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Canadian Rail 270 1974

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Canadian Rail 270 1974

Canadian Rail
No. 270
July 1974

manustript
~ourtrs jfor ~ar I!
lailwa!s
IN THE PUBLIC ARCHIVES OF CANADA
Edward F. Bush
f
ew Canadians over the age of thirty but
feel a twinge of nostalgia for the pic­
turesque steam locomotive which, until
as recently as a decade ago, pursued a
thundering progress across the nation.
Many will recall the mournful wail of the
whistle in the still hours of a frosty
winters night.
The railway era, commencing with the promotion and speculation
of the 1850s to the completion of a third transcontinental line in
the early years of the twentieth century, was vitally and intimate­
ly mingled with the political and economic development of this land.
Indeed, in many instances as, for example, the transcontinental line
of the Canadian Pacific Railway, the railways preceded settlement.
The train was the successor to the stage-coach and the track to the
primitive, pot-holed roads of the pioneer era.
The surge of prosperity of the late Nineties and the turn of
the century resulted in an over-extension of the countrys railway
system, with no fewer than three transcontinental lines complete or
under construction by the outbreak of World War I. During the War,
the accumulated indebtedness of three major railways forced the
~THE CORPORATE SEAL SHOWN ON OUR COVER IS THAT OF THE TEMISCOUATA
Railway Company, whose letters-patent were recited in Dominion Order
in Council dated October 6, 1885 and confirmed by Dominion Act 50-51
VIC Cap. 71, 1887. This company was acquired by His Majesty in the
right of Canada and the property was invested in Canada effective De­
cember 10, 1949 as part of Canadian Government Railways. The line was
actually entrusted to the Canadian National Railway Company for man­
agement and operation effective January 1, 1950. The photograph is
from the Public Archives of Canada, C-55242, RS 30 Vol. 1607.
2-4-0 WOOD-BURNING STEAM ENGINE NUMBER 51 OBERON OF THE GREAT WEST­
ern Railway Company of Canada. This locomotive was built by Robert
Stephenson & Company of Darlington, England, in 1856, BIN 990, road
number 83. When the engine was rebuilt from 5 foot 6 inch gauge to
Stephenson or standard gauge about 1870, she was renumbered 51. The N.G
sign on the right front buffer beam warned signalmen that the
engine and train were narrow-gauge equipment, not capable of opera­
ting on the railways not yet standard-gauged trackage. The photo is
from the Public Archives of Canodo, C-46979, RG 30 Vol. 2707.
CANADIAN 196 R A I L
Government of Canada to assume their obligations, thus imposing an
onerous burden on the national economy. Coincident was the ever-in­
creasing use of motor vehicles and, in a large measure, the highway
became the most popular means of transportation for all but heavy
bulk freight.
Early or pioneer railroading really ended with the comple­
tion of the Canadian Pacific Railway to Canadas west coast in 1885 and
thus traversed a largely uninhabited wilderness north of the
Great Lakes and across the prairies and western mountains. It is
with good reason that this accomplishment was and is ranked as one
of the great engineering achievements of all time.
Well before this date, the Grand Trunk and Intercolonial Rail-
ways provided a through route from the Canada-United States fron-
tier at Sarnia, Ontario, to Halifax, Nova Scotia, and tidewater.
With the return of better times in the late Nineties, coupled with
an increasing tempo of immigration to the Canadian west, railway
development during the long-lived administration of Sir Wilfred Laur­
ier really entered its modern, as distinct from its pioneer, phase.
This article does not purport to be an exhaustive or definiti­
ve treatment of the history of Canadas railways. It should be no­
ted that the subject matter relates to sources available in the
Manuscript Division of the Public Archives of Canada, for the writer
~is not qualified to comment, even in the most general fashion, on ·
the extensive holdings in both the Picture and Map Divisions, not
.-~o mention the diverse resources of the Public Archives Library.
Although one should not perhaps generalize too freely on the
subject of research, it may be suggested by way of introduction that
the students or writers approach may follow two broad courses. One
is that of the historian per sen, in which the subject of railways
is closely related to the general economic and political history of
the whole country, or a particular region.
The other is an examination of a more specialized nature, such
as delving into the history of a particular railway company or route
railway equipment (locomotives are great favourites with enthusiasts~
schedules and trains and miscellanea: timetables, tickets, waybills,
dispatchers sheets and the like, devolving upon a more antiquarian
than strictly historical interest. Possibly the railway enthusiast
will find the Picture Division more rewarding than the Manuscript
Division, although there is ample material scattered throughout the
latters very extensive holdings to excite the interest of the most
avid amateur.
Research into the pre-1890 period enjoys the advantage of being
wholly free from the restrictions which often apply to material of
more recent date. The sources touched on in this article are all
readily available to the student, the only handicap being the lim­
ited nature of the finding aids available in certain areas, making
the search for a specific item or subject a lengthy process.
Perhaps a brief explanation of finding aids would be appro­
priate here. The Manuscript Division archivists are constantly work­
ing on new and improved aids for collections or units in popular de­
mand, or of obvious historical significance, conditions which gener­
ally coincide. However, it is quite impossible to provide detailed
listings for all the units held in the Manuscript Division. Thus,
finding aids vary from simple chronological lists, requiring labor­
ious scanning, in the case of voluminous material, through more de­
tailed listings, CUlminating in the comprehensive nominal and sub-
CANADIAN 197 R A I L
ject indexes. There is a current long-range project to complete in­
dexes for the papers of the Prime Ministers of Canada, with spe­
cific page numbers. These are available for the Macdonald, Laurier,
Borden and Meighan papers and perhaps also for those of R.B.Bennett.
Through the use of such aids, the researcher can approach the
subject directly, by means of the subject index or by reference to
names listed in the nominal index, or alternatively, by means of
chronological listing.
The Laurier pa~ers, containing much railway-related correspon­
dence and many documents, have a comprehensive nominal index, citing
subjects for each entry, as well. The subject index is less helpful,
being primitive and composed when the technique was at a rudimentary
stage. However, it should not be ignored, since its disadvantage lies
solely in too generalized headings, often comprising hundreds of
page listings.
Many sources have been microfilmed, permitting access to mater­
ial in other repositories through inter-library loan arrangement.
Finally, the various cardindexes which may be used by the student
are located in the Reference Room and provide scores of references
to spe~ific items frequently stored in units for which there are, as
yet, no adequate finding aids.
Sources described or referred to in this article are those clas­
sed as Manuscript Sources in Public Archives terminology, as dis­
tinct from Records. The latter are the product of various Federal
government departments, whereas Manuscript Sources originate from
other locations. Public Records are an excellent place for the
railway researcher, but their servicing is a specialized function
within the Archives.
An investigation of the early years of the Grand Trunk or In­
tercolonial Railway ideally should start with the Canadian National
Railways Records. Because of its crown corporation status, CNR
Records are classed with Records instead of with Manuscripts. These
records cover hundreds of feet of shelving, with additional material
being added constantly. Both the Macdonald and Fleming Papers are
full of interesting and informative documents relating to both the
GTR and the ICR. The Buchanan Papers also contain considerable rail­
way material.
The career of Sir Sandford Fleming, civil engineer, railway sur­
veyor, trans-oceanic cable-layer and first proponent of the system
of standard time, is well-known and requires no elaboration. Born
in Scotland, he emigrated to Canada in 1845 shortly before the rail­
way mania of the 1850s. His first surveys were made for the Northern
Railway Company of Canada, the original name of which was the Tor­
onto, Simcoe and Huron Railroad Company (1849). By 1863, the young
Scottish engineer found himself in charge of the long-deferred In­
tercolonial Railway survey and, by 1~71, engineer-in-chief of the
stupendous Pacific Railway project, while it was under government
direction,
The Fleming Papers
r
occupying forty linear feet, cover the
whole period from 1775 to 1914 and were presented to the Public
Archives in 1915. Although the principal part of this collection
does not deal with railways, Flemings interests included a wide
range of engineering and related subjects.
General correspondence, 1846-1915, twenty feet, is arranged
alphabetically, by corre~pondent. Letter books, 1867-1882, are also
/
CA NAD IAN 198 R A I L
available. The Pacific Railway (1871-1881) and the Canadian Pacific
Railway Letter Books (1881-1890) concern the transcontinental pro­
ject and the lands of the Northwest Territories. There are also
memoranda and notes about the Canadian Pacific and Intercolonial
Railways, arranged in subject files. Printed matter covers no fewer
than nine linear feet and contains information on Flemings pro­
fessional career and other similar matters.
The small Wolter S. Thompson Collection (1775, 1874-1901) tr-
ansferred from Canadian Notional Railways in 1967, is included in
the papers and contains information on the CPR. Finding aids for
the Fleming Papers comprise both subject and nominal lists, giving
file number references.
In this collection, there are some colourful and unique items
doting from the days of pioneer railways. There is a map of the
Intercolonial Railway survey of 1864, showing the proposed routes
(1). That originally surveyed by Major Robinson and the Baie des
Chaleurs/Matapedia Valley location, the latter subsequently adopt­
ed, were not popular with the citizens of New Brunswick. On the
other hand, the Imperial Governments War Deportment preferred the
Robinson location, offering financial assistance to a location less
vulnerable to attack from the United States.
Another interesting item in the Fleming Papers is on Inter-
colonial Railway contract doted 11 January 1869 (2). Sir Sandford
Flemings paper on the future of railway communications, under
date of 31 March 1860, merits perusal by the railway historian (3),
and finally, the railway amateur will surely appreciate a Grand
Tr~nk Railway timetable issued 7 May 1860 for the Detroit-Portland,
Moine, service (4).
The Buchanan Papers (1845-1880), accumulated by Isaac and Peter
Buchanon, wholesale-retail merchants with interests in Hamilton, On­
tario, Montr6al, New York, London and Glasgow, are worthy of atten­
tion. A member of the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada, Isaac
was also an ardent railway promoter. The portion of the Buchanan pa­
pers about railways follows a subject file arrangement, comprising a
charter, prospectuses, minutes, agreements, lists of shareholders
and financial statements of the various companies in which he hod
on interest. Most of these railways were planned or located in to­
days southern Ontario, with a few being in the United States or
Great Britain. Finding aids are a descriptive list of the correspon­
dence, arranged nominally, and a list of subject files.
Included in the above material is a list of stockholders of the
Amherstburg and St. Thomas Rail~ay on 24 August 1858 (5). Another
item used recently for display purposes is a fly-sheet protesting
the sale of the Hamilton and Port Dover Railway, doted 22 September
1855 (6). A timetable, issued by the Intercolonial Railway, doted
14 June 1880, for the Halifax-Saint John, N.B. division, gives a
glimpse of the railway services offered in our grandfathers day (7).
A prospectus for the Qu6bec and Richmond Railway, issued in 1852, is
of inter8st (8). .
Sir Alexander Tilloch Galt, one of the Fathers of Confedera­
tion, actively engaged in railway promotion. His papers (1858-1891),
~ A VERY EARLY PHOTOGRAPH OF A GRAND TRUNK RAIL~AY COMPANY 4-4-0 STEAM
locomotive Number 42 with a train of platform (flat) cars, crossing
the bridge over the Clinton River in southern Ontario, about 1860.
The photograph is from the Public Archives of Canada, C-46481.

—MAP-
OrTH[ HAMILTON &. NORTH WESTERN R~ILWAY
-~-AND ITS CONNECTIONS—
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.: .. ~. ~- :-.~ I
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. I
.f;-I–___ ~~—.-.–=:…—-
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CANADIAN 201 R A I L
a comparitively small unit, nonetheless deserve the attention of
the researcher. The correspondence, arranged chronologically, has
both subject and nominal indexes. Railways mentioned in these papers
include the St. Lawrence & Atlantic/Atlantic & St. Lawrence, the
Grand Trunk, the Great Western Railway Company of Canada, the Inter­
colonial and the North Shore Railway Company (Quebec), among others.
Marcus Smith, a civil engineer, emigrated to Canada from En­
gland in 1849. He began his career on the Great Western Railway,la­
ter working for the Niagara and Detroit River Railway and the In­
tercolonial (1868-1872). He became engineer-in-chief of the Pacific
Railway (1876-1878) and was engaged in the survey of the line and
its construction from Port Moody to Emorys Bar, British Columbia.
Presented to the Public Archives of Canada in 1949 by his daughter,
~Iiss Clarice Smith, these papers, dating from 1815 to 1904, are made
up of letter-books (1853-1899), diaries and autobiographical notes
(1815-1664). An author index, listing subjects, provides a finding
aid for this unit.
Samuel Keefer, a pioneer Canadian civil engineer, was born at
Thorold, Ontario. He was appointed to the post of chief engineer ,
Board of Works, Government of Canada, from 1841 to 1853. The Keefer
Papers (1852-1830) constitute a modest but rewarding source for the
student of railways. Such a small collection does not require a so-
phisticated finding aid; thus, only an inventory description is
provided.
The Keefer Papers include a discussion of the location of the
Pacific Railway in the mountainous interior of British Columbia,da­
ting from 1880, together with accounts of surveys made in 1871, 1876
and 1877. His engineers notebook (1852-1878) is full of technical
informqtion on railway construction.
Selected papers from the records of the well-known English mer­
cantile banking house of Baring Brothers (1818-1872) contribute in­
formation about early Canadian railways. There is no comprehensive
finding aid, but a series of subject and nominal listings, arranged
by various offices and agents of the Company, together with chrono­
logical listings, are of some assistance. Because of the inter­
national interests of Baring Brothers, some of this railway infor­
mation relates to lines outside Canada.
Those who are interested in Canadas By town (Ottawa) region
should not overlook the Hill Collection (1798-1942). These papers
were given by the Hill family to the Public Archives in 1954, and
contain many items about railways. The documents, arranged by fam­
ily unit, have only a nominal listing.
The celebrated Sir John A. Macdonald Papers, arranged by his
literary executor, Sir Joseph Pope, from 1891 to 1917, were trans­
ferred to the Public Archives in the latter year. The original,
handsome morocco bindings have been removed and the material is
stored in standard boxes, in the interests of safer preservation.
Apart from some 30 volumes of patronage correspondence, the Macdon­
ald Papers begin .with 34 feet of subject files of topics of major
historical interest, dating, for the most part, from the crucial
and colourful period of Sir Johns premiership.
~ A MAP OF THE PROPOSED ROUTE OF THE HAMILTON & NORTH WESTERN RAILWAY,
ca. 1883. Photo Public Archives of Canada, C-55241 MG 26A Vol. 140.
CANADIAN 202 R A I L
Railway topics include files on the Intercolonial Railway
(1851-1891); the Pacific Scandal, responsible for the downfall of
Macdonolds second ministry; the titanic Pacific Railway project,
first undertaken by the government and later (1881 to date) contin­
ued by a private corporation. An entire volume is devoted to the
North Shore Railway (Quebec) controversy, which caused a minor cri­
sis in Macdonalds cabinet. There are many docume~ts on the inter­
minable wrangling over the government~ s efforts to safeguard the
interests of the Canadian Pacific Railway, known as the Manitoba
Disallowance Issue. Finally, there is the Hudsons Bay Railway Pro­
ject (1889-1891), which outlasted Canadas first Prime Minister by
a number of years.
The subject files on railways occupy a little more than two
linear feet, nominally arranged correspondence with important con­
temporary persons takes up 24 feet. Topics frequently concern mat­
ters of primary interest, including material relating to railways.
Macdonalds correspondence with George (later, Sir George) Ste­
phen, first president of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, dur­
ing the period of construction (1881-1885), and with dynamic William
(later, Sir William) Cornelius Van Horne, the companys general man­
ager, reflect the intensity of the personalities and the insuperable
physical and financial difficulties of completing the formidable un­
dertaking. This correspondence (1869-1891) cannot be slighted by the
serious student of the railway companys relationships with the gov-
=., • ernment of the time, particularly with regard to the uncertain tem­
~-per of the government in the matter of continuing financial support
for the vast project.
George Stephens honesty and conviction are clearly shown in
the following excerpt from a handwritten letter to Macdonald on 2
January 1884:
The Bank people have swallowed the pill .pro­
vided the letter from the Minister of Railways
is satisfactory in terms. They are a weak lot
in the Bank & we have there two or three-G.T.R.
allies who would not mind seeing us all in tr­
ouble. Smithers and Buchanan have no~he in­
fluence necessary to help such men to decide ••• (ll)
There are so many documents of significance to illustrate the
scope of the Macdonald Papers that selection is difficult. For ex­
ample, there is the famous telegram sent to Macdonald by Van Horne
from Eagle Pass on 7 November 1885, announcing the driving of the
last spike on the Montreal-Port Moody line of the Canadian Pacific
Railway (12). The same volume contains Flemings congratulatory te­
legram to the Prime Minister on the same occasion (13).
Macdonald and Stephen were not on the best of terms in the
final months of the great C.P.R. project. Stephens perennial opti­
mism was strained to the utmost in those stressful days by ultimati
from the Federal government, not the least of which was the forced
purchase of the North Shore Railway (Quebec), palmed off on the
Federal government by the Quebec government. This conflict of in-
terest between these two bodies and the Grand Trunk Railway and the
C.P.R., caused a cabinet crisis and forced the unpromising North
Shore Railway on the C.P.R., to Stephens understandable exasper-
ation:
It is simply impossible for me to go on
struggling to carry the C.P.R. to a success
CANADI~N 203 R A I L
if I am to have the Government to fight
against me. Unless we make the enterprise a
success to the extent of justifying its own
existence as a commercial enterprise, all
that has been accomplished so far will but
serve as a reproach to all connected with
the concern, and especially to you ond to
me. The North Shore deal means a loss of
$ 400,000 a year to the C.P.R..(14)
The G.T.R. and the C.P.R. inevitably found themselves at log­
gerheads. The older G.T.R. had initially considered the transconti­
nental project. Unwilling to contemplate the difficult and unprofi­
table all-Canadian route through the rocks and muskegs north of
Lake Superior, the G.T.R. tenaciously adhered to the existing easier and more
heavily populated route south, through the United States.
It also proposed to use its own line as far as Chicago. The northern
route was, however, a sine qua non with the government of Canada,
which obliged the construction of the Pacific Railway, first under
government auspices, but from 1881 by the Canadian Pacific Railway
Company and the relentless hand of William Cornelius Van Horne.
The epic contract, drawn up between the Company and the Govern­
ment, granted an immense subsidy to the new Company, but on the
strict condition that the line of railway should not cross the In­
ternational Boundary to the United States. Van Horne set about obey­
ing this dictum by constructing a line from Winnipeg to Burrard In­
let on the Strait of Georgia over the shortest possible distance.
The
finished railway, through largely uninhabited territory,
was an engineering feat of the first magnitude. The Company then
turned to exploitation of the region east of the Great Lakes, long
considered by the G.T.R. as its private preserve. The G.T.R. mis­
trusted M~cdonald s relations with its chief rival and this suspi­
cion is demonstrated in one box of Macdonalds correspondence with
Joseph (later Sir Joseph) Hickson, general manager of the Grand
Trunk from 1874 to 1891. In a letter dated 9 October 1882, Hickson
did not mince words:
••• As I remarked to you in a previous com­
munication, your government has created a
power which believes itself to be not only
stronger than the Grand Trunk but stronger
than the Government. The result will be ser­
ious trouble in a good many quarters in the
near future.(15)
The miscellaneous section of the papers following the nominal
files contains material on such early railways as the Credit Valley
(1879), Esquimalt & Nanaimo, the Nova Scotia (1880) and the Buffalo
and Lake Huron (1857). Correspondence with less well-known figures,
following a chronological arrangement, concludes the collection. Re­
cently, a complete subject, nominal and chronological index, giving
page references, has been completed. This provides an invaluable
finding aid,to the whole of the Macdonald Papers.
A LATTER FROM CHARLES MAGILL, MAYOR OF HAMILTON, ONTARIO, TO SIR JOHN
A. Macdonald, Prime Minister of Canada, dated June 20, 1883, solicit­
ing support for the Northern and Pacific Junction Railway, in connec­
tion with the Northern and North Western Railways, proposed for con­
struction. Public Archives of Canada, C-55249 & C-55250 MG 26A Vol.140.
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CANADIAN 206 R A I L
A review of this collection should not be terminated without
considering a small but complimentary unit relating to the Canadian
Pacific Railway. This is the Sir George Stephen Papers, consisting
of 135 confidential letters from Macdonald to Stephen, during the
critical period of the enterprise. Many of these are direct replies
to Stephens letters, referred to above in the Macdonald Papers.
They deal with all aspects of the railway: finances, choice of
route, construction, political implications and the attitudes of
the press and the general public. The C.P.R. s Short Line exten­
sion from Montreal to Saint John, New Brunswick, through the State
of Maine, U.S.A., and the ill-starred South Shore Railway ( St. Lam­
bert to Sorel, Quebec) also figure in this correspondence. The
Stephen Papers were presented to the Public Archives in 1937 by his
nephew, Mr. Stephen Douglas Cantlie, of Montreal, Quebec.
It is probably fair to say that the amateur railway enthusiast
or historian will find the Fleming and Buchanan Papers most to his
liking. The general historian will undoubtedly find the Macdonald
or Stephen Papers of primary importance. A prime minister or a cab­
inet minister generally conside~ a subject from a palicy, political
or economic standpoint; promoters and civil engineers emphasize its
technical aspects and frequently mention timetables, tickets, way­
bills and freight rates as substantiating items.
~ For the hobbyist and professional historian alike, the manifold
holdings in the Manuscript Division of the Public Archives of Canada
provide a wealth of interesting and significant material relating to
the early railways of Canada. Generally, the collections mentioned
in this article are readily available to the researcher. His task
is made easier by the able and experienced staff, each a specialist
in his field. It is fair to say that no other archives in the world
can place such facilities at the disposition of the researcher.More­
over, there is the added advantage that the historian can have ac­
cess to this material after normal hours throughout the year.
References.
1. Fleming Papers: Volume 113, file 32.
2. I bid., Volume 113, file 21.
3. Ibid., Volume 101, file 28.
4. I bid., Volume 121, files 44-45.
5. Buchanan Papers, p. 64545-.
6. I bid., p. 69044.
7. I bid., p. 65898.
8. I bid., p. 67126-67130.
9. Baring Papers, Volume 185, p. 83142.
10. I bid., Volume 185, p. 83258.
11. Macdonald Papers, Volume 269, pp. 122139-122140.
12. I bid., Volume 129, p. 53567.
13. I bid., Volume 129, pp. 53569-53571 •
14. Ibid. , Volume 268, pp. 122121-122122.
15. Ibid. , Volume 223, pp. 95376-95377.
tlee
I

Pierre Patenaude
W
ithout doubt, there are several very interesting
railways on both the north and south shore of
the mighty St. Lawrence River, east of Quebec
City in La Belle Province of Canada. Therefore,
in the summer of 1973, it became necessary to make a
trip to inspect them and to photograph the motive
power used on these railways.
The best rail service to the region is provided by Canadian Na­
tional Railways, along the south shore and it is not surprising to
find that the first picture is of CNs Train 12, the Scotian, as
it stopped briefly at Mont Joli, Quebec, on 6 August 1973, with
units Numbers 6779, 6631 and 6628 on the head-end. In the yard wos
an MLW RS 18, Number 3667, on way-freight Train 788 from Mont Joli
to Campbellton, New Brunswick. The second picture presents the
scene.
Mont Joli is the junction where the Chemin de Fer de Matane et
du Golfe -the Canada & Gulf Terminal Railway -meets the CN. The
C&GT -or CFMG -has an interesting baggage-passenger combine, Num­
ber 304, which is used os the tail-end car on the mixed train to
Matane. It is shown in the third picture. Motive Rower is normally
a GMD SW 8 switcher, ex-Number 356 (BIN A-296, 11/51) in the next
.
;. ;:S~:~i
.. · .. ;;-:lW~
~.;~;r.(,~shot. Both of these were taken on 9 August 1973.
·.Hot;; Across the St. Lawrence River on the North Shore, the map said
that there was the Cartier Railway at Port Cartier, Quebec. For the
photographer, there was CR unit Number 67, a DL 718 B from MLW in
the yard on 8 August 1973.
A few miles further east, at Pointe Noire, Quebec, the Arnaud
Railway carries plenty of iron ore, using MLW-built DL 718 Bs like
Numbers 906, 901 and 904, which were photographed. The Arnaud Rail­
way is the step-child of Wabush Mines Limited, who ship their iron
ore south from Wabush Lake, Newfoundland, over the Quebec, North
Shore and Labrador Railway to Sept-lIes, Quebec, where the Arnaud
Railway takes over for the run to the loading dock at Pointe Noire.
At Sept-lIes, Quebec, on 8 August 1973, there was a great deal
of activity on the Quebec, North Shore and Labrador Railway. Two
SD 40-2 units, Numbers 223 and 218, were just heading north from
the yard with a train of empty ore cars. They had to be photograph­
ed. Meanwhile, Numbers 128 and 176, a pair of GP 9 units, were sw­
itching a cut of cars in the freight yard. Another picture was ne­
cessary.
If you decide to explore the north and south shores of the St.
Lawrence River, east of Quebec City, you will enjoy it. You will
enjoy it more if you are a railway enthusiast. Be sure to bring as
much film -both black-and-white and colour -as possible. It is
certainly a trip to be recommended for those amateurs who like
independent railways.
Should you wish to ride passenger trains on these private rail­
ways, all you need to do is to write to the superintendent for a
current public timetable. When you get there, you will have to buy a
ticket. By careful timing of your visit, you may be able to ride
most of the railways for most of their distances in the daylight.
That is why a good supply of film is recommended.
You will enjoy some unforgettable experiences and the pictures
you bring back will be the envy of your friends.
:

AbPHA8ETIBA~
iTATIElN iTElPi I
s . s . /0 r the n
Forth . .
e, GOYernment , ,
,and. Informal. .
, 101/ of EmPloyees Only
CANADIAN 213
R A I L
F
or man) years, raihtoy histor­
ians and authors, writing about
the fine art of naming railway
stations, have taken a kind of
mischevious pleasure in making
veiled references to the somewhat
unorthodox manner in which the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway named
its stations and operating points
west of Portage la Prairie, Man­
itobo, in the early years of this
century.
It was alleged that the GTP selected its station and opera­
ting point names using a strict alphabetical sequence, starting from
the crossing at grade with a branch of the Canadian Pacific Roilway
and the line of the Canadian Northern Railway, 5.5 miles west of
Portage la Prairie and 59.8 miles west of Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Such a thing was incredible.
It must be kept firmly in mind that this altogether unilat­
eral procedure in naming these geographical locations was quite nor­
mal, particularly in a situation where the Grand Trunk Pacific was
laying its rails across the lane prairies of Canadas middle west -a
vast, unending land as yet quite uninhabited -in much the same
manner as the Canadian Pacific Railway had done farther to the south
some twenty-five years before. Thus, in this empty vastness, the
station-namers may, in some degree, be forgiven for this unorthodox
but novel procedure.
, Thanks to Mr. H.W.Blake of Winnipeg, Manitoba, this remarkable
list of stations and operating points of the 666.8-mile Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway of 1908 is reproduced herewith in its entirety,from
Employees Time Table, No.1, taking effect at 12.01 a.m., September
21, 1908. For purposes of comparison, the corresponding listings
from Canadian National Railways Employees Timetables of April 28,
1968, are shown.
GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
September 21, 1908 April 28, 1968
1 st. District Rivers Subdivision
Miles Station Miles Station
000.0 WINNIPEG, MANITOBA 000.0 WINNIPEG, MANITOBA
54.3 Portage la Prairie 55.3 Portage 10 Prairie
59.8 Arona
63.4 Barr 64.3 Barr
71.0 Caye 72.0 Caye
77 .1 Deer
84.5 Exira 85.2 Exira
91 .5 F irdale 91.8 F irdale
99.7 Gregg 100.6 Gregg
106.8 Harte 107.8 Harte
113.2 Ingelow 114.2 I ngelow
121 .7 Justice 122.7 Justice
129.4 Knox 130.2 Knox
136.9 Levine 137.6 Levine
142.2 RIVERS, MANITOBA 143.2 RIVERS, MANITOBA
CANADIAN
2nd. District
147.9
152.0
158.4
164.9
170.8 176.5 186.2 193.3
203.8
208.8
217.1
224.7
238.0
244.1
Myra Norman
Oakner
Pope
Quadra
Rea
Uno
Treat
Lazare
Victor
Welby
Spy Hill, Saskatchewan
Yarbo
Zeneta
214
149.2
159.4
165.8 171.8
179.9
186.9
204.5
218.0
225.8
239.0
245.1
R A I L
Myra
Oakner
Pope
Quadra
Miniota
Uno
St. Lazare
Welby
Spy Hill, Saskatchewan
Yarbo
Zeneta
The new line of the Grand Trunk Pacific had now progressed
across the lone prairie through the 1st. District from Portoge la
Prairie to Rivers, Manitoba and, in this 142.2 mile stretch, had
used the first 12 letters of the alphabet in precise order. Onward,
through the 2nd. District towords Melville, Saskatchewan, another
13 letters had been used -in a somewhat disorderly fashion, it is
true -and omitting X.
The gallant station-namers then set about repeating the exercise
as follows:
251.9 Atwater 252.8 Atwater
257.3 Bangor 258.3 Bangor
271.5 Cana 272.6 Cana
279.3 MELVILLE, SASKATCHEWAN 280.3 MEL VILLE, SAS; TCHEWAN
3rd. District Watrous Subdivision
286.2 Birmingham
291.4 Fernwood 292.4 Fernwood
298.4 Goodeve 299.1 Goodeve
307.8 Hubbard 308.7 Hubbard
314.0 Ituna 314.8 I tuna
321 .4 Jasmin 322.7 Jasmin
326.1 Kelliher 327.1 Kelliher
331 .8 Leross 333.0 Leross
337.5 Mostyn 338.3 Lestock
351.7 Punnichy 352.8 Punnichy
357.0 Quinton 357.9 Quinton
362.3 Raymore 363.2 Raymore
371 .7 Semans 372.5 Semans
376.6 Tate 377.5 Tate
385.6 Nokomis 386.5 Nokomis
393.2 Undora 394.4 Undora
400.0 Venn 401.0 Venn
408.4 WATROUS, Saskatchewan 409.3 Watrous, Saskatchewan
To complete this second alphabetical series, it was necessary
to proceed onward some 23 miles into the 4th. and 5th. District of
the Grand Trunk Pacific:
414.9
422.3
431 . 1 X
ena
Young Zelma
415.8
423.3
431.9
X ena Young Zelma
I.
I
CANADIAN 215 R A I L
This second alphabetical run-past had suffered somewhat,
having missed D and E, as well as N and 0. However, all but
these four letters of the alphabet had been used as initial letters
for station names in a distance of 187 miles.
Now enough ought to have been enough, but the GTP station­
namers bravely began yet a third alphabetical station series,start­
in gat mile 438. 1 0 f the 4 t h. Dis t ric t :
438.1
446.6
453.6
460.5
466.6
474.7
481 .9
496.8
501.2 507.2
515.2
519.7
526.7
4th. &
535.1
542.6
563.3
569.4
577.8
584.6
595. 1
604.1
610.2
617.6
Allan
Bradwell
Clavet
Duro
Earl
Farley
Grandora
Juniata
Kinley
Leney
Mead
Neola
BIGGAR, Saskatchewan
5th. Districts
Oban
Palo
Reford
Scott
Tako
Unity, Saskatchewan
Vera
Winter
Yonker
Zumbro
439.1
446.5
454.6
471.9 475.5
482.6
497.8
502.4
507.9
519.1
520.8
527.6
Allan
Bradwell
Clavet
SASKATOON
Farley
Grandora
Juniato
Kinley
Leney
Cazal et
Neola
BIGGAR, Saskatchewan
Wainwright Subdivision
536.2 Oban
543.9 Palo
570.3
585.5
596.1
612.1
Scott
Uni ty, Saskatchewan
Vera
Yonker
This third exercise did not show much improvement over number two -H and
I had been omitted for some reason, as had 0 and
X -understandably, perhaps ~
Passing into the 5th. District at Scott, the GTP was within
50 miles of its 1908 terminal at Wainwright, Alberta, but alas~the
third alphabetical series had been exhausted. There was, of course,
only one thing to do. The dazed but determined station-namers be­
gan the whole exercise allover again, in one final, desperate at­
tempt to achieve the apparently impossible:
623.3 ArUand 624.1 Artland
629.9 Butze
634.6 Chauvin 634.5 Chauvin
643.5 Dunn 644.4 Dunn
647.5 Edgerton
654.5 Heath 655.4 Heath
662. 1 Greenshields 662.9 Greensheilds
And they were getting along so well,having missed only F,
after all, when they came to
666.8 WAINWRIGHT, Alberta 667.6 WAINWRIGHT, Alberta
and the end of the line~ In 1908, that is.
CANADIAN 216 R A I L
The CNR Employees Timetable of April 28, 1968,suggests that
a genuine and determined effort was made subsequently to introduce
the missing F and thus complete the series between Wainwright and
Edmonton, Alberta:
674.2
685.3
699.7
Fabyan
Irma
Kinsella
But west of Kinsella, any residual reason fled and the se­
quence was utterly and irretrievably randomized with the introduction
of Viking, Bruce, Holden and Ryley.
A faint, nostalgic echo of this monumental four-time effort
to establish alphabetical regularity to the names of prairie railway
stations on the Grand Trunk Pacific was faintly audible in Ardrossan,
Clover Bar and Bretville Junction, just before the GTP entered North
fdmonton. –
It is interesting to speculate on the motives of these pione­
er prairie station-namers in the planning and implementation of this
beautifully simple -but unbelievably difficult -procedure of as­
signing station names. Could it be that the GTP Superintendent of
Construction anticipated the later immortal, apocryphal eipgram of
Henry Ford, who retorted, You can have em any damned colour you
wont, as long as its black.
SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
Trains 1I111st not IctlC Illeir initinr Mafion withont·( Train Order
or ClcarnlJ~ Card (Form 2.;).
Trainslof iltterior dltSS .nltllit, ill all Crt.Sel5. clear tra.ru,1 of su~rior
c1n~, 6,·t nUllutes.
11.1. TRAINS runs! approach sliltions lIot prot«ted by ~npllort!l.
>jtutctions, milroad crQSSit1t:!r.at grnd.c and draw.brjdge5prcpared to stop nnd
lIot proce:eJ until :witches and signals are right· al(~ tmel: j:
pl..tiniy sceu fo ~ clear. Whell~ Te1:HlireJ by.lnw. allirains Ulllst :(op.
l
a!;Se:nger l(ains-mUll;t not exceed twellly.ti~ (2$.) ·UIiI~ per hour
oftt dinil)olld CroS.iillgs, Ilnd fifteen (15) D1i1~ pe.f hOllr over draw-
b
ridges. .
Preighl (!:tiIlS llIust 1I0t exCCw fift~n (15) lIlile-s per hour ,?er di
:lmoml croMinJt~, ;lnd,tcl1 (10) miles per hour o … er dTQw·bridg~,
Stamiard cJ()(k~ aUtI registe~ boOks at WinniPfg, RiVen>, ~[Ch;ille,
Wp.trous.,SOOIt ;ml Wnlnwright. ~
Wye two mites W~t ~f ~e~.
W~e:; n.( Harl. Biggar IlId Waiuwright. .
COl1dUclors and ·l!ugin … ~rs wm ~ held equall) rC$ponsible for tbe salet) of
their troins . .
, .1:0 mure pcrfcd safety, e-xtr.e!n.e~lttioll and gO .~ uset!, in regnla!ing s~of(lU tmius, .
INTERLOCKING PLANTS AT
Crostln~ ~lth Clln~dl~n. P,·.,Uk. 4.4, run,es West of Ylnnipec
Cronlne willi Canadian P.adll~, ~3.9 .mlleSWe-tlt-91 .Winnlpeg:
Crossing wtlh Can, Northern. I.J:mll,s,E.,t of Porta,etln Prflirle,
CrossinI with Can. P.ac:. ~ Can. Nor., 0.0-miles-West 01 P.ortage I. . , .
~. {Prairie
Cro~rfr wltl:t,Conadian Padflc, •. 1} miles .Wnt ,of Deer.
Crossinit wUh-Canadian Northetll, 4.1 nll1~ We~t of Orerr .
; .Cro
lsln,e with CaoadJan Pac1fi.I.1 miles East ol·Knox. .
Crosslnr·w1th Cl!lna~l.n Pac1Uc. ,0.3 miles. We~t. of Nokomis
Croning with Ca~ad.lan ~orthern,,0:6 mile.!! We~ 0. ,earl
: 1!if:;;~~~~i;t:ru~~j::C:;:;~n~~{~~~ ~~~lh ·~~:~~W:i;:~~~:::,~~.
Ner. . -.
J~T~:;i~;::t~ P1.~:i1.:-Au ,,.gbl.ljj.e Of~Witeh~, 0:1: 8 ,lin.llJppli.1uCd, ill,
1:n1~11X~I~(; C.t.sIN . ..,…A·buitdii11: fiou._ ,,licb;io itit.,dock!og,PloUIt i$-opu-t<:d.
I!iTfUtLOCJ:IS(; S,OXALS._tlu,.6xo;d i):u:lhof an. (n(f:rlcekln1/. vb •.
110): 51G~Af~-:-A ti·XN liCU3IIlttht POit1.t ;l_OIhicb In.in,,.,te ~;i-,!I ~o.t!op
. wlu:u !I~ rout.: i$ :01 cl.,;tr. . -. -. . .
-. II liOlnt sl!,TiIl to~ul..tt 11 . ~·f)WrJlY f~QN.o.r .• -A low Iilctd Ij.K,Jtal.. . ., _
I

I
I
DI1iT ….. looT SIO~Ak-Afixf::d .1j{t.Ilot d. itUlltl.il:t-thnm. t ti

-~~ -~,,:,,-:-.,-; –, ~–.—-.—-,-:….,..-~-~
/
t
CANADIAN 217 R A I L
RU&.ES FOR I·NTERI.OCKIN.G
Inlerlockiug signals, unless otl~erwise provided, do 110t affect lhe rights of traills lInd
er the time table, or train . rules ; and do not di{;pense with the lise or
observance of other signals whenever and wherever they DIay be required.
SIG-NAt
HOME SIGNALS
OCCASON JlOR
USll
INDICATION
Hor.l.ou tal AtuI or Red}
J,t~ltt …………. .
Route is. not clear Slop…………. Stop Signal
Diagonal Arm or Green~. R t I P d
.. h 011 e IS c ear. . . . rocee ..
Llg t· …………. .
Clear Signal
SWNAI,
DISTANT SIGNA!-.5
OCCASION FOR
USE
INDICATION NAME
Horizon.tal Ann or Y cl-I Home . SignaCat I
low. Light .. , . ….. ) Stop ……. ;
Proceed with ~ Cautioll . caution
to th. e Signal
. home signal. ,
Hom~Signal … t} . Clear ~Dia~onal Armor Green I
Light.,.:. …… I,
. Proceed …. 1 Proceed …. ,.,., .. , . Signal
=========0=. :1=a=.r:=o=;Ia=)=-=l~t= .. a=I=, =aol=·g,=e=o7
f
7
60
=:degrees below th~ hOrlZOll ta:!
The arm of a home signal has a square end, of a distant siglin. a forked elld,
The governing ann is displayed to tleright of the signal ;ll.ast-as seen from an
approaching train. _ .
The back view of a sign at does not govern the movement of·a train.
When there is more thall.one ;,ignal 011 a mast the;highest ~.ignal governs the
main track; aIJd iit the caseoof adwarI signal it g9verJ.lsthe track t() the· right.
Trains ar engines shaJ.1bc· run to but not·beyond a signal.itJdicating stop.
H
affericcepting a c1ear·signaliUs·clii!nged to astopsignall:ieforeit is reached,
t11(~. stop shall. be made at one.e. Such occurrence-shall be reported to the Super-
hltendeJ.lt. …. .
. . Engi-llclpel) all.
t! trail1ln~n must notacceptCl~arha.nd . signals as against fixed signals
until they are tully.lnformed of· the sllna.lIonand know that they are pro­
teded;. Whercfixeir,~ignals are iil openitiQn .. dellr lial1cl signalstllllst not be gi ye,lJ
01 accepte.cl ·ll-gaiJlsrthenl.· . -. . . . . . . . . .
Tht? engineer of alrain whiCh li~s pqrted on. app.roachi-t)gati ill.terlpcking cabin,
l11u,st SOU lid the whistle signal {ot; ; Train ·Plu·t¢d.: _ ,,: .. > .
.; An 6lgin.eer j·eeeivi.ng a: .. :~1.rail1 Parted;.!..~ignl f.roll! a sigiralmin/tllllst RuS,-er
liy the whistle sigl1al·fo.r..Ttain -F~rted·. Wheu tlie tra111 has ·been re-coupled
th~ sigl181man Shall: benoti·fieer:.. . . ,, . .: .
.
Sand 1l1).Istnot be llsed dve,r·lnovab)e. parts oraninterlockiirg~Jilant. .
Conductorsll1ust report to the Snperint(}J.ldenl aly tinHs!t~ldeteniion_atinter-
locking plants. . . . .
. trraiits
·. orengiIH!S, .st()pped ~Ii; n~akipg,! rnovenient th~.oughait. interlo~king,-..
plant ml1s~ not .move.m: either dlrec.tion unlll tliey-havc-rec,etved ·t1~e prop~r sIgnal,
flom the .sIgn.almatt. . … .~ . . .,.. …. ,, . .
. NON·INTER.lOCKING· SEMAPUORffAlLEVE~CROS,Sn~GSAND-OTHE.R POINTS
. Ami at Horjzontul .positjoll by day; aud ied light b; iligltt; iupicates, Dal1ger
.~S~oJ~.a~ perpeudieu;a;,,PQSiti?noy ~h:y,ruid G(~e-n-light by ~jght, in Safety
..,.,.Proceet!.: . : . .. . . . . .
Dl8patch~n Oifl~o at Mel.vllle: ·T.,10!lraph.call 15,
July, 1974
MR. JOHN L. HARMSEN, PRESIDENT, TACHOTRACK SYSTEMS LIMITED OF MARKHAM,
Ontario, member of the Association and chief officer of
the North American representative company for the RS Con­
crete Tie system, has advised us that the test section of Canadian
National Railways track, located near St-Germain, Quebec, where the
RS concrete ties are installed, is in excellent condition after car­
rying 240 million tons of traffic during 12 years of service. Mr.
Harmsen points out that, since this was the first test of concrete
ties in Canada, future installations will be modified for the follow­
ing reasons:
-the RS concrete ties at St-Germain were spaced at 30
inches, which is excessive for a heavy-tonnage, high­
.s.peed .l,ine such as Canadian ,National s Mon.t,r.eal-Qu,e.~
bec-Maritimes route;
-the ties in the test section were of standard Euro-
pean size; the present concrete blocks for North
American conditions are 15% larger;
-at the west end of the test section, the long, welded
rails on concrete ties were joined to bolted roils on
timber ties. These two track systems are incompatible
and therefore track disturbances were caused in the
joint area~ The last fifty RS concrete ties suffered
damage, as a consequence;
-RS concrete ties were installed under bolted joints
between long rail sections. No concrete tie can with­
stand the impact forces at bolted rail joints and,
consequently, the concrete ties adjacent to the
rail joints were replaced with timber ties.
Mr. Harmsen points out that, in spite of these developments,
the test section is still in very good condition after this lengthy
period of difficult service.
THE TWO M 420R (R FOR REMANUFACTURED, SINCE UNITED STATES MANUFAC­
tured parts were used) units, Numbers 2001 and 2002, for
the Providence and Worcester Railroad left MLW Industries
Montreal on 29 March 1974 for the D&H at Rouses Point, New York, to
be readied to work a special train south on 1 April 1974.The special
turned out to be the Icecapades Train, which was delivered to Mechan­
icville, New York.
The two P&W units took an eastbound Boston and Moine Corpor­
ation freight to East Deerfield and Gardiner, Massachusetts, where the
two new units reached their home iron.
It is rumored that the P&W will order three more units of
the same model from MLW Industries in 1975.
J.J.Shaughnessy.
CANADIAN 219 R A I L
PAT WEBB, OUR MEMBER IN LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA, REPORTS THAT THE CP RAIL
yards in that Alberta city have been seething with activity
since the railway began to ce~tralize westbound prairie
grain movements there. On Tuesday, March 5, 1974, the first 82-car,
250,OOO-bushel grain unit-train left Lethbridge, powered by a four­
unit lashup headed by CP RAIL low-nose Number 5655. The accompanying
phato is reproduced courtesy of the Lethbridge HERALD.
About 60 truck-trailers with a capacity of 900 bushels each
are unloaded daily at the government elevator at Lethbridge, with
shipments originating at points within a 100-mile radius. With trains
varying between 82 and 87 hoppers and operating on a six-day-return
schedule to the West Coast, it is anticipated that 2.5 million bush­
els will be moved from the Lethbridge area. Similar shipments are now
under way from government grain terminals at Edmonton, Saskatoon and
Moose Jaw.
This grain-moving concept is very efficient, Pot says, and
has, for the first time in many years, made the grain elevator opera­
tion at Lethbridge profitable. By contrast, the usual method of pick­
ing up grain cars from rural points on branch-lines and sending them
to the West Coast or the Lakehead takes three weeks at a minimum.
MANITOBAS OFFICIAL PUBLICATION VACATION HANDBOOK 1974 CONTAINS AN
entry which is intriguing:
STRATHCLAIR: Strathclair Museum, located on Main Street.
Old CPR station converted to contain railway
and other pioneer artifacts. Also on old
country church at site. Open at hours as
posted or on request by telephoning any
Director as posted at the entrance.
Admission: donations accepted.
CANADIAN 220 R A I L
Strathclair, Manitoba, has a population of approximately 250 and
is located on CP RAILs Bredenbury Subdivision at mile 27.6, about
170 miles west of Winnipeg.
John Welsh of Dorval, Quebec, who sent this item, says he would
be most interested to see a picture of the Strathclair Museum in a
future issue of CANADIAN RAIL. Perhops one of our readers will oblige.
~FRUM THE MECHANICVILLE, NEW YORK YARD OF THE DELAWARE & HUDSON RAIL­way Company, a
facility shared with the Boston & Maine Corpor-
ation, Jim Shaughnessy reports that the first trios of the
B&Ms new GP 38-2 units have begun to appear. Twelve of the order
for 24 have been received and the remainder are scheduled for de-
livery during 1974. The first orrivals were numbered 201 through 212
and, in addition, the B&M is reviving the ancient and honorable cus­
tom of naming locomotives after prominent historical personages from
the five States served by the railway. Names assigned to date include:
Number 202 -Daniel Webster Number 209 -Styles Bridges
Number 205 -Hannah Dustin Number 210 -Franklin Pierce
Jim sends two photographs. One is a close-up of Number 202,
Daniel Webster and the other of a lash-up of Numbers 202, 208(un­
named) and 207 (also un-named). To carry these units and their tr­
ains speedily and safely, the B&M has completed the laying of new
welded rail from the west portal of the Hoosac Tunnel near North
Adams, Massachusetts, to Charlemont, about 13 miles and on the east­
bound track from Charlemont to Shelburn Falls, Mass.(ca. 9 miles).
~CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CONSOLIDATION-TYPE NUMBER 3728 WAS BUILT BY
Montreal Locomotive Works, Montreal, in 1912. She had builders
number 51565 and was a class N-2-b. In 1946, Number 3728 was
converted to a 2-8-2, class P-1-n, and renumbered 5201.
About 1946, Mr. Frederick A. Benger, then Chief of Motive Power
and Rolling Stock for the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, made a
trip to Europe and, during the trip, saw a steam engine which was
fitted with a curious orrangement which recycled sparks and cinders
from the funnel to the firebox. Mr. Albert Bacchiochi, then-designing
draftsman for the CPR, was assigned the job of creating a similar
device for Number 5201.
The engine was fitted with a large stack, in the lower section
of which was a series of baffle-plates. These plates imparted a swirl-
ing motion to the sparks and cinders passing through the tubes from
the firebox to the smoke-box. An attachment at the top right-hand side
of the stack caught these sparks and cinders and led them into a pipe
which returned them, the length of the boiler, to the side of the
firebox and through the firebox wall. Theoretically, the cinders were
then burned.
The long pipe from the stack to the firebox often plugged up and
an air-jet was introduced to speed the cinders on their return jour­
ney.
Mr. Jack Hewitson of CP RAIL was a member of the team in the
dynamometer car when Number 5201 was being tested on the Winchester
Subdivision, west of Montreal, between 4 November and 29 November,
1946. Unfortunately, Benger s Cinder Burner was long on trouble
and short on efficiency and, after running on the Ste. Agathe Sub­
division for some time after the competion of the tests, Number 5201 was
fitted with a normal stack and the sparks and cinders resumed
their traditional direction.
Mr. Roger Boisvert of Quebec sent in the picture and these de­
tails, for which we wish to thank him.
CANADIAN 221 R A I L
THE RAILWAY ENTHUSIAST IN EASTERN NORTH AMERICA WAS DELIGHTED TO
learn that the Delaware and Hudson Railway, under the guid-
ance of President Carl B. Sterzing and Vice-President of
Sales and Industrial Development T.E.OBrien, planned an excellent
CANADIAN 222 R A I L
series of excursions for the summer of 74. By now, several of them
have taken place.
On April 20, D&H ran a 12-car train, headed by three of the
four PA 1 units, from Scranton/Carbondale, PA to Oneonta, NY, and re­
turn. A week later (April 26-28), the same train operated from Oneon­
ta to Albany (April 26), returning to Oneonta on the Sunday following
(April 28). Both trips were operated by the D&H. . The
St, Lawrence Valley Railway Society of Montreal ran a
trip on May 11 which was a real first. Out of Montreal, the all-CN
coach special was hauled by two CN ALCO-Montreal FPA 4 units south
to Rouses Point NY, where a change of motive power, but not in pas­
senger equipment, brought two of the PA 1 units to the head-end for
the trip onward to Whitehall NY and return -226 miles for $ 16.95.
The following Saturday, May 18, the D&H planned to run a
Capital District Trip, sponsored by the National Model Railroad As­
sociation and the Mohawk & Hudson Chapter of the NRHS. The power and
equipment were the same as on the Oneonta-Albany trips.
A week and a day later (May 26), under the auspices of the
Mohawk & Hudson Chapter NRHS, the same train operated from Albany to
the Starucca Viaduct near Susquehanna PA and return. The consist was
the same as usual. Photo run-bys were part of the trip.
Another week and another day later (June 15), the Main
Line Steam Foundation proposed to run a special train from Elizabeth,
NJ to Warwick NY, over the former Lehigh & Hudson River Railroad and
to provide power, the D&H planned to lease two of the PA 1 units and
perhaps two baggage cars.
In addition to these special trains, the Champlain Valley
Chapter of the NRHS was negotiating for a special move from Rutland
VT to Saratoga NY and thence up the D&Hs North Creek Branch.
There was also the possibility that two steam locomotive
specials would be operated in the late summer or fall by the D&H,
using ex-Reading Number 2102, now lettered Delaware & Hudson Number
302.
All in all, a very commendable summer programme. Railway
enthusiasts in particular and the public in general should be very
grateful to Mr. Sterzing and Mr. OBrien, as well as to their behind­
the-scenes colleagues, Messrs. Murray, Hoadley, Wilson, McDermott and
many others, all D&H enthusiasts.
IN MID-JANUARY 1974, CP HOTELS DISTRIBUTED HUNDREDS OF FLYERS TO THE
commuters who use CP RAIL services out of Montreal, adver­
tising role Chateau Montebello at Montebello, Quebec and
the delights of culinary competence and winter sports at this famous
hostelry. The flyers were also available to the public at Windsor
Station and part of the copy appeared in Montreal newspapers.
But did CP RAIL get a plug for their speedy DAYLINER ser-
vice from Windsor Station to this North Shore line auberge? Not on
your life: On the contrary, the flyer was explicit in stating that
the Chateau Montebello was only 80 miles west of Montreal at Monte­
bello, Quebec, on Highway 8.
They did the same thing in 1973, too~
John D. Welsh.
THE MICHIGAN RAIlFAN OF DETROIT, MICHIGAN, RECORDS WITH REGRET THAT
Canadian National-Grand Trunk Western eXgect to discontinue
their 120-year-old car-ferry operation across the Detroit
River between Windsor, Ontario and Detroit, Michigan, in the summer
of 1974. The Detroit Renaissance Development is to be built on the

CANADIAN 223 R A I L
site of the Brush Street ferry slip, which will effectively curtail
further operotion. Since the cor-ferry operation has declined to
obout 40 cors of the high-cube variety per day, it is probable that
alternate arrangements can be made, possibly with the Penn Central,
to use their tunnel under the river. However, the use of the tunnel
for oversized cars may be impossible until the track level has been
lowered to provide the necessary clearance for these oversized cars.
PUBLIC HEARINGS HELD BY THE STANDING COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION,
Government of Canada, in May 1972, resulted in recammenda.
tions that roil passenger service should be restored by Can­
adian Notional Railways ta the Polmerstan area of Ontario, which ser­
vice hod been discontinued on November 1 1970. Passenger services
from Goderich, Kincardine, Southampton and Owen Sound, south through
Polmerston to Guelph and Toronto or to Stratford and london, were
involved.
Early in 1974,
ta hold a public hearing
for a resumption of CNs
the Canadian Transport Commission proposed
in Guelph on february 18, to hear proposals
Toronto-Guelph passenger service only.
Editorial Staff.
THE CRIES OF OUTRAGE FROM THE GRAIN FARMERS ON CANADAS PRAIRIES IN
the early port of 1974 influenced CP RAIL to i.plement new
methods of handling wheot from Saskatchewan and Alberto to
Vancouver, British Columbia. An announcement in the Montreal STAR of
Morch 8 1974 implied that covered hopper carl of grain were being
accu_ulated o~ Lethbridge, Alberto, for the 770_mile run to the Port
of Vancouver.
On March 6 the first groin unit-lrain of 82 carl arrived
ot Vancouver fram Lethbridge. It wos said to be the firsl of a series
of high_speed gr05n trains from the Prairiel to the Welt Coast, cor_
rying more than 245,000 bushell of wheat in GOVERNMENT OF CANADA hop-
per cars.
CP RAIL handled the train west through Crowsnest Pass, over
the Crowsnest and Cranbrook Subdivisions and up the Kootenay Central
(Windermere Subdivision) fro. Fort Steele to Golden, on the main
line.
At Golden, two ROBOT_controlled diesel units were added
mid_train for the assoult on Rogers Pass through the Connought Tun_
nel, following the some procedure used for cool unit-trains between
Golden and Roberts Bonk.
Mr. J.D. Bromley, General Manager of CP RAILs Pacific Re­
gion operation, said that this route should cut groin delivery tine
to the West Coast by half, if groin terminal operators could schedule
their portion of the handling operation to toke advantage of it .
…..,
DR. R.F .LEGGET, AUTHOR OF RAILROADS Of CANADA, SENDS THE PICTURE
I~ reproduced on the bock-cover. Little soddletonk 0-6-0ST
Number 6 (Montreol Locomotive Works BIN 49495, 1911) for­
merly owned by Pratt & Shonacy Compony, Biscotosing, Ontorio, t ex­Cov
icchi & Pogo no Number 8) il today a stotic exhibit ot the Eost
Gate logging Exhibit, Algonquin Park, Ontario. The plaque states
that Ihe was dono ted to the Ontorio Deportment of Lands and Forests
by D.l. Pratt in 1958. Number 6 wos one of 12 0-6_0ST engines built
in 1911_12 by HLW for the construction of the Grond Trunk Pacific
Roilwoy. Originally de~igned to burn wood a$ fuel, Number 6 was la­
ter converted to burn coal.
Canaaoan Rail
is pOOIished monthly by the
Canadian Railroad Historical Association
p.o. 8ao; 22,Statlon6,Mont,~CavtdNH3EI3J5
Editor;s.s.Worthen Production; P. MlIllhy
Association &Mches
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN
L,H.Un,in, Secretory 1727 23rd. Avenue N.W. Colgry, Alto,T2I1 IV6
OTTAWA
W.R.Linley,Sc •• tory P.O.8,,~ 141,Sttion A Otto,Conodo KIN 8VI
PACIFIC COAST
R.Il.Neyer, Secretory P.O.8o~ l006,StUon A Voncouver,8.C.V6C 2P1
ROCKY HOUNUIN
J .tI.tI.i.kle, Secutry ,P. O. Bo~ 6102,5 tot ion C, Ed.on ton,Al to. T 58 «5
TORONTO & YORK OtVISION
P.
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Association Representatives
YlSit the Canadian Railway Museum St.Constanl,Oo.Iebec,Canada •
• More than 100 pieces 01 oquopnent on di5pIay

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