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Canadian Rail 269 1974

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Canadian Rail 269 1974

Rail

,.
SHOVEL ON
A LITTLE MORE COAL!
Colin J. Churcher
S
hould you ever decide to join the Railway
Branch, Surface Iransport Administration,
Department of Transport, Government of
Canada, you can expect to become involved
in a variety of undertakings, most of
which are related to a greater or lesser de­
gree to railways.
But who could have imagined that an apparently innocent tele-
phone call in mid-April 1973 would have projected me into the steam
locomotive procurement and operation business? It was unb~lievable,
but it was a fact. A steam locomotive was required for operation in
the Ottawa, Canada area by July 1, 1973 and I was expected to pro­
cure it. When I became involved, the terminal date was about 75 days
away.
I n the early 1970s, steam locomotives were like gold: precious
and scarce. But there were and are a number of diligent modern-day
prospectors like Mr. Duncan du Fresne of the Air Traffic Control
Section, Air Administration, Department of Transport. You might
think that a person working for Air Traffic Control would not know
anything about railways but, in Duncs case, the exoct opposite is
the case. Dunc could tell me that a group in Toronto had an opera-
ting steam engine, which just might be available for the proposed
Ottawa operation.
Taking a chance, I made a telephone call and, within a short
time, I had determined that Ontario Rail Association did have an
ex-Canadian Pacific Railway 4-6-0 Locomotive, Number 1057, which
was available for the summer season. Having found the proverbial
needle in the haystack, I assumed that my part of this unusual
project was completed.
How wrong I was . Next thing I knew, I was loaned to the Na­
tional Capital Commission of Ottawa to co-ordinate the operation of
a steam-hauled passenger train in the Ottawa area during the summer
of 1973 and to resolve the thousand-and-one problems that were sure
to be encountered.
Originally, it had been planned to operate the steam-hauled tr­
ain over 19.7 miles of CP RAILs Maniwaki Subdivision, from Ottawa
to Wakefield, Quebec. This is a very scenic line which parallels the
beau~iful Gatineau River for much of its distance.
RARER THAN A DAY IN JUNE IS CREDIT VALLEY RAILWAYS D-10 NUMBER 1057
on July 29, 1973 on this months cover, caught by Bruce du Fresne of
Ottawa on her way to Ottawas station and immortality.
~ OPPOSITE, NUMBER 1057 REPOSES AT HER SERVICING POINT AT OTTAWAS NA­
tional Museum of Science and Technology, the engines base of opera­
tions during the summer of 73. The picture is courtesy of Bruce du
Fresne.
CANADIAN
164
R A I L
Negotiations were proceeding smoothly, when heavy rains and a
mud slide severed the line to Wakefield and it therefore become ne­
cessary to select an alternate route for the summer operation. The new
route was over the Carleton Place Subdivision of CP RAIL, 27.7
miles west to Carleton Place, Ontario. The use of this line would
involve operation in CTC territory to Bells Junction.
Engine 1057, identified as belonging to the Credit Valley Rail­
way, had to be stored and serviced in Ottawa between weekend trips
and arrangements were concluded with the National Museum of Science
and Technology, represented by Mr. John Corby, Curator of Industrial
Technology, to perform part of this service. The Museum was to be a
joint partner in the scheme with the National Capital Commission.
The By town Railway Society of Ottawa agreed to clean and service the
locomotive and Duncan du Fresnes experience was to prove invaluable
when it come to details of steam locomotive maintenance and operation.
It is an understatement to say that I was learning -and remem­
bering -more and more about steam locomotive operation. For example,
I discovered that, in the 1970s, the high calorific coal best for
use in the firebox of a steam engine, comes from West Virginia, U.S.A.
Hastily, I ordered a carload. It arrived about five days before the
first scheduled trip of 1057~ The locomotive arrived in Ottawa via
CP RAIL about a week before The Great Day, but with her connecting
and eccentric rods removed. The 175-ton locomotive had to be moved by
sheer manpower to the appropriate position for installing the
left-side connecting rod. That was not an easy job, but By town mem­
bers provided the muscle to complete the task.
And then, before anyone had time to flinch at the possible op­
erating problems, The Great Day arrived. In the early hours of
that memorable day, a wood fire was carefully laid in the firebox
of 1057 at the National Museum of Science and Technology. Right then
and there, the first operational problem was encountered. How extra-
ordinary~ No one had a match to light the kindling~ But by great
good fortune, a pipe-smoking member was found and. luckily, he had
a match. None too soon, the wood fire was blazing, a little coal had
been added judiciously and, after a seemingly interminable and not
a little agonizing interval, the black needle on the white face of
the steam gauge slowly edged off the pin.
The engine crew for the days run was supplied by CP RAIL, but
neither the engineer or the fireman had operated a steam locomotive
for nearly 15 years. With the helpful advice of the irreplaceable
Dunc du Fresne, the engineer, fireman and 1057 were sure to perform
flawlessly.
Now I could give a sigh of relief. My part of the project -once
again -seemed to be complete.
It would have been, had not my own darned curiosity intervened.
There was a time, a number of years ago, when I had a brief fling
at working as a fireman on a British steam locomotive for a short
period. This experience naturally led me to wonder if firing a steam
engine in Canada in 1973 was a different sort of experience than that
which I remembered. There was just one way to find out.
So, on a Sunday morning in July 1973, I found myself in the cab
of Number 1057, preparing to play the part of fireman under the ever
watchful eye of Dunc du Fresne -of the Air Traffic Control Branch.
But first, what should the well-dressed Canadian steam locomotive
fireman wear? I had managed to find my navy-blue British Railways
CANADIAN
165
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overolls in the basement of my home, but my peaked BR plastic-topped
cap looked a bit out of place. So I went out and bought a convention­
al, flimsy, blue-denim one. I had never before worn gloves when fir­
ing a steam locomotive; on all the former Great Western Railway (En­
gland) locomotives, the levers in the cab were fitted with varnished
wooden handles which did not transmit the heat too much and, anyway,
a few days on the shovel soon hardened up my hands. I must admit I
felt a little self-conscious in my strange new cap and new leather
gloves.
Standing in the station at Ottawa, Number 1057 had a full head
~ of steam and plenty of water in her boiler. Through the open fire­
doors, I could see that the fire was well burned through and quite
thin. It had been allowed to burn this way so that the engine would
not blow off steam or make smoke while she was standing in the sta­
tion. Wisps of steam arose from her valves and cylinders and period­
ically, the air-pump thumped and banged rhythmically. Cautiously, I
added two or three scoops of coal, mostly around the back corners
of the firebox and under the doors, with a little up front. The blow­
er was turned on to disperse the resulting small amount of smoke.
At the All aboard. signal from the conductor, the engineer
turned on the bell-ringing valve and cracked the throttle. There
was the familiar momentary pause, as the steam pressure built up in
the cylinders and then, with a soft and slightly soggy whoosh, No.
1057 led her train slowly out from under the platform canopy into
the bright sunshine, to the music of several toots on the whistle,
which added to the general excitement.
The a~ron and the cab floor slowly began their shifty little
dance, as I stood on the deck ready for the first round of serious
firing. I had that strange feeling, experienced so many times before
on the footplate of an unfamiliar locomotive at the beginning of a
run. I wondered if I could really fire this monster for 50-odd miles.
How would she react to my firing? Could I persuade her to steam as
she should? Could I judge her peculiarities well enough to keep the
needle of the steam gauge and the water in the glass where they ought
to be?
There was no time for conjecture. We were running and there were
almost 300 passengers behind the tender drawbar. Now it was left fo-
ot on the pedal for the firedoors. Scoop in. Scoop out. Foot off
pedal. The first shovelful of coal went just under the doors, to re­
duce the blast of heat. After that, shovelfuls of coal around the
back corners of the firebox, with a few up front. It was easier to
reach the front by bouncing the scoop off the firehole, although this
added to the mounting noise in the cab.
Just when I was settling into the long-forgotten rhythm of firing
a locomotive, Dunc tapped me on the shoulder. The din in the cab was
now deafening, but he did not need to speak. He just pointed to the
sky visible above the tender, nearly obscured by a thick pall of
black smoke. Oh Heavens~ This, right in the middle of one of Ottawas
swimming-pool districts, where people are pollution-hypers~ And on a
Sunday morning in summer, at that~ Turn on the blower quickly and
let the stack clear somewhat.
A little more water in the boiler was needed and Dunc put on the
injector on the firemans side. The steam pressure dropped slightly,
as the locomotive was not yet properly warmed up. But, thank goodness,
the stack had cleared and we were rolling through the outskirts of

-.:-.

.!
. ~ …
WITH DRIVERS OUTLINED IN WHITE AND TENDER LETTERED CREDIT VALLEY,
ex-CPR D-10 Number 1057 was the cynosure for spectators and photo­
graphers on Canadas Birthday 1973. Bruce du Fresnes picture sure­
ly proves it.
DUNC DU FRESNE GIVES NUMBER 1057 A QUICK INSPECTION BEFORE TRAIN­
time on The Great Day. The engines impatience to be off and run­
ning is evident by her humid and rapid exhalations.
Picture courtesy Department of Transport.
Canadas capital city under the traditional white clouds of steam
from the stack. I had a good look at my fire, using the scoop to de­
flect air through the flames, so that I could see the condition of
the firebed. The next round of coal went on without making black sm­
oke, you can bet.
And so the ritual continued. A round of firing; check the stack,
water glass and steam pressure. Sweep up the coal and hose down the
deck. Check the stack again and it was time to get to work with the
scoop. Familiar landmarks passed, but there was no time for sight­
seeing. I was a slave to the white-hot inferno behind the firedoors.
A glimpse of the cool, slow-flowing Rideau River contrasted sharply
with the deafening noise in the hot, bucking, swaying cab.
Puffing through Ottawas western suburbs Number 1057 warmed to
her task. The steam pressure was close to 200 pounds, with the in-
jector on and a white-hot fire. Up ahead was the steepest grade on
the run, at Nepean, and the fire needed almost continuous attention.
I could not see more than six inches into the roaring red and white
::WpH SCOOP, GLOVES, CAP AND OVERALLS, THE AUTHOR TAKES A REFRESHER
~course in locomotive firing abaard Credit Valley Number 1057, as
she races onward to Carleton Place, Ontario.
Photo courtesy Department of Transport.
~ THE WAY TO MAKE THREE HUNDRED PEOPLE HAPPY ON A SUMMER DAY; NUMBER
1057, with the traditional -but strictly temporary -cloud of black
smoke, heads for the Nations Capital on August 19, 1973. Our
thanks to Mr. Michael A. Eagleson for recording the nostalgia.
fire, yet I had to be certain exactly where each shovelful of coal
should be placed. Every time my foot hit the pedal, my left side was
scorched and, just about then, I discovered that if I lifted my foot
from the pedal too soon, the scoop would be trapped in the firedoors~
Wonder of wonders~ We reached the top of the grade with a full
head of steam and plenty of water in the boiler. Dunc indicated –
with gestures -that I could ease off a bit, as the rest of the trip
would be easier running. There seemed to be spectators everywhere,
waving and taking pictures. We scared a few cows in a neighbouring
pasture.
The engineer gradually brought the reverser back towards centre,
reducing the cutoff, and the exhaust from 1057s stack softened, but
the incessant bonging, clanging and jolting in the cab persisted.
Muscles, used to less strenuous activity, complained mildly, a warn­
ing, perhaps, of a future unpleasant consequence to this days exer­
cise.
I thought that Dune would probably motion to me to shut off the
injector, shortly. When he did, I would have to sacrifice the level
of water in the boiler to maintain steam pressure and the fire would
work down a little. But I did not know this rood, and the injector
stayed on. Steam pressure began to drop alarmingly and I hod to hop
-,
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CANADIAN 170
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to it with the scoop. Luckily, we had only five cars behind the ten­
der and I was able to resurrect my fire while 1057 coasted along
with the greatest of ease.
A brief pause in firing allowed the breeze to cool my hot face
and gave me a chance to exercise a privilege of my occupation in wa­
ving to the spectators at the overbridge at Ashton. And then, all at
once, we were approaching the block signal for Carleton Place. It
seemed impossible that we had come nearly 30 miles.
As Number 1057 came to a stop in the station, the clanging and
banging in the cab ceased, to be replaced by the monotonous whine of
the turbogenerator atop the boiler. Hot, grimy and sweaty, I stood
in the gangway and looked down into the sea of faces of several hun­
dred people who had come to the station to greet us. There were old­
timers with a far-away look in their eyes, remembering the days when
they rode the heaving, swaying deck of an engine or listened to the
far-off cry of the whistle. There were the wide-eyed youngsters, gaz­
ing in wonder at this real, live, panting steam locomotive, seeing it
for the first time in their lives and just a little frightened by its
black, hissing bulk. The varied expressions on all these many faces
reassured me that the recreation of a little piece of Canadas trans­
portation history had truly been worthwhile.
Isnt it hard work, shovelling all that coal?
The ten-year-olds question snapped me out of my reverie.
Its not all that hard, once you know how, I replied, puffing
out my chest -just a little. I just managed to stop myself from ad­
ding, But I dont think I would want to do this for a living.
No. In retrospect, I dont suppose I would want to do this kind
of a job for a living now, but there was a time when doing the job of
a locomotive fireman on an express train seemed to be all that I ever
wanted, or would want to do.
The return trip from Carleton Place to Ottawa helped to confirm
my happy memory. It was satisfying to know that I could still do the
kind of work that I had almost forgotten how to do. Of course, times
have changed from the days when I first learned this trade. Steam lo­
comotives, by and large, have disappeared and because they have dis­
sappeared, perhaps I feel impelled to try firing one whenever the op­
portunity occurs.
Without doubt, there will be another summer, another July
another steam engine. When this happy occasion occurs, it is
reasonable to suppose that on a Sunday in July, I will find
and
quite
myself
with
I
once again at a station, dressed in overalls and denim cap,
gloves and scoop, anxious to satisfy that ungovernable urge. And
am sure that the experience will be, then as now, a satisfying
rewarding one.
and
I just hope that they wont change all the coal-burning steam
locomatives to oil-burners~ If they do, I will just have to learn a
new technique~
Patrick A.G.Webb
~
or a short period in the history
of Canadas present-day Province
of Alberta, a little-known, 300-
mile narrow-gouge railway system
flourished and, with its expansion,
opened up the country through which
it ran for settlement and laid the
foundation for an enormous coal­
mining industry.
Subsequently, the industry so created would supply
all of the coal burned by the locomotives and coal
stoves of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company be­
tween Winnipeg, Manitoba and Vancouver, British
Columbia, as well as much of the fuel used by the
Great Northern Railway (USA) in the neighbouring
States of Montana and the Dakotas. In addition,the
narrow-gauge railway system carried coal to satis­
fy the increasing heating requirements of the set­
tlements on both sides of the International Boun­
dary in that part of the Canadian west.
The North Western Coal and Navigation Company -for that was the
corporate title of the enterprise -could boast of a number of firsts.
It was the first railway -other than the Canadian Pacific -to be
built in Canada west of Winnipeg. It was also the first railway to
cross the International Boundary west of the territorial capital. The
NWC&NCo. was in revenue operation two months before the last spike of
the Canadian Pacific was driven at Craigellachie, B.C., in November,
1885. Like the Canadian Pacific, the NWC&NCo. was directly respon-
sible for the establishment of a host of towns and at least one
city in the area which it served, accomplishing all of this in a
brief seven-year period.
Ultimately, most of the 350 miles of railway was absorbed into
the Canadian Pacific by William Cornelius Van Horne, in the struggle
to beat James J. Hill and the Great Northern Railway to the mineral
riches of the Crowsnest and the Kootenays. But wily Jim Hill did
manage to capture part of the narrow-gauge system in his unrelenting
efforts to maintain an iron-clad monopoly in the territory adjacent
to his Great Northern.
There are still traces of the NWC&NCo.s roadbed today -suffi­
cient to excite the interest of the railway archeologist -as much
of it is still used by CP RAIL and Burlington Northern in Alberta and
Montana.
Had you been standing at 14-Mile Tank, Northwest Territories, on
August 29, 1885, you would have been a witness to history, just as
Edward Mallandaine would be at Craigellachie, some two months later.
On the August occasion, a little mogul with 20 loaded gondolas of
coal laboured eastward from Coal Banks over the three-foot-gauge line
to Dunmore (Junction) on the Canadian Pacific Railway, a short dis-
,.
, THE HEAD-FRAME OF NUMBER 1 SHAFT OF THE GALT COAL MINES AT LETH­
l bridge, Alberta, about 1890. The roundhouse of the North West
Coal & Navigation Company is in the right background.
Photo courtesy Sir Alexander Galt Museum Archives.
tance east of what would later become Medicine Hat, Alberta, to de­
liver the first of a large number of trainloads of coal to the stan­
dard-gauge CPR. This and other important local events may have pas­
sed unrecorded in the development of Canadas west but, at the time,
it marked the end of a critical period for the North Western Coal &
Navigation Company and its directors.
The tank at 14-Mile was no different from that at Woodpecker,
77-Mile, Grassy Lake, Winnifred or Seven Persons, trackside stops –
and little more -along the bleak 109 miles of narrow-gauge to Dun­
more. Man-made structures like water tanks and sheds seemed to be
puny intrusions on a vast landscape, neatly bisected and balanced by
the horizon·with a treeless prairie below and a limitless sky above.
The rails carefully felt their way around coulees, circumvented
sloughs and avoided swells and rolls in the prairie with all the fi­
nesse of a transcontinental line gingerly making its way through the
Rocky Mountains. The NWC&NCo. s new railway was aptly nicknamed The
Turkey Trail, for it most resembled the path made by these wild
birds as they hunted for seeds and insects among the thickets and
grassy patches of the prairie.
But this is to anticipate part of the story, for the little train
brought an end to the steamboat era on the Belly River and ushered in
the era of the narrow-gauge, bringing prosperity in the best Colorado
tradition to a region only slightly less impressive in natural gran­
deur.
In 1882, Sir Alexander Tilloch Galt, who had acquired a certain
reputation in and out of railway circles in eastern Canada, organized
the company that developed a coal mine and started production at a
l
CANADIAN
173
R A I L
place called Coal Banks on the Belly River, Northwest Territories.
The historian can identify this place as todays city of Lethbridge,
Alberta, on the banks of the Oldman River, second tributary of the
mighty South Saskatchewan. Coal deposits occurred frequently in this
entire region, from Fort Benton, Montana Territory, as far north os
Blackfoot Crossing, Northwest Territories, on the Bow River.
Sir Alexanders superintendent wisely selected Coal Banks coal
for its superior quality. The mines first production went to the
nearby Royal Northwest Mounted Police detachment at ¢)cjICfC/;nt Fort
Macleod, where it brought $ 15 per ton. Additional quantities were
teamed south by oxen to Fort Benton, Montant Territory, where it
brought $ 22 per ton. These were good prices and encouraged the mine
operator to expand production. However, better transportation facili­
were essential if the task of supplying the Canadian Pacific Railway,
then still building west, was to be undertaken, together with meeting
the demands of the settlements which were sure to follow. According­
ly, after the NWC&NCo. was incorporated in April 1882, it was decided
to attempt transportation of 3,000 tons of cool per year by barge
down the Belly River to Medicine Hat.
The proposal was rather fantastic by virtue of the logistics a­
lone. Everything needed to build the sternwheel steamboat which would
push the barge up and down the river had to be bulled (by ox-team)
~ A SHORT SPUR ABOUT 2 MILES LONG RAN NORTH FROM THE YARD AT LETH­,
bridge to Staffordville Mine, Number 3 of the Alberta Railway &
Coal Company about 1891. The wooden-sided gondolas are loaded
with pit-props. Photo courtesy Glenbow Foundation.
. ;
CANADIAN 174
R A I L
from Swift Current, ot the end of track on the CPR, 230 miles over
the prairie to the east. The lumber, it should be noted, was obtain­
ed from the Porcupine Hills, only 60 miles to the west. Skilled ship­
builders were brought from the United States to the Coal Banksship­
yard, via the Missouri River. By June 1, 1883, the Baroness was
ready and was floated downriver to Medicine Hat to receive her ma­
chinery.
The following year, the Coal Banks shipyards launched two more
sternwheel steamboats and sixteen new barges, bringing the Com­
panys total fleet to the surprising total of three sternwheelers and
25 barges. The same year, despite a myriad of problems, the North
Western Coal and Navigation Company delivered 3,000 tons of coal to
the Hat. But as the market demands increased, so did the terrible
strain imposed on the equipment. It was quite clear that the short
period of high water, when the Belly River could carry the stern-
wheelers and barges with ease and safety, placed absolute limits on
this mode of transportation. Year- round operation was essential. A
crisis for the Company was at hand.
Meanwhile, locomotive superintendents on the Canadian Pacific
became more and more convinced of the excellent steaming quality of
Cool Banks coal and, consequently, the infant NWC&NCo. was offered
a contract of such a size that a railway line from the mine to the
CPR was imperative. The NWC&NCo. directors immediately sought and
were granted a charter -with the help of Sir Alexander Galt in Ot­
tawa -to build a narrow-gauge railway. With the charter came a land­
grant of 3,840 acres per mile, to be paid for at the rote of $ 1.10
per acre, a price which the Company could not pay. Renegotiated, the
Company received 1,920 acres per mile at the rate of 10¢ per acre.
This sum it could afford.
In 1884, a new company, the Alberta Railway and Coal Company, was
formed, having been granted powers to build a railway from Coal
Banks to Dunmore, in the event that the NWC&NCo. did not do so. The
new company issued construction contracts in April 1885, only to
have the commencement of the work delayed by the ominous threat of
rebellion among the Metis and Indians in the northeast. Construction
crews flatly refused to work on the construction sites without pro­
tection from hostile raiders and so it was May before work was under
way. But there were armed lookouts scanning the horizon and wild ru­
mors were rampant in the construction camp.
The official opening of the narrow-gauge railway took place on
September 24, 1885, a little less than a month after the line had
been completed. The ceremony was attended by Canadas Governor Gen­
eral, the Marquls of Lansdowne, Sir Alexander Tilloch Galt, Sask­
atchewan Jack McLean, the Anglican Bishop of Saskatchewan and J.M.
Egan, General Superintendent of the Canadian Pacific Railway. The
arrival of the special train at the newly-named town of Lethbridge
was electrifying. Real estate values soared briefly to heights akin
to those current in Winnipeg at the time and nothing but great
achievements were forecast -if we can believe the Companys adver­
tising~ In the traditional grand style, an opera house was immedia-
GREAT DAY AT DUNMORE JUNCTION~ IN 1890, NORTH WEST COAL & NAVIGA­
tion Companys engine Number 1 and a very extraordinary way-car
form the backdrop for a group photograph, starring Mrs. Dr. Kennedy
and Joe Howe McKay, jr., taken by Steele & Company of Winnipeg, Man.
Photo courtesy Glenbow Foundation.
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CANADIAN 176
R A I L
tely proposed and, as it turned out, one which was to become the lar­
gest and most grandiose, west of Winnipeg.
without doubt, coal assured Lethbridges future. A former NWC&NCo.
river captain told of a test he witnessed, soon after the first de­
livery of coal was made to the Canadian Pacific at Dunmore. Seven tons
of Lethbridge coal and seven tons of Pennsylvania hard coal were used
to power steam locomotives on the newly completed Medicien Hat -Cal­
gary line. The locomotive using the Pennsylvania coal barely reached
Calgary, while the engine burning the Lethbridge product got there –
and then made the return trip.
The new railway was not very impressive, as early photographs
indicate. Extremely light rail way used, apparently 28 pounds per
yard, yet the railway had all the accessories in the best main-line
tradition. A massive coal dock was constructed at Dunmore for the
trans-shipment of coal from narrow to standard-gauge cars. A round­
house and wye were built at Lethbridge, in the shadow of the mine
tipple, the nexus of the roads operation.
It is of interest to note that while the Alberta .Railway and
Coal Company was incorporated in 1884, it did not exercise its char­
ter powers until 1890 and then indirectly. In that year, the AR&CCo.
began proceedings which resulted in the purchase of the North West­
ern Coal and Navigation Company the following year. Thus it was that
in the years 1885-1890, the rolling stock and motive power on the
NWC&NCo.s railway carried the name of the original company.
Nevertheless, certain rights and franchises had been transferred
to the AR&CCo. in the interim, so that, when the railway was com-
pleted, the AR&CCo. received 414,200 acres of land. It immediately
undertook an extensive advertising campaign through a land sales de­
partment. Soon, the railway would consider an extension west to the
Crowsnest, in anticipation of even greater things. Through the rail­
ways telegraph line to Dunmore, Lethbridge was brought into communi­
cation with Winnipeg and the east. The Wests first hot line -fif­
teen posts to the mile -was established for the Lethbridge newspaper,
which carried happenings in the outside world as next-day news.
When the AR&C took over the enterprise, the railways rolling
stock was similar to that on other narrow-gauge railways in western
North America. Link-and-pin couplers and hand-brakes were standard
equipment on most of the cars. Locomotives were stopped with tender
and steam-brakes. A rope was strung through loops for the length of
the train, from cab to caboose; if -or when -the cars in the train
became uncoupled, the rope tightened, ringing a bell in the cab be­
fore it broke, alerting the engineer to the situation. The Company
apparently preferred Baldwin Locomotive Works products and, over
the years, owned as many as thirteen 2-6-0s, most of which were pur-
chased new. A Baldwin 0-6-0 switcher was also used for a time, as
was a Hinkley 0-4-0, purchased from the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Baldwin also supplied the AR&C with consolidations, six or seven of
which carried the AR&C name. As well, Canadian Locomotive Company
and Brooks Locomotive Company supplied two or three moguls.
Water supplies along the line were terrible and engineers were
admonished to keep not more than an inch of water in the glass at
all times, in order to avoid foaming and priming. After each trip,
the engine boiler was washed out and the tender emptied. This pro­
cedure was continued until chemical water-treating agents were in­
troduced, which lengthened the interval between wash-outs to a mon­
th or more.
. -. ~, . -. . – .
. ,x-u· C{;;fli (~O·S (.().. f>iJilNS)l;lf,,~)UNM01(1:; AS~H N,J n01.:,(. ~ .
• FROM THE NARROW-GAUGE TO THE STANDARD-GAUGE: AN UNIDENTIFIED MOGUL
l of the Alberta Railway & Coal Company tugs a string of tiny hoppers
up the incline of the coal-pocket at Dunmore about 1890. The ar-
tists name is not recorded; the sketch is from The Western World.
The photograph is from the Glenbow Foundation, Calgary, Alberta.
The railway was aperated entirely by train-order and traffic
was heaviest in the summer months, when coal was being stockpiled
at Dunmore on the CPR in anticipation of the heavy demands during
the cold prairie winter. Rarely did winter snow represent a hazard
to operation, but the constant chinook winds, usually blowing at
more than 50 miles per hour, could pack snow into the cuts and on
the leeward side of hills which could be plowed out only with the
greatest difficulty.
The railway did not own a snowplow when operation first began,
but relied on enormous wedge-plows fitted at Lethbridge to the pi­
lots of the engines, just before full-scale winter operation began.
Later, a wing-plow was purchased. A wedge-plow, mounted on a flat
car, was tried, but it proved to be too light for dependable opera­
tion. On only one occasion was the line severely blocked, when, for
a period of two weeks in 1887, nothing could move.
Major repairs to motive power and rolling stock were made at
Lethbridge, where a twelve-stall roundhouse and wye -later, a turn­
table -were constructed. The old turntable pit is still visible to­
day, immediately in the rear of CP RAILs facilities.
On the trip to Dunmore, 35-car freights were maximum tonnage,
each car carrying 13 tons of Lethbridge coal eastward. By todays
standards, where an SDP 40 by itself lifts 60 loaded cars out of
Dunmore, the capacity of the three-footers was miniscule, but the
AR&Cs limitation on train size was imposed by the braking require­
ments for the train. Oak brake-clubs were standard equipment for the
brakemen on the Turkey Trail. One of the last surviving employees
of the AR&C claimed that the brakemen could bring the train to a
stop with the engine at the station door at Dunmore.
• IN 1893, RAIL OPERATIONS IN THE DUAL-GUAGE YARD AT LETHBRIDGE HAD
l reached their peak. The 0-6-0 switcher in the picture is probably
an Alberta Railway and Coal engine, perhaps their Baldwin Number 1.
Photo courtesy Sir Alexander Galt Museum Archives.
Despite the limitations imposed by track, trains and terrain,
the Company was moving 90,000 tons of coal annually by 1890. Most
of the rolling stock was gondolas, of which the road had 135 at one
period. There were boxcars and flats for other commodities. There
were a number of passenger cars available and one was frequently at­
tached to the end of a trainload of coal. After a trip when the ch­
inook was blowing hard, the car cleaners were particularly busy.
There was a regular passenger service on the line, connecting with
through trains of the Canadian Pacific at Dunmore.
Another first for the AR&C had to be its union station at
Coutts, Alberta, certainly the only union station in the West for
some years. At Coutts, one building was later to serve both the AR&C
and its United States counterpart, the Great Falls and Canada Rail­
road. This dual use could hardly be avoided, since the International
Boundary cut straight across the platform~ For a time, the station
at Lethbridge also was the site of some unusual railway operations.
After the Canadian Pacific took over the Dunmore-Lethbridge line,
both standard and narrow-gauge trains could be seen beside the
platform, an occurrence which is believed to have persisted until
1912.
By the year 1889, the AR&C was enjoying a modest degree of pros­
perity, but it was still largely dependent on its coal operations.At
Lethbridge, the mines on the river flats were unable to keep pace
with the market demands and the carrying capacity of the inclined
tramway up to the railway, 300 feet above, was greatly overtaxed.
.f
CANADIAN 179 R A I L
To resolve the problem, a number of new mineshafts were driven from
the level of the prairie in proximity to the new town, the head frames
shattering grotesquely the monotonous horizon. To the Companys di­
rectors, the prospect of the market at Great Falls, Montana, to the
south, became even more alluring. There was also the Great Northern
Railway, whose steam locomotives also consumed vast quantities of
coal.
And so a charter for a railway to the International Boundary was
solicited, which the Government of Canada at Ottawa ultimately appro­
ved and the year 1890 saw track-crews completing the 64.5 miles south­
eastward over the Milk River bridge to the undefended frontier ot the
town of Coutts, Alberta. The junction at Ghent with the Dunmore-Leth­
bridge line, later named Montana Junction, is today a crossover and
a switch on the eastern side of Lethbridge, immediately adjacent to
Highway Number 3.
To complete the connection to Great Falls, the Great Falls and
Canada Railway was chartered in the State of Montana and construction
began north and west, heading for Coutts.
The line from Lethbridge to the border struck out over the flat
prairie at first, but was forced into a series of tight curves as it
began to climb up to the low summit of Milk River Ridge, which sep­
arated the Arctic and Gulf of Mexico watersheds. The right-of-way cut
~ THE ENGINE IS BELIEVED TO BE ALBERTA RAILWAY & IRRIGATION COMPANYS
, Number 3, a 4-4-0 standard-guager. In the background is the then­
new Canadian Pacific coaling tower. Some oldtimers assert that Num­
ber 1 was a product of the Manchester Locomotive Works, because of
the unique sound of her bell. Photo from the Authors Collection.
CANADIAN 180
R A I L
the old Whoop-Up Trail, whose ruts can still be seen in several pl­
aces. At the time of the railways construction, there were no inter­
mediate settlements and the only stops made were beside the numerous
water-tanks, holding the brackish liquid which was available on the
desolate prairie.
There was more construction in 1900, when the St. Marys River
Railway Company, a subsidiary of the AR&C, was incorporated. The
area south and west of Lethbridge, settled largely by pioneers of
the Mormon faith, was clamouring for a railway and a third three-foot­
gauge line was begun from St. Marys Junction -now Stirling -on the
Coutts line. The new railway headed straight west toward Cardston,
following the newly-built main irrigation canal of the Alberta Irriga­
tion Company. The track was completed to Spring Coulee, then exten­
ded to Cardston in 1904, with a branch 12 miles south to Kimball,near
Whisky Gap. Unlike the Dunmore-Lethbridge-Coutts line, this 66-mile
extension was not built primarily to haul coal. In fact, aside from
the coal coming from Lethbridge for domestic use, the St. Marys Ri­
ver Railway Company hauled not a lump. Rather, it was built to serve
an expanding community and to move the general produce of an agri­
cultural region.
As a subsidiary of the Alberta Railway and Coal Company, the St.
Marys River Railway owned no motive power or rolling stock. The en­
gines and cars were supplied by the parent company.
While the Alberta Railway and Coal Company exercised its option
and purchased the Dunmore -Lethbridge line of the North Western Coal
and Navigation Company in February 1891, this was but a preface to
the lease of this line to the Canadian Pacific Railway on November
27, 1893. The gauge was rapidly widened to 4 feet 8t inches so that
the CPR could carry the coal in larger capacity hopper cars.
It may be that the AR&C saw the handwriting on the wall, for by
1902, it had decided to facilitate the passage of standard~9auge
equipment from Montana Junction to Stirling and over the St. Marys
River Railway to Raymond. At the beginning of 1903, its U.S. exten­
sion had been similarly improved.
All of these bits and pieces of railway were gathered together
in 1912, when the Canadian Pacific Railway acquired th~m, having ob­
tained a lease of the Alberta Railway & Irrigation Company, under
whose corporate umbrella they had sheltered. On April 1 of that year,
all AR&I crews received orders that incoming engines will go to the
CPR roundhouse at Lethbridge. On that date, narrow-gauge operation
passed into history as the standard-gauge CPR removed the inside
rail of the dual-gauged track.
The development of three-rail operation in Lethbridge should be
explained. By 1892, the Dunmore -Lethbridge line of the AR&C was
the prime target of William C. Van Horne of the CPR. He visualized
this line as the first stage of a railway to the Crowsnest and the
Kootenays, which would prevent James Jerome Hill of the Great Nor­
thern from invading the territory. Though no money was involved, Van
Horne got possession of the AR&C and standard-gauged it in six weeks,
so that, by 1893, the CPR was in Lethbridge and Van Horne was champ­
ing at the bit to start westward. The yard at Lethbridge was then
~ NORTH WEST COAL AND NAVIGATION COMPANYS 4-4-0 NUMBER 8, JUST ARRIVED
from the builder, poses at Lethbridge, Alberta, about 1886.
Photo courtesy Sir Alexander Galt Museum Archives.

CANADIAN 182 R A I L
dual-gauged -three-railed -until the AR&C was leased in 1912. Dur­
ing the intervening two decades, motive power in the yard at Leth­
bridge sported both link-and-pin and knuckle couplers, for moving
both narrow and standard-gauge rolling stock -the Hinkley 0-6-0 re­
portedly being so equipped.
In the same year, through runs to Virden, Montana were discon­
tinued and Canadian crews terminated at Coutts, on the Internotional
Boundary.
In the second year of the 1970s, the railway lines in this area
still follow the original locations, for the most port. In fact, not
much has changed. Grain elevators designate many of the original vil­
lages, but the frequent water-tanks are long gone and only concrete
foundations suggest the presence, long ago, of lines ide coaling fa­
cilities. Gone, too, are most of the Canadian Pacific stations, as
passenger service through this area disappeared early. By contrast,
this region is now the stamping-ground of the last of CP RAILs fir­
st-generation diesels, as well as a number of leased PNC units.
Despite these outward signs ot modernization, the wandering
Turkey Trail, the original three-foot line, continues to impose
speed and tonnage restrictions, just as it has persisted in doing
for the last ninety years.
J; THE FIRST TRAIN TO REACH CARDSTON, ALBERTA, IN 1904: ENGINE NUMBER
, 13, a 2-6-0 of the Alberta Railway & Cool Company, originally Num­
ber 1 of the North West Cool & Navigation Company, poses at the
west end of the St. Marys River Railway Companys line. Engineer
was J. Wallwock, Fireman, Waldron McKay, Conductor Joseph Tennant
and Brakesman Alexander McKoy. Photo courtesy Glenbow Foundation.
.
1882
1884
1884
1885
1885
1890
1891
1893
1897
1900
1903
1903
1904
1912
1929
CANADIAN
183
R A I L
SYNOPTICAl HISTORY OF THE NARROW-GAUGE IN ALBERTA
North Western Coal & Navigation Company incorporated in England;
North Western Coal & Navigation Company incorporated in Canada;
Alberta Railway & Coal Company incorporated in Canada, with
powers to build a railway to Crowsnest Pass and beyond;
First train over the NWC&NCo., Lethbridge to Dunmore;
Canadian Pacitic Railway completed from Montreal to Port Moody;
Great Falls and Canada Railway completed and first train runs
south from Lethbridge to Great Falls, Montana, U.S.A.
Alberta Railway and Coal Company exercises option and purcha­
ses North Western Coal and Navigation Company;
Canadian Pacific Railway leases AR&C line, Dunmore to Ghent
(Montana Junction) and lays third rail under lease arrange­
ment into Lethbridge;
Canadian Pacific Railway purchases Dunmore to Lethbridge line.
AR&C retains running rights into Lethbridge;
St. Marys River Railway Company incorporated; construction of
narrow-gauge completed to Spring Coulee, Alberta;
AR&C completes standard-gauging of Lethbridge -International
Boundary line; Great Falls & Canada Railway completes standard­
gauging of line from Great Falls, Montana to International Boun-
dary; Montana and Great Northern Railroad Company takes over
this portion;
St. Marys River Railway extended to Cardston, with a branch
to Kimball, Alberta;
Alberta Railway and Irrigation Company chartered from amalga­
mation of Alberta Railway and Coal Company, St. Marys River
Railway Company and the Canadian Northwest Irrigation Company;
All narrow-gauge lines of the Alberta Railway & Irrigation Com­
pany converted tu standard-gauge,a~ Canadian Pacific Railway
Company leases AR&I for 999 years. CPR assumes operation on
June 2,1912. Branch of St.MRRy., Raley to Kimball, abandoned;
Canadian Pacific Railway builds about 8 miles on former St.MRRy
branch, Raley to Whisky Gap.
A NOTE ON NAMES …… .
The first reference to coal outcroppings in the area today
known as lethbridge, Alberta, was to Sheran s coal banks. Sheran s
mine was across the river from Sir Alexander T. Galts original
mine. The settlement was thus first known as Coal Banks. later,
the village was named Medicine Stone, briefly Coal hurst and,
finally in 1885, lethbridge, the controversy being settled by
the Office of the Post Office Inspector.
Mr. Stafford, Galts first superintendent, realized that
there would be problems in moving the coal from Sheran s mine
to the east side of the river. He deduced that the coal seams
ran under the river to the east bank and he uncovered them with
his first drift, located within a hundred feet of the footings
of the yet-to-be-built Lethbridge Viaduct over which CP RAIL
CANADIAN 184 R A I L
.(tI~-~ …. -…… -woo DptSc,1 77 Tl>N/(~IASW
LAl<.~
IMB~~
-f.,R N/>..il 0 Nc,,1….
/ /
WI-lOOP UP COUtlTRY
SI:LOWING Nt:lRR..Ow c,t.,V(E
1.IlJes .18~5 -19,1..
(Nor iQ 1>CLl..E.)
THE. N.W.C.4N Co.
(HE. TURKEY TRAIL)
e~UTQ w.o.t£.A. 1OWE~
,60VNO,c,R.V
GJ<.£LT NOR.l H E R.N R..WY.
CANADIAN 185 R A I L
freights rumble today. A cairn marks the spot, which today is
in the Indian Battle Park. This park includes the entire level
area in the Oldman River valley and has an almost exact replica
of old Fort Whoop-Up of pioneer fame. If you were to hike from
the river bottom to the top of the bank, you would emerge into
downtown Lethbridge,
Sherans original workings on the west side of the Oldman
River are unmarked and, in fact, remain lost. The distance be­
tween Sheran s and Galts mines is about half-a-mile. The orig­
inal Galt mine buildings were in the river valley in what is
today Indian Battle Park. Sir Alexanders luxurious mansion was
demolished when the Lethbridge Viaduct was built.
The town of Coal Banks naturally coalesced around the
terminal of the narrow-gauge railway, which, in turn, terminated
near the top of the inclined tramway which brought up the coal
from the mine in the river valley. Sir Alexander layed out the
plan of the growing community which became today s Lethbridge.
Before the turn of the ceritury, maps of this area showed
the Belly River being joined by the Oldman River and continuing
eastward to join the Bow River. In 1908, the Government of Can­
ada completed a hydrographic survey of the Belly-Oldman river
system and thereafter concluded that the Belly flowed into the
Oldman. This resulted in the re-naming of the section onward to
the confluence with the Bow.
It is thought that both of these names have their origin
in Indian legends, but just which legend of the three or four
surrounding each is not clear.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The Author wishes to thank the following indivi­
duals and organizations for their assistance in
the preparation of this article:
Mrs. B. Brown
Mrs. M. Toth
Mr. D. Forster
Public Archives of British Columbia
Glenbow Archives
Sir Alexander Galt Museum Archives
Lethbridge, Alta.
Lethbridge, Alta.
Lethbridge, Alta.
Victoria, B.C.
Calgary, Alta.
Lethbridge, Alta.
THE WESTERN RAILROADER OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, REPORTS THAT
seven of the articulated chair-car sets of the Southern Pacific
Corporation, stored at Bayshore Yards, San Francisco, somewhat
vandalized and sold to the Purdy Company, have been re-sold to the
Algoma Central Railway, presumably to increase the capacity of their
summer excursion service from Sault Ste. Marie north to the Agawa
Canyon on the 500 Subdivision.
BENDING BUT NOT BOWING TO PUBLIC SENTIMENT, AS EXPRESSED BY MR. PIER-
re Berton, among others, Metro Centre Developments Limited of
Toronto, Ontario -owned by Canadian Notional Railways and Can­
adian Pacific Limited -have been asked by Toronto City Council to
defer demolition of Toronto Union Station for a period of at least
four months.
The developers had agreed to preserve the Great Hall of the 57-
year old _station, keeping it w~Jhin the development, but the Council
now wants to preserve the entire station as a transportation centre,
working out the intricacies of an integrated rood-rail terminal at a
later date.
Stewart Andrews, President of Metro Centre Developments Limited
said that the main question for the consultant would be whether to
retain the two wings of Union Station or to demolish them and build
something to complement the whole block bounded by Bay and York Str­
eets, University Avenue and The Esplanade. John D. Welsh
UNITED RAILWAY SUPPLY OF MONTREAL HAS RE-MANUFACTURED EX-READING RA­
ilroad RS 3 Number 492 into a unit designated as SMARRCO Number
16. This identity was short-lived, for the unit then became Ro­
berval & Saguenay Number 31. Ex-Reading Number 488 was repainted as
SMARRCO Number 15, was then repainted bright orange, becoming URS
Number 15 and was leased to CP RAIL. Ex-Reading Number 468, which
had a steam-generator when it was used in commuter service, was re-
manufactured and pointed bright orange, emerging as URS Number 16
for lease to CP RAIL. Ex-Reading Number 493 followed the same pro-
cedure, emerging as bright orange URS Number 17 and being leased to
CP RAIL.
C. de Jean
OUR MEMBER IN THE LAC ST-JEAN AREA OF QUEBEC REPORTS THAT ROBERVAL­
Saguenay RailwayS M420TR units Numbers 26 & 27 have been re­
turned to MLW Industries, Montreal, for wheel modifications. On
completion of these modifications, the two units will be loaned to
Canadian Notional Railways for trials as transfer switchers. CN seems
to be very interested in these units, which are powered with the some
251-model prime movers used in CN s road units. CN is said to be look-
ing for a heavy rood-switcher capable of replacing their RS 18 and
GMD 1 units.
CANADIAN
187 R A I L
An advertisement in a Lac St-Jean region newspaper invited ten­
ders for the purchase of the station and grounds at Arvida, the pro­
perty belonging to liLa Compagnie du chemin de fer au Lac-St-Jean
and liLa Compagnie du chemin de fer de Roberval et du Saguenay. Po­
tential purchasers were requested to send their bids to the Director
of Building Services, CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS, Montreal.
Our member remarks that, in view of the length of the corporate
titles of the A&J and R-S, no wonder the Aluminum Company of Canada
wishes to shorten them to ALCAN-Transportation Division-Arvida.
NOTRE CORRESPONDANT A GRENOBLE, FRANCE, M. FRANCOIS REBILLARD, NOUS
envoye une photo de la locomotive electrique CC 6500 de la So­
ciete nationale des chemins de fer fran~ais. Cette locomotive
est la plus puis sante de la SNCF, avec un pouvoir de 8 000 cv. Elle
a ete construite en 1969, pese 115 tonnes et est limitee d 220 km/h
avec les trains rapides comme Etandard, Aquitaine et Mistral.
La photo a ete prise d Hendaye, gare frontiere franco-espagnol, en
aoOt, 1973, par M. Rebillard.
J
. ,
3
.. ……… ..w,:l._~

.. !A.l
MR. FRANCOIS REBILLARD, OUR CORRESPONDENT FROM GRENOBLE, FRANCE,SENDS
us a photo of electric locomotive CC 6500 of the French National
Railways, taken at Hendaye on the Franco-Spanish frontier, in
August, 1973. This locomotive is one of the most powerful on the SNCF
being rated at 8,000 hp. Built in 1969, it weighs 115 tonnes and
has a top speed limit of about 142 miles per hour when hauling express
trains such as Etandard, Aquitaine and Mistral.
CANADIAN
188
R A I L
THERE IS NO CHANGE IN THE DISPOSITION OF CP RAILS BALDWIN DRS-4-4-10
units on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, writes John
Hoffmeister of Victoria, B.C. For the record, here is the
stotus as of 1 February 1974:
Road number
8000 8001 8002 8003
8004
8005
8006
8007
8008
8009
8010 8011
8012
Operational
Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
No
No
No
Yes Yes
No
No
Detail
Assigned to Wellcox Yard, Nanaimo.
Assigned to Wellcox Yard, Nanaimo.
Assigned to Wellcox Yard, Nanaimo.
Assigned to Wellcox Yard, Nanaimo.
Assigned to Wellcox Yard, Nanaimo.
Main generator replaced Ogden Shops,
Calgary, Alberta, December, 1973.
Assigned to Wellcox Yard, Nanaimo.
Stored at Wellcox Yard, Nanaimo,
after wreck. Not yet scrapped.
Stored at Wellcox Yard, Nanaimo,
after wreck. Not yet scrapped.
Stored at Wellcox Yard, Nanaimo,
after wreck; partially dismantled;
not yet scrapped.
Assigned to Wellcox Yard, Nanaimo.
Assigned to Wellcox Yard, Nanaimo.
Stored at Wellcox Yar~, Nanaimo,
after wreck; partially dismantled;
not yet scrapped.
SCRAPPED at Ogden Shops, Calgary,
Alberta, in June, 1973.
Mr. Hoffmeister sends twa pictures of these Baldwin units. In the
first, Mr. Tom Quinn stands on the front platform of the engine of
Extra 8010 South at Courtenay, B.C., on 8 February 1972. The second
shows a late afternoon meet between Extra 8000 South from Courtenay
with 10 cars and Extra 8661 North with 17 cars at Wellington. –
CANADIAN
189
R A I L
MLW INDUSTRIES OF MONTREAL WILL BUILD THIRTY MX 624-MODEL UNITS FOR
the Republic of Cubo, reports Roger Boisvert. MLW Indus-
tries will also build fifteen M 420-model units for the
Ferrocarril del Pacifico of Mexico and five M 636-model units for
the Cartier Railway of Port-Cartier, Quebec. The road numbers of
the latter quintet will be 77 through 81.
LATE IN 1973, SIX EX-CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS PASSENGER CARS WERE
loaded on board the Greek freighter GEORGE N. PAPAL lOS at Van­
couver, B.C., for delivery in Cuba. This was the second ship­
ment of obsolete railway passenger cars to Cuba from Canadas west
coast. CN says that these cars were not in the rolling stock pool,
being equipment formerly used on branch lines and mixed trains and
now considered inoperable. Can one of our readers supply a description
and the numbers of these cars?
David Ll. Davies
PORT WELLER DRY DOCKS LIMITED HAS BEEN AWARDED THE CONTRACT TO BUILD
a $ 12.5 million rail-car ferry to operate between Port-aux-Bas­
ques, Newfoundland and North Sydney, Nova Scotia. The 444-foot
long, 7,500-ton vessel is scheduled to be delivered in August 1975
and is designed to carry 34 railway cars or truck and tractor-trail­
ers on the railway car deck. Some members of Canadas House of Com-mons
and the Canadian Transport Commission are very concerned be-
cause the new ferry is not designed to be an ice-breaker; that is,
her bow will not be heavily reinforced to withstand the impact of
ice. This could mean that her operation would be intermittent at a
season of the year when her services would be most essential.
S.S.Worthen.
ENCOURAGED BY A SUBSTANTIAL INCREASE IN THE PRICE OF NATURAL GAS, THE
Aquitaine Company of Canada Limited has undertaken a $ 22 million
railway project to link its two-year-old gas processing plant
at Ram River, 70 miles west of Red Deer, Alberta, with an abandoned
Canadian National Railways line, 28 miles from the plant. Con-
struction of the line has been delegated to Canadian National and
will cost $ 13 million. Upgrading of the abandoned CN line, which
served a coal mine in the area until the 1960s, will cost $ 9 million.
The Ram River gas plant produces about 4,000 tons of sulphur per
day, or 20% of Albertas total production. The extracted sulphur has
been stockpiled for the last two years near the plant, but Aquitaine
has no plans at present to start shipment of this sulphur, since it
will cost from $ 5 to $ 8 per ton to remelt prior to shipping.
C.W.Creighton
EX-CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY 2-8-2 NUMBER 5361, ORIGINALLY DESIGNATED
for the Ontario Science Centre, Toronto, and subsequently re­
fused for display, has been stored in CP RAILs John Street Ro­
undhouse, Toronto, since May, 1963. Early in January 1974, the loco­
motive was moved to Hamilton, Ontario, where she will be stored under
cover by the Steel Company of Canada. The ultimate fate of the mikado
has not been determined at this time.
W.J.Bedbrook
LE PROGRES-DIMANCHE OF CHICOUTIMI, QUEBEC, IN ITS 30 DECEMBER 1973
issue, reported the demise of the Alma & Jonquieres Railway Com­
pany as follows:
CANADIAN
190
R A I L
, The directors of the Alma-Jonquiere Railway Company decided
to effect the dissolution of the company and they have author­
ized the transfer of the enterprise and its assets to its par­
ent company, Roberval-Saguenay, effective 1 January 1974, sta­
ted M. Raymond-J. Girard, superintendent of railway services of
ALCAN in the Saguenay-Lac St-Jean area. M. Girard underlined
the fact that the dissolution of the Company would result in no
displacement or reduction in personnel.
, This step, he said, , is being taken only to simplify the ad­
ministrative structures relating to the operation of ALCAN rail­
way services in the Saguenay-Lac St-Jean region. The Roberval &
Saguenay Railway Company will continue to provide railway ser-
vice to its regular customers at Alma and Jonquiere, concluded
M. Girard.
The Alma and Jonquieres Railway Company was incorporated in 1912
to build a line from Hebertville to Ile Maligne, between the La Grande
Decharge and La Petite Decharge in the Saguenay River at its outflow
from Lac St-Jean. Another portion of the A&J was to run from St-Joseph
dAlma to Jonquieres. In fact, a junction with the Canadian National
Railways main line from Quebec City to Chicoutimi was made just east
of Hebertville at what was subsequently known as Saguenay Power Junc­
tion, mile 183.2 on CNs Lac St-Jean Subdivision.
Initially, the A&J was constructed to serve the paper mill of
Price Brothers at Riverbend, on La Petite Decharge. Later on, hydro­
electric power developments were constructed on both La Grande and
La Petite Decharge and the A&J brought in construction materials and
heavy equipment. Some years later, the Aluminum Company of Canada
built an aluminum refinery at St-Joseph dAlma and the ever-increas­
ing traffic between St-Joseph and Arvida assured that the A&J would
have a steadily increasing volume of freight.
CANADIAN
191 R A I L
..


Over the years, main-line freights from Arvido to St-Joseph were
hauled by Robervol & Soguenoy locomotives. These trains used the CN i
main line between Arvido and Saguenay Power Junction.
At the time of its amalgamation with the Roberval-Soguenay, the
Alma & Jonquiere hod two S 4 switchers, Numbers 101 &. 102. It owned no
boxcars or other equipment such os tonk cars, snowplows, etc.Most
of the trains aver the 11 miles to Saguenoy Power Junction hod been h
andled by R&.S RS 2 Dnd RS 3 units and it is reported that, from time
to ti~e, the two R&S M42DTR units oppeored on transfer trains from
Alma to Arvido. Swi
tching at the Price Brothers paper mill at Riverbend is hand_
led by a centre-cob, side-rodded GE switcher, similar to the one used by
the Quebec North Shore Paper Company at Boie Co~eou, Quebec. Our Loc_
St_Jeon correspondent, who sends us these notes, included two
phot
ographs of Price Brothers Number 5, which are reproduced herewith.
CP RAIL HAS DECIDED NOT TO RENUMBER DIESEL UNITS NUMBERS 5669 THROUGH
5674 as previously intended, writes Mr. Roger Boisvert of
Quebec. Roger a
lso reports that the fifty SO 40_2 units, scheduled
for delivery to CP RAIL by Diesel Division, General Motors of Canada
between Nove~ber 1974 and February 1975 will have rood numbers 5800-
5805 ond 5675_5718. The first six units are reported to be about 22
inches longer than the second group, perhaps to accommodate the LO­
COTROl equipment with which these ~oster units will be fitted.
~ ROBERT A. LOAT OF CALGARY, ALBERTA, SENDS US THIS PICTURE OF CANA­
.~ dian Pacific Railway Train 71 on the Macleod Subdivision at 28th.
Avenue S.E., Calgary, on 7 Septellber 1970. Bob points out that it
isnt very often that you con photograph a GP 9 (Number 8522) run­
ning with on H_16_44 (Number 8556), but it does happen occasionally
around Colgary~
Canadian Rail
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.. -.
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AssociatiOn Branches
CAlGARY 6 SOUTH WESTERN
L.I1.Unl.n, Secretory 1727 2Jrd. A … ue N.W.Colgary, Alta,TZI1 lV6
OTTAWA
W.R.Linl.y,Secretory P.O.Bo>! 141,Slation A Ottowa, Canada KIN BVI
PACIFIC COAST
R.H.
H.yer, S.cretary P.O.Box lOO6,Station A Voncou .. ,r,II.C.V6( 2f1
ROCKY HOI.IIOAIN
J .H.H.lkle, S cnt ry, p, O. Box 6102,5 tot ion C, [d.onton. Alto. TS(I 4X5
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
P.Sh.rgoid,Secretary P.O.(lo~ 584~,Ter.inal A Toronto,Ont.H5W IP3
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