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Canadian Rail 265 1974

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Canadian Rail 265 1974

Rail

..
The
Inter M City Cars
01 the .lP&11R~
Jacque~ Phara~d, Ens.
II I a c kat L.l e 🙂 e S l ;111 i n J 0 ; t !, e pre sen tee n C u r y ,
= the need was felt -as it is even today -to
= bring the tOHns on the outskirts of r10ntreal,
Canada, closer to the metropolis. The City
Fathers concluded that, after all, it should
not be considered a foolish mans dream to con-
sider travelling from so-called distant loca­
tions, such as Cartierville and Montreal-Nord,
to the downtown centre of the city in less
than a days riding in a horse-drawn wagon or
carriage.
TheMontreal Street Railway, which had gained financial control
over the Montreal Park and Island Railway (MP&IR) in 1901, was try­
ing to find the best way of bringing its passengers from these sub­
urban locations to the city. Actually, the Company was looking for
some kind of interurban streetcar, large enough to bring as many
passengers as possible on each trip, thus minimizing the number of
cars required and at a speed sufficient to outpace the infant
horseless carriages -and, of course, horse-drawn carriages -the
competitive forms of transport. In addition, these interurban elec­
tric cars had to be sturdy enough to ride tLe rails of the existing
lines without requiring rebuilding of the roadbed and track.
The 1032-class cars of the Park & Island, for so the railway
continued to be called, were to provide a satisfactory answer to
all of these requirements -and for a good many years to come. As
they emerged from the Montreal Street Railways Hochelaga Shops in
1902, in all probability they were the administrators dream-come­
true. The cars were indeed spacious, being 52 feet 6 inches long,ca­
pable of speeds of 50 mph. and unusually sturdy, weighing 51,700
pounds empty. Yet only ten of these cars were built and they were
numbered 1032 through 1050, even numbers only.
As far as the technical aspects of these cars were concerned,
the MSR had chosen reliable equipment, which had already gained
widespread acceptance. Curtiss trucks, Canadian Westinghouse rail­
way motors type 533T, rated 53 hp. at 5JO rpm. on each axle and
K-35-G controllers -already patented yearly from 1393 to 1898-were
standard equipment on all of the cars. Aside from these accessories,
the Company experimented somewhat, as two cars, Numbers 1038 and
1042, had wooden frames, while the remaining eight were steel-bodied.
ON THE COVER, MONTREAL TRAMWAYS COMPANY CAR NUMBER 1042 ON A CANADIAN
Railroad Historical Association excursion on 30 October 1949. The car
is about to stop at Rockfield on the westbound run to Lachine and Dix­
ie, Quebec. Canadian National Railways main line is on the left: Can­
adian Pacific Railways Montreal-Saint John N.B. line crosses overhead
on the steel viaduct. Photo CRHA E.A.Toohey Collection.
FROM AN OLD POSTCARD TITLED CHARS URBAINS-SAULT AUX RECOLLETS: A RARE
view of car Number 1042 at the station at Sault aux Recollets, at the
northeastern extremity of the Island of Montreal. Note the double-wire
overhead, apparently a permanent installation. Photo M.P. Murphy Coll.
CANADIAN
36
R A L
Without any specific guidelines on the opinion of the passen-
gers regarding smoking in these cars, Solomons judgement was
exercised. Cars 1038, 1044, 1046, 1048 and 1050 were built with a
plainly identified smokers compartment in the rear portion of the
car, the entrance being located about two-thirds of the cars length
towards the rear, while the other cars were of the conventional rear­
entrance type -and No Smoking, Please.
At the time, these cars could definitely be classed as inter-
urbans, for they travelled on the MP&IR private right-of-way for
almost the whole 10-mile journey to and from Cartierville. Stan-
dard equipment for this kind of running included a huge arc-head­
light, together with a marker-light on the rear right side of the
car, a cowcatcher-type fender and a brass air-whistle.
As a preventive measure to counteract unexpected breakdowns en
route, a spare trolley pole was firmly fastened either on the roof
or underneath the car-body. This same care for dependable operation
probably accounted for the extra contact wire alongside the main
overhead feeder in remote or hazardous locations along the right-
of-way and at some stations.
The last innovation in these cars in respect to safe operation
was the paint scheme, in dominant shades of bright traction orange,
which was applied shortly after they became part of the rolling st­
ock of the new Montreal Tramways Company in 1911. The Montreal Park
and Island Railway had maintained its separate identity up to that
time, as had the other companies which merged together to form the
MTC in that period.
After a few years of operation of these cars, the Montreal Tr­
amways Company concluded t~.at additional improvements were necessary
in order to keep abreast of current electric traction stylings. The
modified railroad roofs of the ca.rs were passe. The five-narrow­
windowed front ends, although economical on glass-pane replacement,
restricted the motormans vision. Sustained speed in operation was
actually less necessary than smooth and brisk acceleration from
stops.
Moreover, experience gained in operation of cars of the 1325-
1424 and 1425-1524 series had shown that the roof type, seating ar­
rangement and door-operation of these cars were excellent. Without
further ado, the Company at once began a slow but sure process of
rebuilding. Cars 1038 and 1042 were rebuilt in 1921; 1046 and 1048
in 1924; 1032, 1034, 1036, 1040 and 1050 in 1925 and finally, 1044
in 1926. At the same time, it was also decided to include in the
modernizing process yet another steel-framed car, which had been
built in 1911 by the Ottawa Car and Manufacturing Company of Ot­
tawa, Canada as the initial unit ofa three-car class and numbered
1051, 1053 and 1055. This car, 1051, was included in the new hybrid
class in 1925.
Accordingly, the vestibules at both ends of the cars were ex­
tended and lowered from the main interior floor area, with the en-
trances at the front and rear widened to three standard and four
standard door-panels, respectively. Similarly, the characteristic
Montreal roof was modified to the arch-roof type and an impres-
~CAR NUMBER 1036, MONTREAL TRAMWAYS COMPANY, ON BOIS-FRANC ROAD, VAL
Royal, Montreal, in 1941. Photo courtesy L. Dauphinais.

CANADIAN 39 R A I L
sive total of sixteen side-windows replaced the original twelve, to-
gether with a conventional three-windowed front. As a result of
these modifications, the cars could now accommodate 56 passengers
seated, with a symmetrical arrangement consisting of a side-bench
for two, ten double cross-seats and a longitudinal seat for six, in
that order, on each side, from the front of the car.
For some now-unknown reason, Car 1042 was only partially con­
verted, retaining its five-window front, a level front vestibule
with a consequently higher step, a narrow two-panel exit and the
famous lattice fender, which it was to retain to the very end of
its operation.
Experience gained from daily use caused yet another curious
improvement at that time. As thses cars were the backbone of the
service on the Cartierville Line, each rush-hour brought a mob of
workers who literally besieged the cars at the Cartierville Ter­
minal. To cope with this crowd of passengers, a practice was in­
stituted whereby the cars were loaded through both the entrance and
exit doors. Fare collection therefore became a next-to-impossible
task and an ingenious solution was found, as a consequence.
In each car, along the length of the strap-hanger rail, were
located the cords of the conventional bell-ringing devices required
for conductor-motorman signals. To this assembly was added another
wire, connecting the rear-door opening and closing mechanism to the
front vestibule. Three grab-handles were attached to this wire by means
of an articulated joint at their middle point. Their ends were
fastened to the ceiling, thus allowing a back-and-forth movement of
the wire by a similar movement of the grab-handle.
One of these grab-handles was located ~n the front vestibule,
within reach of the motorman (note 1). The other two were fixed at
the fifth and eleventh windows in the body of the car. Moving one
handle activated all three and also actuated the rear door-opening
mechanism. When the grab-handle was returned to its original pos­
ition, the result was that action was reversed and the rear doors
closed. It was a wonderful device~
With this arrangement installed in each car, loading at very
busy points proceeded thro~gh entrance and exit and no fares were
collected before the car left the station. As the car started up,
the conductor, using a portable fare-box (the one in the rear ves­
tibule being locked) made his way from the front to the rear of the
car, collecting fares from passengers as he scrambled through the
crowded car. When the car stopped at a boarding point en route, ei­
ther the conductor or motorman would grasp one of the grab-handles
and open the rear doors. Passengers would board the car in the usual
LEFT LOWER: ORIGINAL STATE OF CAR NUMBER 1038; SMOKING COMPARTMENT,
off-centre entrance and spare tolley pole on roof are clearly visi­
ble. Photo from MUCTC/ Montreal.
LEFT UPPER: CAR NUMBER 1034, SHOWING ORIGINAL REAR-ENTRANCE ARRANGE­
ment. Date is 13 April 1915. Photo courtesy MUCTC Historical Coll.
CAR NUMBER 1044 AT ST-HENRI CARBARNS, MONTREAL, ON 3 NOVEMBER 1914.
The car is ready for operation on the Lachine Line. Photo MUCTC.
OFF-SIDE VIEW OF CAR NUMBER 1050 ON BOIS-FRANC ROAD, VAL ROYAL,
on 7 June 1948. Photo CRHA E.A.Toohey Collection.
..
I
.
4{
.
· –
l I II I I ( I r ,
~~~~~~~~~~~~~+~~~~;~~~.
. ;1:: —
J ••
,,:?I .II ?; i?
t
CAR 1051 OF THE MONTREAL TRAMWAYS COMPANY BEING REBUILT AT THE COMPANYS
Youville Shops on 15 October 1923. A view of the side-framing of the car.
Photo courtesy MUCTC, Montreal.
manner, after which either the conductor or motorman would return
the grab-handle to the normal position, thereby closing the rear
doors. Those passengers who had already paid and wished to detrain
did so through the front exit, having passed the conductor and paid
their fare in the process. The front doors were operated mechanical
ly by the motorman. As the conductor finally worked his way to his
raised stool in the rear vestibule, normal two-man operation of the
car was resumed.
While it might be thought that,this system would allow free­
loaders to leave by the rear door when the car stopped, before the
conductor could collect their fare, it should be kept in mind that
this entire operation took but a few minutes and most patrons, on
the other hand, travelled the better part of the length of the line.
In addition, this door-opening-and-closing device reduced the time
lost at stops and thus allowed the cars to maintain a better over­
all schedule.
In the years that followed, progress on the MTC was marked by
the introduction of one-man car operation and motormen were request­
ed to double up as conductors as early as the 1930s. On June 1,1934,
the 1032-class cars were officially deposed from the Cartierville
Line, to be replaced by the 2850-class one-man cars. The future of
the big orange cars seemed to be uncertain, as Montreals suburbs
CA NAD I AN 43 R A I L
vacant
used to
hazard.
suffi­
of the
were gradually merging with the City. Only a few acres of
land remained along the Cartierville Line and cows, which
intrude on the right-of-way, were no longer an operating
Main tramway lines excluded, one-man cars were considered
cient to provide service outside of rush-hours and the fate
big intercity cars had to be decided abruptly.
Once again rebuilding of this class was approved and undertaken
but, by this time, between the years 1934 and 1936, five of them,
Cars 1032, 1034, 1038, 1040 and 1044, were scrapped and the bright
orange livery, once seen so frequently and so clearly on the Car­
tierville Line, was observed for the last time in Montreal on the
day of Frere Andres funeral, January 6, 1936.
The remaining six cars were repainted in a bottle-green colour
to identify them as two-man cars. Indirect dashboard lighting was
installed, the extraordinary remote-control device for the rear
doors was taken out and the familiar brass air-whistle was removed.
But, intriguingly enough, these big cars continued to operate with~
out roll-type destination signs, the only route identification being
CAR NUMBER 1051, AT THE ENTRANCE TO ST-DENIS CARBARNS, WAITING COL­
lection of the fare-box at the Hospital entrance. Now-demolished
St-Justine Hospital is visible in the background. Photo courtesy
Lucien Dauphinais.
CANADIAN 44 R A I L
the route number, which was located in the lower corner of the right
front window (note 2).
The saga of these big cars was not yet concluded. As they could
be easily fitted with snowplows by merely removing their fenders,
they were still very useful -almost essential -on the Cartierville
Line, mainly to keep the track free from snowdrifts in the winter.
Their length, however, did not exactly suit some tight curves on
city routes and no clearance signs had to be posted, thereby avoid­
ing mischevious bumps and scrapes with the regular cars. The fact
that they could accommodate a large number of passengers at rush-
hour periods explains their subsequent intensive use on the routes
along Park Avenue, just east of Mount Royal, which street was a very
important north-south traffic artery at the time.
However, what was considered as the main primary advantage of
the big green cars eventually hastened their downfall. Restrictions
and resulting delays at heavily-travelled city intersections re-
duced their usefulness and made them a real public hazard. More-
over, gradual curtailment of service reduced the scope of their use.
FRONT-END VIEW OF CAR NUMBER 1055-
one of the same class and design
as the original version of Number
1051. Photo courtesy ~lUCTC-Montreal.
CAR NUMBER 1036 AT YOUVILLE SHOPS­
Montreal, classed for scrapping
after its 1950 accident. Photo
taken in 1952 by F.F.Angus.
A RARE VIEW OF THE INTERIOR OF CAR NUMBER 1046, SHOWING THE FRONT THREE­
windowed vestibule and the three-panel door. In the top-right corner of
the picture, just to the right of the number, is the hole through the
centre panel through which the wire of the door-opening device passed.
Photo courtesy J. Pharand.
CANADIAN 45 R A I L
Car 1036 was the first to disappear, following a serious acci­
dent with a truckload of sand at the Cate de Liesse/Decarie traffic
circle in 1950. The damaged car was stored for two years at Youville
Shops prior to final scrapping. Four of the remaining five, Cars 1042,
1048, 1050 and 1051, were eventually disposed of in 1955. But, for­
tunately, Car 1046 was preserved by the Montreal Tramways Company and
its successor, the Montreal Transportation Commission. It was
well maintained, repainted in its glorious ~raction orange and par­
ticipated in several commemorative celebrations, running on the
streets of Montreal to the delight and amazement of the general pub­
lic.
Subsequently, Car 1046 was placed in the Montreal Transportation
Commissions historical collection and, in.~lay 1963, it was donated
to the Canadian Railroad Historical Association for preservation at
the Canadian Railway Museum, Saint Constant, Quebec.
And so Car 1046 remains as a memento of a glorious 50-year-plus
record of service. Indeed, this is a record unbeaten by any other
class of streetcar on Montreals electric tramway system and it is
fitting that this car, above all others, should be kept as a rep­
resentative of the big orange inter-city cars of the Montreal Park
and Island Railway.
Note 1· In Car 1038, this grab-handle was a W-C type chain.
Note 2: I nCar 1042, in the second window from the left, facing the
front of the car.
According to
Specification!
C.A.Andreae
I
n the Year of Grace 1914, the City of
London, Ontario, Canada, became the
rather reluctant owner of a genuine
interurban electric railway property,
named the London and Port Stanley Railway
Company. On July 1 of the following year,
the City of London began providing ser­
vice for passengers and freight to St.
Thomas, an important intermediate city,
and Port Stanley, on the shores of Lake
E ri e.
Also in 1915, the passenger rolling-stock of the railway was composed
of five steel motor cars, Numbers 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10, built
by the Jewett Car Company of Newark, Ohio, U.S.A. and three wooden
trailer cars, Numbers 1, 3 and 5, built by the Preston Car and Coach Company
of Preston, Ontario, a not-too-distant city.
At the end of the first season of operation under the ownership
of the City of London, the L&PS management discovered that several
annoying problems had developed in the new wooden trailer cars from
Preston Car & Coach. The f~rst indication of this discovery appear­
ed in a letter dated January 27, 1916, from Mr. Callahan, operating
manager of the L&PS, to Mr. Campbell, general manager of Preston Car
and Coach at Preston.
The letter explained that, because the latches on the trailer­
car windows were not of the design or manufacture stipulated in the
specifications, they did not maintain the windows in the raised or
open position. Indeed, the windows had a definite tendency to un­
latch and fall down, thereby inflicting severe bruises on the crania
(heads) of unsuspecting passengers. Such occurrences frequently re­
sulted in expensive damage suits against the L&PS, which were all too
frequently sustained by the courts. Could something please be done?
During the same years operation, the baggage-racks in these
trailers had become excessively tarnished and had turned black~ Of
course, this detracted from the interior elegance of the cars. The
last straw -as far as the L&PS was concerned -was the condition
of car Number 5, whose exterior paint had peeled badly. The car had
been damaged by the Canadian Pacific Railway in transit from the
factory at Preston to the L&PS at London.
Mr. Callahan of the L&PS felt quite justified in expressing the
opinion that, inasmuch as the Preston Car & Coach Company had been
able to claim for damages against the Canadian Pacific, the repaint­
ing of the damaged car should have been as good as -if not better
than -the original job. This did not appear to be the case. Would
it be possible, asked Mr. Callahan, to correct these details~
In order to underline the importance of this problem -as well
as the others -the London & Port Stanley had withheld $ 537.76 of
the total purchase price of $ 27,597.66 for the three wooden trail­
ers, an action which had an immediate and somewhat unanticipated
effec;t~
t
CA NADIAN 47 R A I L
THE SUBJECT OF THE ARTICLE: LONDON & PORT STANLEY RAILWAY TRAILER CAR
Number 5, photographed at the London, Ontario shops on 30 September,
1956. The photo is from the collection of M. Peter Murphy.
On February 8, 1916, Mr. Campbell, GM of the PC&C indignantly
replied to Mr. Callahan that the equipment t.ad been inspected before
it left the Preston plant by the Ontario Hydro Electric Power Com­
mission engineer and hod been considered satisfactory. It should be
explained that the Hydro Electric Power Commission of Ontario was
supervising the construction of the London and Port Stanley Railway,
in anticipation of the line forming port of a larger network of elec­
tric lines being developed by the HEPC.
In the some letter, Mr. Campbell also noted very firmly that,
as the trailer cars hod been stored outside, unheated during the
winter by the L&PS, the Preston Cor and Coach Company could in no
way be held responsible for the proper maintenance of the cars,i.e.,
tarnished baggage-rocks and peeling exterior point. Indeed, a valid
argument.
Since no settlement seemed to be forthcoming at this stage, the
impasse was referred to Major Spittal, Secretory of the L&PS, to see
if he could determine who was responsible for the repairs to the
cars. Accordingly, on February 18, Mr. Campbell wrote to Major Spit­
tal outlining the PC&Cs position. He insisted that his Company was
relieved of all responsibility when the cars were inspected and ac­
cepted by the Hydro Electric Power Commission engineer. He noted
further that the brass trim had been installed against the advice
of his Company. Most railway companies, he remarked, requested pol­
ished bronze fittings in their cars, as this finish withstood wear
and weathering better. Mr. Campbell -thrifty Scot that he was
concluded by repeating his Companys objection to paying the twelve­
month maintenance costs for these trailer cars.
At the end of the month, Mr. Baukat, mechanical engineer for
the Hydro Electric Power Commission, who had been supervising the
t
AN INTERIOR SHOT OF LONDON & PORT STANLEY RAILWAYS TRAILER CAR NUM­
ber 3, looking from the smoking section to the passenger section.The
photograph was taken on 7 May 1917 and is from the Authors Collection.
CANADIAN
49
R A I L
construction or the wooden trailers, unwittingly complicated the
negotiations by sending a memo to the L&PS w~th his recommendat~ons
for action on each of the points under discussion:
Point 1 -The Preston Car and Coach Company had been
instructed to install window-catches de­
signed and manufactured by the O.M.Edwards
Company. Instead, the PC&C had elected to
use catches of their own manutacture, made
of softer and cheaper metal and of inferior
workmanship.
Mr. Bauket recommended that the window-cat­
ches be replaced by the Preston Car and
Coach Company with those specified, pur-
chased from the O.M. Edwards CompanYi
Point 2 -The original spec~tications had required
that the baggage-racks be made with a bronze
finish. Somehow, racks with a brass finish
had been installed instead.
Mr. Bauket was of the opinion that the bag­
gage-racks should also be replaced by the
Preston Car & Coach Company with the speci­
fied materials, at no charge to the L&PSi
Point 3 -Mr. Bauket pointed out that the paint
job on car Number 5 was the same as
that appl~ed to metal cars and, since
the paint should hold better on a wooden
surface, the fact that it was
peeling indicated that there was
something unusual about ,he paint
job. Perhaps this car had indeed
been painted in an inferior manner.
He recommended that the PC&C repaint
the car.
In order to maintain untarnished his reputation as an inspect­
ing engineer for the Hydro Electric Power Commission, Mr. Bauket re­
cited for Mr. Campbells benefit a section of the specifications,
which stated:
The inspection herein provided for shall in
no way relieve the Contractor of full respon­
sibility for the quality, character and proper
performance of the complete work or any part
of it.
In his conclusion, Mr. Bauket again compared the product of the
Jewett Car Company with that of the Preston Car & Coach Company, sta­
ting •••.• the Jewett Car Company did furnish the materials exactly
as called for •••••• whereas the car t1ttings furnished by the Preston
Car and Coach Company •••. are giving us trouble due to cheaper sub­
stitutes furnished by them~ ••• This should be sufficient proof that
they are entirely at fault and should waste no time by asking us to
relieve them of any responsibility. II
The matter appeared to be settled. Mr. Campbell did not share
this conclusion.
The PC&C reluctantly advised the HEPC that they were prepared
to make some of the recommended repairs to the cars. Even though the
HEPC engineer had approved the substitute window-catches before in-
CANADIAN 50 R A I L
t
GENERAL VIEW OF THE PRESTO~I CAR AND COACH COMPANYS SHOPS AT PRESTON,
Ontario, about 1910. The cur-bodies (left-centre) on flat cars are
500-series Hull Electric Railway cars. Photo N. Campbell,ex Wm.Bailey .

INTERIOR OF NUMBER 2 SHOP, PRESTON CAR & COACH. OPEN-END OBSERVATION
l car is lettered Ontario Government Railway.Ca.1910. Photo N. Campbell
Collection Wm. Bailey.
CANADIAN 51 R A I L
stallation, the PC&C magnanimously were prepared to replace them with
those from the O.M.Edwards Company, as per specification.
The baggage-racks were another matter. The PC&C, said Mr. Camp-
bell, had requested a sample baggage-rack from the HEPC, because
the specifications were vague on this item, and had thereafter warn­
ed the HEPC that the finish on the sample would not stand up, if it
was left for long periods in unheated cars. Nevertheless, the HEPC
inspector had insisted that the racks must be as per sample and
his dictum was obeyed. Therefore, the PC&C declined to assume re-
sponsibility for this damage, but inasmuch as they were anxious that
these cars should show to advantage, they were prepared to re­
finish the tarnished racks at cost, provided that the cars were re­
turned to Preston by the London and Port Stanley Railway.
In the matter of the exterior paint, the following: the PC&C
was of the opinion that the present condition of the exterior of
can Number 5 was not due to inferior materials or workmanship. Sub­
sequent to the damage incurred in transit from Preston to London,the
London & Port Stanley had asked that the repairs be rushed as fast
as possible, so that the car could be placed in service immediately.
Consequently, there was insufficient time available between succes-
sive coats of paint to allow each coat to dry properly. For this
reason, the paint had peeled and the PC&C was disinclined to assume
responsibility. Further, it was obvious that the repainting could
be done just as expeditiously by the staff of the L&PS at London.
In September, 1915 -about six months earlier -Mr. Bauket of
the HEPC had composed a list of modifications to the cars, which
would be required before they would be acceptable to the Commission.
Curiously enough, no reference was made to the window-latches, the
baggage-racks of the exterior painting. Des~ite this oversight, the
PC&C said that they were willing to make thcl stipulated modifications,
provided that a guarantee was given that the cars would then be ac­
ceptable and the balance of the contract price, previously withheld,
was paid.
At this juncture -just when everything seemed to be well on
its way to settlement -the HEPC committed the colossal blunder of
adding insult to injury by incurring with the Preston Car & Coach
Company, on 25 March 1916, charges amounting to $ 222.83 -on be-
half of the London & Port Stanley Railway~ A month later, when the
PC&C asked for their money, they were summarily told by the HEPC
that the charges had been transferred to the L&PS for settlement~
Once again the Preston Car & Coach Company began the battle to
collect the money which they considered was rightfully theirs. Mr.
Campbell wrote to the L&PS on 21 and 27 June and 4 July, asking
that both of the accounts be settled promptly. He did not receive
the courtesy of a reply~ He then wrote to the HEPC to solicit their
assistance, but the HEPC -being the good bureaucracy that it was –
simply forwarded the letters to the L&PS.
Finally, in desperation, Mr. Campbell wrote to the General Man­
ager of the London and Port Stanley Railway Company on 5 August,
1916:
Dear Mr. Richards:
I have been expecting to hear from you daily
for the past two weeks. No doubt you are very busy
and I am glad to hear of it. The London and Port
Stanley Railway seems to be doing an excellent bus­
iness and I have no doubt that it will continue to
do so under present management. I do not think the
London and Port Stanley Railway Company con accuse
me of impatience after waiting for a year for their
CANADIAN
52 R A I L
good pleosure in paying their accounts. In fact, I
think interest should be accruing about now. I know
we have to pay interest on overdue accounts
whenever we have them, which I am thankful to say
is very rarely, but to enable us to meet our lia­
bilities it is almost necessary that our customers
meet theirs at least within a reasonable time.
(signed) Yours truly,
Donald M. Campbell
If this letter did not provoke an answer, it seemed as though
the next step would be for the PC&C to seek redress in the courts to
recover their money. •
But, at last, on 26 August, Mr. Richards of the L&PS communica­
ted to Mr. Campbell the conditions under which both accounts would
be settled. The PC&C would be required to install the Edwards win­
dow-catches on the trailer cars in London after 1 October, at the
end of the summer season. The PC&C would also allow the L&PS the
sum of $ 25, if the latter were to paint the car themselves. No men­
tion was made of the defective baggage-racks.
And so the affair seemed to be settled -ofter a fashion.
In retrospect, one wonders why it took seven months of frus-
trating correspondence to settle such an apparently simple respon-
sibility. The PC&C were responsible for the window-catches. The
L&PS earned the peeling exterior paint and the HEPC -and hence the
L&PS -was to blame for the tarnished baggage-racks.
After the 1915 summer season, the L&PS decided that it needed
more trailer cars and subsequently ordered three from the St. Louis
Car Company of St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A. These new trailers were
also of wooden construction and were very similar in design to those
built by the PC&C, except that they were three feet shorter. The
price was probably the most attractive feature of these new cars.
The St. Louis price was $ 5,780 per partially-completed car-body,
while the initial PC&C cars had cost $ 9,199 each. Yet, one wonders
how significant the difficulties between the L&PS and the PC&C were
in motivating the L&PS to look to other car-builders for their rol­
ling stock.
By 1920, the streetcar-building business in Canada was on the
wane. The Preston Car & Coach Company kept on building electric str­
eet and interurban cars until 1923, when the Company suddenly ceased
operation. Although its units were expensive, they were among the
finest cars built for Canadian urban and Interurban electric rail­
ways.
Only one of the famous Preston Car & Coach Companys trailers
exists today (1972) and its future is very uncertain. After the ces­
sation of passenger service on the L&PS, trailer car Number 3 was
purchased by the owner of a marina in Port Stanley, for the purpose
of storing sailboat masts. This particular requirement has now been
satisfied by other means and the owner of the marina wants to have
the car removed. Destruction of this unique piece of L&PS rolling
stock seems to be the only way to accomplish this unworthy purpose.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The author would like to thank Mr. William Bailey for his assistance
in supplying illustrations for this article.
CAR
COMES
John E.
400
HOME!
HofL:wistp.r
Fifty_three years Ogo, the well­
equipped Kitsilano Shops of the
British Columbia Electric Rail­
way Company in Vancouver, Bri-
tish Columbia, outshopped a num­
ber of comparatively small Birney
Safety cars for the Companys
operations in the city of Victor­
ia, on neighbouring Vancouver Is~
land. ,
For many years after they were placed in service, these small
cars faithfully served Victorians, pursuing their usual routes to
Beacon Hill, Cloverdale and Outer Wharf. Seldom did they ever ven­
ture over the longer city routes, such as the Uplands line, which
terminated in a graceful loop in the northern part of the Municipal­
ity of Oak Bay, known as The Uplands.
One of these s~all Birney cars was Number 400. It may well have
been the first BCER city car with the safety feature known as auto­
matic stopping, a facility of definite advantage during rush-hours
in downtown Victoria. At the tender age of twenty-five, ~umber 400
was retired fro~ active service in 1946. Barely two years later, on
July 4 1948, the last runs of Victorias rE;J and cream coloured st­
reetcars were made. In October of that year, the remaining cars were
towed away by the 0-6-0 switcher of the E squimal t and Ilanaimo Rail­
way, from the Chatham Street Carbarns to Victoria West, where they
were unceremoniously and coldheartedly burned and their metal parts
salvaged for scrap.
A few of the car bodies, minus their trucks, became summer cot­
tages, storage sheds and just plain shacks at various locations on
Vancouver Island. For nearly 25 years, Car 400 endured this unhappy
and unpleasant existence.
Charter Siding is a settlement with an unusual name, long since
abandoned, which used to be at 1·lile 12 of the Lake Cowichan Subdivis­
ion of the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway, north of Victoria. It was
to this remote place that Car 400 was deported, first being used
as a bunkhouse for transient lumberjacks. A little later, the car
wa~ downgraded to a storage shed and, finally, after its. roof caved
in, its bare metal skeleton was exposed, with the odd bit of rotting
wood hanging here and there.
After the passage of what seemed like centuries to Car 400, a­
bout 1970, Mr. Dan Gallacher of the Provincial Museum of British Col­
umbia in Victoria concluded, after considerable thought, that an
authentic streetcar which formerly ran in Victoria would be an ideal
exhibit for display in the recently-expanded Provincial Museum com­
plex. But an idea is one thing and a reality is quite another.
A quick survey of what relics still existed soon revealed that
the remains of Car 400 ,~ere the best bet for the difficult task of
restoration. One day, what was left of Car 400 was loaded on a low-
t
IN THE FOREGROUND OF THIS PICTURE, TAKEN AT MIDLAND CIRCLE, OAK BAY
Municipality, Victoria, British Columbia, you can see the remains of
the British Columbia Electric Railways Victoria operations. Two
pieces of the tangent track emerge through the moss and end about
20 feet further on, in the grass. This was the terminus of Route 9-
Uplands. Photo courtesy J.E.Hoffmeister
bed trailer for the journey to an aircraft hangar at Victorias In­
ternational Airport at Patricia Bay, where the rebuilding would be
undertaken. This was the first step in the very complex project of
restoring Car 400.
Expert technical assistance for the restoration operation was
provided by Mr. Paul Class, General Manager of the Oregon Electric
Railway Historical Society, a group of street railway amateurs based
at Glenwood in the not-too-distant State of Oregon, U.S.A. Mr. Class
had a particular affection for Car 400 and was very enthusiastic
about the special task in which he was to be involved. Mr. Gus
Dussin/ a Vancouver restaurant-owner, was also anxious to help. He,
too, wos an electric railway enthusiast, having taken the trouble
to preserve British Columbia Electric Railway single-truck Car 53
in his restaurant~
The restoration of Car 400 required more than 15 months of
patient work and cost $ 15,000. When the project was completed/Messrs.
Gallacher, Class and Dussin agreed that it was quite a bargain for
1973~
lWO VIEWS OF BCERy CAR 400, DISPLAYED AS CLOVERDALE-OUTER WHARF ROUTE 2
outside the main entrance to the B.C.Provincial Museum, Victoria, B.C.,
awaiting installation of doors and pilot by capable Mr. Paul Class.
Both photos courtesy of John E. Hoffmeister.
CANADIAN 56 R A I L
A very interesting sidelight on the restoration of Car 400 is
that the work was carried out at Patricia Bay only yards away from
the abandoned grade of Vancouver Islands only interurban electric
railway, the Victoria-Deep Cove line of the British Columbia Elec­
tric Railway which ran the entire length of the Saanich Peninsula.
Service on this line began on June 18, 1913 and terminated October
31, 1924, after which date the rails were taken up. 1200-series
BCER cars, built by the St. Louis Car Company of St. Louis, Missouri,
U.S.A., were the main type of equipment used on this line.
But to return to Car 400. Technically speaking, it was the very
last piece of rolling stock in North Saanich, although it never turn­
ed a wheel in service in the municipality. On occasion, in the first
years of interurban operation, Victorias streetcars would make the
trip to Saanichton each autumn on Labour Day weekend, when the car­
rying capacity of the 1200-series cars was taxed to the utmost.
In the spring of 1973, Car 400 had been restored to its former
glory. At 11.00 a.m. on Tuesday, May 1 1973, ~ir. Robert Williams,
Minister of Recreation of the Province of British Columbia, had the
important responsibility of presenting Car 400 to the Provincial
Museum of British Columbia, on behalf of the BCER s present-day suc­
cessor, BC Hydro Authority. Everyone, especially Mr. Paul Class, was
very gratified by the realization of the project.
After a brief period of display outside the main entrance of
the Provincial Museum -, an interval which enabled some enterprising
photographers to take pictures -Car 400, once the pride of Victoria,
was moved into the Museum, where its newly-restored finery will be
protected from the ravages of the elements. Perhaps Car 400 will be
brought outdoors again for special celebrations. But even if it
remains inside, thousands vf Victorias citizens, young and old, can
come and see for themselves the kind of transportation their fore­
fathers enjoyed in the time of the trolley in Canadas most westerly
provincial capital city.
Builder:
Length
Height
Weight
Motors
Passenger
Style
BCER CAR 400 -SPECIFICATIONS
British Columbia Electric Railway, Kitsilano Shops,
Vancouver, British Columbia: 1921.
28 feet 0 5/8 inches WiclU,: 7 feet 8 inches
9 feet 9} inches Gauge: 4 feet 8t inches
16,600 lbs. empty, in working order
2 x 600 v DC 25 hI. Normal operating speed: 16 mph.
cora city: 32 seated, 20 standing.
Double-end, one-man car.
RESTORATION PROJECT
The following persons and organizations assisted in the realization
of the project to restore Car 400 of the BCER:
Miss Dorothy Tupper BC Hydro Authority Information Services
Mr. Paul Class, General Manager, OERHS, Glenwood, Oregon, USA
Friends of the Provincial Museum, Vi~toria, B.C.
The Mayo Lumber Company, Nanaimo, B.C.
Viking Aircraft Company, Sidney, B.C. Canada Armed
Forces, Motor Transit Division, Canadian Forces
Base, Esquimalt, B.C.
FF.!3I ONE THING IS FOR SURE: MR. A.C.HOAD, WHO LIVES ABOVE TORONTOS
north Yonge Street subway would be happier with a rubber­
tyred system rather than the steel wheel on the steel ra­
il. Mr. Hoad is as well disposed as the nexy citizen to the railways
and subways, but the new subway, opened since March 31,1973, gener­
ates more noise than necessary, in his opinion. In a letter to the
Toronto STAR, Mr. Hoad reflects that, had the new subway been put
down in the ground another 100 feet, the noise of its train-every­
five-minutes operation would not have harmed property or persons.
As the matter now stands, Mr. Hoad believes that the new
line, only 30 feet below ground level and parallelling the contour
of Yonge Street, is doing physical damage to people and property and
probably nervous and emotional injury, combined with a loss of es­
thetic effect (quietness) in the environment.
Mr. Hoad is of the opinion that, if the executive of the
Toronto Transit Commission – a public body -were to live for even
a few weeks in an apartment along the subway extension, as he does,
they would appreciate the importance of the problem more fully and
would see that something was done about it. And, equally important,
they would see that such a situation would n t be allowed to happen
again.
From this opinion, one might proceed further to contend
that a rubber-tyred subway in a tunnel has a few esthetic and opera­
tianal advantages (quietness and no snow) which open-cut and steel-
wheel-on-steel-rail subways do not. On the other hand, the latter
are generally easier and less expensive to construct.
Which is indicative of the axiom that it is usually im-
possible to have your cake and eat it, too~ Editorial Staff.
SOME NOTES ON THE SUMMER 1973 OPERATION OF THE PRAIRIE DOG CENTRAL
in Winnipeg, Manitoba, have been received from Mr. J. T.
Bradford, our member in that city. Handicapped at the out­
set by lack of volunteer help and capital and with coal selling at
$57 per ton, the Vintage Locomotive Society, which operates the
Prairie Dog Central, was rescued by a local radio station, which
publicized the activity so well that a special pre-season excursion
to Carman, Manitoba, about 45 miles southwest of Winnipeg, was a
resounding success.
The citizens of Carman and the surrounding area turned out
in droves to welcome the PDC s old-time train. There were many per­
iod costumes. The crowd sang and danced and the CN station at Carman
never saw such a celebration. poe 4-4-0 Number 3 had been fitted
out with a cabbage-stack to make the train a real period piece.
During the festivities, someone started passing the hat
for the Prairie Dog Central and an astonishing sum, rumored to be more
than $ 3,000, was collected to help the PDC and to persuade
CANADIAN 58 R A I L
Number 3 to return.
Return it did, the following week, with another 125 pas­
sengers. Carman arranged to hold its Fair on that day and a large
parade and later, horse races, were held in front of the station.
In the afternoon, Number 3 and train made a special trip
to Roseisle, 15.4 miles further along the CNs Carman Subdivision,
carrying an additional 600 passengers for an estimated revenue of
some $ 450. There would have been yet another trip the same evening,
but Number 3 was a little weary and developed a fever in one of
her bearings, thus being unable to officiate as motive power.
After such an initial success, the Prairie Dog Centrals
summer operation on weekends seemed assured. The train operated up
to September 30, 1973.
WALTER BEDBROOK, PRESIDENT OF THE TORONTO & YORK DIVISION OF THE
Association, sends the accompanying pictures of the in­
cline railway at Port Stanley, Ontario, as it appeared in
May of 1973. Walter says that, by this time
l
the railway may be de­
molished. In the summer of 73
1
it had been subject to a degree of
vandalism. He hopes to write a short article about this incline ra­
ilway as it is one of three that he knows of in eastern Canada. The
other two are at Quebec and Niagara Falls
l
the latter having been
closed in the summer of 1973 duel again, to vandalism.
CANADIAN 59 R A I L
ON NOVEMBER 19, 1973, THE TORONTO TRANSIT COMMISSION AGREED IN PRIN­
ciple to replace diesel buses by streetcars on the Citys
Spadina Avenue, between King and Bloor Streets. When com­
plete, this will be the first new streetcar line in North America
since the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority of Boston, Mass., USA
built and opened the Riverside Line in 1959.
Streetcars were last operated on Spadina Avenue in 1948,
although the service was maintained between Dundas and Harbord Stre­
ets until 1966. Yet to be determined are details regarding the lo­
cation of the turning loops and whether operation will be middle-of­
the-street or private right-of-way.
TTC General Manager James Kearns said that preparations for
this revived operation would take about two years. In addition to
turning loops, possibly in the Clarence Square Park area, south of
King Street and midway between Bloor Street and Lowther Avenue, to
link up with the Bloor and Spadina subway lines, the TTC will have
to restore the track and allocate 22 streetcars to provide this ser­
vice.
This new line will provide a direct service on Spadina
Avenue between the subway and the west end of mammoth METRO Centre
development, soon to displace the railway yards south of Front St­
reet in downtown Toronto.
J.D. Welsh.
DURING THE WEEK OF OCTOBER 1 1973, CP RAIL CONDUCTED ADHESION TESTS
on its North Bay Subdivision near Mattawa, Ontario, where
there is a grade westbound of approximately 1.4%. For the
purposes of the study, CP RAIL borrowed a Canadian National Rail-
ways 4-axle, 2000 hp. MR 20 unit, as well as CN Number 4002, a GR
30a 4-axle, 3000 hp. unit, fitted with CNs wheel-slip system, de­
veloped by that Companys Technical Researc .. Department.
Editorial Staff.
UNITED RAILWAY SUPPLY LIMITED OF MONTREAL HAS A RATHER LARGE RECORD
for a relatively small company. Besides doing rebuilds on
FM units for the Chihuahua 01 Pacifico of Mexico -restor-­
edIt H-16-44 units Numbers 517 and 523 left Montreal on 24 November 1973 –
URS converted ex-Delaware & Hudson RS 3 units Numbers 4097,
4117, 4120 and 4129 and sold them to (in order) Crown-Zellerbach of
Ladysmith, B.C., Roberval & Saguenay Number 28, Quebec Iron & Ti­
tanium Number 8 and Roberval & Saguenay Number 29.
In between times in 1973, URS combined ex-Quebec, North
Shore & Labrador Railways two RS 2 units Numbers 102 & 103 -most­
ly 103 -into Quebec Iron & Titanium Number 7.
As recorded elsewhere, URS purchased five RS 3 units from
the Reading Railroad and was reported to be negotiating for an ad­
ditional two ALCO RS 3 units from the Penn Central Transportation
Corporation.
Ex-Norfolk & Western Railroad H-16-44 Number 116, used as
a spare-parts source by URS finally went to the scrap-yard when its
frame and car-body were cut into three sections, loaded on a truck
and shipped, thus writing The End to this FM unit.
C. de Jean.
ON A SUNDAY IN SEPTEMBER 1973, CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS LULU IS­
land Trestle between its Part ~Iann yard and Lulu Island,
British Columbia, lost an 800-foot segment, destroyed by
fire. The heavily-creosoted structure was easy prey for the flames
CANADIAN
60
R A I L
and there was little firemen could do, since the portion of the tres­
tle on fire was more than half-a-mile from the nearest water point.
However, Richmond District firemen had the blaze under control in
about 20 minutes after they arrived. The location of the fire was at
Mile 4.88 of CNs Lulu Island Bridge, between River Road and West­
minster Highway, in Richmond, B.C.
CN negotiated with Burlington Northern and B.C.Hydro for
trackage rights to Lulu Island and Richmond until the trestle could
be repaired.
R.H.Meyer.
THE TORONTO TRANSIT COMMISSIONS TOUR TRAM SERVICE WHICH TOOK TO
the (streetcar) tracks in Toronto, Ontario, on 24 June
1973, proved to be so popular that the TTC began looking
around for additional Peter Witt streetcars -and other modes of
transporting sightseers -before the summer of 1973 was out. On
19 November 1973, the TTC announced that an agreement to purchase
three used double-decker buses from Omnibus Promotions London Lim­
ited, agents for London (England) Transport, had been concluded.
These units, to cost $34,000 each, will be used for sightseeing
tours and charter service in Toronto.
Small Witt car Number 2766, the first car to be restored
and refurbished by the TTC, was the property of the Commission and was
the last Witt-type car to operate in Toronto, the last rUIl be­
ing made on 18 July 1965. Small Witt car Number 2894, the second
and at first the back-up car for the service, was purchased from
the TTC by Mr. Charles Matthews of Langstaff, Ontario, in March ,
1963. Later, Number 2894 was discovered in a barn near Hawkestone,
Ontario and its owners were willing to make the car available to
the TTC. Previously, it wa:; said that this car was to go to the
Rockwood Museum of the Ontario Electric Railway Historical Associa-
tion.
With both of the small-Witt cars in service, in November 1973
it was reported that representatives of the Tour Tram opera­
tion had approached the Canadian Railroad Historical Association of
Montreal with regard to the lease of ex-TTC large-Witt car Number
2300, presently displayed at the Canadian Railway Museum, Saint
Constant, Quebec. This double-truck, single-end car was built by
the Canadian Car & Foundry Company in 1921 and was the first car
of this type purchased new. Number 2300 s trucks, originally of the
4 feet 10 7/8 inch-gauge of the TTC, were regauged to 4 feet 8t in­
ches when the car was donated to the CRHA in May 1963.
It is assumed that car Number 2300 would be required to
protect Numbers 2766 and 2894 in the 1974 Tour Tram service.
W.J.Bedbrook.
PIERRE PATENAUDE SENDS THE FOLLOWING BUDGET OF INFORMATION ON UNITS
delivered by various builders.
The Cartier Railway took delivery of three M 636 model un­
its from MLW Industries, Montreal, on 29 October 1973. They were ro­
ad numbers 74, 75 & 76, B/Ns M-6072-1 through M-6072-3.
The B r i ti s h Col u m b i a Rail way s M 630 unit s we red e Ii ve red
in November 1973, and worked west via Canadian National Railways on
the evening of the day of delivery, in multiple with one or two CN
units: Ro,d Builders
number number Delivered
723
724
M-6074-1
M-6074-2
2 November 1973 7 November 1973
725 M-6074-3 8 November 1973 726 M-6074-4 9 November 1973 727 M-6074-5
13 November 1973 728 M-6074-6
15 November 1973 729 M-6074-7
16 November 1973 730 M-6074-8
22 November 1973
Algoma
Central Railway SD 40-2 units were delivered from
the Diesel Division, General Motors of Canada, London, Ontario on
the dates shown. They travelled via CP RAIL to Sault Ste. Marie,On­
tario, where they will be based:
183 A-2860 184 A-2870 185 A-2871 186 A-2955 187 A-2956 188 A-2957 29 September 1973 3
October 1973 29
September 1973 29
September 1973
10 October 1973
10 October 1973
CP RAIL has confirmed order number C-364 with the Diesel Division,
General Motors of Canada Limited, for twenty SD 40-2 units, to carry
road numbers 5816 to 5835 inclusive, serial numbers A-2858 to A-2877
inclusive. These units will be equipped with LOCOTROL controls and
will be used as master units for coal unit-trains on the Sparwood­
Roberts Bank run in British Columbia.
The numbering of these new units will require renumbering
of CP RAIL units Numbers 5659 to 5674 to Numbers 5800 to 5814 and
the installation of equipment to make them master control units for
coal unit-train service.
units
dates
Ya rd,
Canadian National Railways took delivery of the following
from Diesel Division, General Motors of Canada Limited on the
shown. These units, class GR-20c, will be based at Symington
Prairie Region:
Road Builders
number number
Delivered
5560 A-2843
23 June 1973
5561 A-2888 26 October 1973 5562 A-2889
19 October 1973 5563 A-2890 19
October 1973 5564 A-2891
19 October 1973
5565 A-2892 22 October 1973 5566 A-2893 22
October 1973 5567 A-2894 24
October 1973 5568 A-2895 24
October 1973 5569 A-2896
29 October 1973 5570 A-2897 29
October 1973 5571 A-2898
31 Octo b e r 1973 5572 A-2899
31 October 1973 5573 A-2900
26 October 1973
5574 A-2901 31 October 1973 5575 A-2902
31 October 1973
Unit Number 5560, outshopped on 23 June 1973, went west on o
display tour through western Canada to justify modifications in the
production of units Numbers 5561 through 5610. Number 5560 was con­
structed with black cab numbers. Modifications on later numbers in­
cluded DO GMCs own version of Canadian Nationals safety cab, 2500
imperial gallon fuel tanks and Blomberg high-adhesion-type trucks.
CP RAIL has taken delivery of sixteen SO 40-2 units from
Diesel Division, General Motors of Canada Limited:
5659 5660 5661 5662 5663 5664 5665 5666 5667 5668 5669 5670 5671 5672 5673 5674 A-2872
A-2873 A-2874 A-2875 A-2876 A-2877 A-2878 A-2879 A-2880 A-2881 A-2882 A-2883 A-2884 A-2885 A-2886 A-2887 30 April 1973 30
April 1973
4 May 1973
4 May 1973
8 May 1973
8
May 1973
12 May 1973
12May1973
16 May 1973
16 May 1973
18 May 1973
18 May 1973
30
~lay 1973
30
tvlay 1973
5 June 1973 5
June 1973
THERE ARE SPLENDID RUMORS EMANATING FROM BRITISH COLUMBIA THAT EX­
Canadian Pacific Railway hudson-type steam locomotive Num-
ber 2860, stored in CP RAILs Droke Street Roundhouse for
ten years will be repoired to operating condition in 1974 for tour­
ist train service on the British Columbia Railway. It is said that
some ten ex-Canadian Pacific 2200-c10ss caacl lS will be used to haul
pass~ngers and the West Coast Railway Associations nountain obser_
vation cor Nunber 598 Arbutus Ridge will bring up the rear.
Nu~ber 2860 was sold to the Vancouver Railway Museum As­
sociation in August 1964, but payment could not be co.plated cnd o
wnership reverted to the CPR. The locomotive was subsequently pur_
chased by Mr. Joseph Hussey fran CP RAIL in September 1970, for pos­
sible operation.
CPR consolidotian Number 3716, also stored at Drake Street
since April 1966, is said to be designated as motive power for the
Museum Train, planned by the Government of 8ritish Columbia with
the support of BC Premier _ and railway enthusiast _ David Barrett.
The BC Government is also said to have acquired Macmillan
& Bloedel 2-8-2ST Nunber 1055, stored at Cnemainus, B.C. and 2-6-2
NUl!lber 1077, stored at Ladys .. ith, B.C. Both loco .. otives have been
out of sArvice since the H&B operation was terminated on 16 Decem­
ber 1969. Mr.
Peter Cox, our r.lclllber in Coquitla .. , B.C. took the o
ccompanying picture of CPR Number 2860 in Vancouver, B.C., on 26
May 1955 Qnd the picture of Number 3716 gt Winnipeg, Non., on 20 August
1957. Our thank~ to Mr. Cox for providing these il.lustrotions.
5.S.Worthen.
~ MONTREAl TRAMWAYS COMPANY CAR NUMBER 1046 AT THE COTE OE LIESSE TRAF_
II fie elrde (Continental Can COlllpany), St_LourAnt, site of mar thon
one collision botween rood vehicles and streetcars. 7 June 1948. P
hoto CRHA E.A.Toohey Collection.
–~ . —
DA.NA DIAN RAIL
punUeh.d by .h.
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