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Canadian Rail 272 1974

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Canadian Rail 272 1974

Canadian Rail ..-
-No.272
September 1974

;
,
. _~ .,N,H.
Glenn Wallis
J
~ late George Warden of Kentville, Nova
Scotia, third-generation Canadian Pacif­
ic Railway conductor, probably had a
boyhood dream of owning his own railway
car. Early in 1972, the late Mr. Warden
approached CP RAIL, railway enthusiasts
and civic-minded townspeople of Kentville
with a plan to move Canadian Pacific/Domin­
ion Atlantic Railway combination baggage/
passenger car Number 3252 from the DAR
siding across the road from his house an
River Street in Kentville, to a location
beside the house. His proposal had a pur­
pose.
Mr. Warden had acquired this car to house his extensive collec­
tion of railway memorabilia which, prior to this time, had been ex­
hibited in his basement. George Wardens collection was described in
the article Kentvilles Secret Ingredient, which appeared in the
November 1970 issue Number 226 of CANADIAN RAIL.
Initially, Dominion Atlantic and the civic officials of Kent­
ville expressed a strong desire to have the proposed museum on pub­
lic property, but George insisted that, for reasons of security, it
be established close to his house. After a very determined effort,
George was successful in persuading the DAR and the Kentville admin­
istration -in spite of the bureaucratic red tape -that his pro­
posal should be adopted and, on June 23, 1972, order Number 801 is­
sued from the DAR operator at Kentville, for the movement of com­
bination car Number 3252 across River Street to its permanent loca­
tion. The complicated move began.
After the car had been safely moved to its permanent location,
~~ON THE COVER, RAPIDLY ROUND THE BEND COME TWO CANADIAN PACIFIC SLI­
~I ghtly used MLW RS 3 units, Numbers 8445 & 8449, on the front end of
a transfer freight, chugging through suburban Toronto, Ontario, way
back in 1957 A.D. The photo is courtesy of Mr. Peter Leggatt.
~ HAVE YOU EVER THOUGHT WHAT IT WOULD BE LIKE TO HAVE A RAILWAY BUILT
through your back-yard? When George Warden decided to move the combo
car to his property, this was one part of the result. Luckily, the
new line managed to pass right by the level crossing sign and bell.
Photo courtesy Joe Haley,Kentville, N.S.
George spent his days painting and refurbishing the combo and
moving his many exhibits from the basement to the new display facil­
ity. Nights, he went out on his regular run on the DARs Kentville­
Halifax passenger train.
It was a verv strenuous schedule for George and, in the end, it
proved to be just too much for him. Overcome by fatigue, he suffered
a heart attack on the return trip from Halifax on Wednesday, August
16, 1972 and was rushed to the hospital at Kentville. In spite of
all that could be done, he did not rally from the attack and died
later that evening.
Ace Foley, columnist for the Halifax CHRONICLE-HERALD, wrote:
George Warden put everything he had into everything
he tackled, and it could be he was tackling too tough
a schedule.
He was a community leader in the best sense of the
word. Sports was his great love and railroading his
t
CANADIAN 261 R A I L
AS IT WAS IN THE BEGINNING: BEFORE THE ACQUISITION OF THE CPR/DAR
combination car, the driveway of Mr. and Mrs. Wardens house in Kent­
ville was occupied by automobiles. In the end, it was again just a
driveway, but a number of things happened in the interval.
Photo courtesy Glenn Wallis, Hantsport, N.S.
PART 2 OF THE OPERATION INVOLVED RUNNING THE CAR ACROSS RIVER STREET
from the DAR freight siding on River Street South. The useful front­
loader made light work of laying rail, under the supervision of DAR
track-laying experts. Photo courtesy Joe Haley, Kentville, N.S.
DOWN THE 3% INTO THE BACK-YARD OF THE WARDEN HOUSE, THE TEMPORARY
track was layed, right past the crossing sign. The track at the far
end had to be permanent and strong, to hold the weight of the DAR
combo. Photo courtesy Joe Haley, Kentville, N.S.

t
CANADIAN 264 R A I L
WHEN THE TEMPORARY TRACK HAD BEEN BOLTED IN PLACE, THE BIG MOVE BEGAN.
In attendance, right to left at the vestibule steps, were Mayor Ripley
and Police Chief Granes of Kentville and George Warden (with the glas­
ses), proprietor of the Museum. The combo was inched across River
Stre~t by a small cat and a front-loader. Photo by Joe Haley.
life. He ran on the DAR all his adult life, and in
between and all around built a railway museum in his
own home and welcomed interested guests.
You could soya lot of things about George Warden,
all good. He was a very dedicated man; dedicated to
everything he undertook.
George Wardens obit.uary in the Kentville ADVERTISER had this
to say:
His dedication and devotion to sports led to Mr. Warden
being selected Sportsman of the Year in
1964 and, in 1965, he was named to the Nova Sco­
tia Sports Hall of Fame. Mr.
Wardens great interest in the youth of the
town prompted him to build the first playground
equipment for the Kentville schools. From 1952 to
1954, he served as Kentville town councillor.
In 1941, Mr. Warden joined the Dominion Atlantic
Railway. At the time of his death, he was chair­
man of the Trainmens United Transportation Union
CANADIAN 265 R A I L
as well as Secretary for the insurance department
of the UTU, Atlantic Division.
In 1967, Mr. Warden founded the George Warden Rail­
way Museum at his home on River Street. Last month,
the Town of Kentville and the Canadian Pacific Rail­
way donated a railway car to house the many sou­
venirs of past railroad days Mr. Warden had collec­
ted. The collection was considered one of the lar­
gest in eastern Conada and Mr. Warden delighted in
showing visitors about the premises and explaining
the source of the items on display.
George Warden was one of our finest citizens, a wonderful, com­
munity-minded man and a great help to our young people, said Mayor
THEN THERE WAS THE GREAT MOMENT WHEN MAYOR RIPLEY DROVE THE LAST SPIKE
in the track leading to the permanent home of DAR/CPR combination cor
Number 3252. George Warden held the spike -but only until it was well
seated~ Photo courtesy Joe Haley, Kentville, N.S.
CANADIAN 266 R A I L
Frank Ripley, in tribute. Mayor Ripley and other sports ond railroad
and civic officials said Mr. Warden would be greatly missed in the
Town and Valley.
In a letter to Mrs. George A. Warden, the Editor of CANADIAN RA­
IL wrote:
Many railway enthusiasts in Canada and the United
States, when they were informed of Mr. Wardens
efforts in the Kentville area, were quick to re­
cognize his accomplishments and to praise him for
them. For myself, I could well appreciate the gr­
eat personal contribution which he was making to
the railway hobby and to the history of railways
in western Nova Scotia. • •• the very significant
contribution which Mr. Warden made, not only to his
community but to projects which represent many Can­
adian organizations and initiatives, will be a per­
manent memorial to his energy, ability and citizen­
ship.
Although it was a sad time for Mrs. Warden and there were a mul­
titude of details requiring attention, nevertheless she continued to
welcome railway enthusiasts and other visitors from Canada and the
United States until the autumn weather necessitated the storage of
the many exhibits in the basement of her home.
In mid-February 1974, Mrs. Warden made plans to re-open the Geo­
rge Warden Railway Museum for the coming tourist season. The Junior
Chamber of Commerce of Kentville had helped her in 1973 to make the
roof of the combine water-tight and the display cases were there­
after moved into the car. To prepare for the 1974 summer season, Mrs.
Warden had only to replace the exhibits in these cases and hang some
of the pictures of railway scenes on the walls of the car.
The summer of 1973 had been a busy one for Mrs. Warden, as she
welcomed more than 350 unexpected visitors to the Museum. Unexpected,
in that no advertising had been sent out and no signs had been put
up. Some of the visitors came from as far away as the southern part
of the United States, having heard about George Wardens collection
of railway memorabilia from their friends who had visited Kentville
~n previous summers.
The museums popularity has continued to increase annually, as
word-of-mouth advertising continues to bring more and more people to
Kentville from ever greater distances.
Three years ago, a great many visitors came to Kentville for
Old Home Week and saw George Wardens museum while they were there.
This year, Kentville welcomed hundreds of visitors, drawn to this
Annapolis Valley town to participate in various celebrations and to
visit the George Warden Railway Museum in its new location.
Canadians in general and railway enthusiasts in particular are
indebted to the late George Warden for his enterprise and initiative
in assembling this permanent display of Canadian railroadiana, and
to Mrs. Warden for her courage and effort in perpetuating the George
Warden Railway Museum for the railway enthusiasts and historians,and
the people of Nova Scotia, of today and tomorrow.
CANADIAN 267 R A I L
Canadian Pacific Railway Car Number 3252
Former Canadian Pacific Railway passen~er (smoker)/baggage com­
bination car Number 3252 was one of the series 3250-3257, built ln
1924 and of steel construction. Its length over end-sills was 78
feet ot inches.
In the main passenger compartment, which was a smoking section,
there were two rows of 12 seats, accommodating 48 passengers.
Number 3252 was used in regular service on the Dominion Atlan­
tic Railways mixed train from Windsor to Truro, Nova Scotia, until
November 1971. At that time, the car was retired and was stored on
the DARs South Street siding in Kentville. CP RAIL coach Number 1303,
a survivor of the Peru emigration, was 3252 s replacement.
Number 3252 was moved from the DAR tracks on South River Street
to Mr. Wardens property, over temporary trackage, on June 23 1972.
The move required about 12 hours and the distance covered was about
360 feet, which worked out to a speed of about 30 feet per hour~
Today, car Number 3252, the display facility of the George War­
den Railway Museum, is located on North River Street, Kentville, No­va
Scotia.
t
AFTER THE GREAT MOVE HAD BEEN ACCOMPLISHED, THINGS AT THE WARDEN RESI­
dence returned to normal. The driveway was once more a driveway, but
the roof of Number 3252 could be seen over the tops of the automo-
biles~ Photo courtesy Glenn Wallis, Hantsport, N.S.
How
to Become
a Good Train Photographer-
With a Little Help
From Ones Relatives.
. :… ~ ~ ; . . ~ : ,
CANADIAN 269 R A I L
Patrick A.G.Webb
I
t is well known to most parents that
their children, at a very early age,
are quite fascinated by moving ob­
jects. That is why loving uncles and
aunts send presents of motored, mobile
displays, usually supplemented by mu­
sical boxes, to be hung above babys
crib. It is therefore equally natural
that all children, as they grow up,
are attracted by moving objects. Pro­
bably, it has something to do with
kiddie-cars, tricycles, bicycles, mo­
tor bikes and fast-back automobiles.
It may also have something to do with
boy-and-girl-watching and, more often
in the male, train-watching.
For the adolescent and young adult of either sex, the next mo­
tivation is to preserve the event for future reference and this is
one reason why Kodak makes so much money, as the syndrome seems to
be more pronounced in parents and relatives with respect to children,
and in adolescents and young adults with respect to members of the
opposite sex.
Colour slides and small-screen movies are superior modes of ev-
ent-preservation, although some favour enlargements, in colour or
black and white, with or without publication in news-stand magazines.
The preservation on film of the great moments of train-watching
may begin at an early age, for the same doting uncles and aunts who
once purchased the motorized mobiles may be stimulated to give in­
expensive cameras and film as toys. This practice frequently results
in unfortunate situations, where the neophyte train photographer sud-
denly discovers that his primitive black box or quick-flick pocket
panoramic photo-shooter will not stop even the way-freight on the
passing track. In fact, it will not capture a stationary track-car
with any degree of sharpness in the enlargement.
This frustrating condition frequently requires a couple of years
or more -and several rejection slips from hobby magazines -to re­
solve, since even the most affluent paper-route will not facilitate
the purchase of a 2t square, single-lens reflex camera of any great
potential. Not with all the other concurrent demands on the bank­
account, associated with motorbikes, tape-recorders, record-players
and girls~
After using a $ 7.95 disaster for several years, its shortcom­
ings become more than obvious. To escape this dilemma, it is some­
times advantogeous to have an unmarried sister. By dint of a little
scheming, you may perhaps be able to persuade her to see something
reolly great in a professional photographer who has -would you be­
lieve -some fantastic cameras and does his own developing and en­
larging. Once having accomplished the first step of generating some
interest in the photographer, unfortunately, it may turn out that
he lives in a city a thousand miles away, since you forgot to tell
your sister that he should be a local boy.
To salvage some benefit from this awkward situation, it then
becomes necessary to exercise a little patience and, in the end, to
t
THE FIRING LINE AT A RUNPAST ON THE OTTAWA-PEMBROKE, ONTARIO EX­
cursion of the By town Railway Society on 14 October 1973. This trip,
using Canadian National Railways equipment, was very popular with
the photographers. Photo courtesy R.F.Legget, Ottawa, Canada.
attend the wedding in the distant city. You may then be expected to
entertain your new brother-in-law, when he first comes to visit his
new in-laws. You may anticipate a few problems when this visit is
scheduled. The normally sunny weather which your region enjoys will
be sure to deteriorate into a rainy, foggy spell, and the beautiful
views of the lakes and mountains which you had counted on to stim-
ulate his photographic genius will be quite invisible and totally
unimpressive.
Nevertheless, after a couple of exposures to the local scenery,
such as it may be, you ought to be able to persuade him to look for
local employment and, when he does, your problem with train photo-
graphy will be well on the way to resolution. Always remember that
patience hath its own reward~
It is interesting to note that, in one case, showing the country
to the new brother-in-law involved a hike up a modest mountain peak,
in the rain and mist of a summer afternoon. As luck would have it,
the hikers emerged on the top of the peak just as the sun burst thr­
ough the clouds. Coming out of the mist into this dazzling spectacle,
the sightseers were immediately engulfed in a stampeding herd of
mountain sheep, a very rare occurrence. The photographer brother-in­
law, two cameras slung around his neck, was so dumbfounded by the
flood of charging sheep that he froze -and did not get a single
picture~
CANADIAN 271 R A I L
When brother-in-law, the photographer does arrive in town, it
will then be necessary to convert him to photographing trains, since
he may already be some kind of aeroplane or old auto nut. It is usual­
ly easier to accomplish the conversion process with barbecued steaks,
generously oiled with scotch, while you weave extravagant tales of
train-chasing, armed with a single camera. This is big-game hunting,
indeed, with na caustic criticisms anticipated from the conservation­
ists ~
These tales of adventure, coupled with an impassioned appeal
for assistance in upgrading the capability and quality of your pre­
sent efforts should do the trick. If you are a clever persuader, you
wont be able to hold him back. He will soon be haunting all of the
local diesel shops and freight yards and shortly will be able to dif­
ferentiate between ALCO, GE and GM noses by model number. Of course,
he will be taking all your train pictures for you and helpfully de­
veloping and enlarging the best of the selection.
with­
very
But all of this skilful planning and persuasion may not be
out a price-tag~ You may wind up purchasing a very good -and
expensive -camera from your photographer brother-in-law, of
Moreover, he will tell you that to achieve the best possible
you ought to try several types of film, both black-and-white
course.
result,
and
ALWAYS A FAVOURITE AT THE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, OTTAWA,
is ex-Canadian National Railways Number 9400, especially useful as
a background for Junior. Photo courtesy J. Langevin, Ottawa, Canada.
t
TELL ME HOW LONG THE
Sutton, Quebec in the
tile Speed Graphic of
TRAINS BEEN GONE, ON A COLD WINTER NIGHT AT
1950s. A splendid night shot, from the versa­
Jim Shaughnessy, Troy, New York.
may be a colour, which he also just happens to have for sale. There
temporary diversion into a consideration of one or several
angle or telephoto lenses for your new camera, which he also
happens to have in stock. Add to this the necessity of doing
own developing and printing, which he has taught you to do,
professionally, with equipment, chemicals and paper which he
ries in his store. Anything less would be unthinkable.
wide­
just
your
very
car-
There will thereafter be the possibility that you could have
your pictures published in your favourite enthusiast magazine and,
regardless of the quality of reproduction which the magazine usually
achieves, it will be necessary for you to prepare and submit en-
largements of the very highest professional quality.
After the umpty-umphth 8×10 enlargement in the darkroom on a
Friday night, when everyone else is out unwinding at the bowling al­
ley, the thought just might cross your mind that the whole exercise
has been something less than worthwhile. You might as well rational­
ize at this point, and make another enlargement, for you are far too
far down the (rail) road to turn back.
About the only alternative left is to try to persuade some pub­
lisher to produce a picture book about railways, using a selection of
the thousands of prints which are stored in the attic. If you have
been keeping them in the basement, that is another and perhaps sad­
der story~
Do not despair~ Such a miracle really happens, occasionally. And when
it does, you will achieve a great degree of satisfaction and all
your stomach troubles and nervous tics will at last disappear.
September 1974
THE CITY OF MONTREAL, CANADA, IS PRESENTLY BLESSED WITH A MUCTC, OR
if you prefer, a CTCUM, which tronslates in the English
version to the Montreal Urban Community Transit Commission.
On Wednesday, March 17 1974, the city was awarded another group of
initials, TRRAMM.
This is not a Scotsmans pronunciation of the popular ab­
breviation for an electric street railway vehicle~
Minister of Transport Jean Marchand was too busy criticizing
Canadas two major railways for their failure to provide adequate mo­
tive power and equipment for the expeditious movement of wheat from
the prairies to ocean ports to make the announcement. Instead, it was made by
Quebecs Transport Minister Raymond Mailloux.
TRRAMM may be deciphered as Transport Rapide Regionale Aero­
portuaire Montreal Mirabel. The English-language equivalent boggles
the imagination and pronunciation.
The proposal describes the high-speed transport system de­
signed to link the jumbo-jet airport of Mirabel with Montreals cen­
tre. It is planned to use existing installations, wherever possible.
Basically, it will be electric steel wheel on steel rail and will
originate in Canadian National Railways Central Station. Using the
Mount Royal Tunnel, TRRAMM will travel on CN iron to a point north
of Cote Vertu station (near the intersection of the Laurentien Auto­
route and Henri-Bourassa Boulevard).
From here, a new line would be constructed northeastward
to the Park Avenue/Ste-Therese line of CP RAIL, which would be used
to a point north of St-Janvrier, where the new line would turn in
a southwesterly direction to the Mirabel Airport. A new double-tr­
ack tunnel would be dug under the Riviere des Prairies at Bordeaux.
From Mirabel Jetport, additional construction would be re­
quired to join TRRAMM to the existing CN Montfort Subdivision near
St-Augustin. Once the Montfort Sub is reached, TRRAMM trains will
return to Montreal via Deux-Montagnes, Roxboro, Val Royal, rejoining
the outbound line north of Cote Vertu.
Mr. Mailloux said that electric TRRAMM trains would travel
at speeds of more than 100 miles per hour, covering the 35 miles to
the jetport from CNs Central Station in about 30 minutes. The new
system could run, Mr. Mailloux said, with about the same frequency
as Montreals METRO.
The cost of the project is estimated at $ 438 million 1973
dollars and should be completed by 1980. The Minister said that the
proposal would have to be ratified by the Government of Canada and
the municipalities and transportation companies involved.
Until TRRAMM is completed, an express bus service will be
provided from Mirabel Jetport after its opening in 1975 to Montreal,
Dorval, Loval, Ste-Therese and St-Jerome. The Minister said that an
agreement had been reached between MUCTC (CUCTM), Laval Transit and
CANAD·IAN 274 R A I L
the Government of Quebec on the financing and operation of this bus
service, estimated to cost $ 5 million.
TRRAMM stations are planned to have park ond ride facil­
ities and will link up with local and regional bus lines and METRO,
the latter at four points.
Minister Mailloux said that TRRAMM would become the bock­
bone of a fast, metropolitan transit network, serving Montreal,Laval
and the northern off-island communities such as Ste-Therese and
Deux-Montagnes.
rtes M ntreal STAR 27
Mirabel-Montreal Rapid Transit System (TRRAMM)
o
I~
5 MILES
••••• ;;: I( i,!~
L .. ~) iJ.
•• : V~r:~nt Royal ~
Laval West v.-••••… ~
C~t .. r.::::::==;:::::~:::: Val Royal MeG,
•••••••• Saraguay
,,,bo<. 0 /d j
~/~I
r–9
The Quebec governments proposed Jines ro link Montreal with tbe new jetport.
AT THE BEGINNING OF MAY 1974, BARRIE MACLEOD OF SYDNEY, NOVA SCOTIA,
reported that ex_Southern Railway (UK), ex-Steamtown USA
4-4-0 steam locomotive Schools class Number 926 REPTON
had arrived at Sydney, Nova Scotia. The REPTON was built by the for­
mer Southern Railway in 1934 and was brought to North America and
Steamtown, Bellows Falls, Vermont, in June 1967. ,
REPTON, on lease to the Cape Breton Steam Railway for a
five-year period, passed through Montoon, New Brunswick, an April 8,
1974, coupled to an ex-Great Idestern Railway (UK) first-class pas-
senger coach (compartment, side-corridor), sandwiched between two
CN idler flats, which had MCB couplers on the outer ends and UK cen­
tre-links and buffers on the inner ends, to match the UK couplings on
the REPTON ond the ex-GWR coach. Wendell Lemon spotted the strangers
in CNs Moncton yard and photographed them.
Wendell notes that the REPTON is a 3-cylinder locomotive
with a TE of 25,130 lbs., 79 drivers and a BP of 220 psig.
From CN s Sydney station, a DEVCO diesel and van took
the special to The Hub, otherwise New Aberdeen, a suburb of Glace
Bay, about 1 mile west of the ex-Sydney & Louisbourg roundhouse ot
CANADIAN 275 R A I L
Glace Bay.
Old NUAlber 42 chuffed out to pick up the special
from the DEVCO diesel and had the honour of pulling REPTON and the
GWR coach into the Glace Bay station, where several DEVCO officials
were on hand.
According to these latter gentlemen, the REPTON 1S 1n
good condition and will require far less overhauling than did Number
42. Of course, the couplings will have to be changed to North Amer­
ican standard MCB couplers and the brake system will have to be al­
tered from vacuum to Westinghouse.
Barrie also reports that the new line of the Cape
Breton Steam Railway from Morien Junction to Port Morien should be
ready for the 1974 operating season. Unfortunately, the track from
Broughton Junction to Mira Gut and Louisbourg, part of the former
Sydney & Louisbourg Railways main line, has been torn up completely,
so that there is no chance that the Cape Breton Steam Railway will
be able to operate beyond Morien Junction.
But with a gee-en-u-wyne English 4-4-0 steam locomotive,
a yew-neek GWR British corridor compartment coach and the Morien
Junction-Port Morien extension, who need more right-of-way?
THE SAN FRANCISCO MUNICIPAL RAILWAY TOOK DELIVERY ON 26 NOVEMBER 1973
of the first four of eleven PCC streetcars, purchased third­
hand from the Toronto Transit Commission, Toronto, Ontario.
Five of the six cars were built in 1946 -and the sixth in 1947 -by
the St. Louis Car Company, St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A., for the Kan­
sas City Public Service Company and were bought by the TTC in 1957.
Apparently the MUNI selected these cars because they have back-up
controls.
The four cars minus their broad-gauge (4 feet 10 7/8-inch)
trucks were delivered to Southern Pacifics Bayshore Yard, San Fran­
cisco, and were trucked across Geneva Avenue to the MUNI carbarn.
About 1 December, four more cars were en route to San
Francisco and three were still to be shipped.
The cars involved in the sale are as follows:
CANADIAN 276 R A I L
Original TTC San Francisco
KCPS number number MUNI number
551 4752 1190 740 4754 1180 754 4757 1 1
81
756 4758* 1182 767 4763* 1183 769 4764 1184 778 4769 1185 779 4770 1186 780
4771 1187 789 4775
1188
792 4777 1189 *
Included in first 4-car shipment.
This information and accompanying photographs are supplied
through the courtesy of the WESTERN RAILROADER of San Mateo,CA 94401.
CA NAD IAN 277 R A I L
ADDED TO THE LIST OF CP RAIL EQUIPMENT WILL BE 15 ADDITIONAL ROBOT
units for use on coal and grain unit-trains from Golden, B. C.
to Vancouver and Roberts Bank. The new units will be num­
bered 1017 through 1031 and will be built by Angus Shops, Montr6al,
on new boxcar frames, unlike the original ROBOT units, which were
rebuilt from other equipment.
For the record, here is the status of the first 15 ROBOT
units:
Road Original
number Source number Status
———
1001 Baggage/Express car 4465 Retired: in storage
1002 Baggage/Express car 4472 Retired: ~n storage
1003 Baggage/Express ca r 4473 Retired: in storage
1004 Baggage/Express car 4478 Retired: in storage
1005 Baggage/Express car 4475 Wrecked in Kamloops Lake
1006 Fairbanks Morse CFB 16-4 4454 In service
1007 Fairbanks Morse CFB 16-4 4449 In service
1008 Fairbanks Morse CFB 16-4 4452 In service
1009 Fairbanks Morse CFB 16-4 4471 In service
1010 Fairbanks Morse CFB 16-4 4472 In service
1011 Fairbanks Morse CFB 16-4 4450 In service
1012 Fairbanks Morse CFB 16-4 4451 In service
1013 Fairbanks Morse CFB 16-4 4454 In service
1014 Fairbanks Morse CFB 16-4 4458 In service
1015 Fairbanks Morse CFB 16-4 4453 In service
1016 Fairbanks Morse H-16-44 8719 In service
H.W.Elson.
MR. F.F.ANGUS SENT A CLIPPING FROM A SAINT JOHN, NEW BRUNSWICK, NEWS­
paper, dated October 1973, which described the demolition
of the old union station in that city. Demolition of the
union station (CN/CP/CPRAIL) -it had Union Station debossed in
the cement above the pillared main portico -was accomplished by
Grove Construction Company Limited of Saint John. The site was to
be cleared by year-end.
This regrettable event caused our member Major C. Warren
Anderson, well-known railway historian of Sussex, New Brunswick, to
send us the following resum6 of stations in Saint John:
The first station in Saint John was a small building just large
enough to hold the ticket-seller at Mill Street, near the Portland
Bridge, from which the first train of a locomotive and flat cars de­
parted on 17 March 1857, on the European & North American Railway,
up the Marsh for 3t miles. On 20 July 1857, daily except Sunday ser­
vice was announced. This small station presumably remained in service
until 1859.
The next station to be built was at the foot of Dorchester
Street, although one was proposed as early as 14 October 1853, on a
site just east of the Marsh Bridge. The Dorchester Street station was
used by the E&NARy until 1872, when the Intercolonial Railway assumed
operation of the E&NARy. The ICR continued to use it until 1884.
In that year, Saint Johns third station was constructed
near the corner of Pond and Mill Streets, the Mill Pond having been
filled with gravel from the Rothesay gravel pit and the debris from
the Saint John fire of 1877. This was the first Union Station, at­
taining this title when the Canadian Pacific Railway entered Saint
John from the west on 3 June 1889.
CANADIAN 278 R A I L
This station was used by the Intercolonial from 1884 to
1916, the Canadian Pacific Railway from 1889 to 1932, the Canadian
Government Railways from 1916 to 1918 and the Canadian National Rail­
ways from 1918 to 1932.
Two red granite pillars supporting a colonnade at the front
of the station are now used to support a sign over one of the entran­
ces to Cedar Hill Cemetary in present-day Saint John.
A new station was built on the same location and ope~ed
on 8 March 1933, at 6 a.m. by J.M.Thompson, Superintendent of Ter­
minals, Canadian National Railways. Mrs. Mary Briggs, travelling to
Moncton, was the first person to enter the building. G.W.Garrett
purchased the first ticket -to Coldbrook~
This, then, was the old union station, recently demolish­
ed. It served the Canadian Pacific Railway until 1970, when the CPR
built its own station in Saint John West and withdrew from occupancy.
Canadian National continued to use the station until it was closed
on 6 June 1973.
Canadian National Railways built a new station some distan­
ce from the citys centre on 1+ acres of land donated to the railway
by the Provincial government, in exchange for the old union station
site. The new CNR station is on Rothesay Avenue and was officially
opened on 7 June 1973. It is a combination station-SERVOCENTRE and
was built by Richard & B.A. Ryan (Alt) Limited at a cost of $ 360,000.
Measuring 150 feet in length, L-shaped, by 50 and 100 feet wide, with
a waiting room for 72 people, it also includes a large parking space.
Without doubt, it will serve the CNR for many years to come,
but it lacks the architectural beauty and regal appearance of the
building it replaced.
IN JANUARY 1974, THE ENERGY CRISTS WAS UPON US. BY MARCH, HARVEY EL­
son wrote to say that because of the energy crisis, the
Washington-New York-Montr~al AMTRAK service was booming.
One Thursday morning, The Washingtonian rumbled over St-Antoine St­
reet, Montr~al, into Canadian Nationals Central Station with a mam­
moth consist of 29 cars of all descriptions, both new and old, some
with AMTRAK markings and some with their original company identities.
The mammoth was nearly two hours late.
By mid-June, Jim Shaughnessy could send a newspaper cl­
ipping from the Albany, New York Times Union, which reported that
Governor Wilson had ordered State Transportation Commisioner Raymond T.
Schuler to restore passenger train service north of Albany to Mon­
tr~al.
Incredible. A hasty check of D&Hs Colonie Shops and
administration confirmed that PA 1 units Numbers 16 & 19 were parked
at Colanie without engines, tagged for deadheading to Boise, Idaho,
and the shops of Morrison-Knudson, where brand-new ALCO 251 prime­
movers, manufactured at Auburn, New York and rated at 2,000hp, would
be installed. Meanwhile, PA 1 units 17 & 18 prepared to handle the
restored passenger service.
By the time this report appears in print, many of the
questions posed on June 15 will be answered. At that time, it appear­
ed that AMTRAK would pick up part of the expense, with D&H receiving
just expense money -no mark-up -for running the service. However,
the arrangement with AMTRAK and the State of New York will enable
D&H to undertake some maintenance on the main line north,particular­
ly along thase stretches where the roadbed is supported by scrapped
hopper cars.
Other questions: What kind of service? One through pas­
senger car from Grand Central terminal (?) to Montr~al, or an across-
CANADIAN _ 279 R A I L
the-platform change at Rennsaler? Where will the train terminate in
Montreal, CP RAILs Windsor Station or CN s Central Station? Probably
the latter. Will the schedule be that of the old Laurentian? Most
likely. Who will benefit, AMTRAK, D&H or CN? Each, a little bit, but
the brotherhoods most, as it will mean the reinstatement of a number
of men who did the same thing up to May 1971, when the former service
was withdrawn.
As of June 15, the passenger train reinstatement was a
State of New York project, all the way. The cost: no estimates,but
the 1974 New York State legislature has already approved a $ 30 mil­
lion program.
As the Times Union said, the move will be welcomed by
railway buffs who have lamented the loss of the scenic route through
the Champlain valley, but it will take more passengers than they will
generate to make the restored service a success.
Meanwhile, Bruce Sterzing, D&Hs President, is quite op-
timistic. And the PA 1s are being re-engined. And ALCO Products of
Auburn, New York, have sold 48 more cylinders.
UNITED AIRCRAFT CORPORATION (USA) BEGAN TO BE A LITTLE NERVOUS IN MAY
1974 about the possibility of AMTRAKs opting for $ 70
million worth of french-designed, turbine-powered trains
instead of United Aircrafts own TURBOTRAIN. The Company made repre­
sentations through letters from its Washington DC vice-president to
all members of committees of the US Congress and to members of trans­
portation appropriation subcommittees in each branch of Congress wh­
ere the AMTRAK budget is examined.
In addition, UAC was pushing a redesigned train, TURBINE
II, which, UAC said, would be 25% lighter and would use 30% less
fuel than the French-designed train. TURBINE II also has wider seats
and a 50% wider aisle, accelerates from zero to 90 mph in 45% less
distance; operates at a substantially higher speed, takes curves
25% faster and could meet all US safety standards without extensive
changes.
The Washington DC STAR-NEWS also reported that a spo­
kesman for UAC conceded that the initial investment, based on 25
trains, was lower for the French train: $ 119.7 million for the UAC
variety versus $ 87.5 million for the French model. But, contended
UAC, on a 10-year life-cycle, the TURBINE II would save AMTRAK
$ 24.4 million, based on a saving in maintenance of $ 38.2 million
and of $ 18.4 million in fuel consumption. The 25 French trains, if
ordered by AMTRAK, would be built under license by Rohr Industries.
Subsequently, about June 10, AMTRAK was given approval
by the US Department of Transportation to order more than $ 110 mil-
lion worth of new equipment, including six of the French TURBOs.
The request for an additional 14 turbotrains for the Boston-New York
service was rejected. This was the report in the New York Times Ser­
vice
ll

In addition to the six turbotrains estimated to cost
$ 18 million and to be used on short-haul routes out of Chicago, AM­
TRAK was authorized to order 200 new passenger coaches for $ 82 mil­
lion aQd 25 diesel locomotives costing about $ 13 million.
OUR CORRESPONDENT WENDELL LEMON OF MONCTON, NEW BRUNSWICK, SENDS US
a picture of Canadian National Railways RS 3, built 9/
54 by ALCO Schenectady and once a familiar sight to com­
muters between St-Hilaire and Montreal, Quebec. Number 3900 was with­
drawn from service on October 29, 1973 and returned to Moncton where
it was cannibalized to keep other units in the 1800-series going.
CANADIAN 280 R A I L
Wendell notes that this unit was once assigned to the
Central Vermont Railway and formerly was numbered 1859. The photo­
graph was taken on November 17, 1973.
eNs class ER-6a, Number 41, is normally in service on
the south end of Prince Edward Island with Numbers 30, 35 and 40.
These small 70-ton units will MU with each other and, at the same
time, comply with the weight restrictions on most of the Islands
trackage. The photo was taken at Moncton, N.B., on April 12, 1974.
CANADIAN 281 R A I L
-AT THE END OF JANUARY 1974, THE BRITISH COLUMBIA MOOSE WERE LEAD­
ing Canadian National Railways by a score of 27 to 23.
That is to say, 27 cars derailed for 23 moose killed.
Severe snow conditions were alleged to be responsible for bringing
the moose to lower levels in the mountains in search of food, near
the railway. Approaching trains irked the ungainly, tempremental an­
imals; they charged the diesel units head-on, with the results tabu­
lated (with regret) above.
H.W.Elson.
-RESISTANCE TO CHANGE OR GENUINE SUGGESTIONS FOR IMPROVEMENT? THE
new diesel units equipped with the much-publicized new
safety cabs stimulated the following observations from
an engineer who has drawn them from the power pool:
1. With small windows, the visibility to the sides is poor,
with a blind spot on each side. The high gauge-stand and
raised short hood make it impossible to see a trainman
getting on or off, or making a joint, without hanging
your head out of a window which has no arm-rest. The amp
meter obstructs the view and is impossible to see at
night;
2. The speedometer, centred above the windshield, is out of
the engineers line of vision and a real neck-sti ffener;
3. The cab heater cannot be controlled properly and blows
hot air in your face, while your back freezes;
4. The location of the toilet in the nose has not helped
much. If anyone is foolish enough to use it when the
engine is travelling at speed, the stink will be enough
to drive you out of the cab;
5. The engineers seat is very hard, with no back-rest ad­
justment, which aggravates the locomotives already
rough ride;
6. Because of all the ridiculous steps to the door in the
nose, there is no room left for your grip, or other es­
sential equipment, in the cab;
7. The centre seat looks over a big hole -the stairs -and
should be fitted with a seat-belt, for safety;
8. Sweeping out the cab is a major undertaking. And if you
dont believe this statement, think about how you would
do it;
9. The hot-plate and refrigerator are used relatively sel­
dom, as not many engine crews carry groceries, utensils
-and a portable sink or dish-washer to wash up.
The older units may not have had cabs which were as safe,
apparently, they were more convenient. The problem of how the
gine crew escapes from the safety cab when the door in the
cannot be opened is another question. At least these are some
but,
en­
nose
of
the observations one engineer has made.
H.W.Elson.
TWENTY YEARS AGO, THE ACCOMPANYING PHOTO WAS TAKEN IN JUNE. THE EN-
gineer, only a year away from retirement, was W. J.
Bill Barrett of Calgary, Alberta and the eigine was
Canadian Pad fie Railways 4-6-2 Number 2354, the halder of seven
records, none of which was ever equalled. Number 2354 distinguished
herself in the following ways:
-she travelled 283,000 miles without a class 1 repair;
normally, a class 1 repair on a steam locomotive was
required after 150,000 miles;
CANADIAN ·282
R A I L
Number 2354 was the best maintained engine on the system;
Mr. Barrett and his fireman spent many hours cleaning and
polishing the engine and adjusting the valve-gear;
-she was t,he only Pocific type-1ocomot,&ve anQ· … .ene of iwo
engines, other than Hudsons and Selkirks, to be painted
in the well-known tuscan red passenger-engine paint scheme;
-she was the only locomotive, in recent times, to be assigned
specifically to one engineer and one fireman; no other crew
was rostered for Number 2354;
Number 2354 was the only CP engine to be fitted with a six­
chime whistle. Normally, whistles on the CPR engines at that
time, were of the five-chambered type, but the shopmen at
Ogden Shops, Calgary, fitted this special whistle to Number
2354 as a tribute to her and her crew;
-moreover, Number 2354 had special brass fittings, whereas
other CPR passenger engines had the usual black fittings;
-Number 2354 was the first engine on the CPR to be converted
from a coal-burning to an oil-burning locomotive.
Mr. Barrett, who is in excellent health and now lives
in Calgary, Alberta, sends the accompanying picture, for which we
express our appreciation.
H.W.Elson.
A NEW $ 1.5 MILLION PAINT SHOP HAS BEEN BUILT BY CP RAIL AS AN ADDI­
tion to its Ogden Shops (Calgary, Alberta) facilities.
The new shop will process all types of freight equip-
ment and diesel locomotives on an assembly-line operation. Freight
cars, for example, will pass through five stages at eight-minute in-
CANADIAN 283 R A I L
tervals, moving along a single track through a drying oven which
heats the cars to the correct temperature for painting. There is an
air-blasting stage where old, chipped paint and dirt are remaved.This
is followed by a spray-painting booth, a drying oven and a stencil­
ling area, where the multimark and lettering are applied, together
with other pertinent numbers and essential information.
The new paint shop has a through-put of 12 cars per day,
which extrapolates to 2,700 cars per year. Phl M
l. l.p ason.
A FURTHER EXPLANATION OF THE PICTURE WHICH APPEARED ON PAGE 151 OF
the May 1974 issue Number 268 of CANADIAN RAIL has been
received from Mr. R.F.Corley of Peterborough, Ontario.
Mr. Corley Points out that the steamer in the background is not the
5.5. DALHOUSIE CITY, but may be the 5.5. TORONTO, a sidewheeler.
In addition, only the S.S.NORTHUMBERLAND belonged to
Canadian National Steamships. The 5.5. CAPE TRINITY of the Toronto,
1000 Islands and Bay of Quinte Line, probably passed into the fleet
of Canada Steamship Lines at a later dote.
BURRARD DRY DOCK COMPANY LIMITED, VANCOUVER AREAS LARGEST SHIPYARD,
delivered the first of two railcar ferries to INCAN
Marine Limited, early in June 1974. The $ 5 million ves­
sel was to be taken through the Panama Canal, on its way up the St.
Lawrence River, through the Great Lakes, to begin newsprint service
b
7
tween Thunder Bay, Ontario and Duluth, Minnesota-Superior, Wiscon-
Sl.n. The keel has been layed for an almost identical rail­
car ferry, ordered by INCAN for late 1975 delivery. This vessel may
be intended for service on the St. Lawrence River, between newsprint
paper mills on the north shore of the river and a connection with CP
RAIL at Quebec. According to sketch-mops of the intended service,
cars of newsprint, destined for Boston ~rrd New York, will move from
Quebec via the Quebec Central Railway to Sherbrooke and a connection
with CP RAILs Lyndonville Subdivision at Newport, Vermont.
J.D.Welsh.
THE MINNEAPOLIS, ST. PAUL AND SAULT STE. MARIE RAILROAD, POPULARLY
called the $00 Line, has placed the largest single
order for rolling stock and motive power in its history.
For delivery over the next two years and costing nearly $ 20 million,
there will be 20 locomotives and 665 new freight cars on hand by 1976.
The company established record operating revenues and
net income in 1973, the former reaching $ 168.324 million, up 19.7%
over 1972 and the latter topped $ 18.216 million or $ 7.19 per share,
an increase of 76.5% over 72.
H.W.Elson.
THE FORMER PACIFIC COAST REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ASSOCIATION, MR. PETER
Cox, now resident in Prince George, British Columbi~,re­
cently sent a newspaper account of the Sixtieth Anniver­
sary celebration of the driving of the last spike on the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway at Finmoore, British Columbia -exactly half-way be­
tween Prince Rupert and Wolf Creek -on April 7, 1914.
Peter Titiryn, construction foreman on the GTP in 1914,
drove the last spike at that time. Sixty years later, the last
spike was driven by his grandson, Mr. Terry St. Jean and five of
the originals who worked on the GTP, including octogenarian Jim
Moriss of Quesnel, British Columbia.
CANADIAN 284 R A I L
The location of this last spike on the GTP is today
alleged to be some two miles east of Fort Fraser, scene of the 1974
re-enactment ceremony. The location is said to be marked by a small
sign. However, it is noted that Finmoore, mile 50.2 on CNs Nechako
Subdivision, is not at all the same location as mile 92.3, two
miles east of Fort Fraser, on the same CN subdivision.
EARLY ON THE MORNING OF MAY 31, 1974, NORTHERN ALBERTA RAILWAYS TR­
ain 2 from Dawson Creek, B.C., Grand Prairie and McLen­
nan, Alberta, clattered through the approaches to Dun­
vegan Yards, Edmonton, raising a cloud of dust and powered by GMD-1
unit Number 302. When Train 2 ground to a stop at Dunvegan station,
after completing the 489.6-mile run from Dawson Creek, passenger tr­
ain service on the NAR s main line was no more. There were a few peo­
ple at Dunvegan to meet this last passenger train. Among them was our
member Mr. W.C.Slim of Grand Center, Alberta, who sends us two photo­
graphs of this unhappy occasion.
THE HISTORIC THOMAS G. (LATER LORD) SHAUGHNESSY MANSION ON MONTREALS
Dorchester Boulevard West, was built in 1875 by Robert
Brown and was subsequently occupied by Duncan McIntyre,
originally of the Canada Central and Atlantic and North Western Rail-
ways and, in 1881, the Canadian Pacific Railway Companys original
Vice-President. Recently, this building was classified as an historic
site by the Government of Quebec, much to the satisfaction of the
ancient-building conservationists. The mansion has been purchased by
a Toronto developer, who now has planned to preserve it.
Sir William Van Horne resided in this house from 1882
to 1891. Lord Shaughnessy occupied the eastern half of the house from
1892 to 1902, when he took over the entire building, living there
during his term as President of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company.
Lord Atholstan, another CPR magnate, operated a home for
young girls in the house for a number of years. It then became St.
Marys Hospital and was finally sold to the Sisters of Service who
, .
CANADIAN 286 R A I L
used it as a girls
Toronto developer.
hostel until June 1973, when it was sold to the
H.W.Elson.
THE 1973 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE ALGOMA CENTRAL RAILWAY SAYS, ACCORDING
to our friend John Welsh, that over $ 300,000 was ex­
pended during that year in new passenger facilities to
accommodate the growing number of riders out of Sault Ste. Marie,On­
tario, summer and winter, who ride the wellknown Agawa Canyon Ex­
press. Traffic in 1973 reached a peak of more than 105,000 passen­
gers, an increase of 35% over 1972.
Although Company officials are of the opinion that this
growth rate will not continue in 1974, on account of the increased
cost of gasoline and accommodations, early in 1974 they increased
the railways passenger-carrying capacity through the purchase of two
passenger coaches from the former Gulf, Mobile and Ohio Railroad. In
addition, 12 pairs or articulated parlor cars, formerly of the
Southern Pacific Railroad in California, were acquired.
Dale Wilson, who sent in this item, says that it is ru­
mored that the Algoma Central will lease some of its surplus passen­
ger equipment to Canadian National Railways.
SINCE JANUARY 10, 1974, TURBO HAS BEEN OPERATING REGULARLY IN SER­
vice on Canadian National Railways Montreal-Toronto ma­
in line, making the daily trip in both directions in 4
hours and 10 minutes, 49 minutes faster than CNs afternoon RAPIDO
service, which it assumed, but 11 minutes slower than the old TURBO
schedule. Basic difference between the two services, other than the
scheduling, is that TURBO has 110 club-car (TURBOCLUB) and 262 coach
(TURBOLUX) seats, total 372 seats, while RAPIDO offered 300 or more
coach seats, with the occasional addition of extra coaches. Since
the resumption of TURBO service, the trains on time performance
is said by a Company official to have been fair to good.
H.W.Elson.
THE NOTE IN WAYBILLS IN THE MARCH 1974 ISSUE NUMBER 266 OF CANADIAN
RAIL recalling the silk trains of the 1920s, stimulated
a letter from Mr. Bert Lanning, a retired Canadian Pa­
cific Railway fireman:
When I was firing for the Canadian Pacific out of Revelstoke,
British Columbia, I caught a pusher job at Golden, assisting
freight and passenger trains up the Illecillewaet Canyon to
Field. One night, we hooked onto the head-end of seven or
eight express cars loaded with a million dollars worth of
from Japan. Silk trains were well guarded at every stop, no
matter how brief. The guards would get off the train and pa­
trol up and down. They carried submachine guns.
Because of the high cost of insurance on these trains,
they had rights over everything; the important thing was to
get the shipment to its destination -usually, New York -as
quickly as possible.
When we left Golden that night, the hogger opened the
throttle wide and left it there. Our trip through the canyon
to Field was the fastest and most hair-raising that I ever
made.
H.W.Elson.
WITH THE RETIREMENT AT THE END OF APRIL 1974 OF MR. NORMAN J. MACMIL-
CANAOIAN 211 R A I L
lan, a.c., Chair~an and President of the Canadian Na_
tional Railway Company, the Co~pany5 Board divided
these two functions. Pierre Tachereau, who has been with CN since 1946,
except for the period 1963_1971, when he was in private prac_
tice as a lawyer and vice_president of the Canadian Transport Com_
mission, was appointed a Director and Chairman of the Boord. R.
A. B~ndee~, Ph.D., a for~y_three_y?or old vete~on of twe~ty years
Service with CN was aPPOinted PreSident and Chief Executive Officer. The r
etire.ent of Mr. MacMillan after 37 years of roil_
rood~ng, seven of theM as Chairman and President of the Company, is
cons,~ered by so.e as the end of the era of old_tiMerailwoy .en :
that IS, the lost of type of career railroaders who started with
the railway at an early age and COMe up through the ronks. H
.W.Elson.
MR. WALTER BEDBROOK, PRESIDENT Of THE TORONTO AND YORK DIVISION OF
the ASlociation, writes to correct on iteM which appear­
ed in the Inforillation Booth, page 44, of the April
1974 issue of RAILROAD MAGAZINE. The S.S.HURON, veteran cor-ferry on the W
indsor, Ontorio-Oetroit, Michigan run across the Detroit River
was a propellor craft and not a :sidewheeler. To prove t.he point,
Walt.er send:s the accoMpanying photograph, which show:s the cor-ferry
leaving Wind:sor on a run in SepteMber 1970. The wash frOM the pro_
pellor is plainly visible, as is the tonk cor of bunker oil (or her
fu rnoces.
The vessels two engines each drove one propellor,which
created proble.s when her en!ilines stopped on dead-centre. A crow­
bar was kept near each driveshaft, :says Walter, just in case this
unique situation occurred. But, as this was a real operating hazard, the
engine_rOOM crew were always on the alert when the engine-rOOM
telegraph signalled stop engines.
Y
OU CANT HARDLY fIND THIS KINO NO HORE~ DOMINION ATLANTIC RAILWAY
Mixed train, with Mostly Canadian Pacific-lettered equip.ent, .ade
its way leisurely up the shore to Truro, stopping for a little shuf­
fling of cars at Scotch Village, Novo Scotia, on April 23, 1973.
Carl Sturner of AUDIO VISUAl DESIGNS, Earlton, N.Y., was present.
Canaaoan Rail
is published monthly by the
Canadian Railroad Historical Association
p.o. 80>::22, Station B.MontreII,Ouebee,Cmadlo/I13B 3JS
Editor; s.s. M::>rthen Production; P. M<>phy
Association Branches
CALGARY 4 SOUTH WESTERN
L.tI.Un .. i, S.cr.tc~y 1721 23<0. Avene N.W.ColgOTY, Alt<>.121 lV6
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W.It.Linley,Secutory p.o.eo~ 141,Stotion A OHa .. o.Conada KIN 8VI
PACIne COAST
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ItOO J.t.H.i~l.,S.cr.torr.P.O.Bo~ 6102,5tot;on C,Ed.onton,Alto.T58 4K5
TORONTO A YORK DIVISION
P. Shu,oLd, Secretary P. O. Box 5649, T I .. inol A Toronto, On t .HSW IP3
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