Consulter nos archives / Consult our archives

La majorité des documents conservés par le Centre d'archives et de documentation de l'ACHF sont disponibles pour consultation.

Most of the documents kept by the ACHF Archives and Documentation Center are available for consultation.

Canadian Rail 266 1974

Lien vers le document

Canadian Rail 266 1974

6
c h 1974

TO TYE
Hal Riegger
~ forty-mile drive through south­
~ eastern British Columbia brought
me to my destination at the north
end of CP RAILs yard at Nelson
where, I had been told, my great
expedi tion would begin. The foot­
notes to the directions given me
said that I should look for a small
diesel switcher, facing east. It was
here that I was to meet Mel, an en­
gineer on CP RAIL.
In my mind, I rapidly reviewed th~ incidents that culminated
in todays rendezvous and the plan to take my first ride on a diesel
locomotive. By phone, Mel had tendered me an invitation. After that,
there was a seemingly unending series of obstacles, not the least of
which was a strike. Happily, it did not last too long. There were
also difficulties in keeping in touch with Mel, aggravated by the
forty-mile intervening distance. Perhaps I was overly eager for this
experience. Anyway, I was now at the appointed place and hopefully,
in a short time, I would be riding up front, enjoying the exciting
sensations that no paying passenger ever could.
Yes, I was here, but where was the action? The diesel switcher
was grumbling softly, looking very much alone in the empty yard.
Where was the activity in which I was hoping to participate? It
seemed so quiet here~ The steep mountains reached upward to the
sky on either side of the narrow West Arm of Kootenay Lake.
After a few moments of conjecture, it suddenly dawned on me
that, while I was living by daylight saving time, CP RAIL was work­
ing by the suh. M~ trip to Nelson had begun hurriedly before dawn
ahd my arrival, ther~fore, was one hour too soon~ Having about six­
ty minutes to wait for the action to begin,I remembered that there
was 6ne lone all-night restaurant on Nels6ns main street. So I
walked uptown for a cup or two of coffee, whiling away the time un-
til the schedule caught 0p~ ,
In less than an hour, I was back at the diesel switcher in the
yard. A few minutes later, a man wearihg a shirt, tie and suit ap­
proached, apparently a CP RAIL e~ployee of some rank, probably from
the divisional office in Nelson. He asked me what my reason was for
oN THIS MONTHS COVER~ YOU ARE SITtING ON THE FIR~MANS SIDE OF CP
RAI~DS 10 Number 7115, rumbling through a rock-~ut, sastbound to
Tye Siding. Nearby ~s the whit~ wooden ~rOS8 commemorating ~hs Un-
timely death of the powder-man in 1928.
~ ALL THE COMFORTS OF HOME~ THE GENUINE PORCELAIN BATH-TUB ON ONE END
of the fla~ car in the work-train. The 45-gallon drum, needless to
say, is not the regular occupant, but has been placed in the ba·th
temporarily ,;., until the next regular occupant~ comes along~
CANADIAN
68
R A I L
being here. Wondering if it wos the right thing to soy, I replied
that I was riding the work-train to Tye. On being assured that the
necessary permission had been obtained and that I was meeting Mel,
the gentlemans formality evaporated and he escorted me back to
the office, genially remarking that, in that case, another chair
would be necessary. For the cab of the diesel, I surmised.
Within a few minutes, Mel arrived. We had never met previously,
but he was recognizable immediately from his description; a warm,
outgoing, jovial, middle-aged I talo-Canadion. Knowing that I had
to be the man who wanted to ride his engine, he introduced himself
and several others in the crew, including the student-engineer who
would be at the throttle for at least a part of the time. There
were seven of us. The cab would be crowded~
My cab-ride, so long and so uncertain in its realization, now
seemed to be assured and I relaxed in relief. But suddenly my assur­
ance was shattered by the casual remark that the Divisional Super­
intendent would be on board today~ Damn and Hell~ Should I make
myself scarce in the face of this awesome authority and forget about
the whole thing? Or should I tough it out?
Mels expression of chagrin and concern reflected his desire to
avoid any complications or embarrassment. Abruptly, without any com­ment
other than Sit tight~, he took a straight line to the station
and, in about ten minutes, returned with a form-letter in his hand,
the document popularly called a release. At his request, I signed
the form, gladly, quickly and almost illegibly, thus relieving the
Company of any responsibility in case of accident. Now I felt my
long-anticipated ride was assured -definitely~
. Mel ralf apologized for the work-trains slow schedule. No fast
running like the passenger trains that used to be the pride of the
subdivision. Extra 7115 east was a work-train and would be picking
up old rails along the right-of-way. At some time during the pre-
vious year or two, CP RAIL maintenance-of-way crews had installed
new rails on the Nelson Subdivision and the old ones had been left,
scattered along 40 miles of the line. These were to be salvaged and
returned to the Nelson yard.
The days consist was headed by a DS 10 switcher, Number 7115,
two flat cars, on one of which was installed an air-operated crane,
plus the usual red vao. So many things about the entire train were
new to me that it was hard not to overlook some of the details and
events. To quench a summers thirst, cans of sterilized water -for­
tified with Vitamin C -were loaded into the cab and nestled among
the ice-cubes in plastic bags.
Of the many other things I saw, one quite fascinated me. I had
to chuckle to myself about it. Work orders in octuplicate or more
were issued in the flowing script of ane of CP RAILs female rail­
roaders in the dispatchers office. These orders stated the precise
location -in terms of mileage and left or right-hand side of the
track -where rails were to be picked up. I had been given a current
employees timetable and, from this, I noted that it was possible to
determine distances between various stations and other operating poi­
nts to a tenth-of-a-mile.
Our run was to take us from Nelson, mil~ 137.8, to Tye at mile
91.4 • What puzzled me was how mile notations, let alone tenth-of-a­
mile indications, would be of much practical use, when the diesels
speedometer was out of order~ I concluded that Mel probably knew
t
JUST INSIDE THE CITY LIMITS OF NELSON, BRITISH COLUMBIA, THE
day job of loading rails onto the flat cars began.
ALL-
every tenth-of-a-mile on the line and, anyway, how could anyone miss
seeing the lengths of rail beside the track. But the latter was a wrong
conclusion. We did miss some rails~
When I had first arrived at the yard in Nelson, it seemed to me
that we might have some rain, but this was only early morning damp­
ness, typical of the Kootenays. Fo~r or five miles east of Nelson,
the sun shone brightly over the tops of the mountains and glittered
on the smooth surface of Kootenay Lake. The day grew warmer as our
train rattled through magnificent scenery to Procter and beyond.
The latter part of the run was made through territory seldom explor­
ed by man, even today. There are no roads between Procter and Creston.
The ridges and slopes of Ymir Mountain (7,920 feet) and Steeple
Mountain (8,077 feet) fall precipitously to the waters of Kootenay
Lake.
After several stops, each only a few tenths-of-a-mile apari,
to load rails, the crew developed excellent coordination and timing,
fastening the crane-hook to the rail at the exact point of balance,
for easy, sure loading onto the flat car. Occasionally, the distance
between stops was 50 short that the crew walked alongside the slow­
moving train. There was plenty of time for me to photograph these
activities. As I grew accustomed to the procedure, my movements in,
out of and around the locomotive became less restricted. In fact,
I felt free to explore the whole train, a privilege that took some
time to enjoy fully.
t
THE CP RAIL STATION AT PROCTER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, WAS STRAIGHT OUT
of the past, almost Victorian in architectural style. Number 7115
switched the loaded flat cars up to the gondola, for trans-shipment.
Before long, we reached Troup, mile 132.3 , the junction with
a branch of the Burlington Northern from Ymir, Salmo and Montrose ,
British Columbia and Kettle Falls and Spokane, Washington. BN moves
sparse weekly freights in and out of Nelson, but the track from
Troup to Nelson is owned by the BN and leased and maintained by CP
RAIL.
Model railroaders no longer need to dream up complex junction
layouts for switching challenges. Troup is a really neat obstacle­
course and apparently not unique in modern full-scale railroading.
We moved east leisurely through Atbara (mile 128.0) and Harrop
(mile 122.2) to Procter (mile 117.5). By now, the flat car was
almost completely loaded with rails. Our train pulled alongside an
empty gondola, spotted on the siding, ta transfer the rails. It was
almost noontime, so the crew took a lunch-break. Having anticipated
this event, I had brought along a few sandwiches and a thermos of
coffee. It was, indeed, a pleasant pause in the days activities.
Around Procter, there were many interesting things to discover
and to photograph. The station was out of the past, almost Victorian
in architectural style. There was a cor-barge apron at the shore,
used infrequently for loading and unloading cars of lumber from
up Kootenay Lake. There were many switch and track details and,last
but not least, the DS 10 and red van. The car-barge apron was under
CANADIAN
71
R A I L
about a foot of water. Later, I consulted the timetable for in­
structions about loading the barge under this and other operating
conditions. The train movements involved would also be of interest
to a model railroader.
About 45 minutes later, the 7115 was cut off the train and Mel
backed her into the siding to couple up to the loaded gondola, to
add it to our consist. We then left Procter, continuing east toward
Tye. The country became more and more rugged, until we were running
through wild and beautiful scenery. Intrusions by m(fn into this area
are rare and it came as no surprise when a bear and two cubs were
sighted on the track ahead. Mel sounded a warning blast on the air­
horn, but Mother Bear made up her mind that no diesel was going to
intimidate her~ Rising on her hind legs, she peered short-sightedly
at the oncoming diesel, prepared to do battle with the approaching
monster. Had she not caught sight of her two cubs bounding to safe­
ty in the underbrush, there might have been an incident of an un­
usual and fatal kind.
THE FLAT CAR LOAD OF RAILS WAS MOVED UP OPPOSITE THE GONDOLA BY NUM­
ber 7115 and the rails were transferred to the gondola with the aid
of the air-operated hoist. It was almost noontime, and the crew
then took a lunch-break.
CANADIAN
TO
u,S,
72
R A I L
r—————-
———~–~
CANADIAN 73 R A I L
Stopping momentarily to p1CK up more rails, we passed the sid­
ing at Blake, mile 107.5. We clattered over trestles and around cur­
ves on the winding, lakeshore track. The ridges of the mountains
crowded us closer to the water. A missed rail, there. Through rock­
cuts, past a slide-detector fence, no longer in use. At a deep rock­
cut, there is a carefully maintained white, wooden cross in a niche
in the rock. Here, in 1928, a powder-man was blown to bits by dyna­
mite, killed in the course of his work when the railway was be1ng
built from Kootenay Landing to Procter. His relatives in the United
States seemed not to care, but his fellow-workers cared enough to
erect this modest marker above the place of his death. They and
their descendants have carefully maintained the white cross, as the
years have passed.
Rails to be salvaged became less and less frequent. Our speed
increased, until we were barrelling along at a good clip. Having
chosen to ride under the headlight on the front platform of the lo­
comotive, to me our speed seemed to be that of an express, instead
of the 30 mph. permitted by the timetable. What an experience~ Wind
blowing in my face. Clear track ahead. Completely alone on a mar-
vellous observation point, isolated by the wind from even the en-
gines noise and exhaust~
After Drewry, mile 99.0, we passed four men working along the
track who were part of the crew of the work-train that we were to
bring back to Procter. Around a sharp curve and through the only
tunnel we encountered, we saw the Tye work-train on the siding. Mel
reduced the speed of the 7115 to a very slow pace, pulled alongside
the work-train and stopped. Everyone got off, including me~
Probably I should have stayed in the cab of the diesel, for
hardly had I turned around when I met the Divisional Superintendent
face to face. I was still scared, but nevertheless I approached him
as courageously as I could. He was standing on the steps of the
work-trains mess-car, completely blocking any entry.
Want a cup of coffee?, he asked.
S ure, I replied -with some relief. Id like one very much.
Up the steps and into the mess-car we went. Coffee-filled mugs
were dispensed to us all by a motherly sort of woman in her fifties,
who seemed to be in charge. Pleasant and relaxed, she seemed to be
an old hand at this job. There was ample opportunity to become ac­
quainted with her and with several of the crew. I hoped that the
questions I asked were intelligent. I was glad to have the straight­
forward answers and explanations that I received.
Next to the mess-car, itself a converted combination passenger­
baggage car, was a converted boxcar, newly reconstructed into a some­
what sterile looking, if efficient, mess-car. The superintendent was
very proud of this new cor and obviously hoped that our matron would
be pleased with what he was providing as her new domain. But she
would have none of it~ She preferred her homey old car with her
radio, chintzy curtains, a cushion or two and magazines scattered all
about. She did, though, look longingly at the new oil-burning cook­
stove. Perhaps, in the end, she convinced the superintendent to move
it into her old car, to replace the old coal-burning stove, because,
as I overheard her say, It dont bake bread the way I like it.
The conversation in the mess-car was enjoyable. The crew
was interesting. And I had to admire the simplicity, honesty and
kindness of the matron who was cook, companion and mother-away-from-

CANADIAN
75
R A I L
home. With an hour to spare before the four men could return from
down the line, I was able to examine the Tye work-train at lesiure.
With satisfaction, I discovered one of those minor details that
makes railroading so human and so close to our hearts. It was a flat
car with a genuine porcelain bath-tub installed on one end~ Exper­
ienced modellers know that anything can be -and often is -done in
prototype. As proof of inventiveness to accommodate a necessity,here
was a flat car mostly occupied by a several-thou sand-gallon water
tank, but with a bath-tub at one end, providing a useful and nec-
cessary facility. Privacy in bathing? Well, hardly. But would a
railroader be embarrassed by the curious gaze of a bear or deer?
The four crewmen finally returned from down the line. They
c.limbed on board .the work-train, now a port of extra 7115 west, and
we started on our way back to Nelson. The return was without special
incident. The lake sparkled in the lowering light of the afternoon
sun. The roil-collecting job had been completed, except for those
few lengths that we had overlooked. At another time in the future,
a crew would pick them up.
At Procter, we set off the Tye work-train on a siding. It was
interesting to watch the engineer and brakeman making the switching
moves. Number 7115, which had run cab-forward from Tye, was turned
on the Procter wye, to run hood-forward back to Nelson. Other cars
were set out and some were picked up. There were no wasted moveSj
everyone understood what he had to do. But time began to be impor­
t~nt. We had been ~unning late after leaving Tye and now we were
almost on the time of the through freight from Creston.
It was a genuine relief to be running hood-forward again. For
some 26 miles we had run cab-forward and had endured the exhaust
fumes of th~ prime-mover, which seemed to be swept bock into the cab,
somehow. I asked why the exhaust stack could not be made a foot or
so higher, to avoid this situation. The reason it could not be done,
it was explained, was that all exhaust stocks on switching engines
were of a standard height and could not be raised arbitrarily.
Curious marks along the track are not always easily exploined.
East of Procter, I noticed two rows of gouge-marks in the ties.They
continued for some distance and I asked Mel what had caused them.He
explained that, several years ago, a long freight was travelling
over this stretch at just the right speed to produce a rhythmic,
bouncing motion of the cars. This motion increased in intensity
until a truck on one of the cars literally bounced off the rails.
The engineer, several curves and some distance ahead, was unaware
of the derailment and the train crossed two trestles in the course
of three miles before the derailment was spotted and the train br­
ought to a stop. Amazingly, the car remained upright.
Once again we passed Troup, the junction with the Burlington
Northern. I had a lost look at the track layout in the several sec­
onds that it was in view. About 4.5 miles further west, we passed
the yard limit board for Nelson and, slowing down, entered the city
limits, with its many pedestrian and grode-crossings. Soon, we were
heading into the east end of the main yard.
~ AROUND A SHARP CURVE AND THROUGH A TUNNEL, WE CAME UPON THE
train at Tye, on the siding. We were to bring the work-train
to Procter on our return trip.
WORK­
back
t
IN THE MESS-CAR, COFFEE-FILLED MUGS WERE DISPENSED TO US ALL BY A
motherly sort of woman in her fifties who seemed to be in charge.
The coffee was good and the atmosphere was pleasant and relaxed.
In the picture ar.e the a .. uthor, the divis.ion for.eman, a member of
the train-crew and the chatelaine of the mess-car.
When Number 7115 and the train were safely put away, there were
many goodbyes from the crew and Thanks very much from me. Mel
asked me if I wanted to go up to the Slocan country on the freight
the following doy. What an opportunity~ Mel also said that the
scenery up there was much more magnificent -was that possible? -and
the train speeds would be a little faster.
I really wanted to go~ Even though I would have to face an 80-
mile spell of driving, dead-tired now and sleepy tomorrow morning,
I still wanted to go. But all the while I knew that the fabulous
trip would just have to wait for another time, another year. I told
Mel I would try to be there tomorrow, but not to be too surprised if
I did not show up on time.
When the Slocon freight left Nelson the next day, Mel was at
the throttle, but I wasnt aboard. Perhaps I will be, this summer,
and that will be another story, with illustrations.
Editors note: Mr. Hal Riegger is a ceramist who lives in Rough and
Ready, California and spends a portion of each summer at the Banff
School of Fine Arts, Banff, Alberta. Between classes and courses, Mr.
Reigger indulges in his favourite hobby, as described in the fore-
going article.
:a!l:e .::.-· … ·1C, E=..&..T.
· … ·e.
S.S.Worthen
Part II
(Part I of Montreal to Megantic
appeared in the January 1974 issue
Number 264 of CANADIAN RAIL.)
On reaching Sherbrooke, preparations were made for the next
stage of the CPRs eastward progress to the Atlantic coast. To com­
prehend the problem with which it was now confronted, attention must be
directed to two circumstances, one geographical, the other, gen-
ealogical. The CPRs new main line was straight and level across
the bed of the ancient Champlain Sea from Caughnawaga to Brigham
Junction. Beyond this point, the rolling hills of southeastern Que­
bec predominated and the railways profile changed slowly into that
of a roller-coaster. From the valley of the Yamaska at West Shefford
to Foster and the second summit near Eastray, there were lond stret­
ches of winding curves on 1% grades. Over the Missisquoi River val­
ley at Eastman, two trestles, 390 and 525 feet in length, with an
intervening earth fill, eliminated the downhill-uphill valley cros­
sing.
East of the trestles, the railway climbed to an altitude of just
under 1,000 feet at Orford Pass and then descended on a traverse 250
feet to the crossing of the Cherry River bog on another wooden tres­
tle about a mile-and-a-half long. East of Magog, the railway follow­
ed a comparatively easy location beside the Magog River and Little
Lake Magog, to the outskirts of Sherbrooke. The last engineering
work was a 210-foot twin-span through truss bridge at the west en­
trance to the yard.
But now the difficulties really began. Between Sherbrooke and
Lake Megantic, there were three river valleys and three summits to
negotiate. The CPR determined to cross all of these at right-angles.
It was in a hurry and wanted the shortest possible line, with no
detours or deviations. And the word was still Lease if you can;buy
when you cant; build when you must.
The genealogical component of the CPRs problem was the
family of Cookshire, Quebec, a small town some 20 miles east
Pope
of
IN A WHIRLING SNOWSTORM, CANADIAN PACIFIC EXTRA 5396 EAST COASTS
through the station at Lennoxville, Quebec, ready to cross the
Massawippi River and tackle the grade up to Birchton, at the top
of the ridge. Photo J.J.Shaughnessy.
COASTING DOWNGRADE JUST WEST OF THE STATION AT BURY, QUEBEC, CP
Extra 5410 west brings freight from the port of Saint John, New
Brunswick to Montreal, over CPRs Short Line. The date was 29
January 1914. Photo by Jim Shaughnessy.
,

0
–1
.:.–..:
i
CANADIAN 80 R A I L
Sherbrooke. This family rejoiced in a very perceptive and ambitious
scion, John Henry Pope. From his earliest years, John Henry took a
sincere and devoted interest in local and, later, federal politics.
It has been noted by his biographer that John Henry, having made an
intense study of the country to the east of Sherbrooke, determined
at an early date to build a railway line to open up the country to
commerce.
And so, on May 12, 1870, John Henry Pope and friends secured a
Dominion charter for the St. Francis and Megantic International Ra­
ilway Company. Bucolic it might have been, but it had the power to
build a double or single track of iron railway, from Sherbrooke to
the Province Line at a point near Lake Megantic. This charter was
granted by Canadas first post-Confederation government in 1870,led
by Sir John A. Macdonald, while the CPRs Atlantic and North-West
power-package was legalized by Sir John A. s second government, el­
ected to power in 1878. The Honorable John Henry Pope, having been
the Minister of Agriculture in the 1870 government, became Minister
of Railways and Canals in 1885.
The CPRs terminus at Sherbrooke, Quebec, in 1887 was in the
upper part of the town, about 100 feet above the St. Francis River
valley through which the Grand Trunk pursued its way. In order to
cross the St. Francis, the first of the rivers encountered on the
way to Megantic, the CPR had to descend to the valley floor. Out of
the valley, there were severol possible sorties.
Most of these natural exits had all been pre-empted long be-
fore. The northern and southern exits were historically occupied by
the Grand Trunk, with the Massawippi Valley Railway entering from
the southwest. The northeast approach was held by the Quebec Cen­
tral Railway. While there was no natural exit to the east, the only
possible route in this direction was the private preserve of the
St. Francis & Megantic International Railway, owned by John Henry
Pope and his friends.
Secure with their charter of 1870, Messrs. Pope (Member of Par­
liament) Sanborn (ex-MP), Alexander T. Galt (of the St. Lawrence &
Atlantic~, James Ross (Member of the Provincial Purliament), Brooks,
Heneker, Morey, Pomeroy, Bailey, Pope (sr.), Noble and McIver were
anxious to see the grading under way.
However, there was the little matter of money. Despite the Dir-
ectors drum-beating at county council meetings, additional money was
slow in coming and, as a result, most of the Directors had to
dig in their awn pockets to keep the construction going. Clearing
the land for the right-of-way began during the winter of 1870-71.In
its infancy, the lines western terminus was at Lennoxville, Quebec{
junction point between the Provincial Gauge Grand Trunk ( 5 ft.6in.)
and the Stephenson Gauge Massawippi Vulley Railway (4 ft. 8t in.).
Shortly after its opening on July 1, 1870, the Massawippi Val­
ley Railway, creature of the Connecticut & Passumpsic Rivers Rail­
road -President, Mr. Emmons Walker, previously described -secur­
ed running rights over the Grand Trunk through the installation of
a third rail for the three miles from Lennoxville to Sherbrooke. It
soon turned out that the St. Francis & Megantic International also
used this facility to gain access to Sherbrooke. The GTR, MVR and
StF&MIR shared a magnificent double-tracked train-shed and station
in Sherbrooke, not far from the corner of King and Depot Streets,as
well as a large, impressive circular domed roundhouse nearby, which
housed engines of both gauges.
t
.. .
ON A COLD DAY IN JANUARY 1954, A TRIPLE-HEADED EASTBOUND CANADIAN
Pacific Railway freight hammers across the crossing-at-grade with
the CN at Lennoxville, Quebec, pouring on the power for the climb
out of the St. Francis River valley. Photo by Jim Shaughnessy.
By July 1875, the GTR had been standard-gauged and the StF&MIR
had built out of Lennoxville, up the hill past Tracy Siding, through
Johnville and Bulwer to the summit at Birchtan and thence downhill
to Cookshire and onward to a point some two miles east of Bury, a
total of 26 miles or so. Here, without doubt in an effort to re­
enthuse the local citizens, the Directors announced a Grand Open­
ing Celebration, and, amid gaily-waving flags, banners and bunting,
on July 14, 1875, a special train left the GTR s station at Sher-
brooke, entering on the new line at Lennoxville. Naturally, the
Directors seized the opportunity to harrangue the celebrants at
every village, hamlet and settlement for the entire 26 miles, not
by any means overlooking Cookshire, ancestral home of their fore­
most patron and benefactor, the Honorable John Henry Pope. Regret­
tably, the results of this intensive evocation were not very en­
couraging.
The Canadian Pacific Railway, newly arrived at Sherbrooke, was
eager to secure a route for its eastward extension. Lease or sale
of the St. Francis & Megantic International was inevitable and, af-
ter a time, it was quite desirable to the latters Board of Dir-
ectors. In 1877, the Company had changed its name to the Inter-
national Railway Company and had sold a bond issue, to replenish
its lean treasury.
CANADIAN
82
R A I L
With the Canadian Pacific on the verge of becoming involved in
the affairs of the International Railway Company, events proceeded
rapidly. The IRCs line to Megantic was at last opened in 1879 and
in 1883 the Government of Canada granted a subsidy on 49 miles of
railway, probably the remainder of the line to Megantic. In a do
it yourself move, the International Railway Company and the Govern­
ment of Canada were empowered on November 19, 1885, by Privy Council
Order 2168, to undertake jointly the construction of the S hort
Line Railway, across the northern part of the State of Maine to
Saint John, New Brunswick, on the Bay of Fundy. The timing of this
agreement was exquisite. The Honorable John Henry Pope became Min­
ister of Railways and Canals one month before this agreement was
concluded. The drama, as far as the International Railway Company was
concerned, was fast approaching its climax.
Two years later, the International Railway Company was sold to
the CPRs Atlantic and North-West Railway Company. Included in the
transaction was the contract to build the Short Line Railway with
the Canadian Government. Finally, in 1889, the International Rail­
way Company became part of the CPR when the latter leased the At­
lantic and North-We$t, officially.
Although the sale of the International Railway Company had ta­
ken place in 1887, the first locomotive used on the three-times-a­
week mixed train in late 1888, from Megantic to Greenville, Maine,
was International Railways 4-4-0 Number 1.
Soon after acquiring the International Railway Company,the CPR
built a connection from its upper-town station in Sherbrooke south
down the west side of the St. Francis River valley three miles, to
a crossing-at-grade with the GTR at Lennoxville and an end-on con­
nection with its new acquisition. There were some minor troubles
with the local farmers, who endeavoured by petItion and injunction
to block this construction. They claimed that their horses could
not stand the terror inspired by the noisy, smoke-belching iron
monsters on both the GTR and CPR which, unfortunately, ran on either
side o~ the main carriage road from Lennoxville to Sherbrooke, with
a level crossing mid-way.
From Lennoxville eastward, the 14 miles to the summit at Birch-
ton were a steady climb on 1.4 to 1.7% grades. Down from the 974-
foot height, the line descended to the valley of the Eaton River
at Cookshire on a 1.3% slope. Through Cookshire, ancestral home of
the Pope family and later a crossing at grade with the Hereford Ra­
ilway -step-child of the Maine Central Railroad -the Short Line
~ TWO MIKADOS PROVIDE THE POWER FOR CPR EXTRA 5323 WEST, WAITING IN
the siding at Birchton, Quebec, for an eastbound freight. The day
was bright but the grease in the journals was cold and the train
was hard to start. Photo by Jim Shaughnessy.
~ A TYPICAL SCENE AT COOKSHIRE, QUEBEC, IN THE FIFTIES. CPR ENGINE
I~ Number 5329, the second engine of a double-headed eastbound freight,
takes water from the tank, while the fireman on the first engine
raises the steam pressure. Photo by J.J.Shaughnessy.
IN WINTER, RAILS MOVE THE RIVER~ EXTRA 2511 EAST, HAVING TAKEN WA­
ter at Cookshire, rumbles past the station with quickening exhaust,
to cross the bridge over the Eaton River and begin the climb to
Bury. Photo by Jim Shaughnessy.

CANADIAN
86
R A I L
crossed the Eaton River on a 210-foot deck-plate girder bridge and
tackled the 9-mile climb at 1% or better to Bury. Beyond Bury, it
was uphill to Gould over 4 miles to reach 1,300 feet. Over this
crest, the line slid down through the woods to the Salmon River at
Scotstown where, at the east end of the yard, the 1% began again.
For seven miles to Milan and Spring Hill the railway continued,
to the height of land between the St. Francis and Chaudiere Rivers.
Spring Hill, elevation 1,690 feet, was the highest point on this
subdivision. There followed eight miles of descent on 0.9 to 1.1%
grades to the shore of Lake Megantic and Agnes, the original ter­
minus of the railway and the beginning of the next short 16-mile
stage to the International Boundary and the State of Maine.
Construction of the railway from Sherbrooke to Megantic ended,
as previously noted, in Morch 1879 and, at the time of completion,
the International Railway Company owned two locomotives, a couple of
passenger cars and a score or more of freight and flat cars. After
all, what more in the line of equipment was needed for the traffic
originating in five towns, four villages, two settlements and five
localities on or near the line. Major commodities shipped were lum­
ber, potash and dry-goods. It was, indeed, a pioneer railway.
The IRCs two locomotives were products of the Portland
pany and the Baldwin Locomotive Works, built in 1875 and 1878.
iously enough, the infant line seemed to make money, for the
Com­
Cur­
June
1881 year-end statement reported profits of $ 4,269 on a gross re­
venue of $ 36,775.
Engine Number 1 of the IRC was a Baldwin-built 4-4-0 of 1878,
BIN 3976, with 16×24-inch cylinders and 62-inch drivers. Mr. Charles
Small was the engineer when she was used on the thrice-weekly mixed
train from Megantic to Greenville, Maine, late in 1888. Number 1 became
CPR second Number 160 in January 1889, when the IRC was ab­
sorbed by the CPR.
It is probable that, while the 16 miles to the International
Boundary east of Megantic were built under the authority of the IRC
charter, the line in fact was constructed by the Atlantic and North­
West Railway. Today, the highest point on CP RAILs Short Line to
Saint John, New Brunswick (1,849 feet above sea level) is located
approximately one-quarter of the way down the siding at Boundary,
Quebec, from the east end. The International Boundary is 300 feet
east of this summit. With the line completed to Greenville, Maine,
in December 1888, through service to Saint John was inaugurated on
June 3, 1889.
That day, the Canadian Pacific Railway Company could truth-
fully boast that it had a genuine transcontinental railway, unbroken
from the Atlantic Ocean (Bay of Fundy) to the Pacific Ocean (Burrard
Inlet). But was this proud boast quite, quite true? Well, almost~
While the Canadian Pacific could then and CP RAIL can today run
its trains over a continuous line of railway from the Bay of Fundy
to Burrard Inlet, there was and still is a small 56-mile stretch of
the 3,350 miles which it never purchased and therefore does not own.
This is the segment of the Short Line from Mattawamkeag to Vance-
~ FROM THE CUPOLA OF THE CABOOSE ON THE BROWNVILLE JUNCTION, MAINE –
Megantic, Quebec freight turn, Boarstone·Mountain makes a perfect
back-drop for Ship Pond Viaduct, near the operating point of Onawa,
Maine, 99.4 miles east of Megantic, Quebec. Photo by Jim Shaughnessy.
I> :-
L<. ~-:~
I:··
,-,-,
CANADIAN 88 R A I L
boro, in the State of Maine, over which the Canadian Pacific acquir­
ed running rights from the Maine Central Railroad in 1888.
Running rights notwithstanding, the Maine Central can truth-
fully say that it owns 1.67% of the transcontinental route of CP
RAIL. How it came to inherit these 56 miles, so vital to CP RAILs
connection to the eastern seaboard, is another, quite interesting
story.
On January 24, 1974, CP RAIL completed its transcontinental
railway when the Maine Central Railroad Company and Canadian Pa­
cific Limited reached an agreement for the latter to purchase the
57-mile section of the former between Mattawamkeag and Vanceboro,
Maine.
Under the terms of the agreement, the Maine Central Railroad
will continue to have trackage rights over this section.
The purchase agreement was subject to ratification by the
shareholders of both Companies and the regulatory agencies invol­
ved. The sale price was nat disclosed.
LOCOMOTIVES OF THE INTERNATIONAL
RAILWAY COMPANY
CPR
1889
No.
Builder
~
§i!:! Cyls. Driv. Bui! t Re-No. Scra~ d.
Baldwin Loco. Works 4-4-0 3976 16×24 62 1878 2-160 6/1898
2 Portland Company 4-4-0 326 16×24 62 1875 2-162 3/1898
3 Kingston Loco. Compo 4-4-0 (?) 16×24 62 1882 2-163 9/1895
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The Author would like to acknowledge the advice and assistance
of Major C.Warren Anderson, O.S.A.Lavallee, Professor J.D.Booth and Mr.
R.F.Corley, in the preparation of this article,
CANADIAN RAIL
THE ICE RAILWAY
SOURCES
SHETCHES OF SOME EARLY SHEFFORD PIONEERS
HON. JOHN HENRY POPE:
EASTERN TOWNSHIPS POLITICIAN
HISTORY OF COMPTON COUNTY
FOREST AND CLEARINGS:
A HISTORY OF STANSTEAD COUNTY
CRHA NHIS REPORT
WATERLOO ADVERTISER, Waterloo, Quebec
various issues
Robert R.Brown
Jna. P. Noyes
Waymer
S. Laberee
L.S. Channell
John Lawrence
var~ous issues
various issues
~THE IMAGE OF CP RAIL IN 1973. NUMBER 1802 HEADS THE ATLANTIC
Limited at Windsor Station, having arrived from Saint John, N.
B. on this overnight run. Carl H. Sturner took the photograph.

MARCH 1974.
WIIIIllS
MR. R.M.BINNS, LONG-TIME MEMBER OF THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL
Association and author of many interesting and informa­
tive articles on Montreals streetcars, now resident in
Victoria, British Columbia, writes to say that he enjoyed Peter
Murphys article on TERMINUS CRAIG, which appeared in the September
1973 issue Number 260 of CANADIAN RAIL. Mr.
Binns was for many years a member of the management
team of the Montreal Tranways Company and later, the Montreal Trans­
portation Commission. In his letter, he pointed out that intending
passengers did not pay to enter the concourse of Craig Terminus,but
deposited their fares in fore-boxes when they passed through the
turnstiles to go out onto the departure platforms on the east and
west sides of the building.
Track layouts in the immediate east and west entrances to
the Terminus did not permit the diversion of cars coming from the
east to the west platform, or vice verso. Cars normally arriving and
departing from the west side could only reach the east side by being
diverted to on east-side route at an intersection a considerable
distance from the Terminus.
Aside from its primary purpos.e as a streetcar terminal and
passenger transfer point, the Terminals secondary function was to
provide modern office facilities, on the second floor, for the Tr­
ansportation Department of the company, the Superintendents office,
timetable staff, Personnel Department, Training School and a gen-
eral office for the transaction of business with the public: the
provision of information on chartered cars, school-passes and so an.
The building was designed to support several additional storeys, if
needed.
Mr. Binns notes that the Montreal Tramways Company did
not build the present MUCTC headquarters building at 159 Craig
Stre~t West. This building was a private commercial venture, con-
structed shortly after Craig Terminus was built. It was called the
Terminal Building and its construction was protracted because of
the difficulty in finding a proper foundation in unsatisfactory sub­
soil conditions. The Montreal Tramways Company purchased the build­
ing in 1929.
We are grateful to Mr. Binns for this additional informa­
tion. His book on Montreals streetcars, an assembly in one volume
of muoh of the information published in the CRHA NEWS REPORT and
CANADIAN RAIL in the 50s and 60s, is expected to appear early in
1974.
RETIRED RAILWAYMAN GEORGE A. WAITE OF WINNIPEG, MANITOBA, RECENTLY
recalled in a letter the famous silk trains that ran on
the Canadian Pacific Railway in the early 1900s. From
Vancouver, British Columbia, where the 50-pound bales of raw silk
were loaded into special box-baggage cars with passenger-car trucks,
these block-trains (unit-trains) sped eastward to New York City,wh-
CANADIAN
91
R A I L
ere the silk thread was woven into fabric for the needle-trade.
Because the cargo was, in a sense, perishable and the
associated insurance costs were high, speed was essential. A record
time for a silk train for the 130 miles from Brandon to Winnipeg,
says Mr. Waite, was 116 minutes in October 1924, with CPR pacific­
type Number 2544 on the head-end. Mr. Waite remembers that engineer
Robert Binney maintained an average speed of 90 mph., leaving Bran­
don at 14:35 hours and arriving at Winnipeg at 16:31.
Mr. Waite remarks that the death-knell for steam locomo­
tives on the CPR sounded with the appearance of the diesel-electric
locomotive, as exemplified by CPR Number 7000, which made her ini­
tial trip on 30 September 1938, hauling a passenger train out of
Montreal. Number 7000 was sold to Marathon Corporation of Canada,
Marathon, Ontario in 1944 and, according to Mr. Waite, thus joined
the ranks of the disappearing steam engines hauling logs~ Almost,
but not quite. Number 7000 was donated to the Canadian Railroad His­
torical Association in November 1964 and is today exhibited at the
Canadian Railway Museum, Saint Constant, Quebec.
THE NUMBER OF PASSENGERS CARRIED THROUGH THE SIMPLON TUNNEL BETWEEN
Switzerland and Italy increased by S% in 1972 to reach
a total of 3.83 million. Freight traffic declined by 5%. 138,000
automobiles with passengers were transported through the tunnel, on
inc rea s e 0 f 1 7% 0 ve r 1 971 •
The Trans-Europe Expresses using the Simplon were fully
developed. The Cisalpine -Paris/Milan/Paris -and the Lemano –
Milan/Geneva/Milan -achieved on increase in passengers of 17% and
10% respectively. Luxury coaches of the type used on the French Na­
tional Railways Le Mistral will be in the consist of the Cis­
alpine in 1974.
The Technical report of the Simplon Tunnel Commission no­
ted that the schedule of the Direct Orient Express from Paris to
Istambul, Turkey, and Athens, Greece, was much too long. To accel­
erate this service, a new station will be built at Belgrade, Yugo­
slavia. Also, it is planned to provide shortly a connection between
Turkey, Iran and Southeast Asia, a prolongation of the international
route using the Simplon Tunnel. A trans-Asiatic line between Istam­
bul and Singapore, a distonce of 8,700 miles, is contemplated.
The Swiss Federal Railways have only 15 miles of single.
track on the Geneva/Lausanne/Montreux/Simplon Tunnel route, be­
t~een Loeche and Viege, which is under construction, and the Sal­
quenen-Loeche line, which is planned for doubling by 1974.
The whole route from Lausanne to Brigue, ay the northern
entrance to the Simplon Tunnel, and from Iselle to Domodosolla on
the southern slope of the Alps will be upgraded to permit raising
speeds from the present 42 mph. average to 84 mph., over most of
the line. Sebastien Jacobi.
READERS OF TRAINS -THE MAGAZINE OF RAILROADING ARE FAMILIAR WITH
the monthly—-COlumn The Professional Iconoclast, written
by John G. Kneiling, P.E., Consulting Engineer. In his
orticles, Mr. Kneiling frequently recites the shortcomings of the
railway industry in the United States and Canada and offers his ad­
vice as to what should be done.
It may come as 0 mild surprise to some to learn that Mr.
Kneiling -without his spectacles -also analyses monthly the var­
ious problems of the shipping industry in a column entitled The
CANADIAN
92
R A I L
Angle, which appears in SEAPORTS AND THE SHIPPING WORLD, publish­
ed in Montreal, Canada.
By the same token, CONTAINER ROUTE NEWS, the house-organ
of the White Pass and Yukon Route is edited by the able journalist
Mr. Les Rimes. Conversely, Mr. Rimes also contributes a column cal­
led Pacific Soundings to the same magazine.
Editorial Staff.
NOTRE CORRESPONDANT A GRENOBLE, FRANCE, M. FRAN,OIS REBILLARD, NOUS
a informe que Ie 21 octobre 1973, la !ocomotive d vapeur
SNCF .141 R 1244, construite par Montreal Locomotive Works,
Montreal dans les annees quarante, a amene un groupe damis du ch­
emin de fer sur la ligne des Alpes de la SNCF, entre Grenoble et
Veynes, les transportant jusqud une altitude de 1178 metres. Selon
M. Rebillard, cette journee a ete un franc succes.
M. Rebillard nous a egalement envoye une photo de la lo­
comotive electrique NO CC-7107, detent rice du record du monde de la
vitesse sur rail. Aussi etonnant que ce soit, ce record de 331 km/h a
ete etabli Ie 28 mars 1955 -il y a 18 ans -sur la ligne droite
des Landes, au sud de Mordeaux. M. Rebillard nous rapelle que cette
locomotive electrique est toujours en service. Le photo ci-joint a
ete pris au Depot de Narbonne (Aude) en aoOt 1973.
Our correspondent in Grenoble, France, M. Fran90is Rebil­
lard, reports that one of the surviving 2-8-2 steam locomotives on
the French National Railways, No. 141 R 1244, built by Montreal Lo­
comotive Works in the 1940s, hauled a special train on 21 October
1973 from Grenoble to Veynes. This line reaches an altitude of about
3500 feet above sea-level. The trip, says M. Rebillard, was a real
success.
CANADIAN
93
R A I L
Mr. Rebillard sends the accompanying phota of SNCF elec­
tric locomotive No. CC-7107, the very same engine which, on 28 Mar­
ch 1955, established the worlds speed record for a vehicle on a
railway. Eighteen years ago, No. CC-7107 attained 198 mph during a
test run on the Landes tangent, south of Bordeaux. Number CC-7107 is
still in service and was photographed at the depot at Narbonne (Aude)
by M. Rebillard.
WHAT APPEARED TO THE WONDERING EYES OF THE RESIDENTS OF MONTREALS
lakeshore on 7 December 1973 was not Santa Clause and
Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer but United Aircraft of
Canadas orange-nosed TURBO in its new 9-car configuration, with
Canadian National Railways identification. Simultaneously, the
other 9-car TURBO was zipping along through Scarborough, east of
Toronto. Identified in the supplementary operating timetable as
Trains 67 & 66, the two trainsets departed Montreal amd Toronto at
16;30 hours, initially for non-revenue test runs, carrying CN pass­
holders and others.
On 17 December 1973, TURBO service was available
public, in what was described as revenue test service.
was only about 30% of capacity, since the afternoon RAPIDO
was maintained.
to the
Loading
service
Business skyrocketed however when snow, sleet and rain
brought air and road transport to a halt during the Christmas rush.
It was understood that Canodian National was testing the
reliability of the modified TURBO trainsets and that, if reliabil­
ity could be demonstrated conclusively, TURBO service would be of­
ficially re-introduced -with approp~iate fanfare -sometime in
January 1974.
The first untoward incident occurred on 19 December when
Train 66 arrived at Montreal about 30 minutes late, with one of the
turbines in the rear power-car not operating.
S.S.Worthen.
THE DELAWARE & HUDSON RAILWAY HAS SOLD ITS TWO RS 2 UNITS FROM THE
Napierville Junction Railway, Numbers 4050 & 4051, to
MlW Industries of Montreal. It is reported that the
trucks from these two units will be used on the two M 420 units to
be built for the Providence & Worcester Railroad, re-scheduled for
January 1974 production, but as yet not on the erecting floor.
The disposition of the bodies of the two units is pre-
sently unknown, but there are rumors that they may be disposed of
locally.
K. de Jean.
DEVCO RAILWAY UNIT NUMBER 300 HAS BEEN OUTSHOPPED IN A NEW PAINT
scheme, writes Mr. Barrie Macleod of Sydney, N.S.The hood
is all medium green, with yellow stripes midway all around
the unit. The running-board edges and the hand-rails and supports
are also yellow. The name DEVCO RAILWAY is spelled out in the yel­
low band, with the Company lozenge on the cab-sides under the win­
dows. Yellow warning stripes are pointed on both ends of the unit.
Mr. Macleod sends two pictures, in the first of which is
Number 300 in the new paint scheme switching loaded coal hoppers at
Princess Colliery wash-plant, Sydney Mines, N.S.
CANADIAN
94 R A I L
In the second picture, Number 300 double-heads with Num­
ber 202 in the old paint scheme on a loaded coal unit-train east­
bound from Sydney Mines to Sydney on the Canadian National main line
with a CN crew. The picture was taken at Leitches Creek, 10.3 miles
east of Sydney. Both pictures were taken in November 1973.
I
I
..
EARLY IN NOVEMBER. 1973, UNITED RAILWAY SUPPLY LIMITED OF MONTREAL
purchosed five RS 3 units from the Reading Railroad.The
numbers were 468 (steom generator) I 485, 488, 492 Clnd
493. Pierre Patenaude photoglophed them on the turn-around track
at Canodion Notional Railways Montreal Yord on 11 November 1973.
IN JANUARY 1973, DIESEL DIVISION OF GENERAL MOTORS OF CANADA LIM-
ited was the successful bidder on Q contract for 105
fifty-three passenger buses for the Toronto Transit COQ­miss
ion. Lost November, the TTC announced thot 0 further order for 88
of the so~e _odel hod been placed with DO GHC.
Other cities and ~unicipolities ordering this model in­cluded
the Corporation of the Town of Hi55i550U90, Ontario (12) , S
t. Cothorines (Ontario) Transit Co, .. liuion (4), the Cite de Laval
(Quebec) Transit Commission (10 vnits added to on order for 20).
The London (Ontario) Transportation Com~ission placed
on order for 15 of the 45-passenger coaches, similar to those pre_
viously ordered by the City of WeIland, Ontario.
GMC DIESELINES.
C
ANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS NEW H-420 UNITS FROM MLW INDUSTRIES OF
Montreal are apparently experiencing so~e running-in dif_
ficulties, centered around the new Zero Weight Transfer
trucks, according to the NARRAGANSETT NEWSLETTER. -The new-units
are alleged to ride rough and wheel-to-truck-to-frame contact hos
been reported. So~e _ain windshields have crocked.
CN has returned two of the units to HLW Industries for
a reported 135 different repairs, most of the_ minor and associa­ted w
ith running-in experience. Late in 1973, the new M_420s were
restricted fro~ operation on the Lac St-Jeon Subdivision of CNs Q
uebec Area.
DOMINION ATLANTIC RAILWAYS OAYLINER NUMBER 9059 CONNECTS WITH
Canadian National Railways Troin II, Scotian, Montreal_bound,
at Windsor Junction, N,S., on a day in April 1973. Carl H. Sturner
of AUDIO VISUAL DESIGNS, Earlton, NY 12058 took the picture.
CANADIAN RAlL
pUbll.hed. by Lha
WADWI ~!!lS!or.ICAl ASSOC!J.noT ~.::..:.:~.-…
AseOOlaL. W.>nb .. renlp lnoludinc 17 , … U ….
CanaCUan :RAIl a.oo annua.lly
LAYOUT … PRODt.JCTlON P.Murphy
VlelT THE
Can.din Ril ….. y Mute,,
OPleN ::.d:AY • SlePT,
lef
VlSITlCZ LlC
M .. ,;i-c .err,i,.irc UUlooicII
• OUVERT MAl· SEPT.
A
8SOClATION
WUUlH ~.I1..~Io. hu •••• y.
1I.I.LloI.y.S. …… y,
•• H.lloy., 1. …… 1,
P.II,S .. ,., h …… y.
.Sh.lol~.S. …. o.y.
ABSOClATION REPR.:a:SlCNTATIVlCS
4lI$TUl..1A
fA. un
IWIITQIIA
SMKATCII[II.o,N
50111 UICA
SOI1IHl:lH IK~U
SOOTHUH OtrTAAIO
,,nEO ~II

Demande en ligne