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Canadian Rail 261 1973

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Canadian Rail 261 1973

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SURFACE TRACKS
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MONTREAL METRO
SCHEMATIC DIAGRAM
OF UNDERGROUND TRACKS
Minor curV~3 not shown
~ARRY
JCAN rAtON
6EAIJ/JIEN
LAURIER
MONT ROYAL
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FRONT~NAC

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Jacques Pharand, Eng.
g .mb 9, 1971 ,t Moo .,1 METRO,
~~~ Henri-Bourqssa station had been a
=IJ= day just like any other day. In the
evening, operations went just about
as usual, until the hour of 22:18. All
evening long, METRO trains kept arriving
fram the south and passengers kept pour-
ing out onto the platform, passing up
the escalator to the station mall and
the adjoining bus platforms. The empty
trains then proceeded forward several
hundred yards, to the point where they
could reverse over onto the soutbbound
track, to engulf another load of passen­
gers, heading downtown toward the inter­
change of Lines 1, 2 and,4 at ~erri/de
Montigny and the terminus at Bonaventure
station.
About 22:18, Train 03 came rolling out of the tunnel on silent
rubber tyres, headed by motor unit 81-1679 with Motorman E. Maccar­
one at the controls. With a hiss of air, the train rolled to a stop
at the northbound platform. Back in the control cab af the last car,
Guard A. Rouleau waited until the passengers had left the train and
then pressed the switch to close the doors of the cars. He readied
himself for the southbound run, for which he would be the motorman
and Mr. Maccarone would be the guard.
But for Mr. E. Maccarone, badge number 5904, this really was
the end of the line. There would be no return trip. How could he know
that death waited for him 814 feet ahead in the tunnel?
In the dead-end extension of the tunnel -the back-station
beyond Henri-Bourassa station, three trains were parked as usual
It was customary to store them here until the rush-hour the follow­
ing morning, or in case of the need to replace a train during normal
operations. There were 9 cars on the northbound stub-track and 18
cars on the southbound side. The placement of these cars allowed nor­
thbound trains to move forward sufficiently to clear the cross-over
switch and reverse to the southbound platform (see diagram).
STATIONS ON MONTREALS METRO SYSTEM ARE EACH A MASTERPIECE OF DESIGN
as the photograph on this months front cover affirms. During non­
rush hour periods, passenger traffic flow moderates.
Photo courtesy Montreal Urban Community Transit Commission.

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SEQUENCE
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D I A G
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(schematic)
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CANADIAN 297 R A I L
Between Train 03 and the cross-over switch were two shunting
signals. These signals were connected in such a way that, should any
operation be carried out in excess of shunting speed, the emergency
brakes of the train would, be applied. An additional safety feature
on the train itself is the dead-man signal on the motormans con­
troller-handle. When this device is not pressed in place by the
motorman, the emergency brakes are automatically applied.
The moment was now approaching when the first accident to cause
death on the Montreal Urban Community Transit Commissions METRO wo­
uld occur.
At 22:20, Motorman Maccarone notched the controller forward and
Train 03 rolled forward, perhaps somewhat too abruptly and rapidly.
It accelerated into the tunnel, gaining speed. Car 81-1679 tripped
the first signal without slowing. Then it tripped the second signal
and, fractions of a second later, crashed violently into the last
car of the spare train parked on the northbound track, motor Car
81-1540.
The end-cabs of both vehicles were smashed and forced together,
as, under the force of impact, the parked train was squeezed between
Train 03 and the stopblocks at the end of the tunnel, several hun­
dred feet north of the Henri-Bourassa station. The cars of the park­
ed train buckled outward, trailer unit Number 80-0020 and motor unit
Number 81-1539 making contact with the live power-rail. Fierce arc­
ing began immediately, illuminating the tunnel with blinding, blue­
ish flashes and filling it with a characteristic crackling noise.
Ominously, a haze of smoke began to rise toward the roof of the tun­
nel and the lights began to flicker erratically.
It was now 22:25, as Guard Rouleau, jUhJing down to the ballast,
scrambled as fast as he could to the front of the train. In the cab
of motor-car Number 81-1679 he found Motorman Maccarone, shaken up
but still conscious. It was impossible for Mr. Rouleau to free Mr.
Maccarone, as the latters knee was pinned underneath the smashed
dashboard.
Mr. Rouleau had to go for help. He hurried back along the track,
in the thickening smoke, to the station platform and the alarm tele­
phone, cutting off the power at the main switch.
The alarm had been given. At 22:29, grabbing fire-extinguishers,
MUCTC employees rushed down the smoke-filled tunnel to the scene of
the accident, before the eyes of some horror-stricken passengers
who would soon be forced to seek exits from the station by the spr­
eading cloud of noxious smoke.
At
22:35, Montreal Fire Department Captain Paul Labelle
aged to penetrate the smoke-filled tunnel to within speaking
tance of Motorman Maccarone, but he was nearly suffocated by man­
dis­
the
smoke in the process. Stumbling blindly back up the tunnel, he mis­
sed the Henri-Bourassa station platform completely and emerged at
Sauve station, the next stop south.
A few minutes later, at about 22:42, the last communication
link with Motorman Maccarone -the operators microphone -went dead
and all the lights went out. Fed by rubber tyres and seat upholstery,
the flames raged unchecked from under trailer-car Number 80-0020 and
spread rapidly to adjacent cars. Extremely high temperatures, in the
range of 2,0000F., were generated by 10,000-ampere electrical arcs,
a temperature sufficient to melt not only the metal of the cars but
also the concrete walls and ceiling of the tunnel.
CANADIAN 298 R A I L
Some twenty minutes later and, despite all of the initial ef­
forts of the firemen and the rescue squad, Motorman Maccarone died,
suffocated by the hot gasses and smoke from the raging fire.
In the meantime, the fire had spread to portions of all of the
36 cars parked on the two tracks in the tunnel. The flames were fed
by the chain-reaction of exploding tyres and flying bits of burning
rubber, together with the flammable material of each cars interior.
When Montreals firemen came to the scene of the disaster, they
were facing a situation which they had never before encountered. How
do you try to control a raging, roaring fire, spreading toxic fumes,
located at a distance of some 2,000 feet from the street and under­
ground as well. The respirators normally used for fighting fires in
conditions of heavy smoke had a thirty-minute air reserve. At Henri­
Bourassa station, this interval was only enough to descend from the
fresh air to the scene of the fire, leaving no time for significant
action at the site of the disaster.
The first attempt to open an alternate access route to the site
of the fire was made through the vertical ventilation shaft at Berri
and Somerville Streets, at the northern end of the tunnel extension
or back-station. Around midnight, some firemen climbed down through
this shaft with hoses and high-pressure fog nozzles. The use of chem­
ical foam had been ruled out because of the possibility of creating
additional hazards. However, entry through the ventilation shaft
did more harm than good, as the strong draught created by opening
the shaft drew the smoke up through it like a chimney. It was neces­
sary to evacuate the shaft at once to protect the firemen from the
danger of smoke poisoning end, in fact, some of them felt the ef­
fects of the nauseating smoke before they could escape.
To extinguish the fire, there was now only one alternative left,
which was to flood the tunnel entirely. Water was pumped into the
tunnel-end at the rate of 350,000 gallons per hour. Five hours later,
the fire was under control and firemen could get into part of the
tunnel, reaching the still-burning cars at about 08:00 on December
10. However, it was not until 05:45 on December 11 that the remains
of Motorman Maccarone could be removed from the charred debris of
his cab.
While the fire in the back-station was being finally extin-
guished, MUCTC officers at the Berri/de-Montigny control centre had
to cope with the problem of providing adequate service. Line 2
(Bonaventure/Henri-Bourassa) had been completely closed since 00:28,
December 10. This line was re-opened south of Berri/de-Montigny sta­
tion at 07:30 the same day and 75 busses were assigned to Route 31
(St-Denis). METRO service north on Line 2 was resumed in sections:
to Beaubien on December 11; to Cremazie on December 13 and to Sauve
on December 15, with extra busses bringing patrons from Henri­
Bourassa to these successive terminals.
The restoration -one could almost say rebuilding -of Henri-
Bourassa METRO station was by no means a small task. Working 24
INSPECTORS FROM MONTREALS FIRE DEPARTMENT EXAMINED THE INTERIORS OF
the burned-out cars minutely for clues which might explain the lit­
tle-understood aspects of this disaster.
Photo courtesy Montreal GAZETTE.

I
CANADIAN 301 R A I L
hours a day, seven days 0 week, MUCTC employees first had to clear
the tunnel of wreckage, which was completed on December 17. It was
thereafter necessary to clean by hand each contactor to ensure per­
fect flow of electrical power to the motor cars. The walls of the
station had also been damaged and blackened by the smoke and water
and some 140,000 square feet of wall and floor, north of Cremazie
station, had to be washed and cleaned.
Operation to Henri-Bourassa METRO station was restored on Dec­
ember 31, twenty-two days and nights after the accident. Shunting
of trains from the northbound to the southbound track was performed
south of the crippled station. 4,000 work-hours had already been
expended.
In the back-station north of Henri-Bourassa station itself,re­
pair work involv~d the insertion of some 15,000 new bolt-anchors in
the walls and roof, the laying of 3,500 square feet of steel mesh
and the refinishing with 200 tons of cement and 400 tons of sand.
After some 10,000 man-hours of work, the tunnel was literally tot­
ally rebuilt, in the condition that it was when it was first open­
ed. This task was completed on January 28, 1972.
New track then had to be layed in adverse conditions of ventil­
ation, due to the amount of pneumatic and welding equipment being
used at the site. Some 1,775 feet of track and 1,660 feet of guide­
rail were replaced, involving 40,000 man-hours of labour. It was a
herculean task. Normal operation was re-established in the northern
portion of the tunnel at the beginning of March, 1972.
It was a very expensive accident in terms of money. The total
cost of all of the necessary repairs was in the vicinity of $ 5.0
million.
As a result of this accident, ~ome important conclusions were
reached and revisions of operating procedures were made. Motormen
were required to stand up while performing shunting operations and
the speed of trains in back-stations was restricted to 15 mph. Fur­
thermore, no train was allowed to be parked on the incoming track
of any back-station. Recommendations were also made for the immed-
iate installation of adequate fire-fighting equipment in under-
ground locations.
In the accompanying table, it will be seen that some of the
motor and trailer cars involved in the accident were rebuilt, while
others were cannibalized for parts.
As previously noted, it was a very expensive accident in terms
of money. It could never have happened anywhere but in a back-
station, as the main lines themselves are controlled by a standard
block-signal system, proving a two-block protection for each train
(note 1). However, the MUCTC is nevertheless continuously seeking
better safety measures and improvements designed to make Montreals
METRO a model of safety and dependability in operation.
Two METRO trains are already undergoing tests on regenerative
braking devices which will reduce the amount of braking with the
brakeshoes, thereby reducing brakeshoe wear and heat generation. As
~ WATER STILL STANDS KNEE-HIGH IN THE BACK TUNNEL AT HENRI-BOURASSA,
as Montreal Fire Deportment firemen extinguish the last traces of
the fire in the Metro cars. Photo courtesy Montreal GAZETTE.
CA NADIAN 302 R A I L
a result, the problems of ventilation will be reduced. This is one
of many experiments being conducted whose main results will be the
maintenance of the leadership of Montreals METRO in the urban trans­
portation field. And METRO will continue to be the pride and joy of
the citizens of Montreal.
Note 1: Permissive entry at restricted speeds is allowed
when the amber signal is displayed in stations
thus equipped, to ensure faster passen~er flow
in these heavily-transited locations. Authors note.)
MUCTC METRO CARS INVOLVED IN THE ACCIDENT.
Note: The MUCTC has since revised its numbering system to accommo­
date computerization of equipment numbers, dropping the
third digit of the vehicle number. Thus motor car Number 81-
1655 becomes Number 81-655, under the new classification.
81-1575 81-1509 81-1683
81-1593
81-1655
81-1677
81-1633
81-1667
81-1679*
81-1539
81-1587 81-1527
80-0038 80-0005 80-0092 80-0047
80-0078
80-0089
80-0067
80-0084
80-0090
80-0020
80-0044
80-0014
81-1576
81-1510
81-1684
81-1594
81-1656 81-1678
81-1634
81-1668 81-1680 81-1540* 81-1588 81-1528
* Cars which were involved in the initial collision.
81-1655
81-1677 81-1527
81-1587
~
81_655l
81-677
81-527 81-587
MUCTC METRO CARS REBUILT
80-0078 ~80-078l
80-0089 80-089
80-0014 80-014
80-0044 80-044
These 12 cars were rebuilt
using parts cannibalized
from the 24 cars which were
-scrapped.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
81-1656 81-1678 81-1528 81-1588
~
81_656l
81-678 81-528
81-588
The authors sincere thanks are conveyed to Mr. Guy Jeanotte,
Public Relations Officer of the MUCTC, for kindly providing
information used in this article and to Mr. Gordon Hill who
supplied dota on the rebuilt METRO cars •
• A
THREE-CAR MONTREAL METRO TRAIN-SET DISCHARGES PASSENGERS AT T~E
Longueuil Metro Station on the south bank of the St. Lawrence Rl­
ver. This photograph was taken by Carl H. Sturner on April 20,1973.

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John Carbonneau
Sandy Worthen
~
ome railway historians claim
-~. that Canadas first Main
~ Line railway was the Grand
Trunk from Montreal to Tor­
onto, which was opened in 1856.
The more intelligent know that
there was already in existence­
and in operation – a main line
of railway almost as long and
certainly several years older
than the line west to Toronto.
Moreover, it had the added distinction of being an interna­
tional railway and its construction and completion have since been
emulated by many other, similar, international cooperative ventures,
The original St. Lawrence and Atlantic-Atlantic and St. Lawren­
ce Railway of 1853 was, as its name suggests, two halves of a corpor­
ate whole. Obviously, since the purpose of its construction was to
join the ice-free Atlantic port of Portland, Maine, with the growing
city of Montreal on the St. Lawrence River and the summertime, water­
borne traffic to and from the Great Lakes, one-half of the railway
was entirely useless without the other half.
It is therefore not surprising to find that when the company
constructing the United States portion of the line fell on hard ti­
mes in 1853 and could not find the money to complete the railway
from Island Pond, Vermont, 15 miles northward to the International
Boundary, the Canadian company was able to arrange the necessary le­
gal and financial details to build this distance for its United Sta-
tes twin. Surely this was the very first of an innumerable series
of enterprises undertaken jointly by Canadian and United States en­
terprises.
In the nearly 120 years since the Atlantic & St. Lawrence -St.
Lawrence and Atlantic has been in operation, first under lease to
the Grand Trunk Railway Company of Canada and later under the owner­
ship of Canadian National Railway Company, the location of the right­
of-way has changed very little. The railway facilities in the towns
and cities along its route have also remained much the same, al­
though the divisional points have been relocated, with consequent
modification of essential structures, and rural stations have been
demolished with the advent of customer service centres. Sherbrooke,
Quebec, was once a large and important divisional point in the 1850s
and 60s, but the shop and enginehouse, the latter an enclosed Tur­
kish mosque type with indoor turntable, were demolished when the
divisional point was relocated to Richmond, Quebec, on June 9, 1872.
For a hundred years, Island Pond, Vermont, almost midway on the
railway between Montreal and Portland, was the principle divisional
point. For the first twenty years of the railways history, passen­
ger and freight trains in both directions terminated at this Ver-
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CANADIAN 306 R A I L
mont town. For the passenger, it was an overnight stop, with the
onward train to Portland or Montreal departing early the following
morning. Freight trains were generally reclassified in the large
freight yard in front and to the south of the station. The formal­
ities, for both passengers and freight, associated with the cross­
ing of the International Boundary, were discharged at Island Pond.
In the winter of 1856, only three short years after the open­
ing of the railway, the town of Island Pond suffered a disasterous
fire which destroyed half-a-dozen large buildings and some smaller
ones. However, a history of the town implies that at least one of
the existing large buildings survived the holocaust. This was the
pretentious brick railway station of the Grand Trunk Railway,which
accommodated in addition to the railways offices, the passengers,
the express and the representatives of the United States Customs
and Immigration Deportment. This building was to exemplify the
stature of the Railway Company in the community until the turn of
the century.
About 1900, if one can judge from the railway buildings re-
maining along todays Montreal-Portland main line, the Grand Trunk
embarked on a programme of renewal of structures, many of which
doted back to the early years of the railway. New stations were
built at such important places as St-Hyacinthe, Richmond and Sher­
brooke, Quebec, Island Pond, Vermont, Groveton, New Hampshire and
Portland, 11aine. The historic stopping-place at Gorham, New Hamp­
shire, gateway to the White Mountains since 1853, was extensively
rebuil t.
Not the least of these n~w structures was that planned and con­
structed at Island Pond. It was on important port of the new facil­
ities which were centralized at this point in 1900. The cor-repair
shops were relocated here, portly from Richmond, Quebec and portly
from Gorham, N.H. The railway purchased land to the value of $60,000
east and south of the town along the right-of-way, including a por­
tion of Back Pond, a small inlet of the main lake. A 40-stall round­
house was contemplated. The new repair shops employed three to four
hundred men and a 50% increase in the towns population was antici­
pated. A small hill at the northern edge of the property was used
to fill in a portion of Bock Pond. The long line of old freight
sheds between the railway and the towns main street were demolished.
The freight yards, which formerly hod a capacity of some 700 cars,
were greatly enlarged to accommodate 3,000 cars.
Construction of the new station began late in 1900 and was com­
pleted in 1904. It was a model of modern station design. On the main
floor, there was a spacious ladies waiting room and a similar large
room for gentlemen. The former was later converted to the agents
and operators office, while the latter was modified to serve as a
waiting room for both the fair and the dominant sex, when society
began to tolerate mingling. Representatives of the United States
Customs and Immigration Department were on duty at Island Pond from
the beginning of rail transportation and the new station included a
bonding room and office for their use. In addition, there was a bag­
gage room, the yardmasters office and the ubiquitous Railway Express
Agency.
On the second floor of the new station was the office of the
United States Collector of Customs, the general offices of the Cus­
toms and Excise Deportment, the Immigration offices, a detention
room for women and, in the original design, the station agents of­
fice.
CANADIAN 307 R A I L
The GTR Chief Dispatchers office for Districts 1 and 2, Mon­
treal to Richmond and Quebec and Richmond to Island Pond, was 10-
coted on the ground floor, with accommodation for four or five as­
sistant dispatchers. In the lote 1920s, the dispatching offices
were transferred to Richmond and the vacated space thereafter be­
come the bunk room for Canadian train-crews whose passenger runs ter­
minated at Island Pond.
The attic on the third floor, while rather small and not ex-
actly suited to normal use, was reserved as a detention room for
undesirable male persons, apprehended while effecting unauthorized
or illegal entry into the United States. There is the usual story
about two undesirable males who, being detained in the attic,
made their escape by tieing together sheets and blankets from their
beds and thereby lowering themselves from the top-floor window. The
escape is said to have taken place in the winter and, once out of
their snug attic retreat, the two desperados, exposed to the bitter
winter cold, soon decided that it was better to return to the sta­
tion and surrender themselves, so that they would be re-detained in
their cosy top-floor cell, considering this a small sacrifice to
that involved in facing the rigors of liberty in the icy northern
Vermont weather.
The new (1904) station at Island Pond was constructed of brick
with granite facing and was the most outstanding structure in the
business centre of the town. The roof was of slates salvaged from
the old enginehouse formerly located about one-quarter of a mile
south, that had been razed in 1900-01 to make room for the expan­
sion of yard facilities previously described.
Today, more than 70 years later, Island Ponds roilway station
iss t ill in good cond i t ion a nd very few 0 f-he or iginal roof sla­
tes have had to be reploced.
From the earliest days of the railway in Island Pond, commun­
ications between the east and west sides of the town were complica­
ted by the tracks. Passenger and freight trains frequently blocked
the road and pedestrian crossings. Of course, the citizens could use
one of two level crossings about half to three-quarters of a mile
north of the station. While these crossings were an alternative for
wheeled traffic, it was ridiculous to imagine that pedestrians would
walk the additional mile if they could avoid it. They climbed over
and under trains without giving it a second thought. The consequent
hazard to public safety was worrysDme to the GTR.
Accordingly, the railway company constructed a wooden foot­
bridge on the north side of the stotion and, for many years, the
younger citizens -and not a few of the older ones, too -watched
the steady procession of long trains rumbling up and down the tracks
beneath the footbridge. Most of the mothers in the town condemned
the affair as a dirty place. In that era of coal-burning steam
locomotives, it was~
The rising popularity of the automobile created yet another
problem, or perhaps just another addition to the chronic complica­
tion. Motorists demanded a more direct route from the south and eost
to the towns centre. The upper crossings just werent a reasonable
alternative. Continuing agitation finally obliged Canadian National,
the town of Island Pond and the State of Vermont to construct joint­
ly a lengthy and curious wooden viaduct over the tracks.
The viaduct was unique when it was built in 1904 and continued
to be unique to the day it was demolished in 1973. While in the opin-
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THIS EXCELLENT CHARCOAL SKETCH OF JOHN A. POOR WAS DRAWN BY MR. J.D.
Henry for the MICHIGAN RAIL FAN of the Michigan Railroad Club, Detroit,
Michigan, and is reproduced here with the permission of the Editor­
Emeritus, Mr. John Fred Gibson, to whom our thanks are expressed.
ion of some, it did not enhance the towns appearance, it performed
what others described as a very useful service. In fact, it joined
the eastern and southern portions of the town with its business
centre, carrying the traffic over the railway yard. It was a series
of wooden spans -a carriage way 24 feet wide, with a footwalk on
one side six feet wide -erected and maintained by the railway for
a term of 99 years as a vehicular overpass. The five-span structure,
upon reaching the west side of the railway tracks, accomplished a
right-angled turn north and descended to the level, discharging its
traffic in front of the station on the square.
A width of 24 feet was, in the past decade, just about enough
for two automobiles and then it was a tight fit. In order to save
wear and tear on the planks, the bridge floor was faced with four
metal strips, supposedly placed at a distance apart appropriate to
the wheels of a car. Towards the end of its existence, these metal
strips became loose, as did the floor-planks and the resulting clat­
ter was startling and ominous. But the bridge still stood until the
authorities decided that the risks to users was of greater impor­
tance than its anachronistic appearance.
The Canadian National Railways station at Island Pond became a
rather notable structure with the passage of the Eighteenth Amend­ment
to the Constitution of the United States, which came into force
on January 1, 1920. All at once, a very large proportion of the pop-
ulation of the United States found that they could no longer pur-
chase or possess alcohol or alcoholic beverages except, of course,
for medicinal purposes. This entailed a doctors prescription. It
was not very long thereafter before some clever entrepreneurs began
to import various forms of alcohol from foreign countries, such
as Cuba and Canada, where restrictions on the sale and possession
of alcohol did not apply.
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS STATION AT ST-HYACINTHE,
Quebec, was built about 1899 by the Grand Trunk Ra­
ilway Company of Canada. It is of brick construct­
ion and is in good condition. In design, it resem­
bles other CN stations at Richmond and Sherbrooke,
Quebec. Ken Goslett took this photo on 4 February,
1973.
But the U.S. authorities charged with the responsibility of
preventing unlawful importations were not idle. Indeed, before long
it was to be expected that the United States Customs authorities at
Island Pond would find some quantities of whiskey (Fr.Gael.: uisge­
beatha: water of life) on the persons and in the baggage of travel­
lers entering the U.S. from Canada, by trains of the Canadian Na­
tional Railway. The various containers of spirituous preparations
were immediately seized -according to law -and were placed in the
bonded warehouse, which was a room in the ;tation. And the room was
firmly locked -and double-locked~
But what man can devise, he can also frustrate and, before long,
a railway employee -so it was said -had managed to make a duplicate
key to the wonderful storeroom. But since the quantity of forbidden
liquid did not seem to diminish, no one was the wiser.
For a few weeks, the station at Island Pond became a paradise
for the tipplers. The authorities were quite unable to explain this
situation or to discover the source of the elixir vitae, since the
contents of all of the containers in the bonded warehouse apparently
remained undisturbed.
Periodically, the firmly-corked bottles and other containers
were duly taken to the town dump, under guard, where they were of­
ficially destroyed and their destruction duly witnessed. No doubt
the odour pervading the town dump effectively masked the odour of
the contents of the containers.
But while rosy cheeks, red noses and happiness were commonplace,
Mother Nature finally outwitted the gay deceivers~ The wonderful
storeroom was, alas, not heated and so, the first time that the mer­
cury dropped below zero, everyone of the darned whisky-bottles broke
and the contents seeped out. It was light brown and wet, but it sure
didnt smell like whisky~ It smelled like tea~ And, in fact, that
is exactly what it was. The pilferers had been opening the containers
and replacing the whisky with cold tea -of which there was plenty
thereabouts.
The strategm was immediately detected. The days of copious quan­
tities of free booze were over and the rosy cheeks and red noses now
were the result of the frosty winter weather. Happiness was a some­
times thing.

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CANADIAN 311 R A I L
Station agents at Island Pond have been remarkably few, over
the years. From the year of Canadas Confederation (1867) until the
end of the Second World War, only two Company agents were employed.
Mr. John Reeve assumed the duties of Company agent in the old sta­
tion in 67 and, when he retired, Mr. William A. Gleeson succeeded
to the position. Mr. Gleeson himself retired in 1945. As of that
time, he and Mr. Reeve had shared an incumbency of 78 of the 92
years that a station at Island Pond had been in operation.
Mr. Gleeson, not content to sit on his front porch with his
feet up, opened a customs brokerage office in the station and pur­
sued this activity for a time. Mr. Reeve and Mr. Gleeson are still
well remembered in Island Pond, haing been in and around the pres­
ent and former stations for more than three-quarters of a century -a
remarkable record.
From time to time, the Customs and Immigration Service of Can­
ada had an office in the station, but since the termination of pas­
senger service and the closing of the United States Customs and
Immigration Service in the same building, the east end of the str­
ucture now houses the railways Maintenance-of-Way offices and some
of their equipment. The large coaling-stage, the freight car
repair shops and the multiple-stall roundhouse are now entirely
demolished and the remaining local railway operations are central­
ized in the station.
In August 1968, an historic marker was raised by the State of
Vermont in the small square in front of the station at Island Pond,
to commemorate the accomplishment of John Arthur Poor of Portland,
Maine, in his tenacious and ultimately successful attempt to pro­
mote the construction of a railway from Portland, Maine to Montreal,
Quebec (see CANADIAN RAIL,No. 211, June 196). In 1969,Canadian Na­
tional Railways, owner of this small paTk, donated it to the town
of Island Pond.
The clattery wooden viaduct on the south side of the station
was officially closed on April 23 1973 and was thereafter de­
molished within two weeks. A concrete bridge, much smaller, will
replace the wooden viaduct and was nearing completion in the fall
of the same year.
Island Ponds railway station is now almost 70 years old and
is still as solid as the day it was built. Moreover, it is one of
the finest buildings in the Town. Hopefully, when the railway ceas­
es to consider the station as essential to its operations, the Town
will be able to acquire it for other important purposes.
Even in the hustle and bustle of the Swinging Seventies, this
historic New England landmark can still be the place for the time­
honoured pause in the journey along The Road to the Sea.
Postscript
The tall smokestack of the former Grand Trunk Railways shops
at Island Pond was brought crashing down by a dynamite charge, plan­
ted at its base, on April 13, 1973. Simultaneously, the former en­
gine roundhouse, unused for almost a decade, began to be demolished.
On April 23, nearly 100 persons gathered at the west end of
Island Ponds unique wooden pedestrian and vehicular viaduct over
the Grand Trunk tracks, to bid the structure a fond farewell. After
69 years in service, the bridge was closed at 09:00 hours, after a
last automobile, driven by Chairman of the Board of Selectmen Mr.
Joseph A. Wade, had made the crossing.
John Carbonneau.
Barry Macleod
~eaders of CANADIAN RAIL will have
~ read with interest the story of
the revival of steam-locomotive
operation on Cape Breton Island,
Nova Scotia. The rapid progress of
this project, undertaken by the
Cape Breton Development Corporation,
must surely be a model for any fu­
ture operations of this kind in
Canada.
o
c
The key to this project was 2-6-0 steam locomotive Number 42,
presently owned by Mr. R.C.Tibbetts of Trenton, Nova Scotia. As
reported previously, this steam engine was built by the Schenectady
locomotive Company in 1899 for the Sydney & louisbourg Railway, and
later became Dominion Coal Company Number 42. She was acquired by Mr.
Tibbetts in 1963.
The project to organize an operating, steam-hauled train in
this eastern portion of Nova Scotia was announced early in 1973. To
provide the essential motiv8 power, Number 42 was leased by Mr. Tib-
betts by the Cape Breton Development Corporation. The portion of
trackage selected for the operation was leased from DEVCO -the suc­
cessor to the Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation and the Sydney and
louisbourg Railway. Passenger cars were obtained from Canadian Na­
tional Railways.
Number 42 was moved from Trenton to the DEVCO Railways shops
at Sydney, Nova Scotia, where the restoration program was to be car­
ried out. The passenger cars were repaired in the same shops. The
restoration job which DEVCO Ruilway employees did was remarkable,
The portion of the ex-Sydney and louisbourg Railway over which
Number 42 and her train would operate was a 7-mile stretch from
Victoria Junction, two miles east of Sydney, through New Waterford
to lingan Mine, a new operation overlooking the Atlantic Ocean.
By 15 June 1973, old Number 42 was once more riding the rails~
On this Friday, .she made a short test run, with DEVCO President Tom
Kent at the throttle and a bagpiper on the pilot~ She rolled grace­
fully out of the DEVCO Railways roundhouse in Sydney and coupled
up to three shiny coaches. Spouting steam and smoke, Number 42 and
her train rumbled out of Glace Bay yard, for a short run across
Park Street crossing, after which she reversed back to the round­
house. It was the first time that a steam locomotive had operated
in Cape Breton since the Sydney & louisbourg Railway changed over
to diesel-electric locomotives in 1961.
The men of DEVCO Railways shops and roundhouse at Sydney must
be congratulated for the magnificent job they did in restoring Num­
ber 42 and the three cars. The roundhouse crew said that Number 42
would make a second run the following day (20 June) and a second
visit was imperative.
-fuJPE ])l~IlBG][{)N, ,­
I~G~rB~M RAJrI9WA~
JUL Y 2nd -S.EPT_ 15th; 1973
In the hot afternoon sun (86°F), Number 42 looked very smart
indeed in her new coat of paint. The paint scheme of the train was
mainly dark green, with gold and black trim. The boiler of the en­
gine with the exception of a black band around the smokebox, was
dark green, as were the cab and tender. The wheels were black with
gold tyres. The connecting rods were gold and so were the number-
plates and tender-plates.
After a bit of shunting, Number 42 finally coupled up to the
three passenger cars. The first car, renamed FORTRESS OF LOUISBOURG,
was originally a cafe-parlour car, built in 1912 for the Canadian
Northern Railway. It was later named the OTONABEE and was converted
to a combination baggage-passenger car by Canadian National Railways
in 1951. The second car was a coach, built in 1914 for the Grand
Trunk Railway Company. It was renamed OCEAN DEEPS COLLIERY. The
third car in the train was a coach built in 1881 for the Midland
Railway Company. It was a coach on the Grand Trunk Railway and la­
ter a business car before being converted to a rules instruction car
by Canadian National Railways in 1960. It was renamed THE MINERS
MUSEUM. There were five passenger cars donated to the new railway by
Canadian Notional Railways, but only three have been repaired. It
is rumored that the other two will not be restored, but will be used
for spare parts.
The new enterprise is not called the DEVCO Railway, nor the
Sydney and Louisbourg Railway, but has been given a new name, THE
CAPE BRETON STEAM RAILWAY, which title appears on the locomotive
tender and the cars. Official operation of the CBSR began on July
1, 1973, with the train running from Victoria Junction to the new
(1971) Lingan Mine.
About 13:45 on 20 June, Number 42s engineer got his orders and,
with a couple of blasts on the melodious whistle and the clang-clang
of the musical bell, steam started hissing from the cylinder-cocks
ond a great cloud of black smoke belched skyward from the stack.Num-
ber 42 proudly led her train out of the yard at Sydney, bound for
Victoria Junction and Lingan Mine.
The smart little train made the run in 85 minutes. There was
an operating delay at Dominion. Victoria Junction station has been
enlarged and renovated. It is painted a reddish-brick colour and
trimmed with beige. It has even been given Victoria Junction name­
boards, something the little, old, grey station never had before.
Two firetrucks (pumpers) were on hand to greet Number 42 and
to supply her with water for the return trip. For this run back to
CANADIAN 314 R A I L
Victoria Junction, Number 42 ran tender-first with her train, after
having first run around it. This was necessary since the DEVCO Rail­
ways only turntable is at Glace Bay.
All things being considered, it was a very successful trial run.
On 1 July 1973, the official opening of the Cape Breton Steam
Railway took place. The coaches were resplendent in their wall-to­
wall carpeting, gold curtains and green-vel~et padded seats. A crew
of jolly coal-miners were elegantly dressed as uniformed stewards.
These men, all from Mine Number 12, were specially-trained as bar-
men, for the train has a licensed bar for refreshment of the pas-
sengers. The other members of the train and engine-crews are em-
ployees of the DEVCO Railway and former employees of the Sydney and
louisbourg Railway.
The inaugural train of the Cape Breton Steam Railway was met at
Victoria Junction by the Donkin Citizens Band and crowds of people,
not to mention flags and bunting~ It was a memorable occasion.
Among the distinguished guests were Mayor Tubrett of Sydney,
Mayor Munroe of Glace Bay, Mayor Nathanson of New Waterford, Mayor
MacDonald of Dominion and Cape Breton County Warden Fraser. Miss Ann
Terry Maclellan, DEVCOs Director of Tourism, made two presentations,
one to Mr. Tom Kent of DEVCO and the other to W.R.Mitchell,Canadian
National Railways Atlantic Region Operations Manager. A further
presentation will be made to Mr. R.C.Tibbetts at a later date.
Initially, the Cape Breton Steam Railway will operate two trains
daily, leaving Victoria Junction at 15:00 and 19:00. The round-trip
fare for adults is $ 2.50 first-class and $ 2.00 coach; children un­
der 12, $ 1.00. There are parking and picnic areas at Victoria Junc­
tion and,at lingan Mine, passengers can climb the hill and look out
seaward towards Point Aconi, Bird Island and Smokey, with the Cape
Breton Highlands beyond.
The 14-mile round-trip is scheduled to take about an hour.
It is noted with interest that Mr. Tom Kent, DEVCOs President,
made reference in his opening-day remarks to the possibility that a
second steam locomotive, and presumably additional passenger cars,
might be necessary for the Cape Breton Steam Railway. If the CBSR
proves popular this summer and, by all accounts so far, it has been
an immediate success, plans will be formulated to provide the ad­
ditional accommodation.
CANADIAN 315 R A I L
A longer run might also be included in future plans, possibly
from Victoria Junction to Port Morien, where excursionists would be
able to inspect the site of the first coal mine in North Amer­
ica. The early French settlers mined coal at Cow Bay in 1720,while
the first coal mine in the present-day United States was opened in
Richmond, Virginia, in 1745.
The track is still in place from Glace Bay to Caledonia Jun-
ction and from Caledonia Junction to Morien Junction. The latter
portion has not been used in many years and is heavily overgrown
with weeds and thick bushes. However, it could be rehabilitated.
The fact that a sec~n~ steam locomotive and some cars may be
considered makes one enV1S10n even greater things in the future in
this part of Nova Scotia. There is the possibility that steam-haul­
ed trains might be run by the Cape Breton Development Corporation,
in cooperation with Canadian National Railways, on longer trips
over CN trackage, along the beautiful Bras dOr Lakes or up Cape
Bretons west coast on the Inverness Subdivision to Inverness. This
approximately 50-mile-long subdivision is presently used about twice
a week by CN and runs through some of Cape Bretons most beautiful
scenery.
While this may sound like a fantastic proposition, it should
be remembered that one of the chief goals of the Corporation is the
development of a great year- round tourist industry. Steam-powered
excursion-train operation certainly will be a powerful attraction
and, for this reason, the development of the Cape Breton Steam Rail­
way is essential to the successful attainment of this goal.
October, 1973.
THE DELAWARE & HUDSON RAILWAY HAS ANNOUNCED THAT THERE WILL BE NOT
one, not two, but THREE autumn excursions this year, using
three of their four well~known PA 1s, likely Numbers 17,
18 & 19. The first trip will be from Albany to Binghamton, New York,
on Friday, 28 September 1973, departing from Colonie Yard at 16:00
hours. This afternoon trip will include NO runpasts and NO unneces­
sary stops. The following day, Saturday, 29 September, the Susque­
hanna Valley Special will leave Binghamton at 08:00 and, after pho­
to-stops and runpasts, will arrive at Albany at 13:15 hours.
The Susquehanna Valley Special will depart Kenwood Yard
(Albany) at 13:40, arriving at Binghamton at 19:00. Round-trip fare:
adults $ 25, children under 12,$ 15. No one-way tickets will be sold.
The three PA 1s will haul the Leaf-Peekers Express on
Sunday, 7 October, from Albany to North Creek, New York, into the
scenic upper valley of the Hudson River. Details have not yet been
announced.
The consist for. both trips will probably be 10 coaches,
some with windows which open, a baggage car for shutter-bugs and
tape-recorders and a snack-car.
Tickets for both trips will be sold in advance by mail-or­
der only, by Ticket Agent, SVV and/or LPE, D&HRyCo., The Plaza, Al­
bany, NY, 12207, USA.
THE LAST OF THE CORNWALL STREET RAILWAY: OUR MEMBER IN CORNWALL ,
Ontario, Mr. E.H.Heath, sends a clipping from the Cornwall
Standard-Freeholder, which shows three of the CSRs very
weatherbeaten double-truck, centre-cab electric locomotives, loaded
on flat cars at Cornwall for shipment to a scrap metal firm in Lon­
gueuil, Quebec. Mr. Heath notes that the cars left Cornwall in the
week of 30 July and adds that he hopes someone may have intercepted
them for future preservation.
MR. JOHN SANDERS, THE ASSOCIATIONS UNITED KINGDOM REPRESENTATIVE,
sends the accompanying picture of his completed scratch­
buil t model of a Canadian Paci fic Railway 5 elkirk 2-10-
4. It took John about two years to construct the model, which has
mild steel bar-frames, an aluminum smoke-box and brass everything
else, as John puts it. Bonds driving wheels, Kemtran tender trucks
and front coupler. The motor is a 24-volt DC, nine-pole servo-motor.
Everything else I made up myself, concludes John.
A NEW ROBOT UNIT HAS BEEN PLACED IN SERVICE BY CP RAIL ON COAL TRAINS
on the main line west of Golden, B.C. It is a converted CLC
C_Iiner B unit, definitely not a rebuilt A unit, and its
origin, as of this writing, is a mystery. Perhaps a reader of CAN-
ADIAN RAIL can shed some light on this enigma. Philip Mason.
CANADIAN 317
R A I L
HERES ONE FOR THE RAILWAY HISTORIANS IN THE EAST TO RESOLVE~ MR.
Tim Dale, member of the Island Pond Historical Society, re­
counts the following story from the 1910s:
When I was around sixteen years of age, I went to work for
the Island Pond National Bank. I was assigned the task of
taking the payroll weekly from the Bank to the mill at
Fitzdale, Vermont -now the village of Gilman, Vermont
in southern Essex County. The bills were placed in a spec­
ial body-vest which was put on under a regular vest and
suit coat. The silver was placed in an ordinary valise.
Around six thirty or seven, I would cross the square from
the Bank to the railroad station and board the morning Grand
Trunk train to Portland, Maine. At North Stratford, New Hamp­
shire, I left the Grand Trunk and, with a short wait, boarded
the Maine Central Railroads Quebec City to Boston train and
got off at the lonely Fitzdale station. Usually, one or two
men from the mill met me with a horse and buggy and conveyed
me to the mill.
One day, I arrived and no one was there to meet me, so I
walked to the mill some distance away. Instead of crossing on
t~e bridge (over the Cannecticut River •••• Ed.), I took a
short-cut over the log-boom and was severely chastised by
those in charge at the mill.
I usually returned. on the afternoon train to Island Pond.
This enterprise (the mill ••• Ed.) was started by the Dale and
Fitzgerald families of Island Pond, Vermont and they sold it
to Ike Gilman in the 20s. A grateful community changed the
name of the community to Gilman, to honor the man who had
been wonderful to the community. The banking in Island Pond,
Vermont, was abandoned, as it was found much easier to bank
across the river in Lancaster, New Ham,-shire.
Now, perhaps some informed person would like to fill in the
blanks by describing Mr. Dales trip from Island Pond to Fitzdale
(Gilman) Vermont, noting the railroads used and, if possible, the
train numbers and the times and other miscellaneous information.
It is logical that the Grand Trunk had a day passenger train to
Portland, Maine, at that time. The Maine Centrals Quebec City­
Boston express raises a question as to route, whether by Crawford
Notch and Intervale, or by Littleton and Wells River. But how in
the world a MEC train on either of these routes stop at the station
at Fitzdale, unless they had running rights over Boston and Maine
Railroad trackage? S.S.Worthen.
THE ASSOCIATION I·S FAR EAST REP RES ENT ATIVE, MR. WILLIAM MCKEOWN, IS
on the trail of an interesting and historic steam locomo­
tive, the first, in fact, to operate on a railway in Japan.
Mr. Sochiro Hirota, the Japanese engineer who made the engineering
drawings of the Associations John Molson, is also interested in
this research.
Mr. McKeown explains that about 1854, it is said that the
Norris Brothers of Philadelphia, PA, U.S.A., manufactured a quarter­
inch scale steam locomotive which was brought to Japan by one of
Admiral Perrys Black Ships as a gift from the President of the
United States to the Emperor of Japan.
The purpose of this miniature steam locomotive was to de­
monstrate to the Emperor and his Court the wonders of steam rail-
road operation. The model was set up and operated on the beach at
Yokohama, but was subsequently stored and ultimately destroyed by
CANADIAN
318 R A I L
fire. No record of this unique model locomotive exists today in
Japan.
Mr. McKeown writes that Mr. Hirota and his associates are
understandably interested in any information which can be found re­
garding this model. If any of our readers can throw some light on
this subject, they are requested to write to Mr. McKeown, whose ad­
dress appears on the back cover of each issue of CANADIAN RAIL.
IN A RECENT ISSUE OF THE NEW YORK TIMES, IT WAS REPORTED THAT THE
Union Station in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A., had been sold
by the Terminal Railroad Association of St. Louis, its own­
er. Long regarded as the midwest citys premier landmark, in more
recent years its notoriety has been dimmed by the Gateway Arch, to­
day more quickly recognized as the structure symbolic of St. Louis.
The sale was said to have been concluded between the TRSL
and Harry Gurwich of the Castle Building and Development Corporation
of Miami, Florida.
The station was designed by Theodore C. Link, a local ar­
chitect and built in 1894. In its hey-day, it accommodated 100,000
passengers and 200 passenger trains daily. Today, the station is
used by four passenger trains per day, operated by AMTRAK.
Recently it was announced that AMTRAK would find an alter­
nute location for a station for its trains.
THE MULTITUDE OF MISFORTUNES, FINANCIAL AND OTHERWISE, WHICH ARE
afflicting the Penn Central Transportation Company, are
being dutifully chronicled in almost every newspaper and
transportation journal in eastern North America and elsewhere. One
of the actions taken by the trustees of the bankrupt railroad com­
pany early this summer was the filing of a plan for reorganization,
providing for the termination of all freight and passenger services
effective October 31, 1973, if U.S. federal Government assistance was
not forthcoming by October 1. On that date, the trustees said, there
would be no more money available to pay the employees. Well, here it
is October 1.
The trustees told a Federal Court that there was a comple­
te exhaustionof working capital and, without federal money, pay­
rolls just could not be met. The trustees recommended a program of
federal financial support to stem erosion and to ensure adequate
and efficient rail service on Penn Centrals lines.
Money might accomplish the first objective but only good
morale could produce the second.
The trustees plan also described procedures for disposi­
tion of the Companys rail assets, preferably for rail use but, if
not, for non-rail purposes. The trustees said that they would re­
ceive offers for rail assets for a period of six months following
approval of the plan by the Interstate Commerce Commission and the
courts.
In Vermont, Mr. Sam Pinsley proposed about the same plan
to the Government of the State of Vermont. Editorial Staff.
DR. ROBERT F. LEGGET, OUR MEMBER IN OTTAWA AND AUTHOR OF THE BRAND­
new book RAILWAYS OF CANADA (David & Charles, £ 3.75, in­
formation from CRHA Publications), has written to the Ed­
itor to inquire about the Longlac Cutoff of Canadian National Ra-
ilways. This connection between Longlac Junction and Nakino, On-
tario, on CNs present-day Caramat Subdivision, was completed and
opened for service on December 19, 1923.
CANADIAN
319 R A I L
This 30-odd miles of railway was the connection between the
Montreal-Ottawa-Capreol-Port Arthur main line of the Canadian Narth­
ern Railway Company and the Quebec-Cochrane-Nakina-Sioux Lookout-Win­
nipeg main line of the National Transcontinental Railway. When Can­
adian National Railway Company was formed in 1918, both of these
main lines came under one management.
The portion of the National Transcontinental Railway, be­
tween Quebec and Winnipeg, was completed on 17 November 1913 and re­
gular service from Quebec to Superior Junction was inaugurated on 1
June 1915.
The last spike in the Canadian Northern Railways line fram
Capreol to Port Arthur, Ontario, was driven on 1 January 1914, but
service from Ottawa to Capreol was not inaugurated until November ,
1916, because the two bridges over the Ottawa River, west of the
Nations capital were not completed until that time.
Not long after the Canadian National Railway Company as­
sumed operation of these two railways, it was decided to build a
connection between the Canadian Northern at Longlac, at the north­
ern end of Lake Nipigon and Nakina, on the National Transcontinen­
tal.
At a distance of 50 years, the reason for this decision is
obscure or lost. True, the grades on the NTR were easier, but the
CNoR passed through the population centres of Port Arthur and the
Lakehead Region.
If any of our readers can provide the reason for the buil­
ding of the Longlac Cutoff, they are asked to inform the Editor,
for the general edification of railway historians, including our
friend Dr. Legget.
A CONTRACT FOR 25 NEW DIESEL-ELECTRIC LOCO~TIVES WORTH $ 12.5 MIL­
lion has been awarded to MLW Worthington Limited of Mon­
treal, Canada, by Empresa Na~ional de Ferrocarriles del
Peru. Fifteen of the 25 units will be rated at 2,600 gross horse­
power and will be used for general-purpose hauling on the FdeP main
line from the Pacific coast to the high-altitude Alto Plano region,
more than 15,000 feet above sea level.
Five units, rated at 1,350 hp., will be employed on high­
altitude narrow-gauge lines and five of 1,050 hp. will be used on
the standard-gauge for switching or occasional light trains in main­
line service.
The new locomotives and those ALCO units being modified un­
der the provisions of the contract will have modern features which
will upgrade unit performance on the steep grades characteristic of
the railway system in Peru. Dynamic braking will be a feature which
will assist mechanical braking during the descent of steep grades.
Delivery of the complete order is scheduled for the first
and second quarters of 1974. Financial assistance will be provided
by the Export Development Corporation of the Government of Canada,
a similar arrangement to that made for the Governments of Greece
and Yugoslavia in recent years.
At the end of June 1973, MLW Worthington Limited reported
o backlog of unfilled orders worth $ 58,546,000, compared to a fig­
ure of $ 60,925,000 in the same period in 1972. Editorial Staff.
ON JUNE 3, 1973, THE FRENCH NATIONAL RAILWAYS (SNCF) OPERATED SPE­
cial Train 17861 from Lyon to St-George-de-Commiers, some 30
km south of Grenoble, and return. The total distance co­
vered by the Special was about 350 km (210 miles). What was special
CANADIAN
320 R A I L
about the Special was that the ten-car train of side-corridor com­
partment coaches and two fourgons (baggage cars) was hauled by not
one but TWO oil-burning steam locomotives, mikados Numbers 141 R 1187
and 141 R 1244.
The first 2-8-2, 1187, was built by Baldwin Locomotive Works
of Philadelphia, U.S.A. in 1945, while the second, 1244, was a sturdy
product of the Montreal Locomotive Works Limited, Montreal, in 1948.
(CANADIAN RAIL No. 236, September 1971.)
The Special departed from Lyon-Perrache at 08:12 hours and
returned at 20:30. There was a stop for water at Bourgoin and a
photo-stop at St-Andre-le-Gaz on the southbound trip, with a single
stop for water at Rives on the return run.
The two 141 Rs made light work of the ten-car train, lift­
ing it out of the valley of the Isere River with ease. The north­
bound descent into the valley of the Rhone-Saone Rivers was a thril­
ling experience, with the two 2-8-2s running smoothly for long stre­
tches at sustained speeds of 110-120 kmph (66-72 mph).
Many of the enthusiasts on the trip were members of the
railway enthusiast clubs in Lyon and Grenoble, but there was a con­
siderable number of members from the Chemin de fer des Vivarais, a
narrow-gauge railway operated by enthusiasts. Fran90is Rebillard.
MORE THAN A FEW WASHOUTS ON MAINE CENTRAL RAILROADS MOUNTAIN SUB­
division and Beecher Falls Branch were caused by the
heavy rains in northern New England on June 29-30, 1973.
Sections of the roadbed between North Conway, New Hampshire and
St. Johnsbury, Vermont, at Glen, Sawyers River and Willey House,
all in Crawford Notch. Across the Connecticut River in Vermont, the
bridge over the outlet of Miles Pond was carried away and, at Con­
cord, Vt., 150 feet of the roadbed were washed away. Freight Train
YR-1 south on June 29 was the last through freight to operate for
a week. Local freights ran in the interval and the first through
freight after service was restored was Train RY-2 on the night of
July 7, 1973.
The Beecher Falls Branch from Quebec Junction, N.H. to
Beecher Falls, Vermont, was damaged on the northern end. From North
Stratford, N.H. to Beecher Falls, Vt., tributaries of the Connect­
icut River washed out sections of the roadbed. Lyman Brook at
Georges Stotion bypassed the railroad bridge and took out 50 feet
of fill, leaving the ties and tracks suspended eight feet in the
air. The last freight on the branch departed Beecher Falls on June
29,1973 and, as of mid-August, service had not been restored.
About the same time, the Maine Central applied -with
genuine regret -to the Interstate Commerce Commission for permis­
sion to abandon the branch right back to Quebec Junction, on the
Portland-St. Johnsbury main line. Reason given was that, in addi-
tion to the flood damage which would be costly to make good, the
St. Regis Paper Company had terminated shipment of pulpwood from
Beecher Falls, thus depriving the MEC of its major source of rev­
enue on the branch. In these circumstances, the railroad could not
propose anything else.
RRE Lakes Region ORDER BOARD ond Mr. H. Arnold Wilder.
CANADIAN PACIFIC LIMITED ANNOUNCED IN JUNE 1973 THAT THE MV HENRY
Osborne, formerly the MV Princess of Acadia of the Bay
of Fundy run between 1963 and 1971, would be sold shortly
on the open market. The 400-foot ship was converted to an auto­
mobile-carrying ship in 1972, for service between Saint John, N.B.
and St. Johns, Nfld. The vessel caused an estimated $ 10,000 dam-
CANADIAN 321
R A I L
age to a pier when she orrived in St. Johns last November and
latterly has been out of service. Editorial Staff.
THE ROBERTS BANK SUPERPORT, SOUTH OF VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA,
and about a mile north ofthe International Boundary near
Port Roberts, B.C., will be enlarged by an additional 430
acres over the next five years. Dredging and fill will add an addi­
tional 230 acres for ship loading and 200 acres for port-oriented
industry development. The National Harbours Boord has bugeted $ 3
million for 1973 to begin the dredging program in September. Four
or five deepsea berths with a depth of 65 feet will be ovailable
when the project is complete. Presently, Roberts Bank has an area
of only 50 acres, all of which has been leased to Kaiser Resources
of the United States, for the shipment of coal from British Colum­
bias East Kootenay district to Japan. David Ll. Davies.
CONSTRUCTION OF THE NEW $ 22 MILLION RODNEY TERMINAL ON THE WEST SI­
de of the harbour at Saint John, New Brunswick, is well a­
head of schedule. The mountain of fill required to create
the 50-acre storage area is being hauled by both trucks and railway
cars. The first test pilings for the 1,200-foot long slip berth have
been driven and this pier is scheduled to be ready in January, 1974.
The second stage, the longer 1,347-foot marginal wharf, is due to be in
operation in May 1974. Phillip Fine.
EASTERN CANADIAN RAILWAY ENTHUSIASTS WHO TRAVEL SOUTH THROUGH THE
White Mountains of the State of New Hampshire, through fa­
mous Crawford Notch, never cease to marvel at the way the
Mountain Subdivision of the Maine Central Pailroad struggles up the
side of Mount Willard through the pass. Just south of the Gateway,
the spectacular summit cut, the line runs along a narrow ledge some 600
feet above Dismal Pool, an interval in the rushing Saco River.
On June 14, 1973, freight Train YR-l, from St. Johnsbury,
Vt. to Rigby Yard, Portland, Maine, was making its slow and care­
ful way down the steep grade from the Gateway. On the rear end
were two cabooses, the first being deadheaded east and the second
occupied by the conductor and rear-end brakeman.
Going around one of the tight curves, the last freight car
in the train – a carload of first-grade lumber -derailed high above
Dismal Pool and toppled down the side of the mountain about 40 feet,
finally lodging amongst the trees and rocks. The deadhead caboose
was pulled off the rails, but the couplers unlocked before it left
the roadbed. The second caboose, with the conductor and brakeman on
board, stayed on the rails, as did the forward portion of the train.
The lumber was later hauled up the mountainside to the
right-of-way with slings, to be loaded into another boxcar. Two
cranes, one from Rigby and one from Waterville, Maine, came north
to pull the car back up to the roadbed. Two weeks later, crews were
still at work building cribbing and a retaining wall at the scene
of the accident. Repairs were completed by dumping rock and gravel
to support the track. RRE Lakes Region ORDER BOARD.
THE FOLLOWING REPORT APPEARED IN A RECENT ISSUE OF CP RAIL NEWS
and is reproduced with the permission of the author, Mr. Stephen
Morris, of the Public Relations & Advertising Department of Can­
adian Pacific Limited.
Do you remember
…… the last scheduled steam passenger train operated
on the Dominion
Atlantic Railway?
On Aug.
18, 1956, train 97 left Halifax on a fi nal journey
to Yarmouth marking the end of an era in Nova Scotia
railroad history.
No flags flew and no
crowds gathered to watch the half­
century-old Pacific-type
locomotive and coaches weave
through the Annapolis Valley
for the last time.
On that final trip only seven passengers boarded at Halifax.
Along the way
it managed to attract four more passengers
who had come to pay one last
tribute. The lone passenger
coach was tacked to the rear as the
journey began.
Although the steam passenger
service ended on that bright
Saturday afternoon, the clean little Pacific still roamed the
rails hauling freight during the night until the end of 1957.
Not one Dominion Atlantic
Pacific-type avoided being scrapped.
The only survivor of the G2 Class locomotives is 2634 which
saw service in the west. This
locomotive is currently on display
at Crescent Park in Moose
Jaw, Sask.
Today many rail enthusiasts are asking why so many
loco­
motives failed to be preserved. The answer, ironically, is that
while Pacific
2551 made her last run, news reporters, TV
cameramen and the public were busy viewing the new
replacement, Rail Diesel Car 9058.
This great stainless steel
wonder toured Nova Scotia and
was inspected by over
11,000 people.
Today 9058 is no longer the
great marvel but merely
another piece of commuter equipment running out of Montreal.
Historians and rail buffs may question why one of these
Pacific-type locomotives wasnt saved. But then we ask …
where were you on Aug.
18, 1956?
STEPHEN MORRIS
CANADIAN 323 R A ! L
DID YOU EVER HEAR OF THE MORRIS BURG & OTTAWA ELECTRIC RAILWAY COM­
pany Limited, incorporated under the laws of the Province
of Ontario, Canada, in 1908? Neither had we, but our mem­
ber in Ottawa, Dr. R.F.Legget, sent us a report on it recently. It
seems that this company was originally the Morrisburg Electric Ra­
ilway Company and the proposal was to build an interurban line all
the way to Ste-Therese, Quebec, via Williamsburg and Winchester to
the town or Ormond, Ontario. Ste-Therese was to have been on a br­
anch of the MERC.
In 1909, the MERC obtained powers from the Ontario govern­
ment to extend its line to Ottawa. Other legislation from 1910 to
1919 dealt with arrangements for entry into Ottawa and three ex­
tensions of the time-limit for completing the line. The name-change
occurred in 1910. The capital stock was increased in 1909 and was
changed in 1910. But regardless of these financial capers, the
record of the line ended in 1919.
Mr. John G. Kilt, President of the Morrisburg & Ottawa E­
lectric Railway Company up to 1916, had been a broker and operated
a bookstore on Rideau Street, Ottawa, at one time or another. He
died in 1917.
The Company had an office in the Union Bank Building, 85
Sparks Street, Ottawa, Ontario in 1916.
Further information on this venture would be gratefully
received, if any reader can supply it. Editorial Staff.
IN MID-OCTOBER A YEAR AGO, A -STRANGELY EQUIPPED TRACK-CAR SPUTTERED
into Revelstoke, British Columbia. Fitted with a high-in­
tensity rotating light-beam and a camera mounted out in
front of the car on a long steel pole, the purpose of–the what is
it I was tor e cor d the pro fi 1 e 0 fan y s hap e . hi c h the be ami 11 u min­
ated as it spun around. This intriguing device measured all clear­
ances accurately.
The Southern Railway (United States), which developed this
profile car, leased it to CP RAIL to map cleanances in cuts, tun­
nels, etc., to an accuracy of plus-minus a quarter of an inch.
The profile car was very useful to CP RAIL, since there
are many high-wide loads on the Mountain Subdivision and because of
the studies necessary for proper clearances on the proposed catenary
overhead in this area. For example, the installation of catenary in
the Connaught Tunnel would mean lowering the track level through it
by about 4 feet. The cost of doing this would be quite high, so all
of the clearances must be measured carefully before the decision is
taken.
Philip Mason.
KEELE STREET TO AGINCOURT YARD -NO MORE. IN OCTOBER 1972, CP RAIL
announced that its employee passenger service would be dis­
continued between Agincourt Yard and Keele Street, Toronto.
And so it was. The last run was made on October 29, 1972 at 00:01
hours. A single Budd RDC-2 or RDC-3 DAYLINER was used for this con­
venient but extraordinary service which ran several times daily.
Toronto & York Division TURNOUT.
~ON OUR BACK COVER THIS MONTH IS A PICTURE OF ELDERLY CANADIAN
I~ional Railways 2-8-0 Number 2096 arriving at Victoria, B.C.
Youbou, 82.6 miles distant with 13 cars, on Tuesday evening,
13, 1953. Originally Canadian Northern Railway No. 2096, the
finished her career in August 1955 when she broke a driving
after a 48-year career. Photo courtesy John E. Hoffmeister.
NAT -from
July
engine
axle
CANADIAN RAIL
publlShed by the
CANADIAN RAILROAD mSTOIUCAl ASSOCIATION ~~~,~~,;24u:t1·
.A_sBooiat.e Mern.bershlp lncluding 12 lssues
Canndla.n Rall a. 00 ann.ually
EDITOR S.S. VVorthen LAYOUT & PRODUCTION P Murphy
VISIT THE
Canadian Railway Museum
OPEN MAY -SEPT.
Y f7 VISITEZ L E
J:::AJV Mnsee Ferroviai.·e Canadien
Ll._. OUVERT MAl· SEPT,
CALGARY & SOUTH
OTTAIiA
PACIFIC COAST
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
TORONTO & YORK
AUSTRALIA
ASSOCIATION
WESTERN L.H.Unwin, Secretary,
W. R. Linley,S ec reto ry,
R.H Heyer, Secretory,
D.W,Scafe, Secretory,
DIVISION P.Sher901d,Secretary,
BRANCHES
1727 23rd.Ave.N.W., Calgary, AHa.
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11220 73 Ave., Edmonton,Alto. T6G OC6
P.O.Box 5849, Terminal A, roronto,Ont.M5W
ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVES
L ,5. Loun i tz-S chu fe I. Dept.H i story, No tional Uni ….. Canborra, Au .. t
W.D.McKeown, 6-7, .~ .chome, Vornote-cha, SlJito City,Osoko,Jopon.
K.G. Younger, 267 Vernon Road, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3J 2WI
IP3
FAR EAST
MANITOBA
SASKATCHEWAN
SOUTH AMERICA
SOUTHERN ALBERTA
SOUTHERN ONTARIO
UNITED KINGDOM
J.S.Nicholson, 2306 Arnold Street, Saskatoon, Sosk.
D.J,Howard,Price,Waterhouse & Peate,Caixo 1978, Sao Poulo,BrazJ.L
E.W.Johnson, 4019 Vordell Rood N.W., Calgary, Alberto T3A OC3
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J.H.Sanders, 67 Willow Way, Ampthill, Bedfordshire, England.
Copyright 1973 Prin·ted in Canada on Canadian Paper.

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