hill Limousine Service.It
was constructed by the Prevost Car Company, Ste-Claire, Quebec and
by the Murray Hill body-shop and Maintenance Departments, Montreal.
The new vehicle is very striking in appearance, its im-
pact an the observer being enhanced by the tall Olympic propane-gas
flambeau, resting on the front bumper and rising to the roof an the
centre-line, between the two front windshields.
Shortly after the preview at Place Ville Marie and the
reception at th~ Murray, Hill Limousine Services garage and shops,
the new Olympique 76 entered service as a sightseeing and spe­
cial charter vehicle in Montreal.
CANADIAN
3 1
R A I L
BAD NEWS DAY FOR THE FRIEI~DS OF CANADIAN NATIONALS STEAM LOCOMO­
tive Number 6060 was the day she left Montreal for
Toronto, running light, after a most successful trip to
Shawinigan and Garneau, Quebec. When Number 6060 reached Belleville,
Ontario, the engineer, making a routine inspection of the engine,dis­
covered that the inside main bearing on the left side of the fourth
driving axle was hot. After further inspection and consultation, the
decision was made to continue the run to Toronto.
On arrival, the bearing was found to be hotter and,with­
out further ado, Number 6060 was taken to CP RAILs John Street Round­
house, where the connecting rods were removed and the axle dropped
for inspection.
It was found that the bearing had overheated and the br­
ass had fused with the steel axle. This meant that either the brass
would have to be turned off the axle with a lathe and an oversized
bearing fitted to compensate for the smaller shaft diameter, or else
a new axle would have to be found or made and the driving wheels
pressed off the damaged axle and on to the new one.
The wheel set was dismounted at John Street Roundhouse
and returned to CN s Pointe St-Charles Shops at Montreal. Since the
Pointe Shops were closed for the annual vacation, no decision could
be made immediately on the action to be taken. A spokesman for CN
claimed that the axle could and would be repaired and that Number
6060 would run in 1975, although this unfortunate bearing damage
necessitated cancellation of all of the remaining trips with Number
6060 in 1974, including the Canadian Railroad Historical Association
proposed CRHA Convention 1974 trip from Montreal to Toronto, via Ot­
tawa, in September.
If a new axle can be found and machined and the driving
wheels transferred to it, it is bound to be a fairly costly procedure.
The only wheel-press that your reporter knows of, that can do this
job, is oat MLW Industries, Iontreal, and the cost of doing the job
would be commensurate with its difficulty.
J But, Friends of 6060, do not despair. All is not yet
1-.111 lost~ Jim Shaughnessy, that expert of photographers, drove up from
Troy, NY, on July 14, 1974, the day of the Garneau Trip, took pic-
tures and sent us the accompanying selection. Number 6060 appeared at
Gohier (Montreal), taking over from the electric haulers north of
Mount Royal Tunnel; on the high trestle over Ste-Ursule Falls on the
Maskinonge River; on the famous trestle over the Rivi~re du Loup de
lEst -and at the station at Garneau.
And just to keep peace in the family, Jim immobilized
two CN wide-cob M-420 units (closs MR-20a) in the yard at Garneau.
FL CAUTIOI~: NO FOOTBOARD! And theres a 4500-series just around
the pilot of Number 2548~ SSW th
• • or en.
FOOTNOTE: By December 1974, CN 6060 had been moved to Conadian Na­
tional Railways Spadina Roundhouse in Toronto, her rear
axle with wheels was in Pointe-Saint-Charles Shops, Mon­
treal together with an alternate axle and it had been
determined that the pressing job could also be done at
CP RAILs Weston Shops in Winnipeg. However, no decision
had yet been taken as to whether ot not the repair would
be undertaken in preparation for the 1975 season.

CP RAIL, THE CITY OF WINNIPEG ANO THE GOVERN~ENT OF CANAOA ~AVE BEEN
collaborating in a .tudy af the passible relocation of the
CP ~AIL main lin. :Jnd freight yards in the City of ;.linn i_
peg, Hanitoba. While there was a similar study performed in 1972, it
did not COlsider the cityl de … elopment strotegy. The 1972 report
reco~.ended the removal of the CNR tracks and yards east of ~ain
Street, near th. junction of the Red and Assiniboine Ri … ers, the Fort
Rouge area and the Taylor ~ … enue :Jreo. Since 1972, CN has phased out
most of its operations in these oreas and CP ~AILs yard, between
Higgins and Jar … is Avenues were to be relocated adjacent to the nor_
thern section of the peri.eter highway.
CP ~AILs Gain line was recom.ended far relocation north
of the perimeter highway, e~tending so~th of the Birds Hill sandpits,
ocro •• Hanitobo Highway Nu.ber 59 and using CNs Victoria Be:Jch lub
between the Red Ri … er and the floodway. CP ~AIL said parts of this
propolol were too e~penli … e.
City of fiinnipeg Co~.illioner D.I.MocDonald laid the new
stJdy wos required ta determine whether or not Winnipeg waJld be ,,11-
igible for federal cost-shoring and ta demonstrate that the proposed
relocation wOJld benefit tronsaortation, urban developmelt and op­
timUN ule of land for city d ….. lopment.
Winnipeg Tribune John D. Welsh.
ON JUNE 21, 1968, GENERAL MOTORS DIESEL LIMITED OF LONDON, ONTARIO,
delivered this model SW 1200 HG (Seriol A-2176)(Order C-317) to the
Iron Ore Company of Canado, for ule on the Coral Lake auto~oted ra-
ilway near Labrador City, Labrador. This unit pro … ides the power
for 20-car unmanned iron oro trains from the looding pockets at
Luce Lake to the crusher and mill at Labrador City, a distance of
about .i~ ~iles. Photo courtesy Diesel Di … ision_General Motors
of Canada.
..
Canadan Rail
is PLtlished monttWy by the
Canadian Railroad HislOtK:al Association
P.o.BcII.22.StationB,~,a…bec,c..w.cs.;H38 3J5
Editor;s.s.~ Production; P. !AJrphy
Association Branches
CAlGARY L.I1.Unin, Soeutcry 1727 23.<1. A.nuo N,W.Clgo.y, .IIl10,T2!1 lV6
OTT-WA
W.R.Linley,S,etary P.D.Box 1.1,5totion A Otto.a,Conado KIN BVl
PACHIC COAST
R,H.tloyu, Secntory P.D.Box l006,Stotion A Vonco …. r,Il.C.V6C 2Pl
ROCl(Y I1OUNTA,IN
J .H.Hlld., S rHOI Y. P.O. 80x 6102,5 to tion C. E dent an. Al to. T 58 4~ 5
TORONTO & YORK OIVISION
P.S~~r901d,S.cutory P,D,Box 58.?,Ten1inol A To.onlo,Onl.lI511 lP3
~- … f • .,
-, .. ….
, …. OI<~ ••
,,,, _,,
.,, ………. ,.
IIlO.OO;[O
…. IHo 0,,,,,,,,,,,
Association Representatives
o .•. to ••. />8 , •• , ….. , •••• ,, ••• ~, .. I •
W.O.oo,. ..1, •••••••. >_.. ..1 .. 0 ••••• ~ ….
..0……… Ul _., •••••••.• ,……. •• H …. <..... UJ 2<1
J ••. ~ •• loo. ,:s;: ••••• , •• •••.•••••• _ ………….. c._ ••
D.J. ••••. _n, •.•• , ••••.•• & _. C.j •• lfTl. ho h.J.. 1,.,Ll
.. !.~. . ~ t_. .~ .. <.l .. y. .. , ••• (_ ... rJ,& ou
~.J.S……. >0 , ••• ,b, ••••. 1 ……………… 0-•• •• < ... ..
.~.h…….. 61.,,· , .•• , .•. .. 11 os l >c …………… ,.,1 •• ,
V~t the Canadial Railway ~ St.ConSlanl:Quebec.Canada.
-More than lOOpie<:es of eQuipment 00 dispIay-

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