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Canadian Rail 259 1973

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Canadian Rail 259 1973

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~an.adian.
) ffimfLTI
NO. 259
..A.UGUST :1.973
.
I
I
E.J.Emery
E. Helmich
~hen Sir William Corneilus Van Horne of
~ the Canadian Pacific Railway Company,
came thundering west out of the Pro­
vince of Quebec with his Ontario and
Quebec Railway in 1883, it scared the
daylights out of the Grand Trunk Railway
Company of Canada. Hitherto, and as a
result of its absorption of the Great
Western Railway Company of Canada, its
chief rival in southern Ontario, the
Grand Trunk had enjoyed a prof~table mo­
nopoly of railway traffic from the west,
via Windsor and Sarnia and that in and
around the City of Toronto.
The Canadian Pacifics entry into downtown Toronto and the har­
bour front was at first somewhat frustrated, since the Grand Trunk,
Great Western and associated lines -The Northern Railway of CQnada
and the Toronto and Nipissing Railway -had previously pre-empted
most of the available space. There was, however, an independent en­
try, made by the pioneering Credit Valley Railway, which had ooen­
ed its first section from Toronto to Milton on September 19, 1879.
The ever-westbound Canadian Pacific from Peterborough came to
town on Torontos north side, through Donlands, Leaside and North
Toronto, parallelling Bloor Street, south of Daven?ort Road, to a
crossing with the Grand Trunks line to North Bay (formerly the
Northern Railway of Canada) near Royce Avenue. A short distance far­
ther on, the new line crossed in succession the Toronto, Grey and
Bruce Railway (acquired by the CPR in 1883), The Toronto and Nipis­
sing (GTR) and the original right-of-way of the Credit Valley. Ini­
tially, this complex was named Carlton West, but later it was re­
titled Toronto Junctian and finally West Toronto.
~J MR. ELMER TRELOAR PROVIDES OUR COVER PICTURE THIS MONTH. READERS
~I will recognize westbound Canadian National Railways Train 17 with
4-8-4 Number 6222 on the point, leaving Paris, Ontario. 5-15-55.
ON THE PAGE OPPOSITE IS SHOWN LAMBTON ROUNDHOUSE, AT RUNNYMEME ROAD
and St. Clair Avenue West, Toronto, Ontario, being demolished in the
summer of 1965. Photo by Edward Emery.
CANADIAN 232 R A I L
There was little space in Torontos crowded dockside area at
that time for a suitable roundhouse or cor-shops and, indeed, these
facilities would have been of marginal use to the westbound CPR at
the time in such a location. However, 1.3 miles west of West Toron­
to, there was on admirable site for operating facilities and freight
yards and here, subsequently, Lambton engine terminal and freight
yards were developed. About 1890, the former Credit Volley Railway
yard and shops at Parkdale were closed by the CPR and a start was made on
the yard and shops at Lambton.
Lambton roundhouse was located at what later become the corner
of Runnymede Road and St. Clair Avenue West in todays metropolis of
Toronto. Originally, it was a 27-stall roundhouse, but it was later
enlarged to 35 stalls. In its heyday, each stall hod its own smoke­
jack painted with the number corresponding to that of the track
from the turntable. This was not necessarily a mark of distinct ian,
but rather so that the Citys smoke inspector could readily identify
the source of the smoke nuisance while standing outside on the street
or inside in the yard. If the smoke nuisance (this was before pol­
lution was a household word) was too offending, the inspector could
reprimand the careless hostler who was responsible for the locomo­
tive shedded in the stoll identified by the numbered smoke-jack.
Lambton roundhouse had its own boiler-house, coaling stage, ash
pits and engine water-tank. There was a machine shop for locomotive
repairs. But, like all structures associated with steam locomotive
maintenance and repair, it was a cold place in winter, particularly
in its later days. The great wooden doors on the engine stalls fit­
ted more and more loosely. Missing planks became more and more fre­
quent. Repairs to roof and walls were made less frequently. When
it rained, there were large pools of water inside on the floor. In
winter, little drifts of snow appeared here and there on the wind­
ward side of Lambton roundhouse.
But on 1 January 1959, Lambton roundhouse still had a good se­
lection of steam locomotives in daily use. Engines from Lambton were
assigned to four main districts:
North District: Toronto to MacTier & Sudbury
East District: Toronto to Trenton & Smiths Falls
South District: Toronto to Hamilton and the Toronto,
Hamilton & Buffalo Railway
West District: Toronto to London & Windsor.
On the North District were pacifics Numbers 2399 & 2414, with
hudsons Numbers 2839, 2840, 2841, 2856 and 2858.
The East District to Trenton had one 4-6-2 assigned, Number 2662.
The West District to Windsor rostered 4-6-2s Numbers 2206, 2228,
2235 and 2238. The mikados for freight service included Numbers 5102,
5394 and 5406.
The South District sent out pacific Number 2664, for the pas­
senger trains to and from the Toronto, Hamilton & Buffalo Railway
connection at Hamilton, with 2-8-2s Numbers 5375, 5410 and 5460 on
the freights.
Canadian Pacific 2-8-0 Number 3722 was the transfer engine from
Lambton yards to Toronto Union Station and was protected by Number
3507.
The Ontario Food Terminal on Torontos west side was usually
switched by CPR D-10 4-6-0 Number 999. Number 1004 was rostered for
the Orangeville wayfreight and Number 1088 on the Port Credit way­
freight.
L A K E
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TORONTO
TERMINALS
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CANADIAN
234
R A I L
There were always a number of strangers at Lambton roundhouse,
engines not ossigned to Lambton but which were coaled and watered be­
fore starting their return runs. Among these were locomotives assign­
ed to London, for service between London and Toronto, including mi­
kados Numbers 5118,5135,5147,5153 and 5405. Most of the 5100-class
2-8-2s were assigned to London.
Light and medium locomotive repairs were carried out at Lambton,
but engines due for heavy repairs were taken the 1.3 miles east to
West Toronto shops. On the first day of 1959, a visitor could have
seen the following locomotives at Lambton:
Number
807
953
1057
~
4-6-0
4-6-0 4-6-0
R epa i r
Hydro test
Hydro test
Rod & pin repair
Assignment
Orangeville wayfreight
Wayfreight
Wayfreight
1092
2214
2332
CANADIAN
4-6-0 4-6-2
4-6-2
235
Boiler overhaul
Superheater repair
Main rods & tyres
R A I L
Wayfreight
Helper service
South District
Stored in a serviceable condition were 0-10 Number 1098 and
4-6-2 Number 2203. The 2200-class pacifics, based at Lambton, were
assigned to helper or assisting service. It was a common sight
to see a 2200-class working with a 5100-class mikado between Tor­
onto and London on the West District. However, the 2200s did not
work the entire distance to London, but were cut off at Orrs Lake,
55 miles west of Lambton. They would then return light to Lambton ,
to help another freight up the grades to Guelph Junction and Galt.
Mikado Number 5375, which was assigned to Toronto and worked
on the South District to Hamilton, seemed to need constant attention,
especially to her brasses. She was always in for repairs to her
brass bushings and couplings and it was a relatively common sight
at Lambton to see her over the pit with her rods down and the shop
crew hard at work. It was very puzzling as to why she needed so
much attention, while her sister, Number 5394, required very little
maintenance. It seemed as though the foreman was right when he said
that every engine was an individual.
By 1959, there was another important Canadian Pacific roundhouse
in the centre of Toronto. This was the John Street roundhouse, ad­
jacent to Canadian National Railways Spadina Avenue roundhouse on
the Citys lakefront. In this era, the Toronto-Owen Sound passenger
train was worked by light pacific Number 1271, with hudson Number
2857 protecting.
In the all-too-short, twelve-month interval between 1959 and
1960, significant changes occurred at Lambton. More and more diesel-
electric units arrived, displacing the steam engines from their
usual runs. The diesels took over many of the main-line freights
relegating the steam engines to helper service or as replacements
when a diesel-electric unit failed.
But there were still a few steam engines on active duty.Number
3507, a 2-8-0, was the switcher at Lambton yards. Mikados Numbers
5102, 5153, 5394 and 5417 were still running. Number 5417 was the
last steam locomotive to take a scheduled freight train out of
Lambton in January, 1960. The D-10s held on to the last, with Num­
bers 815,851,953,999,1057 and 1098 still working. Pacific Num­
ber 2414 and hudsons Numbers 2839 and 2857 completed the roster of
available steam power.
2-8-0s Numbers 3649, 3722 and 3724 were assigned to the Port
McNicoll-Orillia wayfreights and were running until April 30,1960 ,
but, by this time, the handwriting was very plainly on the wall.Num­
ber 3724 hauled the last steam-powered, scheduled freight in Ontario
on April 30, 1960. The following day, Canadian Pacific Railways pas­
senger and freight operation in Ontario was dieselized.
After the diesel-electric engines had taken over, most of the
steam locomotives were consigned to the scrappers torch, but a few
of them survived. D-10s Numbers 815, 999, 1057 and 1098 were kept,
as were pacifics Numbers 1271 and 2414. Number 2857 was retained,as
was mikado Number 5118. These engines were held for railway enthu-
siast excursions and thereafter were given or sold to railway or
transportation museums or placed on permanent display at different
towns.
· .
(:~:~, .
ONE OF CANADIAN PACIFICS FLEET-FOOTED G-2-s CLASS, NUMBER 2559,
is shown here at London, Ontario, in October, 1953. This locomo­
tive was built at Angus Shops in 1908. Collection H.K.Vollrath.
AT WEST TORONTO IN NOVEMBER, 1957, CANADIAN PACIFIC ENGINE NUMBER
2228 was waiting for on assignment. She was a G-1-s class, built
by CP at Angus Shops in 1911. Collection H.K.Vollrath.
A PACIFIC IN FREIGHT SERVICE: CANADIAN PACIFIC 4-6-2 NUMBER 2664, a
G-2-a class, built by CPR at Angus Shops in 1914, was waiting at
Lambton, Ontario, in October, 1957. Collection H.K.Vollrath.
TODAY AN EXHIBIT AT THE CANADIAN RAILWAY MUSEUM, ST-CONSTANT,QUE.,
Canadian Pacific D-10-h class Number 999 r.ame backing into the yard
at West Toronto in June, 1953. The engine was built by the Canadian
Locomotive Company, Kingston, Ontario, in 1912. ColI. H.K.Vollrath.
,, .
A BEAUTIFUL EXAMPLE OF A ROYAL HUDSON H-5-d CLASS, CANADIAN PACIF­
ic Number 2857, was photographed at West Toronto in April 1959. This
locomotive was built by Montreal Locomotive Works in 1938.
Collection H.K. Vollrath.
ENGINE 2238, CLASS G-1-v, BUILT BY CANADIAN PACIFIC AT ANGUS SHOPS,
Montreal, in 1914, was photographed at Toronto, Ontario, in October,
1958. Collection H.K.Vollrath.

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CANADIAN
240
R A I L
Number 999 went to the Canadian Railway Museum, Saint-Constant,
Quebec, near Montreal. Number 1057, originally intended for the On­
tario Science Centre at Toronto, was sold to Mr. Herbert Hansen of
Union, Illinois, U.S.A. and was later leased to Ontario Rail As­
sociation of Brampton, Ontario. She is running on excursions this
summer (1973) and on Sundays between Ottawa and Carleton Place,Ont.
According to the Public Relations Department of Canadian Pa­
cific Limited, Lambton roundhouse was finally demolished in the sum­mer
of 1965. It had served its purpose well for all of three-quarters
of a century and had gone down to destruction only in the face of
relentless progress.
It is interesting to consider that, in the beginning, most of
the early steam locomotive repair buildings were running sheds of
the English type, where the locomotive entered one end of the build­
ing on one of a series of parallel tracks, to be repaired or stored.
Later on, these longitudinal running sheds were replaced by the
roundhouse, with the turntable in the centre. In the 1970s, this
roundhouse, traditional in North America for almost 150 years, is
gradually being replaced by the original arrangement: a running­
shed, where the diesel-electric units enter at one end on one of a
series of parallel tracks, for repair or storage •
Time marches on~
CLASS H-1-c, CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY ENGINE NUMBER 2839, BUILT
by Montreal Locomotive Works in 1937, was photographed just after
delivery at Montreal in August, 1937. Collection H.K.Vollrath.
BUILT BY CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY AT ANGUS SHOPS IN 1907, CPR CLASS
G-1-s Number 2214 was caught on film at Toronto, Ontario, in August,
1956. Collection H.K.Vollrath.
The
Of
PART I
John Beswarick Thompson.
The First Period.
There is a tendency, wrote J.E.Watkins of the
Smithsonian Institution, some eighty years ago,
to overestimate the benefits arising from the
invention and improvement of the locomotive
and to overlook the development of the perman­
ent way. (1)
Before Conadion National Railways TURBOTRAIN could speed be­
tween Montreal and Toronto, it was necessary to upgrade the track.
In the early period of Canadian railway construction, the correla­
tion between the development of the permanent way and the improve­
ment of service was equally clear. r~e greatest changes in the con­
struction of the permanent way occurred j~ the early days of rail­
ways, between 1836 and 1870. During roughly the first half of this
period, the Champlain & St. Lawrence Rail Road was the only public
railway operating in Canada. It was on this line that the earliest
developments were best reflected.
In the mid-1830s, there were two ways of constructing a line
of railway. The first was the English method. It involved the use
of solid, iron rails, which rested on sleepers and were secured to
them by iron chairs in which the rails were held. It was substan­
tial and safe. It was also expensive.
The second method was that used in the United States. It re­
lied heavily on the use of wood. After the roadbed had been prepar­
ed, heavy timbers were sunk in two parallel trenches, crossties were
placed on these sills and hardwood rails were keyed into grooves in
the ties, by means of small triangular blocks. Half-inch-thick bars
of iron were then spiked to the hardwood stringers to complete the
rail and the track. The United States method was prone to break­
age, heaving and warping. However, it was cheap.
The Montreal capitalists who bankrolled the Champlain & St.
Lawrence Rail Rood were cautious men, not prone to lavish unneces­
sary sums of money on unproven ventures. Since railway profits were
based more on hope than on fact, the directors of Canadas first
public railway, in choosing between the expensive English method of
track-building and the cheap principle used by the Americans,opted
for the latter.
Two witnesses testify to the nature of the choice. Thomas C.
Keefer, an able Canadian civil engineer, called the Champlain & St.
Lawrence a flat-bar railway, so constructed because the nature of
the ground seemed to invite experiment upon the principle.(2)
CANADIAN 242 R A I L
Geologist William E. Logan inspected the railway in 1840 and
wrote: The railroad from Laprarie (sic) to St. Johns is
of a very simple construction:-It consists of
wooden rails shod with flat iron resting on & let
into wooden sleepers which cross from one rail to
the other and cannot have cost much.(3)
Beyond these two statements, little is known of the precise
nature of the original permanent way of the Champlain & St. Lawrence.
Records refer to the use of blocks, splicing plates and nails(4) in
the construction of the line. Financial accounts show that the Com­
pany paid £ 3,333 for railway iron in 1836 and spent £ 927 for ad­
ditional rail for extension and replacement purposes, four years
later. But no drawings of the original track and substructure have
yet been discovered.
Logans description suggests that the track structure was
likely similar to that of the Utica and Schenectady Railroad, also
opened in 1836. If this is so, then J.D.Kelly s well-known painting
of the Champlain & St. Lawrence Rail Roads inaugural run is, in
this detail, inaccurate. In showing wooden rails secured by chairs
to the crossties, the artist gave the Company credit for more so-
phistication than was due.
Whenever strap rail, as used by the Champlain & St. Lawrence,
is described, writers, both professional and amateur, have shown
an irresistable urge to discuss its shortcomings, emphasizing its
tendency to crush at the joints and to curl upwards in a serpentine
curve. Inevitably, they unflatteringly labelled it snake rail.
Many accidents are said to have been caused by strap rail. It 1S
time to lay this hoary myth to rest.
Even a cursory inspection of the piece of strop rail used by
the Champlain & St. Lawrence and now preserved by Mr. Donald F. Angus,
Honorary President of the Canadian Railroad Historical Association,
confirms that the half-inch iron bars did not bend easily. Those
accidents which did occur on railways using strap rail were the re­
sult of faulty maintenance and imprudent operation. If the track
was adequately maintained and if trains were run at a sane speed ,
accidents were avoided. Throughout the entire period during which
the Champlain & St. Lawrence Rail Roads two small locomotives haul-
ed two doily trains between La Pxairie and St. Johns over strap
rails, there were no serious accidents resulting from track failure.
Service might not have been fast but, as one gentleman writing in
1843 stated, everything throughout the line moves regularly and
safe.(5) As the Annual Reports of the 1840s affirm, the Company
took great pride in its record of safety.
Track Renewal of the Late 1840s.
For ten years, the original track structure remained unaltered
but in 1845, following a successful season in which gross receipts
increased by one-third, the Champlain & St. Lawrence decided to mod­
ernize its permanent way. The plan of action embodied four points:
1. The rood would remain unballasted, but the wooden
superstructure would be renewed along the follow­
ing lines:
t
CANADIAN
243
R A I L
Longitudinal sills of Tamarack 9 inches
square in lengths of not less than 25
feet and bound together by cross-ties
of the same timber 3 x 6 about five fe­
et apart dovetailed into the upper side
of the sills and spiked at each end. In
this state the superstructure is ready
to receive either the Iron T or H rail
or the Oak ribbons which are 3 x 4 upon
which is placed the common flat Iron Bar
9/16 x 21-inches.(6)
2. An order would be placed with a Liverpool (England)
fi r m for 25 ton s 0 f 50 -1 b. T -rail w i t h a b r 0 ad b ear­
ing surface •.• fastened to the superstructure by a
claw-headed spike.(7) This type of rail was being
widely used in the United States.
Obviously, this was an experimental order. 25 tons
of rail would have allowed the Company to re-lay
only about 500 yards of parallel track.
3.Iron clamps, spikes and chairs(8) would be used to
join the T-rails to each other. The use of chairs
was, as explained above, an English technique. Un­
ited States railroads preferred fishplate joints •. A
fishplate was an iron bar which lapped the rail­
joint and was bolted to the sides of each rail to
connect them end-to-end. Plates of a similar design
are used today. At that time, chairs were consider­
ed to be more secure, but fishplates were cheaper.
4. The original strap-iron rails would not be replaced
for a year or two till the Iron Market gets down a
little.(9) This would allow the Company to test
the T-rail before proceeding further.
IN THE DETAIL OF THE TRACK, ARTIST J.D.KELLY, IN HIS PAINTING OF
the opening day on the Champlain and St. Lawrence Rail Road, gave
the Company credit for more sophistication than was due~
Painting reproduced courtesy Confederation Life.
t
CANADIAN
244 R A I L
:: … – .-
/i;.I.~I!f-::: … ,
.
WILLIAM LOGAN DESCRIBED THE TRACK OF THE CHAMPLAIN & ST. LAWRENCE
as consisting of wooden rails shod with flat iron and resting on &
let into wooden sleepers, much like that of the Utica & Schenectady
Railroad, also opened in 1836. Drawing courtesy Smithsonian Inst.
The renewal was carried out slowly. The Annual Report for 1846
stated that improvements were in progress and that the Company had
ordered an additional 550 tans of T-rail. The next year, the Annual
Report noted that only two miles of superstructure remained to be r e new e
dan d t hat 6t mile s 0 f T -rail had bee n 1 aid, the ben e fi t s 0 f
which are so apparent that the Committee did not hesitate to take
advantage of a considerable fall in the price of Iron in the English
market and order out 800 tons ..• to complete the road throughout.(10)
By the start of the 1849 season, civil engineer Thomas C. Ke­
efer was able to report that the Champlain & St. Lawrence had been
rebuilt with heavy rail. (11)
The improvement in the track led ta an improvement in the ser­
vice. It was at this time that the railway sold its two original,
small locomotives and acquired several new and mare powerful ones.
t
CANADIAN
245
R A I L
It was also at this time that the Company added to its schedule two more
trains between La Prairie and St. Johns.
THIS CROSS-SECTION OF TRACK FROM THE OHIO RAILROAD SHOWS A VARIATION
in the method of fixing the strap-iron to the wooden rails.
Drawing courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution.
What happened to the old strap-iron rails, which still repre­
sented a marketable asset? In an art{cle on the history of the Cham­
plain & St. Lawrence, the late Mr. Robert R. Brown postulated that
they were left derelict by the Company and were used by farmers liv­
ing along the line.(12) Alas, such philanthropy was not the way of
the Champlain & St. Lawrence. A journal entry dated 24 November 1849
reveals that the Old Iron Rails were sold to the St. Lawrence and
Industry Village Rail Road at a price of about £ 9 per ton and ship-
ped to its terminus at Lanoraie, down the St. Lawrence River from
Montreal. (13)
Twenty years later, when other railways were changing from iron
to steel T-rails, these primitive old strap roils were still in use
when the Montreal newspaper, The GAZETTE, wrote of the anachronistic
little line:
The Lanoraie road is very much like that of George
Stephenson, in his first railway which ran from
the colleries to the sea coast -namely, a wooden
rail covered with a flat iron bar spiked down.(14)
Winterizing the Road.
Changes were made to the permanent way of 1849 after only two
years of use. In January 1851, as railway fever swept across British
North America, the Directors of the Champlain and St. Lawrence an­
nounced that the railway would be extended south from St. Johns to
cross the International Boundary to Rouses Point in the State of New
York and also northward, diverging from a point on the main line
CANADIAN
246
R A I L
+
A VERITABLE ANTIQUE! THIS IS A PIECE OF STRAP-IRON RAIL
from the pioneer Champlain and St. Lawrence Rail Road,
discovered along the right-of-way near La Prairie, Que-1
bec in the 1930s and preserved by the Associations Hon­
orary President, Mr. Donald F. Angus. The holes for the
screws which fastened the rail to the longitudinal st­
ringers are plainly visible. Photograph by F.F.Angus.
four miles east of La Prairie, to a more suitable terminus in the
village of St. Lambert, directly across the St. Lawrence River from
the City of Montreal. The Company also announced its intention to
run trains throughout the year, instead of closing the line in the
autumn, as had been the practice since 1836. To accomplish this,the
Superintendent of the Rail. Road reported
A considerable outlay will be necessary in the coming
season to put the old line of road in good running or­
der at all times of the year.
The old line having formerly been laid on timber, in
relaying the same with T rail, most of the ties used
were made from the old rails, and are now decaying,l~
will be necessary to replace them with new ties.
lOt miles from the diverging point to near St. Johns
should be ballasted and raised two feet with slate
from the Laprairie common, to render the road more
substantial. (15)
Work proceeded apace. In July 1851, it was reported that T­
rails are being laid at the rate of a mile per day on the Rouses
Point extension and thElt there was a large force employed on the
old road .•• enpaged in raising it two feet to make it suitable for
winter traver. The report also noted:
The Superintendent tells us that when the whole is
raised and ballasted and connected with the extensions
he has no doubt of being able to run his passenger
trains over the line 41 miles in one hour.(16)
By January 1852, both extensions had been completed and the
Champlain and St. Lawrence, for the first time in its history, re­
mained open all winter. The new line, no longer laid on longitudinal
wooden sills but on cross-ties set on a ballasted road and probably
looking not unlike the track of today, allowed the Company to pro­
vide service throughout the year, to purchase a dozen more powerful
locomotives, to increase the number of trains scheduled, to acceler-
ate these services and, in effect, to become a brand-new railway.
CANADIAN
247
R A I L
SPECIMENS OF OLD IRON FROM THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY OF CANADA, SHOWING
rail-joints with fish-plates, circa 1878, pen-and-ink and watercolour
sketches by J.M.C.Muir. Photo courtesy Public Archives of Canada.
Unlike the other new railways built about this time, the Cham­
plain and St. Lawrence Roil Rood could boost of a well-built per­
manent way, equal to the rigors of the Canadian climate. Nine years
later, when the particularly hard winter of 61 was playing havoc
with the services on other railways in eastern Canada, the Champlain
and St. Lawrence operated the entire time without incident or inter­
ruption.(17)
A good track meant good -and safe -service.
References.
1. The Development of American Roil and Track: Watkins, J.E.
Report of the Smithsonian Institution, 1889, p. 651.
2. The Philosophy of Railroads: Keefer, T.C.
Armour & Ramsay, Montreal, 1850, p. 20 .
3. Logan Papers: Journal of William E. Logans travels ~n Canada;
Tor 0 n toP u b li c Lib r a r y, Vol. II I, 1 840 -1, p. 79.
CANADIAN
248
R A I L
4. Chief Engineers Report, Champlain and St. Lawrence Rail Road, 1835:
cited in The Champlain and St. Lawrence Rail Road, Brown R.R.,
Bulletin of the Railway and Locomotive Historical Society No. 39
(1936) p. 19.
5. Herald Montreal 6 September 1843.
6. Public Archives of Canada, RG 30, Vol. 3007, p. 14 •
7. Ibid., p. 11 •
8. Journals of the Legislative Assembly of Canada: 1850, Appendix G .
9. Public Archives of Canada, RG 30, Vol. 3007, p. 5 .
10. Gazette Montreal 25 January 1847 24
January 1848
11. Keefer, T.C., op. cit., p. 21
12. Brown, R.R., op. Cit., p. 23
13. Public Archives of Canada, RG 30, Vol. 134, p. 439.
14. Gazette Montreal 30 June 1869.
15. Ibid.,
16. Ibid.,
22 January 1851.
7 July 1851.
17. Report: Commission Appointed to Inquire into the Affairs of the
Grand Trunk Railway; Derbishire & Desbarats,Quebec,1861,
p. 14 •
BROWN, R.R.
CANADA,
Legislature of
COMMISSION
GERSTNER, F.A.
KEEFER, SAMUEL
KEEFER, T. C.
Montreal GAZETTE
Montreal HERALD
PUBLIC ARCHIVES
OF CANADA
TORONTO PUBLIC
LIBRARY
Bibliography.
The Champlain and St. Lawrence Rail Road:
Bulletin of the Railway and Locomotive Historical
Society, Boston, Mass.,U.S.A., No. 39, 1936.
Journals of the Legislative Assembly, Appendix
1850.
Appointed to Inquire into the Affairs of the Grand
Trunk Railway: Report, 1861: Derbishire & Des­
barats, Quebec, 1861.
Die Innern Communication de Vereinigten Staaten
Vienna, 1842.
Boord of Railway Commissioners Report
Gillespie & Robertson, Hamilton, 1859.
Philosophy of Railroads
Armour & Ramsay, Montreal, 1850.
December 1837; January 1843; January 1845; Jan­
uary 1847; January 1848; January 1851; July 1851;
June 1869.
September 1843.
RG 30, Vols. 133-4, Champlain and St. Lawrence
Rail Road, Journals A & B; Vol. 3007, Letterbook
1845-9.
Logan Papers: Journal of his Travels in Canada,
Vol. III, 1840-1 .
t
WATKINS, J.E.
WILGUS, W.J.
CANADIAN
249
R A I L
The Development of American Rail and Track
Report of the Smithsonian Institution, 1889.
The Railway Interrelations of the United States
and Canada, Ryerson Press, Toronto, 1937.
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF THE CHAMPLAIN AND ST. LAWRENCE RAIL ROAD, AS IT AP­
peared in 1967, looking east from Highway 9-A towards lAcadie. The marker was
erected by the Canadian Railroad Historical Association
about 1936 and indicates that the derelict roadbed is that af Can-
adas first public railway. Photo courtesy S.S.Worthen.
August, 1973.
lrATf II J D 1T 1f 17 ~
-U Jr; J!}) JLh~ ~
CP RAILS WINDSOR STATION: TO BE OR NOT TO BE DEMOLISHED? IN A NEW
announcement at the beginning of May 1973, Mr. Graham Mc­
Murray, a spokesman for CP RAIL, said that Marathon Real­
ties multimillion-dollar redevelopment project, PLACE SAINT-GEORGES,
would be unveiled within the month. The new plan would mean that
CP RAILs famous Windsor Station -or, at least most of it -would
be demolished. Work had been under way since early in the year, de­
molishing the former express wing along Lagauchetiere (Osborne)
Street, as well as part of the trainshed, and cleaning out the
vaults in the basement under the concourse.
Mr. McMurray said further that the complex, originally an­
nounced in March 1972, had been redesigned due to changing needs of
Canadian Pacific Limited, for headquarters office space.
Dismissing the agitation of the Friends of Windsor Station
and others, for preservation of the station, Mr. McMurray said that
the proposal to preserve the station as an historic monument was no
longer a factor.
The relocation of Canadian Pacific Limiteds building has
meant the devising of a whole new master plan. It is now unlikely
that the building or buildings will be as described in the September
1972 issue Number 248 of CANADIAN RAIL. S.S,Worthen.
THE SYDNEY & LOUISBOURG RAILWAY HISTORICAL SOCIETY, WHICH HAS ITS
headquarters in the former station of the Sydney & Louis­
bourg Railway at Glace Bay, Nova Scotia, has purchased a
1914 tank car from PROCOR Limited of Saint John, New Brunswick, for
$ 180, the cars scrap value, so says the CAPE BRETON POST of Sydney,
N.S. Barrie MacLeod,who sent in the clipping, says that the tank car
will get from Saint John to Sydney by Canadian National Railways,
free of charge and will be trucked to Louisbourg, where it will be
displayed along with several other pieces of railway equipment.
Among these cars are a 1926 Canadian National Railways box
car, a Sydney & Louisbourg Railway caboose and an 1897 BROWNHOIST
crane.
Society President William Lewis says the Sydney and Louis­
bourg Historical Society is different because while other collec­
tors are interested only in older passenger trains, we want to pre­
serve examples of the older freight trains. There are only about 15
old freight cars in Canadian collections and we have two of them.
SPRING
1973 WASNT MUCH BETTER THAN SPRING 72 IN EASTERN CANADA
for either Canadian National Railways or CP RAIL, accor­
ding to Mr. G.A.Matheson, member of the Association in
Lennoxville, Quebec. About May 1, CNs main line via the Matapedia
Valley was cut at Riviere Ouelle, 40 miles west of Riviere du Loup,
Quebec, when high water rendered unsafe the bridge over the Riviere
Ouelle. The former National Transcontinental line via Edmundston,N.
B. to Moncton was closed when heavy rains affected the piers on the
CANADIAN
251
R A I L
mile-long Salmon River trestle, east of St. Leonard, N.B. As a
result, three eastbound and two-three westbound CN
freights made the detour over CP RAILs Short Line from Saint
John,N.B. through the State of Maine to Megantic and Lennoxville,
the same as last year (see An Otherwise Ordinary Winter, G.A.
Matheson, CANADIAN RAIL No. 249, October, 1972).
These CN freights usually had 3-4 units per train, the
majority of the units being RS 18s in the 3100, 3600, 3700 and 3800
series. Passenger units Numbers 6533, 6616, 6860 and 6629 took an
80-car, 4000-ton freight east on 4 May and returned on a 62-car
solid container train of 3500 tons on 6 May.
Mr. Matheson says that this lash-up -FP 9A, FP 9B, FPB 4
and FP 9B -is definitely unusual and represents a first for
CP RAIL lines in Maine~ Who can argue the point?
THE ACCOMPANYING PHOTO, BY MS M. MALLETT OF CHARLOTTETOWN, PRINCE
Edward Island, shows the railway stat~on at Elmira, P.E.I.,
the fartherest-east railway station on the Island. It was
built in 1911 by a Mr. White, to the same generol design as many
other railway stations in Canada at that time. It contains two wait­
ing rooms, an agent-operators office and a baggage-express room.The
ceilings are 14 feet high~ A large attic was included, which increas­
ed the stations apparent size.
Elmira station was originally painted in two shades of green
but wcs repainted in the 1940s in boxcar red. Originally, there
were rings on the east side of the station, where horses could be
tie d. Two G f the s_e r i n g s .a res till in p I ace. The h 0 r s e s , h a v in g not
much else to do, nibbled the decorations off the building, so a
railing was erected a couple of feet from the station to which they
could be tied and the use of the rings was forbidden.
Only one of the waiting rooms was ever used by intending
passengers, for there was never a large crowd of them. Elmira was
just a small community.
CA NAD IAN
252
R A I L
Until recently, there was a large platform in front of the
station, but it rotted out and was not replaced. The roof of today
is composed of asphalt shingles. The back part of the agent-operators
office was originally a small room in which the train crews rested.
The wall was taken out and the operators office enlarged shortly
after the station was completed. An old boxcar, taken off its trucks
and placed nearby, was used as a bunkroom by crews who had to stay
overnight in Elmira. The boxcar was later replaced by a small build­
ing which is now used at Borden, P.E.I., as a storage shed.
In the beginning, there was a one-stall enginehouse and a
coal shed, but both of these have disappeared. Half-a-mile west of
Elmira is the wye and inbound trains turn here first and then back
into Elmira station.
The second picture by Charlottetown photographer Margaret
Mallett shows the general layout at Elmira: station on the left;
freight shed on the right and the pile of ties marking the end of
track. In the distance, the line went straight through the woods
The amount of grass indicated the frequency of traffic. The two
pictures were taken in 1971.
The importance of this station at Elmira, P.E.I., is that
it is now the property of the Railway History Committee, Prince
Edward Island Heritage Foundation. The windows have been boarded
up temporarily, the chimney height has been reduced to roof level
and plans have been made to clean up the property and to place
three pieces of rolling stock in the yard in the near future. Mr.
Allan Graham, who sends this information, hopes that the display
will be ready for late 1973 or early 1974.
BY THE TIME THIS REPORT IS PRINTED, CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS WON­
derful, beautiful Northern, Number 6060, will very likely
be off and running. The bare boiler passed its hydrostatic
test in mid-May and it was expected that Number 6060 would be steam­
ed about 15 June. That wasnt bad predicting, for she was in fact
-,
CA NAD I AN
253
R A I L
steamed about 26 June. Finally, she made a short run to Dorval,Que­
bec, on the morning of 5 July, under her own steam, and just about
scared the daylights out of the commuters. She was exhibited to
Canadian National employees at Pointe-Saint-Charles shops on 8 July
and, on that occasion, Mr. Barry Biglow took the accompanying photo­
groph.
Mr. J. Norman Lowe, Historical Projects Officer, Canadian
National Railways, has announced that Number 6060 will haul her
first special train on 15 September 1973 from Montreal -Central
Station -to Victoriaville, Quebec, vio Richmond, and return. The
fare will be $ 15 for adults and $ 7.50 for children under 12. There
will be a ceremony at the cab of Number 6060 prior to departure, with
senior officers of the Company taking part.
There is the possibility that Number 6060 will haul a spec­
ial train from Montreal to Toronto, via Ottawa and Naponee, at the
beginning of October, if sufficient interest can be generated. This
would be a one-way trip only, since Number 6060 will stay in Toron­
to, in preparation for the next trip, which has been announced for­
mally.
This second or third trip will be from Toronto to Fort
Erie, Ontario and return, on 27 October 1973. The justification for
the trip is the occasion of the presentation of Canadian Nationals
steam locomotive Number 6218 to the City of Fort Erie. For the trip
to Fort Erie, Number 6218 will be hauled dead behind Number 6060 ,
thus simulating double-headed operation of the train. Number 6218
is to be suitably displayed outdoors in Fort Erie, after having
CANADIAN
254
R A I L
spent the summer of 1973 carefully protected from the weather inside
Building Number 1 at the Canadian Railway Museum/Musee Ferroviaire
Canadien, Saint-Constant, Quebec.
The tentative date for the Montreal-Ottawa-Napanee-Toronto
trip is Friday, 26 October 1973.
The fare for the Toronto-Fort Erie-Toronto trip is $ 15
for adults and $ 7.50 for children under 12.
The cost per mile for adults on the Victoriaville trip is
calculated to be $ 0.0706 and that for the Fort Erie trip $ 0.0710,
if the route is via Hamilton-Merritton-Welland Junction.
All this leaves one wondering if -should Number 6060 be
ready to roll before 15 September -CNs Historical Pro jects Officer
and the steam locomotive enthusiasts around Montreal will be able to
endure the delay~ After all, if you can work in a couple of 400-pas­
senger trips between 15 July and 15 September, its just that much
more money in the till. It is rumored that the investment in the
repair of Number 6060 is of the order of $ 300,000. This means that
it will require $ 21,000 annually to pay the interest on the invest­
ment, before any reduction in the capital cost. Pay-back time on
this considerable investment will depend on the number of trips run
annually and the capacity of the train. It looks as though it will
be a hard job to minimize the pay-back time, but, with careful plan-
ning, it might be done in 5-8 years. S.S.Worthen.
WORK BEGAN EARLY IN MAY 1973 ON THE NEW RODNEY TERMINAL IN SAINT
John, New Brunswick, when Premier Richard B. Hatfield ac­
tuated the mechanism which dumped the first load of gravel
fill from the first of several hundred thousand standard 60-to~ ca­
pacity CP RAIL air-dump cars. CP RAIL would be responsible for mo­
ving 2t million tons of fill to the site before the end of 73.
Erection of a second PORTAINER gantry crane was begun at the new
double-berth terminal, which, when completed, would give BRUNTERM a
throughput capacity in excess of 100,000 containers per year.
Phillip Fine.
BACK TO MONTREAL IN MAY CAME MORRISON-KNUDSON CORPORATIONS TWO
ALCO C-636 units from Boise, Idaho, U.S.A., ex-ALCO demos Numbers
636-2 and 636-3, now M-K Numbers 5402 and 5403.
Speculation is that the two units are on their way to the power-
short Cartier Railway, which has three M-636 units on order with
MLW Industries, Montreal. K.R.Goslett.
CASUALTIES AMONG CP RAILS FLEET OF BALDWIN ROAD-SWITCHERS ON VAN­
couver Island, British Columbia, began in May, 1973, when
unit Number 8012 was the victim of an extensive electrical
fire at Port Alberni, B.C., while coming out in mUltiple on a
freight. So extensive was the fire that the Port Alberni Fire De­
partment was called out to extinguish the blaze. Subsequently sent
back east to Ogden Shops, Calgary, Alberta, the roster in the Vic­
toria B.C. roundhouse had the notation scrapped beside the entry
for Number 8012. It was reported that Number 8007 might get Number
8012 s prime mover and that other Baldwins might benefit from spare
parts.
John Hoffmeister, our member in Victoria, who sent this in­
formation, wrote again to say that, in one of the worst accidents in
the history of the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway, CP RAIL Baldwins
1
CANADIAN
255
R A I L
Numbers 8006,8007, 8008 and 8011 ended their careers at Mile 68.1,
barely four miles south of Nanaimo, in the late afternoon of Tues-
day, 12 June 1973. The crew on the second Nitinat Logger, with
units Numbers 8011 & 8007, 0 water-car and caboose, left Wellcox
terminal (Nanaimo), apparently believing that Train 51 -the freight
from Victoria -had arrived. It is possible thot the presence in the
yard of the two Geeps which normally haul this freight -but which
had been replaced by three Baldwins because of mechanical failure –
misled the crew.
Train 51, with units Numbers 8008 & 8006, 27 freight cars
and the van was, by this time, nearing the end of its run to Well­
cox. Although the precise circumstances are unknown at this time,
the two trains met on a reverse curve at Mile 68.1, colliding at
a combined speed of 50 mph. The result was disasterous. One of the
reasons why there were no fatalities was the fact that the units
telescoped, thus lessening the total force of the impact. Number
8006 sheared off the cab of Number 8008, the crew of the latter
saving themselves by diving to the floor.
In a later communication (9 July 1973), Mr. Hoffmeister
reported that Numbers 8008 & 8011 were scrapped, with Number 8006
to follow. Number 8007 was considered repairable and, with parts
from the victims, should be running in about two months.
This leaves in service Numbers 8000 through 8005, 8007
and 8010.
MR. E.W.WOODLAND, HONORARY SECRETARY OF THE WESTERN AUSTRALIA SEC­
tion of the Australian Railway Historical Society, writes
to say that the MLW Industries M-636s and the ALCO DL 628s,
presently in use on the Hamersley Railway of Western Australia on
block trains of iron ore, are performing very well. Their horse­
power rating has not been reduced and they give very little trouble.
They have had some difficulties with the turbochargers, but these
instances have occurred very seldom.
CP RAIL HAS ANNOUNCED THE PLACING OF A CONTRACT FOR 20 NEW SD 40-2
units from Diesel Division, General Motors of Canada. The
new units, scheduled for delivery in January-February,1974,
are six-axled and rated at 3,000 hp. GM DieseLines.
MR. LAWRENCE C. HAINES, OUR READER IN SOMERVILLE, NEW JERSEY, U.S.A.,
writes to day that ex-Reading Railroad Number 2102, which
played a prominent part in the Sesquicentennial Steam
Spectacular on the Delaware & Hudson Railway last April, in fact
is owned b~ Rail Tours Incorporated -Mr. William Benson and others.
Now identified as Delaware & Hudson Number 302, the locomotive ~s
stored for reasons of security and convenience on the property of
High Iron Company, Lebanon, New Jersey, between excursions.
Mr. Haines also reminds us that ex-Nickel Plate Berkshire
Number 759 was run to Scranton, Pa., from Hoboken, N.J!~, on 22 July
1973. This steam locomotive is the property of Steamtpwn U.S.A.,
Bellows Falls, Vermont, U.S.A. .
AMTRAK: SAN BERNARDINO SAYS THAT TRAINS 3 & 4, EX-SANTA FE SUPER
Chief will carry up to 20 cars this summer, writes Mr.
R.F.Hartney, our member in San Bernardino, California.
It will be interesting, he writes, to observe the performance of
these long trains, since they will probably be obliged to stop
twice at each station, the platforms being too short to accommodate
CANADIAN
256
R A I L
such lengthy trains. Mr. Hartney concludes that Trains 19 & 20, ex­
Santa Fe Chief, will not operate this summer.
There is no news about AMTRAK passenger service in the San Joaquin
Valley yet. Meanwhile, says Mr. Hartney, Southern Pacific Corpora­
tion has started using a portion of their new $ 39 million yard in
Bloomington, due to be opened officially in July. Switch engines
were making up trains on the departure side in May, but hump-re­
tarders were not in use at that time.
A NEW SHAPE IS MAKING ITSELF KNOWN AROUND THE DIESEL DIVISION OF
General Motors in London, Ontario. This is the new G26CW
export model, a total of 58 of which will be built for
the Zeljeznicko Transportno Preduzece (ZTP), the state railway
commission of Yugoslavia. This model is a 2000 hp. unit and the
order was expected to be completed in August, 1973. GM DieseLines.
TWO OF THE NEW SD 40-2 UNITS FOR THE QUEBEC, NORTH SHORE AND LABRA­
dor Railway, Numbers 249 & 250, are shown at CNs Montr6al
Yard on 15 April 1973 in the accompanying photograph sent
in by Pierre Patenaude. Pierre also supplies the following informa­
tion regarding builders numbers and delivery dates. The order num­
ber was C-356 and the builder was Diesel Division, General Motors of
Canada Limited, London, Ontario:
Road Numbers Builders Numbers
241
through 246 A-2849 through A-2854
247 through 248 A-2855 through A-2856
249 through 250 A-2857 through A-2858 251
through 254 A-2859 through A-2862
255 through 256 A-2863 through A-2864
257 through 258 A-2865 through A-2866
259 through 260 A-2867 through A-2868
Delivery
31 March 6
April
13 April
16 April
23 April
25 April
27 April
date
1973 1973 1973
1973
1973
1973 1973
Pierre notes that these units are the same exteriorally as
those delivered by DD GMCL to the QNS&L in April 1972, except that
there are no number boards on the long ends of the units.
CA NAD IAN 257
R A I L
THE RECONDITIONED ALSO RS 3, PICTURED ON PAGE 351 OF THE NOVEMBER
1972 issue Number 250 of CANADIAN RAIL has been purchased
by Comox Logging and Railway Company (actually Crown Zel­
lerbach Building Materials) of Ladysmith, Vancouver Island, B.C.,
writes John Hoffmeister. The unit, formerly Delaware & Hudson Rail­
way Number 4097, will be used on the 22-mile haul from Ladysmith to
Nanaimo Lakes, B.C.
Of more interest to Mr. Hoffmeister is the fate of Crown
Zellerbachs Baldwin Vb-lOOO model, displaced by the ex-D&H unit.
With a surplus of one diesel at Ladysmith, one could also speculate
on the fate of two-truck Shay Number 1 at CZs Elk Falls Division
at Campbell River, B.C., as well as a small Whitcomb gasoline loco
at the same place.
OUR DIRECTOR-EMERITUS OF MEMBERSHIP ACTIVITIES, MR. J.A.BEATTY, HAS
discovered another gem in a Canadian Pacific Railway Pas­
senger Bulletin of January 1st.,1914, which reads thusly:
THROUGH TICKETING TO PRINCE EDI4ARD ISLAND DISCONTINUED
FOR THE WINTER.
Regular steamer service having been withdrawn between Point
du Chene and Summerside and between Pictou and Charlottetown,
no through tickets may be issued until further advised.
Winter service is performed by Government steamer between
Sackville,N.B. and Cape Tormentine, P.E.I.-passengers should
be ticketed to Sackville and left to repurchase.
Mr. Beatty wonders if there really were steamers to Sack­
ville, N.B. Perhaps, he ponders,the Chignecto Canal was not a
myth, after all~
THE MONTREAL URBAN COMMUNITY TRANSIT COMMISSION HAS PLACED AN ORDER
with the Diesel Division, General Motors of Canada Limited,
London, Ontario, for 120 fifty-three passenger coaches.
While this is not the largest order the Division has received over
the years, it is the largest contract to date for one model.
Schedules are being established which will permit delivery of 15 of
the new double-door exit, power-steering busses before the end of
1973, with the remainder being delivered in 1974, GM DieseLines.
THE GOVERNMENT OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA HAS PURCHASED,
for the enormous sum of $ 1.00 , former MacMillan-Bloe­
del 2-6-2 Number 1077, a nicely proportioned Montreal Lo­
comotive Works product (SiN 65377, 1923), which has been stored for
some years, since 16 December 1969, to be exact. It is said that
the B.C. government intends to use the locomotive on an exhibit tr­
ain, the railway at Fort Steele having a surplus of motive power
at the present time. John E. Hoffmeister.
WHILE STREETCAR LINES, ESPECIALLY THE NARROW-GAUGE KIND, ARE RARE
nowadays in North America, quite the reverse is true in
Europe and, particularly, in northern France. To prove this
point, Monsieur Claude Gay has recently written a very comprehensive
and profusely illustrated history of the tramway systems in and
around the city of Lille. This definitive work is a complete history
and description of both the urban and suburban standard-gauge net­
work (TELB), as well as the Roubaix-Tourcoing urban and interurban
narrow-gauge systems (ELRT). In words and pictures, M. Gay takes the
CANADIAN
258
R A I L
reader from the era of hurse-drawn cars of the last century to the
present-day PCC cars of the ELRT, which are still operating. Pro­
fusely illustrated with some 400 photographs of excellent quality,
this book will appeal to the tramway enthusiast, even though his
knowledge of the French language may not be profound.
The accompanying photograph by M. G. Masino shows a selec­
tion of ELRT narrow-gauge equipment at the Grand Place in Tourcoing.
AU FIL DES TRAMS; Claude Gay AMITRAM Publications, 8 rue Deschodt,
59000-LILLE, France. $ US 30.00
ON AGAIN-OFF AGAIN~ A REPORT IN THE TORONTO GLOBE AND MAIL DATED
28 April 1973 said that work had begun on the Burlington
Northerns Kootenay & Elk Railway in southeastern British
Columbia. Clearing for the right-of-way was said to have been star­
ted on the projected line between Elko, B.C. and the International
Boundary near Newgate, B.C., despite the fact that no approval for
construction had been received from the Canadian Transport Commis­
sion. As previously reported, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that
the CTC had erred in rejecting the K&E s application last year,but,
to date, hod not reversed the prohibition. M.B.Pepper, President of ~
Crows Nest Industries -parent company of the K&E -said that the
decision to proceed with first steps of construction was taken ~n
the light of prospective improvements in world coal markets.
On 3 Moy 1973, the Globe and Mail carried another report
which soid that Crows Nest Industries Limited of Fernie, B.C., had
stopped work on the proposed Kootenay and Elk Railway. M.B.Pepper
said that construction was being postponed indefinitely in the face
of Provincial government opposition. Nevertheless, Mr. Pepper re­
mained hopeful that the 80-mile link with the BN would be built at
some time in the future, after either a change of heart by B.C. s
CANADIAN 259 R A I L
new New Democratic Party government or a change in government. Box­
score: CP RAIL 3i Visitors, no score~
THE SALE OF ROBERVAL AND SAGUENAY RAILWAYS STEAM LOCOMOTIVE NUMBER
17, a 2-8-0 built by the Canadian Locomotive Company of
Kingston, Ontario in 1940 (SiN 1959) to Mr. John E. Thomp­
son of Monee, Illinois, U.S .A., was reported in the May 1971 issue
Number 232 of CANADIAN RAIL. Until July 1973, this locomotive was
stored in Canadian National Railways Jonquiere, Quebec, yard, until
details regarding the movement of the locomotive by CN could be ar­
ranged. Because of the condition of the locomotive, there was a
question as to whether or not she could be moved on her worn wheels.
Arrangements were finally made and on 1 July, Number
passed through CNs Montreal Yard, firmly chained between two box­
cars, which provided the necessary braking power for the heavy lo­
comotive. Mr. Barry Biglow took Number 17 s picture, as she was
route to Essex, Connecticut, U.S.A.< via Central Vermont to New
don, CT and Penn Central (New Haven) to Essex and the haven of
17
en
Lon­
the
Valley Railroad Company.
Initially, Number 17 was billed from Jonquiere to Chicago,
via CN and Grand Trunk Western, but the destination was changed 1Je­
fore this routeing could be effected. It is soid that Number 17 will
be restored to operating condition. S.S.Worthen.
Pierre Patenaude photographed Canadian National Railways Train 66,
the eastbound RAPIDO, at Brockville, Ontario, while the engine
crews were making a fast change on 16 June 1973. Power was FP 9A
6540 and FPB 4 Number 6363.
CANADIAN RAIL
publlshed by t.he
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAl ASSOCIATION ~~,~:t 4u;~·uo, e-
ASSOOIa.te MerYl.bershlp 1 nol uding 12 lssues
B.OO annually
EDITOR S.S. VlTort.h.en LAYOUT & PRODUCTION P Mu.rphy
VISIT THE
Canadian Railway Museum
OPEN MAY -SEPT.
W
VISITEZ L E
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Ll._. OUVERT MAl· SEPT
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OTTAWA
PACIFIC COAST
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
ASSOCIA TION BRANCHES
WESTERN L.~!.Un …. in, Secretory,
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P.S hergal d, S Ccleto ry I TORONTO & YORK OIVISION
1727 23rd.Ave.N.W., Calgary, Alto.
P.O.Box 141,Terminol A/Otto …. a,Canado.
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AUSTRALIA
ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVES
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W.D.McKeown, 6-7, 4-chome, Yornota-cha, Suito City,Osaka,Japan.
K.G. Younger, 267 Vernon Rood, ~:innipeg, Manitobo R3J 2W1
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