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Canadian Rail 268 1974

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Canadian Rail 268 1974

Canadian Rail §
No. 268
May 1974

THE
LADY OF THE LAKE
Rev. C. leighton Streight
D
uring ones childhood and youth, many dreams
and ambitions pass in an endless parade across
those formative years. Too often, many youth­
ful aspirations never reach fulfillment. One
of mine, however, was attained.
It was my dream to return to the mountains and lakes of British
Columbia, Canadas westernmost province, to rediscover the wonders
that I knew and loved during the brief period when I lived in Van­
couver in my youth.
During each of five student summers, when I was attending the
Universi~y of Toronto, it was my privilege to come back west. Three
summers were spent in the mountains and two in the foothill country
north and south of Calgary, Alberta. In September 1950, after a
most enjoyable and profitable summer at Banff, I first made the
acquaintence of The lady of the Lake. She was, in truth, the liv­
ing embadiment af everything I had read and imagined abaut her. The
first glimpse – a most enduring one -found her moored at the dock
at Robson West, at the southern end of the Arrow Lakes, awaiting
the connecting train of the Canadian Pacific Railway. Pale wisps of
smoke curled in gentle swirls from her tall stack. Below the three
windaws of her towering pilot-hause was the proud superscription,
S.S.MINTO.
Earlier in the summer, I had read an article in the Saturday
Evening Post, chronicling a voyage the writer had made on British
Calumbias Arrow Lakes, aboard the stern-wheeler S.S.MINTO. The ac­
caunt of the ship and her voyage to quaint, out-of-the-way ports of
call, fascinated me. Then, as I read further, I learned that her
days were -alas~ -numbered. It was unlikely that I would ever
again be so near to this unique ship and so I immediately booked a
passage for the following September.
Mid-September of the following year was long in coming, but one
autumn day, after an uneventful but enjoyable journey by train south
from Calgary to Fort Macleod and then west over the Crows Nest Pass
route and along the precipitous shores of Kootenay lake, my objec­
tive was reached. Leaving the Conadian Pacific train from Nelson at
Robson West, British Columbia, I stood on the dock and examined the
ship that was to be my home for the next twenty-four hours or so.
It was pleasant to savaur the taste of adventure.
ON THE COVER THIS MONTH, THE S.S.MINTO lIES AT THE DOCK AT ROBSON WEST,
British Columbia. Canadian Pacific Railway freight cars an the dock
are loaded and unloaded into the ship. Photo by the Author.
THE S.S.MINTO, WITH ALL HER FLAGS FLYING, STOPS AT A FLAG-STOP ON
the Arrow Lakes, in British Columbias interior, en route from Rob­
son West to Arrowhead, at the northern end of the Lakes.
Photo by the Author.
CANADIAN 132
R A I L
Stepping on board, I had the distinct feeling that I was being
carried back into history, back to the Days of 98 and the Klon­
dike Gold Rush, for indeed, it was this trade that the S.S.MINTO
was
designed to serve, on the Stikine River, far to the north in
the Yukon. She was actually built in sections at Toronto, Ontario
and then shipped by rail to Vancouver, where she was to be re-assem­
bled.
By the time the S.S.MINTO s pieces arrived, however, the Klon­
dike Gold Rush was almost over, so the S.S.MINTO, still in parts,
was shipped back to the village of Nakusp, on the narrows between
the Upper and Lower Arrow Lakes. Here, her sections were assembled
by Thomas Bulger and here she began her 56-year indenture as ser-
vant to the settlers at 25 regular ports of call along the shores
of the lakes. During those years, the S.S.MINTO made over 7,000
trips, travelling more than 2t million miles.
Once aboard for my first voyage of discovery, the hospitality
and informality for which the S.S.MINTO was justly famous, was every­
where apparent. From the deck-hand to the purser to the steward to
the cabin boy, my every contact with the crew bespoke friendliness.
I was shown to my cobin, which cost the enormou~ sum of two or three
dollars. Granted, it was not EMPRESS OF CANADA style. Indeed, my
stateroom was barely large enough to permit turning around. Never­
theless, it was comfortable, with a good bunk and running water and
.:,·w.i.th a porthole of a size adequate to view the magnificent panoramas
~ftu~ing the voyage.
-. The meals in the dining saloon were also quite unforgettable ,
bo·
th as to quality and price. Can you imagine a full-course break­
fast, served on a silver service, for 75 cents? Or lunch and dinner
for $ 1.00 each? Such was the service aboard the S.S.MINTO when I
made
my first trip.
Typical of the hospitality shown to the occasional traveller
and, to me, the highlight of the trip, was the early invitation from
Captain Robert Manning to join him in the pilot-house, whence the
stately swan-like progress of the S.S.MINTO was directed. It was my
privilege to enjoy this vantage-point for the balance of the day,
until we docked at Nakusp, layover point for the night. It was a
pleasure to watch Captain Manning as he skilfully guided his ship
in and out of the various points at which the vessel stopped.
Two, in particular, remain in my memory. At one location, not
designated by any formal title, Captain Manning simply headed the
S.S.MINTOs bow for the shore. As there appeared to be nothing on
the shore at this point, it was impossible to imagine the reason
for this manoeuver. Witbin minutes, the bow of the ship was hard
aground. Thereupon, the deck hands and some of the passengers begon
to unload cargo from the deck to the shore, through the shallow wa­
ter: some lumber; a table-saw; various and sundry other articles,in­
cluding a small skiff. Discharge of cargo completed, Captain Manning
reversed the ships engines and, with paddle-wheel revolving at a
furious rate, the S.S.MINTO slid off the shingle and backed out into
the channel. Signaling her engines to stop on the engine-room
voice-pipe, Captain Manning brought the ships bow around and, cal­
ling slow ahead and then full ahead into the voice-pipe, he
guided the ship to resume her northward journey.
Thus it was that the S.S.MINTO located yet another settler and
his family on the shore of the lake, there to begin a new life in
this most beautiful valley in British Columbia. Who would have ven-
CANADIAN 133 R A I L
tured to predict that, in the 1970s, these beautiful beaches would
be inundoted, as a result of mans immoderate and unending desire
to harness the swift waters of the Columbia River for generating
the exportable commodity of electric energy?
The other notable interval in my voyage north was the stop at
Needles, where it was necessary to unlood a very quaint wagon. This
vehicle was the home-on-wheels of a gentleman and his grandson,
who were in the process of making a journey from somewhere back east
to the Pacific Coast. How many days they had been on the road when I
encountered them and how many more days they spent in reaching
Vancouver are now long forgotten. But there is the vague memory of
a report in the Vancouver SUN, noted later on, of their eventual ar­
rivaL
How well I recall little beauty-spots such as Renata; the im­
posing hotel at Halcyon Hot Springs and, all along the lake, the
unusual docks, sloping into the water, so that a mooring was always
provided for the S.S.MINTO, regardless of the water-level.
In the early years of this century and, indeed, until well
after World War II, the S.S.MINTO provided the essential communi­
cation with the outside world for the residents along the Upper and
Lower Arrow Lakes. But with the improvement in the roads and high­
ways of the region and the advent of the private car and motor truck,
the S.S.MINTO s service became less and less essential. Mareover,
the ship was growing old and there was no justification, after a
time, for retaining her in service.
The end of the saga of the S.S.MINTO is soon told. She was sold
by Canadian Pacific to the Town of Nakusp which, in turn, sold her
to a salvage company at Nelson, B.C. After her fittings and stern­
wheel had been removed, she was sold to Mr. John Nelson of Galena
Bay, B.C., who hoped to convert her to a floating museum, a living
memento of the days of stern-wheelers on the Arrow Lakes. But the
cold patina of age had settled on her forever and it was impossible
to effect the repairs necessary to preserve the historic ship.
In the end, the S.S.MINTO was accorded a Vikings funeral, a
fitting finale for a gallant vessel.
The S.S.MINTO now no longer graces the waters of the Arrow La­
kes with her stately progress; she has passed from the scene. But
she still lingers on in the memories of the thousands who sailed on
her, either through necessity or on occasion, and to whom, for many
years, she rendered faithful service.
She was a phantom of delight
When first she gleamed upon my sight;
A lovely Apparition sent
To be a moments ornament.
And now I see with eyes serene
The very pulse of the machine;
A Being breathing thoughtful breath,
A Traveller between life and death.
(William Wordsworth)
. ··,t THE BROAD EXPANSE OF LOWER ARROW
. . : :., typ i col 0 f the sc en ery alon g the
LAK~, NORTH OF RENATA. THIS VIEW IS
Lower and Upper Arrow Lakes .
Photo by the Author .
…. THE CAPTAIN AND CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE S.S.MINTO, PHOTOGRAPHED AT THE
~ north end of the run at Arrowheod, B.C. See the note at the end of
the article. Photo by the Author.
• THE PIER AT RENATA, BRITISH COLUMBIA, IS
~ that the S.S.MINTO can land passengers and
water-level in the lake.
SLOPED TO THE WATER SO
freight, regardless of the
Photo by the Author.

t
AN ELDE~LY GENTLEMAN WAS MAKING A WESTBOUND TRANSCONTINENTAL JOURNEY
carrying his possessions in this wagon. He persuaded the Captain of
the S.S.Minto to ferry him across the Arrow Lakes between Fauquier
and Needles, the unloading procedure at the latter place being shown
in the photograph. Photo by the Author.
THE S.S.MINTO WAS RUN STRAIGHT UP ON THE BEACH ON THE EAST SHORE NEAR
Deer Park, so that the possessions of a homesteading family could be
unloaded easily. This family was fortunate. They had an electric table
saw. But where was the electricity to be found to operate it?
Photo by the Author.
ONCE A POPULAR PLACE FOR VACATIONERS, ACCESSIBLE ONLY BY WATER AND
the S.S.MINTO, the majestic hotel at Halcyon Hot Springs on Arrow Lake has
now passed into history. Photo by the Author.
o

o
1
o
N
CANADIAN
To
il4NcoWI!R
(VI F~$E~
CAI-IYO,,,)
LoWER.
f>..RRow
L PlI To
VANCOUV.
(A KtiTTc.E
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UPPER
fR I?OvJ
LFlKE:
138

R A I L
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1JNN~9

To MQIC/NE I-IAT
(ACIlik>~
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Wf>,.Sr 1l-Je,-roN
CUSp.)
THE LANDING-STAGE AT NAKUSP, B.C., MID-POINT ON THE S.S.MINTOS RUN,
was the junction w,th the Canadian Pacifi.c Railways Kaslo Sub­
division fT.om Rosebery and New Denver on Slocan Lake.
Photo by the Author.

t
.. :.
AT THE NORTHERN END OF HER RUN, THE 5.5. MINTO TIED UP AT THE LAND­
ing stage at Arrowhead, B.C., 27 miles south of Revelstoke on the
main line of the Canadian Pacific. This scene today is under several
feet of water, since the level of the Arrow Lakes has been raised
by the dam near Robson West. Photo by the Author.
Authors Notes
The Canadian Pacific Railway Company sold the S.S.MINTO to the
Town of Nakusp, British Columbia, for preservation, for the sum of
$ 1.00 • However, the citizens lost interest in the pro j ect and in
April 1956, the ship was sold to a junk dealer of Nelson, B.C., for
$ 750. The furnishings, fittings, boilers, engines and stern-wheel
were stripped and the hull was sold to Mr. John Nelson of Galena
Bay, B.C., who had it towed north and moored in the Upper Arrow
Lake, opposite his farm. Mr. Nelson hoped to restore the ship, but
he died on 26 November 1967 -aged 88 years -before much restora­
tion had been accomplished.
Thereafter, the hull was said to constitute a menace to naviga­
tion on the lake and accordingly, on 1 August 1968, a BC Hydro tug
towed the hulk out into the lake and Mr. Walter Nelson, son of the
late Mr. John Nelson, lit the Viking pyre.
The picture of two of the S.S.MINTO s officers was taken at
Arrowhead, B.C. Captain Robert Manning is on the left and on the
right is Chief Engineer L. Exton.
The First Officer of the S.S.MINTO was Mr. Fred Barlow.
CANADIAN 141
Other Sources
SAGA OF A STERNWHEELER Morrison, G.F.
PADDLEWHEELS ON THE FRONTIER Volume 12
R A I L
CPR SPANNER October 1954
Foremost Publishing Co.,
Surrey, B.C.
NEWS REPORT/CANADIAN RAIL Canadian Railroad Historical Association:
Various issues.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The assistance of Dr. E.W.Johnson in preparing
enlargements of the Authors photographs for
the foregoing article is gratefully acknowled­
ged, as is that of Mr. Jim Hope of Trail, B.C.,
for supplying the photograph of the 5.5. MINTO
at Nakusp, B.C. in 1955.
The two photographs of the Viking Pyre are
believed to have been taken by an employee of
the British Columbia Hydro & Power Authority
and are from the file of Mr. Earl Olsen, CP
RAIL Public Relations, Calgary, Alberta.
AFTER THE SERVICE WAS DISCONTINUED, THE S.S.MINTO WAS ANCHORED JUST
off-shore at Nakusp, B.C. It wos here that Jim Hope of Trail, B.C.
photographed her on 22 May 1955.

~~
.. : ii_
,.,; ON THE FATEFUL FIRST OF AUGUST, 1968, THE .. S.S.MLt:HO, STR1PPED OF HER
~: mach1nery a;i:f othei>riietal parts, was towed out into the lake and set
~t,j,:io n fir e. The pic t u r e was t a ken by an em p loy e e 0 f the B r i tis h Col u m b i a
Hydro & Power Authority. Photo from the Authors collection.
A LAST VIEW OF THE S.S.MINTO, AS SHE SANK INTO THE DEEP WATERS OF UP­
per Arrow Lake off Galena Bay, British Columbia, on 1 August 1968.
The picture is thought to have been taken by an employee of the Bri­
tish Columbia Hydro & Power Authority and is from the Authors files.
00
MUCH
S


AM
CANADIAN
144 R A I L
It would be difficult, indeed, to com­
pose the text essential as a proper
complement to the magnificent pictorial
record of Conadian National Railways
handsome 4-8-2 Number 6060 on her
first official run, prepared by that
most expert and excellent of railway
photographers, Jim Shaughnessy, native
of Troy, New York, whose work is known
and admired world-wide.
Instead of essaying the impossible, we
present herewith a little bit of bit­
ter to go wi th the sweet. The essay
of Mr. Scott Young is reproduced with
the kind permission of the author and
THE GLOBE AND MAIL of Taronto, Ontario.
TOO MUCH STEAM.
Scott Young
As an old cinder-eater on steam-drown trains ever since the da­
ily CPR used to ramble southeast from Winnipeg toward Souris in the
morning and return at night, I have trauble maintaining a polite
silence about the current hokum about the romance of steam. I sup­
pose it is harmless and keeps a lot of people out of the poolrooms,
but whatever draws the otherwise sane inta what they obviously find
to be a heady maelstrom of nostalgia? If they ever had to ride the
train once a week from Glenboro, Manitoba, 100 miles, eight stops
and three or four hours to Winnipeg for a music lesson (violin, I
think), as the only Jewish bay in Glenboro (name of Brown) used to
do in my boyhood, and then ride back, they would be so stupefied
with baredom that they would fall asleep just thinking about it,
more than 40 years late. I did it too often myself, maybe. The
dusty plush cushions, the swaying lights that the trainman came
along ond lit on the Strained Eyes Limited, the mothers commanding
their kids to count telephone poles and the first one who reoches a
thousand wins a free trip to Cypress River -man, engulfing ennui,
reaches out through space and time.
I cant get over the idea that if the members of the Ontario
Rail Association,a hobby or history-minded group of citizens who
operate steam excursions out of Toronto ever were told that they
HAD to ride steam trains to get anywhere, theyd revolt in a matter
of weeks. Theyd take it to the United Nations. Theyd appeal to
the IRA ar the FLO to set them free.
The very idea of leaving home on an otherwise decent day, rid­
ing up toward Orangeville, getting out, and then (as I read recently)
having the train back up and come forward so they could take pictur­
es -whats that all about? Dont tell me Id like it if I tried it.
Ive been right across the country by steam train. Ive ridden day
coaches, colonist cars, sleepers and freights. Toronto to Vancouver,
Toronto to Moosone8, Winnipeg to Montreal, Prince Albert to Flin Flon,
everywhere to anywhere, and I never met anybody who was doing more
than enduring it, waiting for the trip to end.
Diesels and air conditioning improved things a little. Up until
then, my basic memory of riding a train on a hot day was of opening

CANADIAN
148
R A I ~
a window to get a little air and at the next bend, when the wind got
a chance, getting a mouthful, hairful, sbirt full, eyes full of grit: blown
in my face. , Back
in t~ose days about the only fun to be had o~ a train wa.
when ~omeone elegantly climbed on, tried to dust off a seat clea~,
enough to sit down, and disappeared in the resultant smog. Although, come
to think of it, there was some excitement one trip I made from
Flin Flon to Winnipeg. At The Pas. a cook got on who had comedown
the Hudson Bay Railway from Churchill. He hadn t been outside, as:
they say, for eight years and was a little bushed. We first noticed
th~~ when he got into a bridge game and his partner, a prissy woman, –
m~de some bonehead play and he spat in her face. It would have bro­
ken up the bridge game if he hadnt been the only fourth around, and
therefore, in the intense boredom of the train, irreplaceable •
. -_ ……..
(.I
May 1974
WIIIILt8
FROM QUEBEC, ROGER BOISVERT WRITES THAT THE FIRST SIX OF CP RAILS
new SD 40-2 units from Diesel Division, Generol Motors
of Canada will be numbered 5800 through 5805 and will
have the cab on the long end of the hood. The re~aining 44 units in
the order will be numbered 5675 through 5718 and will have a stan­
dard cab configuration. CP RAIL will have a total of 255 SD 40 and
SD 40-2 units when these are delivered.
AN INQUIRY COMES FROM DALE WILSON OF SUDBURY, ONTARIO, AS TO THE LO­
cation and date of the picture reproduced herewith. It
is from the Walker Collection and is unidentified. Dole
suspects it is a picture of the almost-completed Montreal River Br­
idge at Mile 90 on the Algo~a Central Railway about 1912. The car in
the photograph seems to be a double-deck bunk car and may have be­
longed to the Canadian Northern Railway Company, only the word Can­
adian being visible. Dale would be glad to hear from any member who
can identify the location of the picture and the railway company in­
volved.
THE ONTARIO NORTHLAND RAILWAY IS CONVERTING SOME OF ITS FP 7 UNITS
to GO Transit power units at their North Bay, Ontario
shops, writes Pierre Patenaude. The first one to be
outshopped on 20 February 1974 was ex-ONR Number 1512. It is now
GO Transit Number 6981. ONR Number 1505 was sent to Canadian Na-
CANADIAN 150
R A I L
tional Railways Pointe St-Charles Shops so that CN engineers had
the opportunity to monitor the conversion.
Ontario Northland has four GP 38-2 units on order from
Diesel Division, General Motors of Canada. They will be numbered
1800 through 1803 and delivery is expected late in the autumn of
1974.
DE NOTRE MEMBRE DE LA REGION DU SAGUENAY, M. GERMAIN BOULIANNE, NOUS
apprenons que, depuis mai 1972, 10 L6 et 27 de 10 Com­
pagnie du chemin de fer Roberval-Saguenay font 10 nav­
ette entre Arvida et Port Alfred, Quebec. Ces deux locomotives sont
les premieres du modele M420TR, fabriquees par MLW Industries de Mon-
treal. La superstructure de ces deux unites est entierement jaune.
Les hacheures des extremites sont noires ainsi que les dessous.
Actuellement, dit M. Boulianne, on ne vait plus ( mars,
1974) ces locomotives entre Port Alfred et Arvida. Elles sont retour­
nees d MLW Industries pour verification et quelques ajustements avant
d etre empruntees au Chemins de -rer nationaux.
La photo envoyee par M. Boulianne etait prise par
frere, M. Michel Boulianne, au debut de decembre 1973, en gore
Port Alfred, sous· le vi:a.duc, e.ndroit bien con~u par les ama.t,e~rs
chemin de fer.
son
de de
OUR MEMBER FROM THE SAGUENAY REGIO~, MR. GERMAIN BOULIANNE, REMINDS
us that since May 1972, Numbers 26 & 27 of the Roberval-
Saguenay Railway have been w~rking between Arvida and
Port Alfred, Quebec. These two locomotives are the first of the new
M420TR model, built by MLW Industries, Montreal. The hoods of the
units are painted yellow. The diagonal stripes on both ends are block
CANADIAN 15 1 R A I L
as are the under frames a~d trucks.
In fact, says Mr. Boulianne, you wont find these units
in the Saguenay area in March 1974, because they have been sent back
to MLW Industries for examination and adjustment before being loaned
to Canadian National Railways for testing.
The photo which M. Boulianne sent, was taken by his
brother, M. Michel Boulianne, at the beginning of December 1973. The
location is the station at Port Alfred, under the highway viaduct, a
location well known to railway enthusiasts.
THE ACCOMPANYING PICTURE OF THE TORONTO, ONTARIO, WATERFRONT IN 1928
came to hand from Ca;1Odiall National Railways recently.
o In the photo are the 5.5. CAPE TRINITY of the Toronto,
1000 Islands and Bay of Quinte Line, the 5.5. NORTHUMBERLAND, regis­
tered at Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island and (porbobly) the 5.5.
DALHOUSIE CITY of the T1000I&BofQ, astern of the 5.5. CAPE TRINITY.
Mr. R.F.Corley of Peterborough, Ontario, notes that
these ships all belonged to Canadian National Steamships and were
leased to the Niagara, St. Catharines & Toronto Railway for summer­
time service between Toronto and Port Dalhousie, Ontario, and the
connection there with the NS&T to St. Catharines.
The S.S.NORTHUMBERLAND was destroyed by fire at Port
Dalhousie on June 2, 1949 and the 5.5. DALHOUSIE CITY was sold by
the CNS on February 7, 1950 to a company at Lachine, Quebec, which
partially refitted the ship and renamed her 5.5. ISLAND KING. For
obout eight years, the 5.5. ISLAND KING sailed in cruise service on
the St. Lawrence, from Victoria Pier, Montreal, to Pointe-aux-Trem­
bles. She was later laid up and was destroyed by fire while moored
in the entrance to the Lachine Canal at Lachine on November 14,1960. At
that time, she was owned by Lake Shore Lines (1960) Limited of
Montreal. Her remaining upper works and hull were cut up for scrap
CANADIAN
152 R A I L
1n December 1960.
Our thanks to Mr. Corley for this intormation.
REMNANT OF THE ICE AGE: RAILWAY YARDS ACROSS CANADA LOST A GOOD
deal of their attraction when the steam locomotive van­
ished, writes Philip Mason. Along with the iron horses
went thr roundhouses, coaling towers, timber-stone water-tanks and
a host of other appurtenances, all accessories of the age of steam.
If the diesel locomotive brought about the downfall of
the roundhouse and ash-pit, says Philip, it just as surely caused
the demise of another classic structure of early twentieth-century
railroading, the ice refrigerator car, the original of the type kn-
own then and since as the reefer. A feature of the skyline at
most divisional points and, indeed, at other station stops, was
once the great hulking mass of the ice-house. By the late 1960s, 1ce
reefers were a thing of the past, displacecl i~ the main by the me-
chanical refrigerator car, each with its own little diesel engine,
humming merrily to itself as it powered the compressors and pumps
to circulate the liquid and gaseous refrigerant through the cooling
coils.
I c e-ho uses, mo s t I Y aged w.(j)·od en s,truc t u r,eS when. m.ec ha n-
ical refrigerotor cars replaced the more primitive type, did not
survive very long. The accompanying pen-and-ink sketch is of one
that did last -to the summer of 1973, at least -on CP RAIL at
Cranbrook, British Columbia.
Philip regrets that he has no details about when this
magnificent structure was built, or for what purpose; that is, what
kind of traffic through Cranbrook would require ice refrigerator
cars. Perhaps one of our readers can enlighten us all and perhaps
they can also locate other places across Canada where this kind of
anachronistic structure still stands.
CANADIAN
153 R A I L
TRAIN DE BANLIEU QUEBEC-LEVIS? PAS UN REVE MAIS UNE REALITE~M. ADRIEN
dAstous de Ste-Foy nous demonde si ce serait les pre­
mices d un service regulier de trains voyageurs entre
Quebec et Levis. Toujours est-il (ecrivalt M. dAstous), qUetant
donne labsence prolongee des traversiers, d cause des reparations
des quais a Quebec et Levis, les Chemins de fer nationaux est venu
d la rescousse de millier de carnavaleux qui, chaque annee, eva­
his sent le parcours des deux grandes parades du Carnaval de Que­
bec au mois de fevrier.
Au depart, il y avait un probleme d surmonter. On ne
peut faire passer un convoi directement de Levis d Quebec et vice­
versa, sans faire une manoeuvre qui, malheureusement, prend beaucoup
de temps. 11 fallait monter la rampe de Levis a Ouest Jonction (voir
croquis) et reculer sur la ligne d Edmundston, N.B., puis revenir
passer derriere la gare de Charny et de la, prendre lembranchement
du Pont de Quebec. On prevoyait 1.30 hrs. pour faire le trajet, cet­
te malencontreuse manoeuvre compris~
On a resolu ce probleme en pla~ant tout simplement des
unites diesel aux deux extremites du convoi et par le fait meme ra­
courci le voyage de 30 minutes. Les convois partiront done de Levis
d 18:00 pour entrer en Gare du Palais, Quebec, d 19:00, en repartir
d 23:00 pour Levis.
}oies rpl.lJ<.I·?fL~S
SeuLt.-.t ….. r
Voici quelle fut la composition de ces convois:
Le 9 fevrier 1974:
A l avant, les unites CN nOs 6537 et 6622, suivi
~6 ~j7~O!!U~~: ~e~~~~i~~~: dtv~p~~~~riere, l unite
Le 16 fevrier 1974:
A lavant, les unites nOs 3114, 6620 et 6622 et
17 voitures d voyageurs et d ~arriere, CN nO
CANADIAN 154 R A I L
3210 avec une gn~atrice d vapeur.
Ce dernier canvoi fut assembl dons Ie triage du
CP RAIL d Qubec, d ou il partait d 16: 15 pour
Lvis par Ste-Foy et Ie Pont de Qubec.
Au dire de tous, ce fut une tres belle exprience qui devrait
devenir une ralit pour des centaines de carnavaleux et -peutetre –
de banlieusards~
MR. ADRIEN DASTOUS OF QUEBEC WRITES TO SAY THAT IN FEBRUARY LAST,eN come
to the rescue of thousands of visitors at Qubec s
Winter Carnival who wanted to cross the St. Lawrence Ri­
ver to Lvis by ferryboat and could not, since both docks at Qubec
and Lvis were being repaired and the ferryboats were~t running~ As
it turned out, CN was able to eliminote operational delays of 30 min­
utes, necessitated by backing up from West Junction (see sketch) on
to the line to Edmundston, N.B. and then passing behind the station
at Charny in order to reach the Qubec Bridge line. The runnint time
Lvis-Qubec was reduced to 1:30 by making up a push-pull train
with diesel units at each end. On February 9, units Numbers 6537 and
6622 on the head end hauled 11 coaches with Number 6778 and a steam
generator car on the rear.
On February 16, units Numbers 3114, 6620 and 6622 on the
head end handled 17 coaches with Number 3210 and a steam generator
cor on the rear (front?). This train was made up in the CP RAIL yard
at Qubec from which it deported at 16: 15 for Lvis, via Ste-Foy and
the Qubec Bridge.
Mr. dAstous says that the whole thing was a wonderful
experiment which ought to become a reality for hundreds of carnival­
ists and -perhaps -hundreds of commuters, as well~
1 ~ IN ITS HEYDAY AS A STEAM LOCOMOTIVE BUILDING COMPANY, MONTREAL LOCO-
motive Works of Montral exported a very considerable
number of steam locomotives to foreign countries, but
none went to the United States. However, the outshopping of two mo­
del M420R diesel-electric units for the Providence and Worcester Ra­
ilroad of Providence, Rhode Island, USA, can be cons ide a real fir­
st in 1973 for MLW Industries.
Numbers 2001 & 2002 were purchased through the Rhode
Island Industrial Facilities Corporation, which will act as awner-
lessor. To reduce U.S.Customs duties, many components manufactured
in the United States, were used in the construction of the units, in­
cluding rebuilt trucks and the 12-cylinder ALCO 251C 2000 hp at 1050
rpm prime-mover, built at Auburn, NY.
The 60 10 units have BIN M-6075-01 and M-6075-02, can
be MU ed, have pilot plows, intermediate size fuel tanks, front and
rear gyrolights, but no dynamic brakes.
The P&Ws colour scheme is bright red body with white
lettering and a solid white indented pa~allelogram on the sides. The
frame, trucks and handrail stanchions are chocolate brown. Handrails,
anticlimbers and steps are yellow. The new P&W logo appears on both
long and short ends. Ken Goslett, who supplied this information,also
sends a picture, produced herewith.
FROM RUMOR TO REALITY? IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, EX-CANADIAN
Pacific Railway Royal Hudson Number 2860 was steamed
on January 29, 1974, after operating under steam in the
yards on January 9 to determine the extent of the repairs that may
CANADIAN
155 R A I L
be required. In early March, Mr. Robert Swanson, a Director of the
British Columbia Railway, came to Montreal to obtain drawings of the
locomotive -and some spare parts -from the Canadian Railway Museum.
Meanwhile, the British Columbia Railway appointed Mr.
Terry Fergusson of the Victoria Pacific Railway, Victoria, B.C., to
direct several special projects planned by the BCOl for realization
in the summer of 1974.
Commencing in June, a special steum-powered tourist tr­
ain of about six passenger cars is planned for operation from North
Vancouver to Squamish on Saturdays and Sundays. To this end,BCOl has
purchased twelve 2200-series coaches, three 6600-series heavyweight
parlor cars, a baggage car, Number 2757 and an extra tender, pre­
sumably from a scrapped Royal Hudson.
It is said that Number 2860 will be repainted ln her
original CPR colours but with the nameBritish Columbia on the ten­
der sides in the same style of lettering.
After 1974, rumor has it that Number 2860 and train
will make a tour south to the United States, through Washington, Ore­
gon and California, to publicize the Province of British Columbia.
The Government of British Columbia also plans to place
in service two steam-hauled museum trains, one on Vancouver Island
and the other in mainland British Columbia. The Island Museum Train
will be hauled by ex-MacMillan-Bloedel Number 1077 and the Mainland
Museum Train will be hauled by ex-Canadian Pacific Railway Number
3716, longtime resident of the Drake Street roundhouse in Vancouver.
Each train will consist of a stores/exhibits maintenance car, two
exhibit cars and a dormitory car to house the staff attached to the
train.
Ex-MacMillan-Bloedel steam locomotive Number 1055, the
last steam engine operated by that company and retired on October 19,
1972, is now owned by the Government of British Columbia and will
likely be used to protect Numbers 3716 and 1077. Since Number 1055 is
a tank engine and the others have tenders, it seems probable that
Number 1055 would be used only in emergencies because of her restric­
ted range.


PIERRE PATENAUDE SENDS A PICTURE OF CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS NEW
GP 38-2, Number 5590, delivered from Diesel Division,
General Motors of Canada, on 21 November 1973, BIN
A-2917. This unit de one of 51 GP 38-2 units delivered between June
23 1973 (No. 5560) and January 3 1974 (No. 5610). BIN A-2913 through
A-2937, with corresponding rood numbers 5560 through 5610.
According to Pierre, Symington Yard received 18 of the
new units while Colder Yard was assigned the remaining 33.
CP RAIL HAS RECEIVED TEN LOCOTROL-EQUIPPED SD 40-2 UNITS FROM DIESEL
Division, General Motors of Canada, on order C-363.
The new units have BIN A-2945 through A-2954, with road
Numbers 5806 through 5815. Pierre Patenaude sends the accompanying
photograph of Numbers 5811 & 5810 at St-Luc Yard, Montreal, on Feb­
ruary 2, 1974.
CANADIAN 157 R A I L
DE LA VILLE DE QUEBEC, M. ADRIEN DASTOUS NOUS INFORME QUON DISCUTE
serieusement la possibilite de construire une nouvelle
ligne de chemin de fer. Dejd on a publie des appels
d offres pour le deboisment d une emprise pour voie ferre, une liais­
on des subdivisions Monk et Montmogny des Chemins de fer nationaux,
pres de Riviere du Loup, Quebec.
M. d Astous nota it quil y a bien longtemps que nous at­
tendons parler de ce projet qui aura pour avantage deliminer la Fa­
meuse rampe Estcourt -Pelletier et les dangereuses courbes du Lac
de lEst ~site du deraillement serieux du 7 mars 1972) et de St-Mal­
achie, St-Isidore, etc., du subdivision Monk, entre Joffre et Edmund­
ston, N. B.
11 est question qu un systeme CTC soH installe sur la
subdivision Montmagny entre Ouest Jonction et Riviere du Loup, soit
quelques 206 km
M. d Astous nous assure quil nous tiendra au courant.
FROM QUEBEC CITY, MR. ADRIEN DASTOUS WRITES THAT THE POSSIBILITY OF
constructing a new railway in the lower St. Lawrence re­
gion is being discussed seriously. Already, tenders have
been issued for the clearing of a portion of expropriated land for
the connection of Canadian National Railways Monk and Montmagny Sub­
divisions, near Riviere du Loup, Quebec.
Mr. dAstous says that we have heard talk about such a
project for quite a long time. The advantages of the new line would
include the elimination of the difficult grade westbound between Est­
court and Pelletier and the dangerous curves around Lac de lEst,the
site of the serious derailment of 7 March 1972. Other curves near
St-Malachie, St-Isidore, etc., on the Monk Subdivision between Joffre
and Edmundston, N.B., would also be eliminated.
There is also the possibility that CTC will be installed
on CNs Montmagny Subdivision between West Junction (Charny) and
Riviere du Loup, a distance of some 206 km
M. dAstous says that he will keep us informed.
RESIDENTS ALONG AN 80-MILE STRETCH OF CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS TR­
anscontinental main line in the Longlac, Ontario area
north of Lake Superior, might have had a field day re­
cently, had they known what was cascading out of a container on a
CN express freight. When the train with the opened container rea­
ched Winnipeg, CN inspectors were horrified to find that some 27,000
five-cent-pieces, worth about $ 1,350, part of a $ 25,000 shipment
of nickels and quarters from the Canadian Mint at Ottawa to char­
tered banks in Regina, Saskatchewan, had leaked out of the opened
container.
The leaking occurred on 22 February and by 7 March,
Mr. Edward Healy, CN area head for Northern Ontario, said that CN
patrol crews had ~i~ked up about 270 pounds of nickels from the
middle of the track on the same night as they were spilled.
Apparently, the lock on the back door of the container
broke and the door swung open. Somehow, the canvas bags holding the
coins were torn open and the vibration during travel shook the
coins out through the door, from whence they fell onto the right of
way.
Our thanks to Dr. R.F.Legget of Ottawa for telling us
of this bizarre event.
CANADIAN
158
R A I L
EFFECTIVE 1 JANUARY 1974, CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS RIDEAU AREA,
formerly part of the St. Lawrence Region, was placed under the
administrative jurisdiction of the Great Lakes Region, Toronto,
Ontario. Exempted from this change was the Ottawa portion of the
Rideau Area, which continues to form part of the Monti~al Area, St.
Lawrence Region.
Rideau Area headquarters will remain at Belleville, Ontario.Mr.
George Van de Water, Manager of the Rideau Area, welcomed 1,500 new members
to the Great Lakes Region. Ottawa area employees, numbering
some 700 persons, remain with the St. Lawrence Region.
CN KEEPING TRACK
WHILE THE HIGH COSTS OF CONVERSION OF THE EXISTING METRO LINES IN
Paris, France, from steel wheel on steel rail to rubber tyre
on concrete are alleged to have prevented total change-over, it
was announced recently that Line Number 6: Nation/Charles de Gaulle/
Etoile would be converted to the tyre system in the period 1971-74.
This line, 13.7 km long, is elevated for 6.1 km on a steel via-
duct. It is easy to imagine the vibration and noise which must ac-
company the passage of each train over this section, which passes
through residential areas (15th. & 16th. Arrondissements) and urban
renewal sections (13th. Arrondissement). The justification for this
conversion therefore, is to eliminate pollution of the environment
by noise.
Rubber tyres for rail vehicles were first planned in 1929 and
were used in several applications, notably for passenger-car truck­
wheels, operating on normal rail. In 1931, some Micheline autocars
were fitted with rubber-tyred wheels. The best known early applica­
tion was in 1949 on all of the wheels of French National Railways
train-sets operating between Paris and Strasbourg, France.
Following tests conducted in 1951 by the R~gie autonome des
transports parisiens (RATP) -the Paris transport authority -it
was decided to construct an 0.77 km test portion between Porte des
Lilas and Le Pr~ Saint-Gervais. Obtaining encouraging results, the
RATP decided to equip an entire line, Number 11: Chotelet/Porte des
Lilas, 6.5 km long, and the first rubber-tyred train ran in November
1955, with complete operation on rubber tyres commencing in October
1957.
In the last 15 years, Lines Number 11 (6.5 km), 1 and 4 have
been converted to the rubber=tyred system. In other parts of the
world, it is hardly necessary to mention that, in 1966, the METRO of
Montr~al, Canada, was opened, running on the same rubber-tyred sys­
tem. Subsequently, the METRO of Mexico City, Mexico, was built and
opened, using the same rubber-tyred principle for guide and running
wheels.
Line Number 6 in Paris will be the fourth RATP line using this
system to be placed in service, with initial operation planned for
July 1974. Total operation with rubber-tyred trainsets is forecast
for September-October 1974.
It is interesting to note that the large rubber-tyred carrying
wheels on each truck will not roll on a longitudinal concrete track,
but will be carried on the upper surface of a continuous steel H­beam
member, except at switches, where concrete carrying-members will
be use d • J -M. L e c 1 e r c q •
THE ONTARIO GOVERNMENTS GO TRANSIT OPERATION RECEIVED A STIMULA­
ting $ 10 million transfusion from Canadas federal government,
intended to enable launching of a commuter rail service between
Richmond Hill, Ontario and Torontos Union Station. Starting in late
CANADIAN
159 R A I L.
1975 or early 76, citizens of several localities north of Toronto
will have a choice of three trains in the morning and afternoon rush_ hour pe
riods, to travel to and fro~ the Queen City.
The service is expected to lose about S 1 million per year. Hetro
Chairman Paul Godfrey said the expected effect of this new service
would be to reduce the cang~stian on tho Yonge Street subway line,
opening to Finch Avenue in Horch 1974, as well as reducing automobile
traffic into downtown Toronto.
Fares for the new service will be comparable to existing GO Tran­
sit fares, i.e., about S 1.10 one way for the 21.2 miles from Rich­
mond Hill to Toronto. Running times would be 48-50 minutes, with
three stops at Thornlea, Finch and York Hills. W
hile the Toronto GLOBE &. HAIL did not soy so in its story, it
is pretty obvious that the service would use the existing Bola Sub_
division of Canadian Notional Railways, which now terminates 1.3
miles beyond Rich.and Hill, but which used to go a good deal farther.
W.J. Bedbrook.
C
ANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS HAS RETIRED ITS LAST 244-ENGINED ROAOSWITCH_
er, Nu~ber 3900, as of 5 Nove~ber 1973. The unit was sent to M
oncton, New Brunswick, shops on 27 Nove.ber 1973, for scrapping.
Nu~ber 3900 was lost rostered for the in_and_out CN com.uter train frolll
St-Hilaire East, on the South Shore service fro~ Central Sta­
tion, Montreal. Lashed up with Number 6750, Number 3900 was used
three times to haul Canadian Railroad Historical Association excur_ si
ons and pictures of this unit can be found in the Horch 1970 issue
Number 219, page 80 and the April 1973 issue Number 243, page 124,af
CANADIAN RAIL.
Number 3900 was built originally as Central Vennont Railways
Number 1859, BIN 80747, built September 1954.
K.R.Gas1ett.
DIESEL DIVISION, GENERAL MOTORS Of CANADA, REPORTED THE fOLLOWING
orders for their 53_passenger buses in Jonuory 1974:
British Columbia Hydro
&. Power Authority
Ottawa_Carleton tOntaria) Reg
ianol Transit Co~m.
Quebec (Quebec) Urban
Co~~unity Transit Comm. Oshowa
(Ontario) Public
Utilities Co~~issian
110
105
15
6
GO TRANSIT 14
Thunder Boy (Ontario)
Transit Co~mission 6
Halifax (Novo Scotia)
Transit Commission 4
Guelph (Ontario)
Transportation Commission 3
Orde
rs for the 45-passenger
City of Cambridge, Onto rio
Chotho. (Onto rio)
model buses have been received fro~:
4
Coach lines
2
Sault Ste, Harie (Ontario)
Transportation Co~~ission
Sondwich, Windsor and
Amherstburg Railway Compony 8 Ci ty
of Weiland, Ontario
Ata~ic Engery Co_pony
of Canada
Corparotian of the Town
Burlington (Onto rio)
of
2
2
4
ON THE BACK COVER, WE PRESENT PIERRE PATENAUDES PICTURE Of CANADIAN
Notional Railways HLW Industries-built C-630 Number 2019 at the Die_
sel Shop, Hantr~al Yard, for minor repairs, on 23 June 1973. This
unit is normally assigned to Moncton Yard, Atlontic Region of CN.

Canadian Rail
is PlbIished monthly by the
Canadian Railroad Historical Association
p.Q. 800<22,Station B, ~.Quebee,~H3B 3J5
Editor; S.s. Worthen Production; P. Murphy
Association Branches
CAlGARY & SOOTH WESTERN
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OTTAWA
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Ottow,C.,nod ..
PACIne COAST
R.N.tleyu, Secruary P.O.BOK l006,Stotion

Van~ouv.r.B.C.V6C
,,,
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
J.H.H,ikl.,S.c.,tary.P.O.BoK 6102,Station C,Ed.onton,Altu.T5B

TORONTO
,

OIVISION
P. SheQlold,SecretQry P.O.90K 58.9, Teninol

Toronto,Ont.I.5W

Association Representatives
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• More thitn 100 p.eces 01 equipment on disPat·

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