Consulter nos archives / Consult our archives

La majorité des documents conservés par le Centre d'archives et de documentation de l'ACHF sont disponibles pour consultation.

Most of the documents kept by the ACHF Archives and Documentation Center are available for consultation.

Canadian Rail 260 1973

Lien vers le document

Canadian Rail 260 1973

L
CA NAD IAN
ERA HEADLIGHTS
MOtYTl?Efll NORJJ
P1Gfo,
\
!:
..
~
….
~
~
SIIOPS f CIJRIIOfIS[S
A-(oro Sf. PAVL
B-HOCHELAGA
c-MONT-ROyAl..
D-ST.DENoS Q.vrE YMU)
c:. ~ .sT. HENRI
f= -YOiJJll . GENL. REPAIR .sHOP
!:

Z
~
..
§
~
iil
2b1., AVE

a
..
%
~
0:
~
~
<1
01.
>:
w J
~ f;

:r
~
.l; ST, tiE~S
262
8-1

PI!]!
~
%
~

~
,.
0
~ –
;; w
~ 3
0:
0

~
I:

0
R A L
MARCH 1949,
G.ORGfY
l
~ ~

g
r

~ ~
0
~ f.
~
L.ACHINE
N~I!T
44f)4 AiE·
1
M. Peter Murphy
W
~~~! ~en Gabriel Cotte lay dying
-=–== J.n 1795, he could not have
– -imagined that his modest
property on the banks of the
little streom just outside the
walls of the Town of Montreal
would, one day, become the
site of a transfer point for
millions of passengers on Mon­
treals urban electric railway.
The City of Montreal, Canada, like most other major cities
in the world, grew from a small, walled settlement, below the Rapids
of La Chine in the St. Lawrence River to a bustling metropolis and
year- round river port. From its early bginnings to the present
day, Montreals development was a steady process that required con­
stant innovation and improvement to maintain its day-to-day order
and its continuing progress.
At an early stage, some form of public transportation be­
came essential and the horse-dravln caleche and rustic wagon ap­
peared, soon to be displaced -at least in part -by the horse­
drawn car running on iron rails. With the perfecting of the trans­
mission and utilization of electricity, electric trams rolled along
the Citys streets and afterwards were, in their turn; displaced by
rubber-tyred busses and an underground METRO subway system.
In the early 1920s, the City of Montreal, Canada, had ex-
panded over a wide area of the Island of Montreal in the St. Law-
rence River, particularly east and west along the river-bank. In
addition to the east-west current of traffic thereby initiated/many
other hundreds of travellers from the surrounding districts of the
Island came to the City to work, to shop and to conduct their bus­
iness.
One of the principle arteries of the growing City was Craig
Street, which ran along the northwest side of the former City wall,
between Notre-Dame and Lagauchetiere Streets, in the valley of the
little rivulet which wound its way from the farmlands on the eastern
slope of Mont-Royal to the Riviere-St-Pierre near St-Henri.
ON THE COVER THIS MONTH IS A 1932 SCENE ON CRAIG STREET IN FRONT OF
Terminus Craig. A route 35 -St-Denis -two-car train emerges
from the east portal of the terminus, while a St-Hubert Street bus
loads passengers in front of the terminal building.
Photo CRHA Archives: MUCTC Col1ectio~.
ON APRIL 9, 1925, THE SITE FOR THE PROPOSED CRAIG STREET TERMINUS
had been expropriated and the shops and dwellings had been vacated
in preparation for demolition. Photo courtesy MUCTC.
As the City began its slow transition from the hill of the
Place dArmes to that of Beaver Hall, in the direction of Mont-Royal,
Craig Street became a more and more congested thoroughfare,carrying
as it did most of the connecting east-west streetcar routes.In 1923,
no less than 18 lines operated along Craig Street in the blocks be­
tween Boulevard St-Laurent and Bleury Street, passing the property
once owned by Gabriel Cotte, in the process. While the bulk of the
traffic flowed east and west, there were several north-south street­
car routes which also terminated in this area.
The most noteworthy of these were the lines on St-Denis
Street, Boulevard St-Laurent, Amherst and Bleury Streets,which were
all important, heavily-travelled lines. As all of these toutes con­
verged to Craig Street, the car-carrying capacity of the twin tracks
was overwhelmed and many traffic-jams, resulting in delays to cars
and passengers,occurred. These chronic congestions on Craig Street
resulted in protracted delays to cars and crews and, in fact, added
several extra miles and many minutes to the runs of some of the
streetcars. This was a serious and intolerable situation for the
Montreal Tramways Company.
Since the patterns of traffic in this area of Montreal had
now been firmly established, the Montreal Tramways Company decided
in 1924 to erect a Central Passenger Terminal on Craig Street. It
was intended to remove the passenger-transfer traffic from the
I
, ,

CANADIAN
265
R A I L
street and thus accelerate the streetcars.
The terminal was to be located strategically between St­
Urbain and Cote Streets, on the north side of Craig Street, midway
between the two important north-south arteries of Bleury Street and
Boulevard St-Laurent. The new terminal, it was hoped, would elimin­
ate once and for all the chronic problem of traffic-jams on Craig
Street. And it proved to be a plan that worked.
Land was acquired on the west side of the Montreal Light ,
Heat and Power Companys building at 107 Craig Street West.In later
years, the Montreal Tramways Company would build their head-office
building at 159 Craig Street West and these two buildings, together
with the new terminal and the yards and carbarns at the rear, would
form the nerve-centre of the MTC operations in central Montreal. In
the 150-year period since Gabriel Cotte had owned this land, many
things had occurred. I n fact, in later years, the Montreal School
of Medicine and Surgery stood on this site~
At the beginning of the twentieth century, there was on
this property a row of two and three-story shops and dwellings, uni-
que to the Craig Street area. The parcel of land contemplated for
ONE MONTH AND FOUR DAYS LATER -MAY 13, 1925 -ONLY A FEW BRICKS WERE
left on the lot at the corner of Graig and Cote Streets. Admittedly,
there were also two trees at the rear of the property.
Photo courtesy MUCTC.
r,. oJ
CANADIAN
266
R A I L
the new building actually measured 118 feet 6 inches frontage on
Craig Street and 275 feet 9 inches in depth, north along Cote Street.
Early in 1925, the few small buildings remaining on the site were de­
molished and the land was levelled and readied for the start of con­
struction in May of that year.
The new streetcar passenger terminal was planned to be an
impres$ive structure, indeed. The front was to be built of Benedict
stone and would occupy the full frontage on Craig Street. The depth
of the building was 216 feet, the remaining 59 feet and a few inches
would be used for streetcar storage tracks and facilities and an
automobile garage. In actual fact, the building was not designed to
be a terminal in the strict sense of the word. Rather, it was a
two-sided streetcar station, with a concourse in between.
The construction of the new terminal took some seven mon­
ths to complete and streetcars first used it on December 20, 1925 ,
in the midst of the pre-Christmas hustle and bustle. The completed
building was no less impressive than the designers initial sketches.
The frontal facade had two large arched entrances for single tracks
on the east and west sides, through which westbound and eastbound
cars could loop around to return in the opposite direction. On the
east side, St-Urbamn Street provided the right-of-way outside the
terminal building for the turning operation, while Chenneville Str­
eet was used on the west.
Six massive Ionic columns stood before seven bronze doors
in the facade of the building. This was the main passenger access to
the concourse of the terminal. The interior was designed after the
most profound study of the traffic requirements. It was functional
and very modern for that time, having most of the facilities avail­
able in todays METRO stations. –
——
Power 8Ldg
·····B·····-=-~~ …….
~
—–c—t ……… -…… —C··-7S-~ .. 9-·-·—·—–~ ……. -~~
Cote Sf
Slr …. .( J.c,(1 I.ayoul. !1onlrcllllIlInW8)8 CO. Craig st. PU9cnIJer Terminal.
CANADIAN 267
I
L
:1

I:

I
,i
·1
,
R A I L
/.
C
..
~.l f~
o..J ~~
ci ?;
I
.,… …
/
i c 1

CA NAD I AN 269 R A I L
In the main concourse, there was a drug store, a tobac-
conists shop, a newspaper stand, a confectionary shop and clothing
stores for men and women. A ticket office for tramway patrons, a
lost-and-found office and toilet facilities were located nearby,
On both sides of the concourse and separated from it by
swinging doors, were the boarding platforms, on the same level as
the concourse, 16 feet wide and some 216 feet long. In spite of the
length of platform provided, it was not unusual to see, at the peak
of operation, cars waiting on Craig Street and St-Urbain Street, to
enter the terminus.
The entire terminal was designed for maximum efficiency, pas-
senger convenience and attractive appearance. Indeed, during its
first months of operation, the new terminal proved to be so effi-
cient that, within a short time, it exceeded the Companys wildest
expectations. The congestion on Craig Street disappeared like magic.
Streetcars caming along Craig Street from the east turned
north on St-Urbain and ran along the east side of the street to a
tunnel entrance, where they made a complete 180-degree turn west to
south through the rear of the Montreal Light, Heat & Power Companys
building, emerging inside the terminal at the eastbound platform.
After unloading and loading, the cars cautiously emerged from the
eastern portal of the building, turning east on Craig for their out­
ward journey.
Cars coming along Craig Street from the west turned
and immediately entered the terminal through the west portal.
discharging and receiving passengers, the cars exited from
building onto Cot~ Street, through the st0rage yards west to
neville Street. Here,they turned south to Craig Street, where
turned west to continue their outward runs.
north
After
the
Chen­
they
When the terminal was first opened, no less than 13 car-
lines turned here and some 18 lines in all were affected in one way
or another. But the destination signs of incoming cars were uniform­
ly the same and it was from these signs that the terminal became known
to most Montrealers as Terminus Craig-Craig Terminus.
The streetcar route-numbers displaying this sign at
beginning were the following:
1 -Amherst 55 -St-Laurent
23 -St-Denis/Ahunsic 68 -St-Denis/Cremazie
35 -St-Denis/Christophe-Coloumb 77 -St-Denis/Mile End
the
All of these routes entered the east side of Terminus Craig.
Cars arriving from the west and north routes, through the
western portal of the building, were:
9 -Windsor/St-Denis
31 -St-Henri/Notre-Dame-de-Grace
49 -St-Henri/Short Line
60 -Wellington/Short Line
———–
64
80
96 –
Sherbrooke Street W/
Notre-Dame-de-Grace
-Bleury
-Van Horne
THIS IS HOW TUMINUS CRAIG LOOKED IN FEBRUARY, 1926, SOME TWO MON­
ths after it had been opened to the public. A route 9 -Windsor­
St-Denis -car enters the terminal on the west loop, while a route
35 -St-Denis -car emerges through the east portal. In front of
the terminus, a primitive autobus, probably a St-Hubert Street run,
loads passengers. Photo courtesy MUCTC.
CANADIAN
270 R A I L
With the opening of Terminus Craig -and some minor adjust­
ments in the streetcar routes -the beneficial results were immed­
iately apparent. Congestion on Craig Street, between Bleury and
Boulevard St-Laurent, became a thing of the past and the trams could
maintain their schedules without difficulty.
It was possible to cut approximately 6 minutes from the
schedule of every car on routes using Craig Street. Moreover, some
600 car-~les were saved each day with the opening of the new trans­
fer point. Several streetcar stops in the vicinity of Terminus Craig
were also eliminated, with the centralization of passenger facilitie~
in the majestic and modern building.
But the numbers of vehicles other than streetcars on Craig
Street continued to increase and the Montreal Tramways Company was
obliged to install a traffic light on Craig Street in the 1920s, to
halt motor traffic while streetcars exited from Terminus Craig via
the portal on the east side. This was the first traffic light to be
installed on a street in Montreal.
The unrestricted right-of-way which the streetcars enjoyed
in the new terminal simplified and facilitated the turning of large
numbers of cars. No switching or reverse movements were necessary.
The cars could unload and reload passengers through all doors in
rush-hour periods, as passengers deposited their fares in fare-boxes
as they passed from Craig Street into the terminal concourse. Pas­
sengers transferring from a west-end route to an eastbound car sim­
ply crossed the concourse from one loading platform to the other at
Terminus Craig.
When Terminus Claig had been in use for a few months,traf­
fic checks showed that, on an average day between 5.00 and 6.00 p.m.
some 110 cars entered the terminal on the west loop and about 130
cars entered on the east loop. On one extraordinary day, 168 cars
per hour were accommodated on one loop only, when a fire in the
vicinity required the rerouting of a number of streetcar lines to
the opposite side of the terminal.
From the day of its opening, Terminus Craig played a most
important role in the operation of Montreals urban transit system.
It handled an ever-increasing number of passengers each succeeding
year, including the unanticipated increases generated by World War
II. However, times were changing and the rubber-tyred autobus was
carrying a larger and larger percentage of the travellers in Mon­
treal. In the initial years of bus operation, as evidenced by some
of the pictures accompanying this article, busses loaded on Craig
Street in front of the terminal, but were not operated through the
building, as streetcar traffic was given priority over the east
and west loop-tracks.
At the beginning of the 1950s, the age of the streetcar in
Terminus Craig was drawing to a close. As route after route was bus­
sed, the rubber-tyred vehicles finally broke the electric barrier
and began to use the private right-of-way in the terminal, hitherto
TWENTY-FOUR DAYS BEFORE CHRISTMAS, 1928, THE VIEW ON CRAIG STREET
looking east from St-Urbain included a congested mixture of autos,
trucks, trams and horse-drawn wagons. The tracks in the lower left
corner of the picture curve north and loop around to become the
east loop of Terminus Craig. Photo CRHA Archives: MUCTC Collection.

—————
CA NAD I AN 273 R A I L
reserved for the streetcars. This new practice, however, was not
without incident, as, on more than one occasion, a red-faced bus-
driver was embarrassed by the sound of his bus-body scraping along
one of the stone walls at the entrance or exit to the building. Al­
though adequate for the streetcars, the clearances had not been cal­
culated for non-rail vehicles and the busses required very careful
manoeuvering to keep them on a true -and unscraped -course, thr­
ough the terminal.
The first major reduction in streetcar service which af­
fected Terminus Craig occurred in October 1952, with the conversion
of t~e Boulevard St-Laurent route to busses. The St-Denis route was
converted only one year later, in 1953. These streetcar lines had
formerly turned on the east loop of Terminus Craig and the busses
which replaced the trams were soon the major users of the east side
of the terminus. With the advent of busses on St-Denis Street, the
two-car streetcar trains in Montreal virtually disappeared. For many
years, these trainsets of one motor, one trailer, had provided re­
liable service on the two above-mentioned routes. Although these two­
streetcar trains were subsequently used on other toutes in the City,
they were never utilized to the degree that they were on the St-
Laurent and St-Denis lines.
And so, line by line, the tram routes were replaced by bus-
ses, until, in 1957, the Papineau and Rosemont Avenue routes were
cut back east to Papineau Square in the east-central part of the
City and streetcar operation on the east loop of Terminus Craig was no
more.
On the west side of the Terminus, the situation was no more
encouraging. Notre-Dame and Sherbrooke Streets and Girouard Avenue
routes having been converted to bus operation, the only streetcar
lines turning through Terminus Craig were Number 96, Van Horne Aven­
ue and Number 80, Bleury-Park Avenue. These operations were also of
short duration and both were bussed in August 1958. And the clang of
the streetcar gong was heard no more at Terminus Craig.
Nevertheless, the terminal building was to provide several
more years of efficient accommodation to Montrealers, albeit by bus
rather than by streetcar. Moreover, by 1970, a walk-way connected
it to the underground Place dArmes METRO station, thus providing
access to a new and different rail-travel mode in Montreal.
In 1971, the Government of Quebec decided to push on with
the construction of the mid-Montreal portion of the Trans-Canada Hi­
ghway. Building this bi-level expressway necessitated considerable
open-cut construction and the surveyed route passed close behind
Terminus Craig. For this reason, Terminus Craig finally had to be
closed to busses, since there was no longer sufficient turning space
at the rear to permit the busses to exit from the building. Cote
Street had disappeared and so had the car-storage yard and the barns.
At the same time, the Montreal Light, Heat and Power Companys build­
ing on the east side of Terminus Craig was demolished.
But Terminus Craig still stands in 1973. Its twin tramway
portals on the east and west sides are now sealed and the terrazo
_______ IL..!lI __
~MTC CAR 2004 ON ROUTE 1 -AMHERST -DEPARTS FROM THE EAST SIDE OF
Terminus Craig, while a single car and a two-car train wait for a
route 97 -Van Horne -car to enter the terminus. A year later, in
1933, Car 2004 was converted to a double-end car. The large stone
building on the west side of the terminus is the Montreal Tramways
Companys headquarters, which today is still the headquarters of
the Montreal Urban Community Transit Commission.
Photo CRHA Archives: MUCTC Collection.

.A ONL Y EIGHT MONTHS BEFORE THE
~I last streetcar operation in
Terminus Craig, MTC car 1683 ~ ..
on route 80 -Bleury -waits
for passengers, one November night in 1957. Photo courtesy F.F.Angus.
MTC CAR 1317 EXITS NORTH FROM THE WEST SIDE OF TERMINUS CRAIG, PASSING
along Cote Street through the yards to Chenneville and Craig Streets.
Today, this car is at the Canadian Railway Museum.Photo courtesy D. Latour.
~ CAR 1683, A CONVERTED TRAILER FOR ONE-MAN OPERATION, CAME AROUND THE
1rwest loop onto Chenneville Street, in the last days of streetcar op­
eration in Terminus Craig. The notice was posted in the fourth window.
Photo by the Author.
THE STREETCARS WERE REPLACED AT
ses. Here is MTC Number 5117 on
minus onto Cote Street.
TERMINUS CRAIG BY GENERAL MOTORS BUS­
May 31, 1970, exiting from the ter­
Photo courtesy D. Latour.
concourse no longer echos to the passage of hundreds of hustling
commuters, hurrying to catch their streetcars. Through the east side
of the building, there is the access passage to the Place dArmes
METRO station and, during the morning and evening rush-hours, thou­
sands of Montrealers still animate the historic building. The sec­
ond floor is occupied by the Bus Planning Division of the Montreal
Urban Community Transit Commission. Were it not for the fact that
space was not available elsewhere for this department,Terminus Craig
might have been demolished in 1972.
Well then, how long will Terminus Craig hold out? There
is no certain answer to this question and, when the time comes, no
amount of clamour from the antiquarians and architects will postpone
the inevitable march of progress. When that day comes, some Mon-
trealers may perhaps recall a few of the nearly 50 years during
which millions of travellers began and ended their daily journeys
in this famous building. Most will not remember, but there will
surely be a few who will never forget Montreals great downtown
streetcar station, Terminus Craig.
Sources
CANADIAN RAIL various issues
C.R.H.A. NEWS REPORT various issues
CANADIAN RAILWAY AND MARINE WORLD April, 1926
Acknowledgements
The author would like to thank the following people for their
assistance in the preparation of this article:
Mr. F.F.Angus
Mr. Denis Latour
M. Roger Legault, ing.
M. Guy Jeanotte
The late R.S.Echlin
Westmount, Quebec
Dorval, Quebec
Engineering Division, MUCTC
Director of Public Relations,
former Official Photographer,
MUCTC
MUCTC
THE fAR -WEST TROLLEY
Being an Appreciation of the Streetcars of
Victoria, British Columbia.
John E. Hoffmeister
O
nce upon a time, British Columbias capital
city of Victoria on Vancouver Island, like
most large cities in North America, had an
extensive, efficient electric railway sys-
tem. For th~ 58 years of its continuous operation,
from its inauguration in 1890, the street railway
system kept expanding to its ultimate development
as a city system, fed by a busy interurban route.
It maintained this stable condition for 40 years, but finally
succumbed to the unnatural competition of road transport. Now, 25
years after the abandonment of the streetcar and interurban systems,
soaring numbers of private automobiles, impending gasoline shortag­
es, noisy diesel busses and an increasingly-aware, pollution-con-
scious public all make one wonder at the untimely and, in retro-
spect, unjustified abandonment of this type of public transport.
It is correct to say that the electric railway created no en­
vironmental pollution. In general, the noisiest of electric cars
was quieter than the quietest of busses. Above all, streetcars were
a reliable and inexpensive means of transportation for a significant
number of Victorias citizens. On analysis, it could be said that
Victorias electric railway system was fairly typical of those that
could be found across the length and breadth of North America,thir­
ty-or-so years ago.
Street railway service in Victoria began on Saturday, February
22, 1890, when single-truck Car 1 of the National Electric Tramways
ventured forth along the tracks on Store Street, in the direction
of the downtown area. A generating station at Store Street furnish­
ed the power for the system, which had a handful of single-truck
cars, providing Victorians with the beginnings of modern trans­
portation.
Service was interrupted briefly in 1892, when a fire burned out
part of the generating station. Electricity was then a tricky thing
to handle. Records of this period of the systems history, prior to
the purchase of the original company by the British Columbia Elec­
tric Railway, are rather sketchy, so one can only assume that Na­
tional Electric never thought much about major expansions of the
sjstem, other than to the municipalities of Oak Bay and Esquimalt.
With the acquisition of the system by the BCER in 1897, major
improvements in service followed rapidly. Routes were extended and
new cars purchased. The Ross Bay line, which served the southernmost
sections of Victoria, was extended to Foul Bay in 1904. Electric
cars reached the Gorge, a scenic saltwater arm of the Pacific Ocean,
in 1905 and the Hillside District in 1912. Excursions were a popular
diversion then, and the Company ran cars to the Gorge Park and to
Windsor Park in Oak Bay. These excursions were well patronized until
Henry Fords machine finally stole their passengers.
By the 1920s, heavy double-truck cars were speeding to the Up­
lands, Burnside, the Willows, Gonzales, Hillside, Mount Tolmie, Gor-
• SEVEN OF VICTORIA S
1r corner of Saratoga,
Electric Park -now
1892.
STREETCARS LINED UP ON
to take the crowd from
Windsar Park -back to
Photo courtesy
NEWPORT AVENUE, NEAR THE
a lacrosse match at B.C.
the City. The year was
Archives of Br~tish Columbia.
ge and Esquimalt. But it was on June 18, 1913, with the opening of
the Saanich Interurban Line by Provincial Premier Richard McBride,
that Victorias electric system finally reached its most ambitious
extent.
This new 22-mile-Iong line began at Douglas and Pandora Streets
and ran north along Douglas to Burnside Road, where it turned onto
its own private right-of-way. Onward, the line followed the western
slope of the Saanich Peninsula, to Brentwood Bay. Turning northeast,
it passed through Saanichton, missed the town of Sidney -the Vic­
toria & Sidney Railway had the franchise here -and terminated at
Deep Bay, later renamed Deep Cove.
Officially, the interurban line was known as District 5 of
the British Columbia Electric Railway, because the BCER had four
other lines with interurban status on the lower mainland of British
Columbia. These were Central Park, Lulu Island, Fraser Valley and
Burnaby Lake.
Construction of the Saanich Interurban line resulted in an ex­
penditure of over a million dollars and included a very short branch
to Meadowlands, a locality on the shore at Patricia Bay. Freight tr­
affic never developed to a significant degree, owing to the presence
of two competing common carriers on the Saanich Peninsula. These
were the Victoria & Sidney Railway, previously mentioned, and the
Canadian Northern Pacific Railway of Messrs. Mackenzie and Mann,
which later became part of the Canadian National Railway Company.
The Victoria & Sidney was abandoned in 1919 and the CNR line is
mostly dismembered today. But the abandonment of the V&S was too
late to save the Saanich Interurban.
CANADIAN
279
R A I L
Original equipment on the Saanich line consisted of eight heavy
steel interurban cars, built by the St. Louis Car Company, St. Louis,
Missouri, U.S.A. and carrying road numbers 1237 through 1244. The
St. Louies had been built for a Stone and Webster Company line in
the United States, but were picked up by the BCER when the original
sale failed to materialize. Initially, the cars were painted Pullman
green, with black underbody and gold lettering. It was not until
later years that the more familiar red and cream colour-scheme of
the BCER appeared, identifying at a glance the Saanich Interurban
cars as being part of the BCER electric traction empire~
By 1922, the interurban was in serious trouble. A highly com­
petitive bus service had been inaugurated on the peninsula and, be­
fore long, the 1200s had departed for the mainland electric dis­
tricts, where their capacious interiors could be filled with pas­
sengers more routinely. Their replacements on the interurban run
were two city cars from Victorio, Numbers 22 and 23.
This last-ditch attempt to maintain service unfortunately -or
inevitably -proved ineffectual and the interurban line faded into
JL CONSOLIDATED RAILWAY & LIGHT COMPANYS SINGLE-TRUCK CAR 14 ON THE FORT
Street, Victoria run in 1896. The track is completely weed-grown after
only six years of service.
, –
~CAR 22, WITH MOTORMAN AND CONDUCTOR, PAUSES IN OAK BAY MUNICIPALITY
I~ in the 1920s. Car 22 relieved the St. Louis interurbans on the Saan­
ich run and ended her career on Route 10 -Mt. Tolmie.
BCER DOUBLE-TRUCK CAR 235 ON ROUTE 3 -BE~ON HILL -TRAVELLING ALONG
Superior Street towards Government Street Ln June, 1948.
Photos courtesy Archives of British Columbia.

CA NAD I AN
282 R A I L
the sunset on October 31, 1924. Cars 22 & 23 finished their days on
Route 10, Mount Tolmie.
Today, it is possible to drive along most of the old interurban
right-of-way by taking Wallace Drive in Central Saanich Municipality,
Tatlow Road in North Saanich Municipality and -of course -Interur­
ban Road in Saanich itself. The rails were taken up in the spring
after the abandonment (1925), thus demoting the Victoria system to
a streetcar only operation and writing finis to the only attempt
to create an interurban system on Vancouver Island.
The British Columbia Electric Railway Company was fortunate in
having shops with better-than-average equipment at Kitsilano, on
the mainland in Vancouver. While the Company generally ordered cars
from the Preston Car and Coach Company of Preston, Ontario, the St.
Louis Car Company of St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A. and the J.G. Brill
Company of Philadelphia, U.S.A., as well as several minor builders.
it relied heavily on home-built cars for many of its urban and sub­
urban -or interurban -lines.
The majority of Victorias streetcars were wooden-bodied, dou­
ble-truck, single-entrance, rear-exit trams, in charge of a motor-
man-conductor. The cars ran on routes which fanned out over the
city from a central depot, located at Pandora and Douglas Streets.
An intri~ate ~ystem of switches gave access to the street from the
barn. Car maintenance was generally carried out in the shops along
Pembroke and Chatham Streets, adjacent to the Albion Yards of the
Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway.
During the final years of operation, service in Victoria was
provided by a fleet of 10 Company-built Birney cars, Numbers 400
through 409, and about 30 of the longer and heavier double-truck
cars. During World War II, the Victoria streetcar system carried
more than 14 million passengers annually. Perhaps the most inter­
esting sight in that era was Car 252, or one of its counterparts,
on Route 9 -Uplands, charging along the private right-of-way thr­
ough Uplands Park in Oak Bay Municipality, to the picturesque loop
at Midland Circle, where the motorman had always to step down from
the front entrance, with the switch-iron, to line the switch for
the journey back to the city.
When World War II ended the Company lost no time in announ­
cing to the travellers (1946~ that the Victoria streetcar operation
would be converted entirely to busses. It was their intention, how­
ever, to phase out the trams gradually, route by route. It was ra­
ther ironic that many of the streetcars had been completely rebuilt
and repainted only a year or two before the end of the service. In
the opinion of some -amongst whom is the writer of this article
that, had several of the larger routes been retained, with the log­
ical conversion of the shorter runs,such as Outer Wharf, to bus op­
eration, Victoria would have retained a streetcar system which would
have been, at one and the same time, an unequalled transit system
and a unique tourist attraction. But this was not to be.
The end came on Monday, July 5, 1948, when Motorman Walter
Peddle notched up the controller on Car 383, rolling out of the
barns for the last run to Beacon Hill, bringing down the curtain on 58
years of electric streetcar operation in the city of Victoria.
Car 383, lined in black crepe and adorned with special signs
for this last run, carried a large crowd of nostalgic well-wishers,
very few of whom were joyful on this particular occasion. With the
l

BRITISH COLUMBIA ELECTRIC RAILWAY COMPANYS CAR 383 WAS ABLAZE WITH
lights before commencing its final run on July 5, 1948. A funerial
atmosphere was created by lengths af black crepe which hung from
the sills and rattan seats to the slotted floor. Numerous special
posters were displayed above the windows for the final run.
MOTORMAN WALTER PEDDLE TOOK CAR 383 PAST THE EMPRESS HOTEL OF THE
Canadian Pacific Railway Company for the very last time on Monday,
July 5, 1948. The 47 Dodge motor car in the inbound lane would be
as much of a rarity today as would the 303~
Photos courtesy Archives of British Columbia.
symbolic reversal of the trolley pole at Niagara and Douglas Streets,
adjacent to Beacon Hill Park, Car 383 rumbled off towards the City,
to disappear forever.
The bodies of a selected few of the streetcars were subsequent­
ly purchased by private citizens for summer cottages and storage sh­
eds, the inevitable fate of all redundant streetcars and were set up
at various locations on Vancouver Island.
But, in time, and with very few exceptions, these too reverted
to piles of decaying wood. Happily, there was one notable exception,
Car 400, a single-truck Birney Safety Car, which was to enjoy a bet­
ter fate. This car was restored to its original appearance and is
today in the Provincial Museum at Victoria -as recounted in another
article in CANADIAN RAIL.
The remainder of the cars, including Number 383, were unceremon­
iously scrapped and burned in the E&N yards, in the fall of 1948. It
was a sad occasion. Ironically, they were towed there by an 0-6-0
steam engine, a switcher which would itself in one short year be
replaced by the increasingly-popular diesel-electric locomotive.
When the busses arrived in Victoria, they were Canadian Car &
Foundry Company C-36 models, along with a handful of the Mack Motor
Car Companys product. In 1957, General Motors of Canada and Can­
adian Car and Foundry diesel busses appeared, which, in time and
under British Columbia Hydro Authority control, would displace the
original gas busses, sending them, in their turn, to the scrap-yard
and the camp-site.
Service to suburban areas around Victoria improved greatly with
the advent of the highway bus, but service in the capital city has
suffered commensurately. The only legacy from the streetcar era
other than the partly covered ~ails at Midland Circle -are the fare­
boxes on the busses. They are the v~ry same fare-boxes that used to
ride the rails and today roll through Victorias streets and sub­
urbs in rubber-tyred, panorama-windowed boxes~
And speaking of busses, perhaps the most interesting rubber­
tyred vehicles on Victorias streets in 1973 are several, original
London (England) Transport double-decker busses, operated by as
many companies. But these are for tourists and in real service, it
would take a good few of them to carry the rush-hour crowds that
once enjoyed dependable daily transportation on Victorias far-west
electric railways.
September, 1973.
A SHORT LIFE -AND AN UNHAPPY ONE~ FOR THE THIRD TIME SINCE 1968,
United Aircraft Companys TURBOTRAIN rolled out of the
dark caverns of Canadian Nationals Central Station, Mon­
treal, to the trumpets and drums of CNs p.r. and advertising peo­
ple. The new TURBO was in the expanded nine-car configuration and
its schedule had been lengthened from 3 hours 59 minutes to 4 hours
10 minutes for the Montreal-Toronto run. UAC said that more than 120
modifications had been made since the train was removed from service
on 1 February 1971.
And on 22 June 1973, the sleek, high-speed TURBO resumed pas­
senger service on the 335-mile run between Montreal and Toronto.
And on 23 June 1973, the sleek, crestfallen TURBO crept back
to the caverns of CNJs Central Station, after the westbound set had
failed and surrendered its passengers to a regular train.
If at first you dont succeed .••••••••••••.•••.•
Well, lVe could try an ad in tlte paper-low mileage, like TlelV, OTIC owner …
Courtesy Yardley Jones & Montreal STAR
CA NAD I AN 286 R A I L
WHO IS DOING WHAT, AND WITH WHICH, AND TO WHOM? IN AN INTERVIEW
with a reporter from the Lethbridge HERALD on 9 June 1973,
Mr. Pierre Burton, author of THE GREAT RAILWAY 1881-1885 ,
told of how he was supervising the production of the Canadian Broad­
casting Corporations more-expensive-than-Jalna, ten-part documentary
on the building of the Canadian Pacific Railway. Mr. Burton affirmed
that he was a stickler for accuracy and, in fact, had historical con­
trol written into his contract with the CBC. Mr. Burton confirmed
that a team of researchers had been working for twelve months on
everything from how rails were laid in the 80s to construction-cr­
ew costumes.
It sounded as though the TV production would be a model of
historical accuracy. Shortly thereafter, it became a little hard to
reconcile these statements with two articles which appeared in the
May and June 1973 issues of Canadian National Railways KEEPING
TRACK. In the May issue, there was an account by Maurice Simms of
the filming of the Driving of the last S pike on the Canadian Paci f­
ie ceremony, which was re-enacted on a seldom-used Canadian Nation­
al line near Caledon East, 30 miles northwest of Toronto, Ontario ,
and 2000 miles east of Craigellachie, B.C. The story said that the
Caledon West location had similar terrain. The location of nearby
firs, and other leofless trees, helped re-create accurately the
scene on the snowless November day when the last spike was hammered home •
The story said that the historical event could not be film­
ed at the original site at Craigellachie, British Columbia, near Re­
velstoke, because a lot of chonges have taken place there since 1885~
In the June issue of KEEPING TRACK, another article explain­
ed that former Canadian IJational Railways baggage car Number 8029,
now the property of the Alberta Pioneer Railway Association, and
built originally as a coach in 1877 for the Intercolonial Railway,
would, later this summer, be used in the filming of the CBCs tele­
vision series based on Mr. Pierre Burtons two books about the con­
struction of the Canadian Pacific.
A postscript to this article noted that Canadian National
had helped the Canadion Broadcasting Corporation in its filming of
the CPR history on two previous occasions: the one described above
at Caledon East and earlier in the year at CNs ornote Parkdale
station at Toronto.
But never mind~ A return to historical accuracy -or a rea­
sonable facsimile thereof -was reported by the Lethbridge HERALD.
Some of the record track-laying scenes were filmed on CP RAILs
Strathmore Subdivision (Gleichen to Shepard, Alberta), about fifty
miles east of Calgary. According to Mr. Burton, scenes for the fifth
episode, The Railway General, were filmed on the Cassils Sub­
division, a branch from the Brooks Subdivision (Medicine Hat to Br­
ooks, Alberta).
The track-laying sequence, to appear in the Sixth or Seven­
th Episode, will last 30 seconds on the TV screen.
Ex-Canadian Pacific Railway 4-4-0 Number 136, owned by Mr.
Niel McCarten of Toronto, Ontario, ond leased and restored to opera­
ting condition by Ontario Rail Association, is reported by the HER­
ALD to be masquerading as Number 144 and in its guise as CPR 144,
it will carry a sporty, diamond-shoped affair on top, along with a
new number, 148.
If the reader finds some of the foregoing slightly contra­
dictory and somewhat incredible, he is invited to ponder on an in-
CANADIAN
287 R A I L
direct remark by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Producer Jim
Murray, who would only say, when questioned, that the series would be
the most expensive production the CBC has ever done ••••• bigger
than Jalna.
According to present CBC plans, the series will be televis­
ed at 21:00 hours (9 p.m.) each Sunday night in March and April 1974.
It ought to be quite a production~ And completely historically ac­
curate, of course~
STEAM POWER CONTINUES TO MAKE THE HEADLINES IN EASTERN CANADIAN NEWS­
papers. After the Delaware & Hudson GREAT STEAM SPECTACULAR
of 28-29 April, ex-Canadian Pacific Railway class D-10 Num­
ber 1057, ran from West Toronto to Orangeville, Ontario, on 27 May,
restored by the Ontario Rail Association and lettered Credit Valley
Railway. The same locomotive was reported to have run again on June
2, from John Street, Toronto, to the festival at Unionville, at
times with a little help from her friends, a Canadian National Ra-
ilways diesel unit~ A third excursion took place on 23 June, when Number 1057
hauled some 300 people to Orangeville – a second time~
At the beginning of July, Number 1057 was leased by the National Ca­
pital Commission of Ottawa, to haul excursion trains on Sundays
only (July & August) from the Nations capital to Carleton Place,31.8
miles west. Mr. Dave McIntosh, Adviser to Communications Policy of
the NCC told a reporter of the Ottawa CITIZEN that the experimental
operation would incur a deficit of around $ 30,000, despite the
income from tickets at $ 5 each. Some $ 50,000 from the NCCs opera­
ting budget set up the project.
Meanwhile, and as recounted elsewhere, Niel McCartens ex­
CPR 4-4-0 Number 136 was certified for operation by CP RAIL and the
Railway Transport Committee on 27 May and loaded on a flat car for
the journey west to Calgary, arriving there on 30 May. Thereafter,
Number 136 appeared in the CBCs TV production of THE GREAT RAILWAY.
While all this was going on west of Winnipeg, Dr. David
Baird of Ottawas Museum of Science and Technology finalized an
agreement with the Ontario Rail Association for the repair to run­
ning condition of ex-Canadian Pacific Railway 4-6-2 Number 1201,ex­
hibited at the museum for the last several years. A side-wall of the
museum had to be breached to permit Number 1201 to reach the roils
of Canadian National Railways, nearby. The locomotive was send to
CP RAILs John Street roundhouse, Toronto, where it arrived on 1
June 1973.
With regret, it is reported that Ontario Northland Railway
steam locomotive Number 137 (ex-Canadian National Railways Number
2164) was damaged beyond repair in the roundhouse fire at Englehart,
Ontario, last autumn.
As described in the article by Mr. Barry Macleod of Sydney,
Nova Scotia, the CAPE BRETON STEAM RAILWAY made its first official
run on 1 July 1973, with steam engine Number 42 on the head-end.
South of the border, the Delaware & Hudson was planning
trips with pairs of its PA 1s, during the late summer and autumn.
And as if all this werent enough, STEAMTOWN of Bellows Falls, Vt.,
is planning to bring back ex-Nickel Plate berkshire Number 759 for
a one-way trip from Boston, MASS to Montpelier, VT , this fall -or
so the story goes. S.S.Worthen.
CANADIAN
288
R A I L
FOR THE PAST SEVERAL YEARS, THE GEOGRAPHY DIVISION OF THE SURVEYS
and Mapping Branch, Department of Energy, Mines and Re­
sources, Government of Canada, has been working hard to
produce a definitive map of the railways of Canada of today, large
and small. In this project, they have been assisted by members of
the Canadian Railroad Historical Association. These two new maps
one for eastern and one for western Canada -have been produced in
the English and French languages and will form part of the National
Atlas of Canada (1972).
In fact, the new maps show both the railways and canals of
Canada and are very accurate. Canadian National Railways are shown
in red, while CP RAIL lines are printed in blue, which is a change
from the traditional practice when the Canadian Pacific Railway was
the All-Red Route. Other railways are shown in black, with abbre­
viations of the names of the different companies.
The new maps are ideal for the railway enthusiast,although
the railway historian is somewhat at a disadvantage since former
railway lines, now relocated or abandoned, are not shown. However,
for general purposes, the new maps of Canadas railways and canals
are most informative and useful and their creators in the Geography
Division are to be congratulated on their publication.
Further information on these maps of Canadas railways and
canals may be obtained by writing CRHA PUBLICATIONS, P.O.Box 148,
Saint-Constant, Quebec.
IN MID-JULY 1973, THE CAPE BRETON STEAM RAILWAYS NUMBER 42 AND
three passenger coaches ran from Victoria Junction to Syd­
ney, Nova Scotia, over the tracks of the DEVCO Railway and
through the interchange Ii th Canadian National Railways, to the main
line west. Spurred on by her phenomenal summer success, Number 42 &
train were headed for the Canso Causeway, but stopped about four
miles west on CNs Sydney Subdivision at Sydney River. The trip out
and back was a surprise to the local residents, as it was the first
time that they had seen -and heard – a steam locomotive on the main
line since CN ceased steam locomotive operation in the early 1960s.
Barry Macl eod.
FIRST WEllAND, THEN NIAGARA FAllS AND NOW ST. THOMAS,ONTARIO, HAVE
made arrangements with Canadian National and ather railway
companies to relocate their lines in these cities to the
mutual advantage of city and railway. St. Thomas, a mid-southwestern
Ontario city, population 25,000, endured 26 freights daily over the
80 miles of trackage through the city. Necessary, according to city
fathers, is a drastic improvement in this situation.
Timing: over the next 15 years; cost: about $ 18 million.
Proposal: consolidation of east-west rail lines on a new route to
the north of the city. Financing: relocation cost, $ 18 million;
credit for salvage value of railway material and land, $ 2.8 million.
Alternative cost of an in-city expressway connection to
Highway 401 would be $ 1.75 million with an added out-of-city con­
nection to Highway 401 expense of $ 17 million.
The city fathers know what they want to do and how they
p~opose to do it. Now, its just a matter of convincing Federal and
Provincial governments that they should help with this essential
project.
W.J.Bedbrook.
CANADIAN 289
R A I L
CONSERVATIONISTS AND POLITICIANS ARE CONTINUING THE BATTLE OVER THE
transportation mode to be used to bring oil from the Arctic
shores and goods from Canadas southern latitudes to the
Northwest Territories and the North Slope areas. The Federal Gov­
ernment ordered a full stop in the construction of the highway to
the Northwest Territories late in 1972 and a further one-year delay
has been recommended so that the alternative of a railway can be
given more thorough study.
Walter Firth, newly elected New Democratic Party represen­
tative for the Northwest Territories says a railway would be cheap­
er to build, ecologically safer and economically more beneficial to
the North. Bryan Pearson, Eastern Arctic member of the Territorial
Council, recommends that the existing Great Slave Lake Railway to
Hay River and Pine Point, N.W.T., be extended to link the Arctic
Ocean coast, the west coast of Hudson Bay and the port of Churchill,
Manitoba.
That certainly would be some railway~
John Welsh.
MR. HAL RIEGGER, OUR MEMBER FROM NORTHERN CALIFORNIA, WAS EXPLORING
the former Great Northern Railway (U.S.A.) branch from Oro­
ville, Washington, U.S.A. to Princeton, B.C., this July.
The highway between Keremeos and Princeton, B.C., parallels the now­
abandoned right-of-way, through the valley of the Similkameen River.
The railroad crossed the river several times on open-top, wooden-
sided bridges, which are still standing. While not negotiable by
ordinary automobiles, these bridges are still used by wardens of
the British Columbia Forest Service. Mr. Riegger photographed these
unique wooden bridges from several angles.
The branch ends officially at Keremeos, but the part north
of the International Boundary has had its maintenance deferred and
is heavily overgrown by weeds and brush. About two miles southeast
of Keremeos, Mr. Riegger was surprised to find a fairly new B-N box­
car. This convinced him that he should examine this B-N branch in
greater detail on the way back to northern California~
ONE RESULT OF THE MIDSUMMER FEDERAL-PROVINCIAL PRIME MINISTERS CON­
ference was the signing of an agreement whereby the Govern­
ment of Canada and the Government of British Columbia will
sharg the cost of building five new railway lines in the northwest
part of the Province and the large-scale development of port facil­
ities at north-coast Prince Rupert, recently designated as a nation­
al harbour.
In addition, the Province will share with Ottawa ths cost
of construct ian of a 40-mile, $ 20 million rail link between Ash­
croft, B.C. -in the valley of the Thompson River, on both CN and
CP RAIL transcontinental lines -and Clinton, B.C., an the main line
of the British Columbia Railway. This would provide an alternate
connection from the east to Vancouver, in the event of interruptions
of one ar both main lines in the Fraser River canyon.
The Federal government will share the cost of construction
of part of the BCRs Dease Lake extension, to Groundhog, B.C., to­
gether with the extension onward to Dease Lake. The BCR plans a new
branch from Klappan, near Dease Lake, to Telegraph Creek, to serve
the new mineral industries in the area.
Also on the drawing board is an extension of the BCR
Dease Lake to Lower Post, just south of the Yukon boundary.
from
This
CANADIAN
290
R A I L
line would serve the mines in the area, the concentrates from some
of which now follow the container Route of the White Pass & Yukon
to Whitehorse, Y.T. and Skagway, Alaska.
Included in the same agreement is a Canadian National ex-
tension from Terrace, B.C. to Groundhog on the BCR s Dease Lake
line.
While prairie grain will continue to flow through Vancouver,
B.C. Premier Dave Barrett wants to make sure that coal mined in nor­
thern B.C. near the BCR will be exported through Britannia Bay, BCRs
proposed new superport on Howe Sound, between North Vancouver and
Squamish, B.C. Federal government Environment Minister Jack Davis
said that there was a general understanding in the agreement that
mineral and forest products would be shipped via Rrince Rupert and
that would seem to be the justification of the Terrace-Groundhog
connection.
Projected Federal cost of the railway construction program
is about $ 167 million over a 10-year period, while the Provinces
share will be about $ 135 million. Work on this portion of the agree­
ment will start immediately and is planned for completion in 1978.
Cost-sharing arrangements for the estimated $ 23 million
program for upgrading of port facilities for Prince Rupert, B.C.,
have not yet been completed.
IT IS RFPORTED THAT CP RAIL WILL ABANDON A PORTION OF THE KOOTENAY
Division of its southern British Columbia line, between
Fort Steele and Spences Bridge. The part to be abandoned
will be the Carmi Subdivision, between Midway and Penticton. As
many readers will realize, this is the former main line of the Ket­
tle Valley Railway, whic. was leased by the Canadian Pacific Rail­
way from 1 July 1913 and opened for service from Midway to Hope, B.
C., via the Coquiholla Canyon, on 31 July 1916. The reason for the
proposed abandonment is said to be the lack of traffic over this
difficult and remote section of the Carmi Subdivision.
The Princeton and Osoyoos Subdivisions and the Nicola Spur
will be operated as a branch, as will the Boundary Subdivision from
Castlegar to Midway.
In June 1973, part of the Carmi Subdivision west of
McCulloch Summit was used in the filming of the Fraser River canyon
sequences for the Canadian Broadcasting Co~poration s production of
Pierre Burtons book The Last Spike. Ex-Canadian Pacific steam
locomotive Number 136, with a train of a passenger car, a baggage
car and a freight car of the 1885 era, was photograpbed on several
of the high wooden trestles over the deep gulches which the line
crosses on the descent high above OkQnagan Lake to Penticton, B.C. Mr.
Jack Hewitson of CP RAIL, Montreal, was the engineer of Number
136
in these sequences. Edit~rial Staff.
SOME TIME AGO -AND IN CONNECTION WITH THE WRITING OF HIS NEW BOOK
The Railways of Canada -our member Dr. Robert F. Legget
of Ottawa, Canada, wrote to the Edito~ toask if Canadian
National Railways ever had a six-hour-flat Montreal-Toronto schedule
in the days when their crack trains were hauled by steam locomotives.
The Editor thought he remembered that they did, but decided to ask
around. Mr. John Welsh, our correspondent from Dor~al, Quebec, set
the record straight by supplying the following timetable from the
Canadian Official Railway Guides of 1930-1931:
May 1930 February 19?1 CANADIAN May 1930 February 1931
Train 15 Train 15 NATIONAL RAILWAYS Train 6 Train 6
3.00 p.m. 3.00 p.m. Iv.
4.07
p.m. 5.05 p.m. ar.
p.m. 5.10 p.m. Iv.
6.02
7.00
Montreal
Cornwall
~
FAMOUS TRAIN 15, THE
afternoon Pool tr­
ain of Canadian Na­
tional/Canadian Pa­
cific, with engine
Number 5701, a K-5-a
4-6-4 on the head-end.
This locomotive was
built by Montreal Lo­
comotive Works in Sep­
tember, 1930. The pic­
ture was taken in Aug­
ust, 1947.
CRHA, E.A.Toohey ColI.
ar. 10.00 p.m. p.m.
Brockville Iv. 8.00 p.m.
Brockville ar. 7.55 p.m.
10.00
8.51
7.55
7.50
7.00
6.05
p.m. p.m.
Kingston 7.00
Belleville 6.01
Oshawa 4.40
5.00
5.05
6.00
7.00
8.20
9.00 p.m. 9.00 p.m. ar. Toronto Iv. 4.00 p.m. 4.00 p.m.
Mr. Welsh points out that in the public timetable of May,
1930, there was no stop at Cornwall, Ontario. Subsequently, such a
hue-and-cry arose from the outraged citizens and local politicians,
that sufficient pressure was exerted to oblige CN to include a stop
here in the next timetable. Because of the necessity to keep station­
stops to a minimum, Troins 15 and 6 ceased to stop at Oshawa, which
city was apparently unable to whip up a storm of public opinion suf­
ficiently strong to retain the service formerly provided by these
two trains.
The December 1971 CN public timetable showed CN RAPIDO Tr­
ain 51 leaving Montreal,Central Station at 11~50 hours and arriving
at Toronto Union Station at 16:49 hours, while afternoon RAPIDO Tr­
ain 65 departed Montreal at 16:40 and arrived Toronto Union Station
at 21:39 hours.
If the reoder wishes to draw any conclusions from these
figures, he should not overlook, in addition to the differences in
motive power, other important factors such as right-of-way relo­
cations, modern signalling and servicing stops.
In the same era, 1930-1931, Canadian Pacific Railway opera­
ted Trains 19 and 38, departing Montreal at 12:00 (1930) and 1.00 p.
m.(1931), making 14 station stops and arriving Toronto Union Station
at 7.45 p.m.(1930) and 8.40 p.m.(1931). Train 38 left Toronto at
2.00 p.m. (1930 & 1931) and arrived at Montreal at 9.45 p.m. (1930-
1931) •
HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA, WAS ONCE THE STRONGHOLD OF THE BIRNEY SAFETY
car. Here is Number 5, photographed in the car shops on May 30,
1949. CRHA, E.A.Toohey Collection.
CANADIAN RAIL
puollshed oy the
Assooia.te MembershIp IDOl udlng 1 ~ lSSUeS
!fCanadlan RaIl B 00 annually
EDITOR S.S VVorthen LAYOUT & PRODUCTION P Murphy
VISIT THE
VISITEZ LE
Cauadiau Railway llllS~UlU
OPE N MAY -SEPT,
!fusec Ferroviailc Canadicn
OUVERT MAl· SEPT,
ASSOCIATION BRANCHES
CALGARY & SOUTH
OTTAWA
WESTERN L.M.Unwin, Secretory. 1727 23rd.Ave.N.W., Calgory, Alto.
W. R. L inlay,S ecretory,
R.H.Meyer, Secretory,
D.W.Scafe, Secretary,
PACIFIC COAST
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION P.Shctgold,Secretory.
P.O. Box 141, Terminal A,Ottawa,Canedo.
P.O.Box l006,Stotion A/Vancouver/B.C
1122073 Ave., Edmonton/Alto. T6G OC6
P.O,Box 5849,Terminal A,Toronto,Ont.H5W 1 P3
ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVES
AUSTRALIA
FAR EAST
MANITOBA
SASKATCHEWAN
SOUTH AMERICA
SOUTHERN ALBERTA
SOUTHERN ONTARIO
UNITED KINGDOM
Copyright 1973
L. S. Loun i tz-S chu re r I Dept. History, Notional Univ .Canberra, Au!:> t.
W.D.HcKeown, 6-7, 4-chome, Yomoto-cho, Su.ito City,Osako,Japan.
K.G.Younger, 267 Vernon Rood, Winnipeg, Monitoba R3J 211
J.S,Nicholson, 2306 Arnold Street, Saskatoon, Sosk.
D.J.Ho>loyd,Price,Woterhousc &. Peate,CoixQ 1978, Sao Paulo, BraziL
E.W.Johnson, 4019 Vardell Road N.W., Calgary, Alberto T3A OC3
W.J.Bodbrook, 50 Cedarbrae Boulevard, Scarborough, Onto
J.H,Sanders, 67 Willow Way, AlDpthill, Bedfordshire, England.
Printed in Canada on Canadian Paper.

Demande en ligne