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Canadian Rail 256a 1973

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Canadian Rail 256a 1973

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25&.A.
I.973

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~ John A. Rushton
~very once in a while the
attention of the railway
historian is caught by a
footnote in an article,re-
cording something a little
out of the ordinary. Such
a footnote appears on page 83
of Bulletin Number 83 of the
Railway & Locomotive Historical So­
ciety of Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.
This Bulletin is, in effect, a detailed,
all-time roster of the steam locomotives of
the Canadian Pacific Railway Company.
The report, in recording the disposition of various locomo­
tives of the Companys class M-4-g 2-8-0s,light consolidations built
by the Baldwin Locomotive Works, Philadelphia, U.S.A., in 1907,sta­
tes that, in 1947 (sic), Number 3512 was lost off barge into Slocan
Lake, B.C.. —
Now such a thing can hardly be an everyday occurrence. It is
one thing for an engine to be unceremoniously scrapped. It is anoth­
er -and happier -thing for an engine to be rebuilt or preserved.
But to be lost off a barge in the middle of a lake in a relatively
unknown part of the Province of British Columbia -such an event
would stimulate the curiosity and imagination of the most conserva­
tive of ferroequinologists~
The writer was quite prepared to accept this footnote in Bul­
letin Number 83 without further question, accepting it as one of
those peculiarities of railroading until, one day quite by chance,
he met a Canadian Pacific Railway engineer who claimed to have been
shipwrecked~ Shipwrecked? Trainwrecked, maybe, but shipwrecked?Well,
hardly ever~
The simple response 3512 ? was sufficient to initiate a
most fascinating conversation and discussion that recreated the le­
gendary shipwreck of Number 3512, in the middle of the mountains
of central British Columbia. The details which follow have been
supplied by the Shipwrecked Hogger on that eventful last run of
Number 3512, Mr. C.F.Turner, to whom the writer is very much indebt­
ed.
CELEBRATING THE ARRIVAL OF CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS STEAM LOCOMO­
ti ve Number 6218 at the Canadian Railway Museum, here she is toge­
ther with electric hauler Number 6762 at Gohier, Que.,where Jim
Shaughnessy caught her on 31 May 1969, as she coupled up to the
CRHA excursion to Grande Mere.
~AT SLOCAN CITY,B.C., ON SLOCAN LAKE, 8 July 1946 -NOT SIX MONTHS
before the regatta, CPR consol Number 3512 wet her feet inten­
tionally. Jim Hope of Trail,B.C., was there and took the picture.
CANADIAN 136 RA I L
The setting for this strange incident was south-central
British Columbia, in a valley between the Arrow Lakes
and Kootenay Lake, with the 10,000-foot peaks of the
Monashee and Selkirk Mountains towering tall against the
western and eastern horizons. Between the Arrow and Ko­
otenay Lakes is the Slocan Country, home of the Valhalla
Range, Kokanee Peok and Crescent Valley, wherein nestles
Slocan Lake.
Since the middle of the nineteenth century, the Slocan Country has
been famous for its mines: gold, silver and lead, and infamous for
its railways. To reach the Slocan Country, the early railways were
forced to resort to car-barge operation up and down the Arrow Lakes
and to and fro across Kootenay Lake. The mountainous terrain for­
bade any approach by land. Once the natural barriers had been over­
come, the western part of the Slocan Country was amenable to normal,
standard-gauge railway construction.
Not so on the eastern side where, in the 1880s, the Kaslo &
Slocan Railway wound its narrow-gauge way up through the canyons to
the ore concentrators at Retallack and the mines at Zincton and San­
don, in the very shadow of 8,000-foot Mount Carlyle. These mines en­
joyed a degree of prosperity until the early 1950s, when the inevi­
table problems of economics and dwindling output forced their clo-
sure. Today, these mining camps are well-known ghost towns and
attract many visitors and tourists.
At the time of the shipwreck, the Canadian Pacific Railway
was operating the isolated Kaslo Subdivision from Kaslo, on Kootenay
Lake, standard-gauging it up into the mountain canyons on the old
roadbed of the narrow-gauge Kaslo & Slocan, to the summit at Parapet
and then down the west side, through the depths of Denver Canyon to
New Denver, Rosebery and Nakusp, 62.9 hard, twisting miles of moun­
tain railroad. The main line included a 1 .0-mile switchback from
Parapet (m.25.5) to Three Forks (m.26.5).
From Kaslo on the west shore of Kootenay Lake, there was a
car-barge connection to Proctor, 20 miles east of Nelson, B.C. on
the CPRs southern B.C. main line from Crowsnest Pass. There was
another car-barge connection from Slocan City -at the end of the
branch from South Slocan, on the main line 12 miles west of Nelson.
From Slocan City, rail traffic took to the water, across Slocan Lake
for 24 miles to Rosebery, mile 34.5 on the Slocan Sub.
By 1957, the impossible portion of this subdivision -from
Kaslo up the mountain to Retallack, Zincton, Sandon and Parapet –
had been abandoned west to Denver Canyon, mile 30.5. In fact, much
of this section of right-of-way had been utterly demolished by a
succession of flash floods a few years earlier and had not been used
since this disaster.
This abandonment left the car-barge service between Slocan
City and Rosebery as the only means of access to the Denver Canyon­
Rosebery-Nakusp line, albeit for a short time there was a sporadic
service to Nakusp via the CPRs Arrowhead (Revelstoke)-Robson West
(Castlegar) sternwheeler-barge operation on the Upper and Lower
Arrow Lakes.
_ Even today, there are relics of this antediluvian operation.
A car-barge slip still exists at Kaslo, where a switchmobile deliv­
ers freight cars from Kootenay Lake car-barges to consignees loca­
ted along the half-mile of yard tracks remaining at Kaslo.
CANADIAN 137 RA I L
But back in 1946, the subdivision was operated in much the
same way as it is today, except that the line was still in place be­
tween Kaslo and Denver Canyon and freight trains were struggling up
the mountain to Parapet.
The train and crew originated at Nelson, B.C. -headquarters
for the Kootenay Division of the CPR -and ran west 11 .9 miles on
the Boundary Subdivision to South Slocan. Here, the train turned
northwest over the Slocan Sub., 31 .3 miles to Slocan City on the
shore of beautiful but treacherous Slocan Lake. At this point, the
entire train -locomotive included -was loaded onto one or two car­
barges and pushed by a tugboat 24 miles to the car-barge slip at
Rosebery, near the lakes northern end. The crew unloaded and re­
assembled the train, after which the engine hauled the train west
over the winding rails to Nakusp on Arrow Lake -the western ter­
minal. At Nakusp, the train and crew spent the night.
The second day, the train covered the entire north portion
of the subdivision from Nakusp east to Rosebery, New Denver, Sandon,
Zincton, Retallack and Kaslo, returning to Nakusp again to tie up
for the night. Tonnage was substantial, as the main commodity -cer­
tainly on the east end -was ore and/or concentrates. It was not an
easy run.
On day 3 the train returned to Rosebery, was re-embarked on
the car-barge(sj and, having enjoyed the leisurely voyage back to
Slocan City, de-barged the train and engine and returned on terra
firma to Nelson,
Usually they made two trips a week, leaving Nelson on Mondays
and Thursdays and returning on Wednesdays and Saturdays. The service
was normally freight only, but every alternate Monday the train
included a combination baggage-passenger car and thereby provided
passenger accommodation on the Nelson-Nakusp-Nelson portions of the
subdivision every two weeks. Commencing in the summer of 1947 -and
for some time thereafter -this service was once-a-week only.
Very few such genuine train-ferry operations, where pas­
senger equipment with passengers aboard was carried by water, ever
existed in Canada. Certainly, nowhere else in North America was such
service offered amid surroundings of such picturesqueness and beauty.
Probably the most familiar comparable contemporary train-ferry ser­
vice was that of Canadian National Railways, across Northumberland
Strait, from Cape Tormentine, N.B. to Borden, P.E.I. But this could
not compare with the voyage up Slocan Lake.
The particular run to which our attention now turns woul_d
normally have left Nelson on Monday 30 December 1946. However, be­
cause this was a non-mixed Monday -thus not tied to a passenger
schedule -and because the next day, Tuesday, was the day before
New Years Eve, the trip was advanced one day and the crew were
called at Nelson on Sunday morning, 29 December. This meant that
the crew could return to Nelson on Tuesday afternoon, just in time
to help bring in the New Year, an occasion certainly not to be mis­
sed.
The crew consisted of Engineer C.F.Turner, Fireman E. Swanson,
head-end Brakeman W. Chapman, tail-end Brakeman J. Mcivor and C~n­
ductor H. Mansfield. In the consist for the entire run was the ubi­
quitous and essential snowplow of ~lassie CPR design, together with
an assortment of freight cars and the van.
The engine, Number 3512, was one of several M-4 class consol­
idations (Numbers 3400-3565) assigned to Nelson. Having small 57-inch
UNDER THE WEIGHT OF FREIGHT CARS AND 2-8-0 NUMBER 3512, THE APRON
of the car-barge sinks slowly into Slocan Lake at Slocan City,B.C.
Not to worry~ For many triP-si the car-barge carried Number 3512 –
or one of her sisters -safe y to Rosebery and back. Jim Hope of
Trail, B.C., took this picture on 8 July 1946.
~ CPRS RAIL-WATER SERVICE ON LOWER & UPPER ARROW LAKES TERMINATED AT
Arrowhead, B.C., on the north end. The S.S.MINTO, one of CPRs fam­
ous stern-wheelers, pushed the barge. 14 July 1951. EA Toohey Coll.
drivers -small compared to the 63-inch wheels on the N-2 class ·
(Numbers 3600-3670), the M-4s were particularly suited to the winding
hilly track that the Slocan and Kaslo Subdivisions presented. They
were also known to be very dependable machines, summer and winter.
Engineer Turner recalls that, despite her age of forty years,Number
3512 was considered to be one of the best in her class and still had
lots of life and power at the time of her unexpected and unseemly
end.
North. on Sunday the 29th. I to Rosebery and Nakusp, the trip
was without major incident. Similarly, the turn from Nakusp t~ Kb~lo
on Monday the 30th., over the incredible switchbacks a~ P~rapet,was
uneventful. Incidental to the whole affair -at least, at the time -was
the dream of Brakeman· W. Chapman who, on Sunday night, dreamed
that one of the car-barges on Slocan Lake had. sunk~ Q dreadful omen~
But like most premonitions of. disaster, it was passed off without
further concern.
The eventful part.of Number 3512 s ·last trip began just after
midnight on Tuesday morning, when the train left Nakusp for the run
to the car-barge slip at Rosebery. Arriving.at the barge-slip and
finding the tug and the two barges waiting as usual, the crew pro­
ceeded to load the train, putting most of the cars on the first bar­
ge, which was of steel-hull construction. W~en thii barge was loaded
to capacity, Numb.er 3512, the snowplow, the caboose and three flat
cars loaded with lu~ber, were shunted onto the second barge.
While
water
ed or
This was Barge Number ·18, an older unit with a wood~n
Number 18 1tas considered seaworthy, it was known to
and it did, to such an ~xtent that it usually had to be
siphoned out prior to each trip. ·
hull.
seep pump-
a=
rl
rl

CANADIAN 140 R A I L
The tug and two barges cast off around 4.00 a.m. and the en­
gine-crew stepped over onto the tug ROSEBERY, while the train-crew
stayed in the caboose on Number 18 to catch up on their sleep. As
the flotilla passed Cape Horn Rock at abour 6.15 a.m., some five
miles north of their destination at Slocan City, the New Years Eve
anticipation of the ROSEBERY s captain was troubled by the sight of
the wooden car-barge listing at a disturbing and unnatural angle.
The captain at once alerted Number 3512 s crew to the fact that the
barge seemed to be in a curious attitude and requested the engineer
to move Number 3512 a few feet to re-balance and equalize the load
on the barge.
This manoeuver was not immediately possible, since Number
3512 s fire had been banked and her boiler pressure had dropped dur­
ing the two-hour trip from Rosebery. Even if there had been enough
steam pressure to move Number 3512, it would have been an extremely
delicate procedure to move a 101-ton steam locomotive on a badly­
listing car-barge.
Less than four minutes later -with the situation going from
bad to worse -the captain advised the engine-crew to wake up the
train-ere~ in the caboose and get them to the comparative safety of
the ROSEBERY. Waking a train-crew without reason frequently results
in mild violence at the best of times and to do so on the day of
New Years Eve -with the unlikely story that the car-barge was in
the process of sinking -could not generally improve the situation.
Nevertheless, and probably spurred on by his dream of the previous
night, Brakeman Chapman and his two compatriots hastened to comply
with the captains request and evacuated the van in favour of the
tug.
.A. CPRS TRAIN-FERRY OPERATION ON SLOCAN LAKE, THE NORTH END AT ROSEBERY,
I B.C. The line to Nakusp runs along the shore in the background.
J, THE TRAIN CREW CAREFULLY SUPERVISE THE UNLOADING AND LOADING OPERA­
T tions at Rosebery. It was always a tricky operation. Mr. Omer
Lavallee took these pictures in the summer of 1953.
CANADIAN 142 R A I L
They had not long to wait to appreciate the wisdom of their
relocation.
It was still dark at that hour of the winter morning in south­
central British Columbio, but tug ond barge navigation lights were
sufficient to reveal that disaster was imminent. Before the very eyes
of the fascinated and incredulous train and tug crews, old Number 18
began to list more and more severely -fortunately to the open­
water side cather than towards the tug.
And then, in a dramatic moment, as though it could no longer
resist the urge to shrug off its cargo, Car-barge Number 18 suddenly
slid over to a 45°-angle and slowly and majestically spilled into the
lake with a tremendous splash Number 3512, the caboose, the snowplow
and the three flat cars of lumber -in other words, the whole she­
bang~
Having divested itself of its onerous load, old Number 18 rol­
led back again through the 45° to a semi-upright position, gurgling
proudly at being relieved of such a cumbersome burden.
When the crews on the tug stopped holding their breath,there
were sighs of relief. In fact, there was really nothing that anyone
. ,,.,,,f ,.could do but sigh. Fortunately, no one was on the barge or the equip­
i,t, ~;.;ment that, moments later, disturbed a thick cloud of mud at the
f;.: ¥.bottom of Slocan Lake.
~,t_i· .. :·t ……
What was left of the captains flotilla proceeded to Slocan
City.
It was then the painful duty of Conductor Mansfield to ruin,
quite utterly and completely, the entry of the New Year of 1947 at
CPR divisional headquarters, Nelson, B.C., by reporting by tele­
phone the accidental loss of one 2-8-0, one snowplow, one van and
parts of three flat cars of lumber. In addition -and sad to relate­
there was no way of moving the rest of the train off the second car­
barge and back to Nelson and the dispatcher, to understate (perhaps)
his reaction, was not responsive to the conductors plea that an­
other engine, with possibly a caboose, should be sent up to Slocan
City to fetch the survivors.
Alas, as penance, the crew had to find its own way back to
Nelson,a potential 43 weary miles, which indeed it was by hitch­
hiking, but nonetheless mitigated by a kind and compassionate cit­
izen of Slocan City, who gave the crew a good breakfast before they
set out on the homeward trek.
At a later date, when the event could be considered more dis­
passionately, attempts were made to recover Number 3512 and the rest
of the equipment. A dragline 500 feet long was employed, but no
trace of the engine, van or snowplow could be found, an understand­
able situation, since Slocan Lake is reported to be 900 feet deep
in various parts.
Later still, a few more pieces of lumber from the flat cars
floated to the surface, but no flotsam or jetsam from the caboose or
snowplow ever appeared. Needless to say, nobody expected Number
3512 or her tender to rise to the surface. One miracle on the 31st.
of December of any year was sufficient~
This wasnt the end of the story. Then ther.e was the invest­
igation.
The investigation into the event -and you had better believe
that there was one -was unique in that it involved marine as well
as railway officials. This entrained (no pun intended) the filing
.:
.~
CANADIAN 143 RA I L
NORTHBOUND TRAINS INFERIOR DIRECTION
SLOCAN
SOUTHBOUND TRAINS SUPERIOR DIRECTION
THIRD CLASS
841
-Mlxod
!Mon.
7.40
I–····
7.50
—•
8.15
–···
8.21
_____ ,
8.28
–···
8.44
_______ a
8.52
_____ s
9.12
-·-·–
9.22
9.50
; SUBDIVISION
fa 111—-I
:El 1-o STATIONS
· ti
I· f ..
.. .!
THIRD CU.SS
a Wed.
.0 D _____ SOUTHSLOCAN..ZVWRS u __ 16.20
2.6
2.6 ……………. CRESCENT VALLEY … -.. -…….. 11 a 16.10
6.7 9.3
.•…….. SLOCAN PARK–······· ………… a 15.45
1.5
10.8 *–PASSMORE … –……………….. s 15.39
I. 7
12.5 ····-·· *··–VALLICAN …… –……………….. f 15.32 4.0 16.5
…….. *·—LEBAHDO …… –… ····—f 15.16 2.0
18.5 ·······
·–·-·····WINLAW .. -·-······ 14 s 15.08 5.1
23.6 *-··—PERRYS .. __ w …….. s 14.47
2.6 26.2 …..
LEMON CREEK…… 22 f 14.36
1—–31.3 Dz. …. _SLod~clTY ………. YS C·–· 14.15
1—-1—.l—-1
·-·
J Wei.
841 842
Un IBIS othefwlae dlremd ~ must be red-.1 to twenty miles per hour where· Blow
bOMda ate 1-ied.
Traina handling plledriven must not exceed a~ of fifteen mll11 per hour.
Appladale at mlleaga 21.3 will be a reftlar atop for trains 841 and 842. .
=~:.::::: : w:~ .. i;:i:~:·~~~::_vd• unattended Ragging protection as per
WESTBOUND TRAINS
INFERIOR DIRECTION
KASLO
EASTBOUND TRAINS
SUPERIOR DIRECTION
SECOND CLASS
~

841 i SUBDIVISION
0
SECOND CLASS
842
Nakusp
E
l

Mlled
j
i ;:: STATIONS
Nelllln
Mixed
l Mon. a Wed.
———-·———·—–!——
.0 D ….. KASLO …….. WCK K
5.4 5.4
…. ZWICKY.
6.6
12.0 …. KEEN ………. —–···
3.4
15.4 …….. *–BLAYLOCK ……. _. __ _
2.5
17. 9 . —–·-····RETALLACK ………. ___ . 13
1.9 19.8
… *······-···GIEGERICH ….
0.9
20. 7 …….. *···········-·ZINCTON …………. Y —···· 1.8
22.5 …….. *··········-·RAMBLER
3.0
……………. ……………. 25. 5 ………………….. PARAPET .. -………. R ……. I ···········-··· …………… .
—-1-1 3.2 1—–
… * .. SANDO~—··········-
—-l–l-·1—-:3.2—-1–1·—–I—
25.5 .PARAPET·–·-·······R 1.0
26.5 …………….. THREE FORKS …… W … .
I.I
27.6 …….. *······-···—·ALAMO .. 2.9
..
1
~ 30.5 ………. DENVE~-~ANYON. i—I
—~ ~ D Z ……….. ROSEB
0
ERY .. ZYWCRR Y_ll_~
1
..:::::::_::::
…. I 14.35 39.3 . *··········-·····HILLS……………….. I 9.35
.. s 15.10 50.8
…… s15.30 57.6
11.5
. ··-·······SUMMIT LAKE ……. Y ..
6.8
….. BROUSE ….. ·-··-··· W ….. . 12
5.3
• 8.55
8.25
15.50 62.9 D Z .. ——-NAKUSP …… YWCRNA __ …… 8.00
a Mon. l Wed.
841
*No passing track
842
~ ~..i:~ .
::.~,~
CANADIAN 144 R A I L
of duplicote reports and the proceedings were much more complicated
thon as though the accident had been purely a railway affair.
The joint conclusions made two recommendations for future
operation on this rail-water route. First, all members of the train
crew, and the passengers, if it was a mixed trip, would be obliged
to travel on board the tug during the water portion of the journey.
Second, the inadvisability of moving equipment on the car-barge(sJ,
once the tug and barge(s) had cast off, was reaffirmed.
And so concluded the sad saga of the loss through misodventure
of Canadian Pacific Railway engine Number 3512, which to this day
lies in a cold, watery grave, in company with a snowplow, a caboose
and three flat cars, a few hundred yards west of Cape Horn Rock and
some six hundred feet straight down, on the bottom of Slocan Lake
in Crescent Valley, in south-central Beautiful British Columbia.
t
IN THE SUMMER OF 1953, CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAYS M4g CLASS 2-8-0,
Number 3480, a sister engine of Number 3512, pulled a stock car and
a tank car off the two-tracked car-barge, past the diminutive coal
chute at Rosebery, British Columbia. It was at this point that CPR s
Kaslo Subdivision received traffic from Slocan City and the main
line at South Slocan. Consol 3480 was outshopped by Montreal Loco­
motive Works in 1907, while our heroine, Number 3512, was built
,by BaYdwin Locomotive Works, Eddystone, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., in
1907. In line with Number 3480 s smoke-box, you can see the track
running north along the shore to Nakusp on the Arrow Lakes, 28.4
miles away. This photograph was taken by Mr. O.S.Lavallee in the
summer of 1953 and is here reproduced with his kind permission.
I
13 7 RAILBUGS
S.S.Worthen
Railbugs, dear friends, are just
like people, or almost. Railfans
are people who are crazy about
railways and trains. Berry-pick-
ers are nice people who like to
ride on trains every once in a
while.
Railbugs are people who are caught in between railfans and
berry-pickers. They just cannot seem to make up their minds whether
or not they want to be one kind or the other. They are not really
confused or uncertain. They are just uncommitted and happy~
In June 1972, a handful of model railroaders in Picton and
Kingston, Ontario -who are also railfans -decided to sponsor a
trip on a little-known branchline of Canadian National Railways.
They had not done this sort of thing before and so they were not en­
tirely prepared for the onslaught of railbugs. They understood rail­
fans and berry-pickers, but they did not realize that, under proper
conditions, berry-pickers can change into railbugs.
Now, real railfans will buy a ticket and ride on almost any
kind of a train anywhere. Usually, they prefer steam engines to
diesel-electric units because this is what Father told them was the
right thing to do. But since the trip from Belleville, Ontario to
the Marmoraton Iron Mines at Marmora, Ontario and thence to Trenton
and Picton didnt have a steam engine, they admired the diesel units.
It was really a railfan trip.
But notwithstanding this description, railbugs and berry-pick­
ers joined the railfans on that joyous day -10 June 1972 -in the
early hours of the morning, to board two passenger coaches at the
station at Belleville. The coaches were scheduled to depart Belle­
ville at 0700 hours and they did -almost. The yard switcher took
them in taw and carefully moved them to th-e east yard, where they
were attached ta (you guessed it) a long string of 26 empty ore
cars -plus two pressure-unloading hoppers and two freshly-painted
Duluth, Winnipeg & Pacific Railway boxcars -bound for the iron ore
mine at Marmora.
After a brisk run through the clear, cold morning to Modoc
Junction and Anson Junction on the Campbellford Subdivision, the
train turned east on the Marmora Subdivision to the Marmoraton Mine.
On arrival at 0850 hours, the three units with the hoppers
and the two boxcars ran around the train and pushed the string of
empty ore cars past the loading hoppers until the last three empties
were positioned under the hopper spouts. With a swish and a rattle,
the trio was loaded in a trice. The train was then allowed to drift
downgrade until the next three empties were in position. These were
loaded quickly and the same move was again repeated.
While all this was going on, some of the more venturesome
railfans, a few of the railbugs and some of the berry-pickers made
the cold climb up the stony road to the parapet which overlooked the
huge open-pit mine. It was cold in the wind -despite the brilliant
sunlight -but the view of the pit was most impressive. Far below,
mammoth power-shovels loaded rock into huge diesel-powered dump
t
AT MARMORATON MINES, THE EXCURSION TRAIN ARRIVED HOPPERS FORWARD
and, after some reshuffling, departed southbound with passenger
cars forward, much to the delight of the rail fans. The rai !bugs
and berrypickers were puzzled but enthusiastic. Photo S.Worthen.
trucks for transport to the crusher. After being crushed to the
proper size, the ore was conveyor-belted to the sintering-pellet­
izing operation. The pelletized ore, marble-sized, was what was
being loaded into the ore cars.
A loud blast on the air-horn of the lead diesel signalled
five minutes to departure, 0950 hours. The observers lining the
parapet reluctantly began the downhill trek to the waiting train.
The stragglers were herded along by the train crew.
The two passenger cars, spliced into the train between the
hoppers and the caboose for the northbound trip, were now marshal­
led directly beh~nd the third diesel unit. For the railfans, this
was a wonderful arrangement. The berry-pickers generally agreed
that it smelled~ If the roadbed on the northbound trip had been re­
markably free from bumps and low spots, the Marmara Subdivision was a v
eritable Persian carpet~ The heavy train rolled along smoothly,
coming to a full stop briefly at the crossing at grade with CP RAIL s Have
lock Subdivision at Bonarlaw and the crossing at grade with the
CN Campbellford Sub.,at Aston Junction,
t
AS THE ORE-CARS WERE LOADED AT THE MARMORATON MINES LOADING CHUTE,
the caboose was allowed to coast gently down to the south end of the
yard. Photo by S.S.Worthen.
t
DETRAINING AT DOCKSIDE, PICTON, ONTARIO, RAILFANS, RAILBUGS AND BE­
rrypickers headed for coffee, doughnuts and dignitaries. Eer long,
the coffee was drunk, the doughnuts eaten, the dignitaries greeted
and the diesels were back and honking~ Photo A.R.Capon,Belleville,Ont.
CANADIAN 148 R A I L
Instead of turning east at Anson Junction, the PMR Special
stayed on the main line south, to cross the Trent River, passing
under CN s Montreal-Toronto main line at Trenton Junction and rol­
ling slowly through the city of Trenton, under CP RAIL s Smiths
Falls -Toronto main line. Then the three units accelerated the
heavy train across Carrying Place, the ship canal and entered
famous Prince Edward County. And when that happened and perhaps be­
cause of it, the berry-p~ckers began changing to railbugs and some
of the railbugs changed into railfans.
This change was partly due to the q~ality of the air in this
part of Ontario and partly to the fact that every berry-picker,rail­
bug and railfan was given a Prince Edward County Mcintosh apple,
courtesy of the Prince Edward County Fruit Growers Association. To­
gether with the wonderfully peaceful scenery and comfortable ride,
these magics accomplished this transformation. County Warden Ross
Benway, seated opposite some railfans from Montreal, reiterated the
advantages of residence and holiday-making in Prince Edward County.
And with good reason~
The PMR Special, with its railfans, railbugs and berry-pick­
ers kept on rolling through The County. Near Hillier, several cows
solemnly regarded the train, as it passed -and kept on cropping the
rich,green grass. Some of the citizens of Wellington saluted the
railbugs with handkerchiefs and tablecloths, plus a few bed-sheets~
At Bloomfield, things were generally pretty quiet. And then, a long
blast on the diesel horn heralded the arrival in Picton.
But when the train stopped, it was nowhere near the station
at Picton. It was stationary at the ore-dock of the Bethlehem Steel
Corporation, north of the town. The reason was logical. It was here
that the pellets of iron ore in the ore cars would be dumped into
the unloading pit, to be added to the huge pile of pellets already
constructed by the clam-shovel and awaiting the arrival of the ore­
carrying laker. The dock on Picton Bay is located on one of the
finest deep-water harbours on Lake Ontario.
While the ore cars were being unloaded, the railfans, rail­
bugs and berry-pickers -of which there were now very few -were
invited to warm up with coffee and doughnuts in the adjacent of­
fices of the Bethlehem Steel Corporation. This was an opportunity
that hardly anyone declined.
While the passengers were sipping coffee, the train crew un­
coupled the two boxcars and the hoppers and trundled them down to
the siding of Lake Ontario Cement Limited, on the east side of town some
distance away. Their progress could be measured by the reced­
ing honk of the diesel horn.
The Mayor of Picton, Margaret Ackerman, greeted the travel­
lers. Her badge of office, in the form of a very official-looking,
ornate necklace, was most impressive. Coffee was provided through
the courtesy of the County Council and was served by a ladies
group from one of Pictons churches. Warden Ross Benway presented
each excursionist with a copy of The County, the story of Prince
Edward County -very well-written and admirably bound in blue, a
Centennial (1967) project -with a commemorative bookplate signed
by Warden Benway. As the day continued cold, both the warm recep­
tion and the coffee were most enjoyable.
But soon the cry of the diesel horn reminded the visitors
that the train was once again ready to leave. On board the train,
the participants were informed that the train would make yet an-
CANADIAN 149 RA I L
other trip north to Marmoraton Mine, in order to deliver the empty
ore cars which were needed for an extra ore train on the Monday fol­
lowing. This was a welcome announcement, although it presented some
complications for those railfans who had trains to catch or appoint­
ments to keep. Arrangements were made with the conductor to stop the
train at Trenton, so that passengers wishing to do so could return
to Belleville by other means. It was to be only a short stop~
It wasnt. Mrs. Virginia Blakely of Picton misunderstood. She
was buying some chocolate milk in a nearby store when, to her sur­
prise, she saw the train slowly pulling out of town. Thrusting the
chocolate milk into the shopping basket of a surprised customer,Mrs.
Blakely took off down the track after the elusive train. Fortunately,
the conductor saw her and, with wisdom passing all understanding,re­
cognized her as a railbug and signalled the engineer in the lead
unit to stop and reverse slowly, in order to recapture the pursuing
railbug. Mrs. Blakely became the heroine of the afternoon and was
welcomed on board again by the applause and cheers of the other
railbugs. The train thereupon resumed its return journey to Mar­
moraton Mine and Belleville without further incident. By this time,
all of the passengers were either railfans or railbugs~
Now, when all the passengers returned to Belleville, how in
the world could you tell who were railfans and who were railbugs? It
was easy. All you had to do was listen.
Mr. Rogers E.M.Whitaker, associate editor of the famous maga­
zine THE NEW YORKER: It was worth coming all the way from New York
for the trip.
Reeve Albert Piroth of Picton:! wish that I had brought all
my family.
William R. Linley, secretary of the Ottawa Branch, Canadian
Railroad Historical Association: One of the best trips Ive been
on.
Commander James Plomer, R.C.N.(ret.) of Milford: The return
trip to Marmoraton Mine was a real bonus. Commander Plomer must be
pardoned. He lives in Prince Edward County.
Charles Begg of Kitchener: I have enjoyed my first visit to
Prince Edward County immensely.
Sanborn S. Worthen, editor of CANADIAN RAIL: The trip was
delightful and to go on another such over the same route would be
a
treat.
In charge of this mass conversion of berry-pickers to railbugs
to railfans was Mr. William Thorley, President of the Picton Model
Railroaders, ably assisted by Mr. Alan R. Capon, Secretary of the
club. Aiding and abetting their efforts were Trainmaster John Dall
and Passenger Sales Representative Frank Becker of Canadian National
Railways, Belleville. Conductor Harold Arthurs, Engineer Norman
Meldrum, Fireman Kenneth Newlands and Brakemen Jack Doran and Martin
Welsh were the train crew.
It was certainly one of the most unusual -but well-behaved –
carloads of freight that these men have had to transport in quite
some time. One hundred and thirty seven railbugs and/or railfans in
two coaches.
Wonder what the freight tariff book has to say about this cl­
assification? Whatever it says -or doesnt say -the classification
had better b~ reviewed at once, for it wont be long before there
will be another shipment.
You know how bugs are for multiplying in number.
The
West Clearwate-r
La he
Logging Railway

W.J.Bedbrook
I
t is o fair bet that if the
Province of Ontario, Canada
suddenly decided to give one
lake of unspecified size within
its boundaries to every man, wo­
man and child resident in the
Province, there would still be
enough bodies of water left over
to entertain o significant num­
ber of visitors from other Pro­
vinces of Canada and o few from
the United States.
No one who hos ever travelled through the northern and west­
ern ports of Ontario returns unimpressed by the fabulous water re­
sources in this area. In addition to these water resources, Ontario
rejoices in vast forested areas and, beneath these forests, ore
equally vast mineral resources which hove only begun to be develop­
ed in the lotter half of the Twentieth Century.
Apart froM the hunters and trappers and the resident Indians,
woodsmen and lumbermen were the earliest explorers of that port of
the Province between the head of the Great Lakes and the plains of
Manitoba. It is fair to soy that, even ofter the transcontinental
railways hod fought their way through this difficult terrain, apart
from o few lucrative mining areas, this area of the Canadian Shield
still remained relatively undeveloped, In its southern port, neigh­
bouring on the State of Minnesota, the lumbermen of that State were
the first industrialists to develop the forest resources. While the
development may not hove been very scientific, it was rapid, re­
sourceful and thorough.
It was inevitable that, due to the uncertain location of the
height of land between the river systems flowing west to Lake Win­
nipeg and those flowing east to Lake Superior, the enterprising lum­
bermen would do their best to alter the direction of flow of some of
the river systems to suit their purposes. Some time prior to 1913,
when the Shevlin-Clarke Company started logging the White Otter Lake
area, northwest of present-day Atikokon, on attempt was mode to
float logs through the natural outlet of this lake, the Big Turtle
River. This river flows southwestward and finds its way into the
Seine River at Mine Centre, Ontario and thence to Rainy Lake. While
there were sawmills on the United States side of Rainy Lake, there
were more of them on the south side of Lake of the Woods and the
final journey of the logs was down the Rainy River to Fort Frances
and thence into Lake of the Woods.
Attempts to use this natural transportation system proved to
be futile and the first log-drive came to be known as the Lost
Drive because the logs that started from White Otter Lake never or-
WITH THE AID OF A CRANE, SHEVLIN-CLARKE LUMBER COMPANYS TWO-TRUCK
Shay locomotive is lowered onto the podium in Atikokan s Civic
Centre on 6 July 1963, the realization of Mr. W.S.Peruniak s bet­
ter idea. Photo courtesy W.J.Bedbrook.
rived at their ultimate destination. It may also be concluded that
the country through which the Big Turtle_ and Seine Rivers ran was
so impassable as to prevent an investigation of the lost log-drive.
The loggers were just as clever as their State of Maine coun­
terparts and the Shevlin-Clarke woodsmen looking for an alternate
route, observed that the Little Turtle River provided a more direct
route to Rainy Lake. However, two natural obstacles intervened. The
first of these was West Clearwater Lake -the location of some of
Shevlin-Clarkes timb~r limits -which drained in the opposite dir­
ection to that in which the logs were supposed to go. The second
obstacle was the necessity to create some form of overland transport
system between West Clearwater Lake, Turtle Lake and the Little Tur­
tle River, which did flow in the right or desirable direction.
A
plan was devised whereby a dam was constructed between
White Otter and West Clearwater Lakes, which raised the level of
West Clearwater and provided quiet water over which the logs could
be rafted. To get the logs over the dam, a steam-powered chain con­
veyer, about 80 feet long -known as The Chain -was built. Next,
to transport the logs across the portage between West Clearwater and
the headwaters of the Little Turtle River, a one-mile-long railroad
was built.
The provision of motive power for the railway was quite an­
other matter. Apparently, Shevlin-Clarke hod six geared logging lo­
comotives some distance to the south, in the Flanders, Ontario area,
four operating south and two north of that town. The two engines to
the north were designated for use on the Clearwater run. They were

CANADIAN
154
R A I L
disassembled and brought in to Turtle Lake by horse-drawn sleds in
the winter. Affectionately called Limeys, these locomotives were
actually of the Shay type and were built by the Lima Locomotive Wo­
rks of Lima, Ohio, U.S.A.
Pile trestles were constructed at both ends of the line, one
for loading the logs at Clearwater and the other for unloading them
at Turtle Lake. They were on-loaded by a steam-powered Lidgerwood
winch onto Russell cars. These Russell cars were of a very simple
two-truck construction, with two bunks on ten-foot centres, capable
of holding 12 to 16-foot logs. Each engine pulled five or six cars
to Turtle Lake. There, the trestle was built tilted at an angle, so
that when the train stopped, the stakes on one side of the car could
be pulled out and the logs off-loaded by rolling off into the lake.
At first, the Shays burned wood, which was cut along the ri­
ght-of-way. It is presumed that they were equipped with a cabbage
stack or suitable equivalent, to prevent the sparks from the fire­
box from escaping and starting brush-fires. Later, the fuel was
changed to coal and this necessitated the establishment of a supply­
line from Flanders, some distance to the south on the Canadian Nor­
thern Railway. Six-horse teams used to pull Bettingdorf wagons,
loaded with coal, over this route.
During the years 1913-1924, these geared locomotives pulled
millions of board-feet of logs over the line, before being retired.
When this operation was terminated, one locomotive was apparently
considered saleable and was therefore taken out in the same labor­
ious manner by which it was first brought in. The other engine, not
considered worth the cost of extradition, was abandoned on the shore
of West Clearwater Lake.
The demise of this interesting logging railway was probably
due to the loss of the timber-cutting rights by Shevlin-Clarke
around West Clearwater Lake,when they refused to pay the price de­
manded by a rival company to cut timber on certain tracts of land
over which the latter had secured control.
Up to this point, the history of the West Clearwater Lake
Railway was that of just any other logging railway which had out­
lived its usefulness. However, more recent events have provided a
most interesting sequel.
More than 30 years later, in February 1963, Mr. W.S.Peruniak,
Principal of Atikokan High School, approached Mr. E.W.Peterson of
the Caland Ore Company, Limited -one of the joint lessors of the
marvellously-rich Steep Rock Iron Mines -with the germ of an idea.
Mr. Peruniak had discovered the abandoned Shay locomotive of the
West Clearwater Lake Railway, derelict on the shores of the lake and
had decided to resurrect it, if he could. To this end, he had also
solicited the help of the Atikokan Chamber of Commerce (being him­
self a member of the Board of Directors) and later he was aided and
abetted in his scheme by the Atikokan Lions Club.
EXTERIORALLY RESTORED AND IN A PLACE OF HONOUR, SHEVLIN-CLARKE LUM­
ber Companys Class 24-2 Shay Patent steam locomotive was the focal
point on 6 July 1963, when she was presented to the City of Atikokan
by the Lions Club. The photos are courtesy of Mr. W.J.Bedbrook.
CANADIAN
155 R A I L
The venture proposed by Mr. Peruniok was to bring the geared
locomotive out of the woods and restore it as a public monument in
Atikokan. Early in March 1963, Caland Ore Company representatives
met with Mr. Donald Wright of the George Armstrong Company, to dis­
cuss the actual retrieval process. This latter Company supplied a
truck, a flat-bed trailer and a front-end loader, while Caland Ore
provided the essential manpower and other necessary equipment.
The problem of reaching the location of the abandoned loco­
motive was mitigated somewhat by the existence of a fire-road from
the main highway to West Clearwater Lake. On Friday night, 15 March
1963, an advance party went in to the remote site to make arrange­
ments for the resurrection and loading of the engine on the fol­
lowing day. With a bit of ingenuity and assistance from some modern
equipment, the derelict locomotive was disinterred and loaded,ready
for its journey, by 1300 hours, Saturday. It arrived at the Steep
Rock Mine site at 2100 hours.
Between 15 March and the projected dedication date of 6 July,
many hours of patient searching and labour were required. There
were three important accessories missing from the locomotive: the
headlight, the bell and the builders plate. A Fort William scrap­
dealer generously donated a suitable headlight; the bell was located
at Flanders, Ontario, where the proprietor graciously consented to
donate it to the Atikokan Chamber of Commerce. The builders plate,
unfortunately, has never been found.
It has been concluded that this particular Shay locomotive
was built around the turn of the century, probably between 1900 and
1908. From faint paint markings on the tender, it was possible to
determine that the locomotive had at one time belonged to the Crooks-
ton Lumber Company, which means that she probably operated in the
neighbouring state of Minnesota prior to being brought to the wilds
of Ontario.

ONE END OF THE DOUBLE-BOGIE LOG­
ging car carrying twenty 16-foot
logs, which is now displayed at
Atikokan, Ont., coupled to the
class B Shay in Civic Centre Park.
Photo courtesy W.J.Bedbrook.
Technically speaking, the engine is a class B, Shay Patent
locomotive, weighing 24 tons and having a 3-cylinder steam engine
with 8 x 8-inch cylinders. She was built by the Lima Locomotive
Works, Incorporated, Lima, Ohio, U.S.A., who acquired manufacturing
rights from the inventor, Mr. Ephraim Shay of Haring, Michigan. Be­
tween 1880 and 1945, there were 2,761 Shay Patent locomotives built,
of which the West Clearwater Lake Railways 24-tonner is a staunch
representative.
On Saturday, 6 July 1963, the excellently-restored Shay was
brought to a site in Atikokan, previously prepared by the Lions Club
and destined to form part of the citys Civic Centre Park. In the
presence of the Reeve and Councillors of the City and a large crowd
of enthusiastic citizens, the engine was carefully lowered on to the
short section of track which forms a substantial base. At the con­
clusion of the formal part of the dedication ceremonies, the cit­
izens, young and old, crowded around the Shay, to marvel at the
realization of Mr. Peruniak s idea.
Some time after this eventful day, a double-bogie logging­
car carrying twenty 16-foot logs, was placed on an extension of the
track on which the Shay rests, so that now the community of Atikok­
an, Ontario, has a living remembrance of the early logging industry,
which played such an essential part in the development of this new
section of the Province of Ontario.
SPECIFICATIONS FOR A
SHAY CLASS 24-2 GEARED LOCOMOTIVE.
Gauge: 4 feet st inches
Fuel Wood/soft coal
Weight rail required: 20 lb.
Cylinders: 3
Fuel capacity: 2,500 lbs. Cylinder diameter: 8 inches
Driving wheels: 8 Cylinder stroke 8 inches
Wheel diameter: 29 inches Rigid wheel-base: 4 feet 2 inches
Tractive force: 10,370 lbs. Weight working order: 56,500 lbs.
Boiler diameter: 33! inches Adhesion factor: 5.45
Firebox length 49 15/16 in. Water-tank capacity: 830 US gallons
Firebox width 32 5/9 in. Boiler pressure: 170 psig.
Tubes: heating surface: 288 sq.ft. Boiler type: Extended wagon-top
Brakes: Steam
Grate area: 11.4 sq.ft.
Couplers & draft-gear:
Boiler tubes length: 7 ft: l lt in.
Fire box heating surface: 53 sq. ft.
Link & pin, with 3 pockets arranged
at heights of 24!, 29! and 34! inches.
MAY 1973
WI JI ILLS
MORE COACH SALES HAVE BEEN ANNOUNCED BY DIESEL DIVISION,
General Motors of Canada, Limited, London, Ontario. Calgary
Transit System ordered 25 of the 53-passenger buses in Feb-
ruary, while Hamilton Street Railway ordered six and Thunder Bay
put in for four.
The City of Welland, Ontario, ordered ten 45-passenger models, King­
ston Public Transit System contracted for four and the City of Sud­
bury, one. GMCL-DieseL in es.
ODDS AND ENDS OF MOTIVE POWER ORDERS FROM DIESEL DIVISION
are as follows: CP RAIL has ordered ten 3,000 hp SD 40-2s ,
scheduled for delivery in December, 1973.
Ontario Northland Railway has placed a supplementary order for 3
SD 40-2s, following an earlier order for 5. The first five are sched­
uled for March delivery, with the remaining 3 for December, 1973.
Algoma Central Railway has increased its original order for 3 to 6,
of the SD 40-2 model.
OUR MEMBER MR. G.R.TAYLOR OF LAKESIDE, ONTARIO, REPORTS
that, early in March, three new Chessie System GP 40-2s , Numbers
4177, 4166 and 4167 rolled through St. Thomas, Ontar­
io with a long freight. Mr. Taylor notes that there are no Chessie
System units assigned to the Canadian Division and so the new units
appear on through freig~ts only.
In London, Mr. Taylor observed that there were two 9uebec,
North Shore a,n•d Labrador Railway units at DD-GMC, for repairs after
a wreck. Ontario Northia~ds five SD 40-2 units are in production.
In Toronto, CP RAILs switcher Number 17 was in John Street
roundhouse being repaired, after a collision in the yard at Goderich,
Ontario. Mr. Taylor says the unit may have a broken frame and may
be scrapped.
EVERYBODY IS ·GETTiNG INTO MTBAS ACT, ACCORDING TO A RECENT REPORT
in the Boston, Mass. Globe. Boeing Aircraft Company wants
to get out of buildin~ helicopters for Vietnam and into the
construction .of 150 swivel-jointed, sophisticated, air-conditioned
71-foot super-trams for the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority.
Boeings bid was about S 63. 1 million, plus S 3.3 million for sev­
eral extra features, including air-conditioning. This is about
S 268,000 per car. General Elec):ric (Erie) bid S 418,715 per car.
Other bidders were LTV Aerospace Corporation, Dallas, Garrett Cor­
poration, Torrance, California and Rohr Industries of Chula Vista,
California, ~1ready famou~ for the BART San Francisco computer~
controlled subway vehicles.

BILL WOOD OF CONNECTICUT ELECTRIC RAILWAYS TROLLEY MUSEUM
at Warehouae Point, Conn., sends the following schedule of
ope·ration for .Sum·mer 73: 1 March-1 July, as announced; Saturdays,
CANADIAN
158
RA I L
1300-1700 hrs.; Sundays/Holidays, 1200-1700 hrs.
1 July-Labour Day Weekend: Tuesdax through Friday, 1100-1500
hrs.; Saturdays, 1300-1700 hrs.; Sundays/Holidays, 1200-1700 hours.
Entrance to the Museum is free; rides are 75¢ for adults and 50¢ for
children 5-12. Bill says, in case of uncertainty, write to P.O.Box
436, Warehouse Point, Conn.,U.S.A.
IN A JOINT ANNOUNCEMENT ON 21 MARCH 1973, CANADIAN NATIONAL
Railways and the Canadian Railroad Historical Association
said that famous Canadian National Railways steam locomotive
Number 6218, officially retired from service on 4 July 1971 during
commemorative celebrations at Belleville, Ontario, would be placed
on exhibition at the Canadian Railway Museum, St-Constant, Quebec,
for the period (about) 12 May through 15 October 1973. This decision
was welcomed by railway enthusiasts throughout North America.
MR. JACK BEATTY, DIRECTOR EMERITUS OF MEMBERSHIP SERVICES,
now has the time to engage in some serious reading: Canadian
Pacific Railway Passenger Service Bulletins. Jack sends this
gem dated 29 May 1911, with directions on how to get to the gold­
mining region of northeastern Ontario:
A branch of the Temiskaming & Northern Ontario Ry.
in operation from Kelso to Frederick House, with
train service. From Frederick House, the river and
Hawk Lake are navigable for small boats and canoes
within about eight miles of Golden City, Porcupine
trict, which last distance has to be walked.
is now
daily
Night
to
Dis-
Jack says that he doubts that through tickets were issued
to intending passengers, since there were no directions as to how
the interline stubs for the last two companies involved in provi­
ding the transportation were to be completed.
ONE OF TrlE MOST EFFECTIVE WAYS TO MAKE RAILWAY HISTORIANS
lose their minds, says Jack Beatty, is to change the names
of stations when nobody is looking, Jack sends us the follow­
ing examples, to clarify the situation. Of course, these changes
were made on the lines of the Canadian Pacific Railway:
Date Subdivision From To
15
Aug, 1910 North Bay Bisset, Ont. (abandoned)
(new) Adelard, Ont,(m.34.8)
1 Oct. 1910
14 Nov. 1910
27 Apr. 1911
4
June 1911
3
Nov. 1911
Laurentian
M&O M&O
Duhamel, Que.
The Brook, Ont.
Vankleek Hill
Mont Laurier
Bourget
Van kl eek
(was renamed Vankleek Hill at a later date~)
London
( 1 .O mile west
M&O
St-Guillaume
Farnham
M&O M&O
Code Junction
of Zorra)
Ingersoll Junction
Lavigne, Que, Boyerbourg
. (later) Choisy ,
LAnge Gardien
East
St-Constant
Junction
Ottawa Union
Ottawa Cent:eal
Canrobe:rt,. Que,
Delson Junction,
Que.
Ottawa Broad Street
Ottawa Sparks Street
30 Nov. 1911
1
Jan. 1912
30 Aug. 1912
31 Oct. 1912
May 1913
Nov. 1913
CANADIAN
Ottawa
Moosehead
Chalk River
Schreiber
Sudbury Sudbury
Laurentian
Sudbury Sudbury
Sudbury
Toronto
Bobcaygeon
Newpor~,,
M&O
Brockville
(Hamilton-
Goderich)
Maniwaki
Laurentian
·Smiths Falls
Sudbury
1 Dec. f913 Kenora
Wilkie
Laggan
Empress
Lethbridge
Aldersyde
Crowsnest
. Coutts
Slocan
. Westminster
Cascade
159
RA I L
Quebec Junction
Askwith, Maine
Graham, Ont.
Montizambert
Naiscootyong
Pakeshkeg
Routhier
(later)
Blackstone
French
·Bobs
Bethany
m. 2.2
Eastfarn
Boye.rbourg
Wolford
Waterdown Waterdown
Centre
North Wakefield
~t-Martin Junction,Que.
Tarratine, ·Maine
Meath
Mobert, Ont.
Naiscoot, Ont.
Pakesley, Ont.
P icardie, Que.
Barrette, Que.
Brignall, Ont.
Bigwood, Ont.
French, Ont.
Tapley, Ont.
Bethany, Ont.
Mapledale, Que.
Choisy, Que.
-Yule, Ont.
Waterdown North, Qnt.
Waterd.own Sout.h, Ont.
Alcove, Que.
Picardie Barrette, Que.
Golf Links -Dennistoun, Que.
(half-way between present Grovehill
and Dorval stations)
Ambo Nobel, Ont.
Norquay
Swinburne
Castle
Contour
Invermay
Noble
Beecher
(today
New Drayton
Gutelius
Mount Coquitlam
Marconi
Cloverleaf, Man.
Unity, Sask.
Mount Castle, Alta.
Castle Mount.ain)
Cantuar, Sask.
lnversnay, Alta.
Nobleford, Alta.
Maunsell, Alta •
New Dayton, Alta~
Passmore, B.C •
Essondale, B.C.
Magellan, B.C.
Jack has promised to send us another interesting:installment at an
early date.
PIERRE BURTON ENTERPRISES OF TORONTO HAS ENTERED INTO AN
agreement with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to pro­
duce a series of eight one-hour programmes for television ,
based on Mr. Burtons two-volume history of the building of the Can-
adian Paci fie Railway, The National Dream. , j! • . ,
Production was scheduled to start ab.out 1 March -19Z.3, follow­
ing what wa·s described in the press-:release as months of exhaustive
research and preparatio~~. The series is scheduled to appear on CBC
television early in 1974, with world-traveller, lecttirer, writer,
raconteur, pulHisher, bon vivant and telE!!vision super-star Pierre
Burton as.host-natrator. ·
To .direct the drama li~gments of the doc.umentary, the CBC has
engaged English film direc;tor Eric Till,. , ;
The Roya~ Trust Company will sponsor the series.
CANADIAN 160 R A I L
CP RAIL C-LINER A-UNIT NUMBER 4081 HAS BEEN SENT EAST
to Montreal from Ogden Shops, Calgary, writes Philip Mason.
Philip says that Number 4081 will be converted to a ROBOT
unit for mid-train service on coal unit-trains between Sparwood and
Roberts Bank, B.C. The C-Liner came east on freight Train 952 on
25 March to Smiths Falls, Ontario, making the remainder of the trip
to Montreal the following day.
When Number 4081 is rebuilt to a ROBOT unit, it will be the
first cab unit to be so converted.
MLW INDUSTRIES, IN MID-APRIL, WERE OUTSHOPPING THE FIRST
of the 2,000 hp. MX 620 export diesel units for the Port-
uguese Railways and the first frame for the M 420 order for CN was on
the floor of the erecting shop. K.R.Goslett.
CP RAILS PIGGYBACK TRAFFIC CONTINUES TO GROW. IN ORDER TO COPE
with current increases in traffic, CP RAIL has ordered 200
piggyback flatcars from Marine Industries Limited of Sorel,
Quebec. The value of this order is about $ 4.5 million. Delivery is
scheduled for the early part of Summer 73. CP RAIL NEWS.
PREMIER DAVID BARRETT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA SAID AT THE
beginning of February 1973 that the Government of British
Columbia hopes to develop Britannia Beach, a small ex-m1n1ng
village on Howe Sound, about 30 miles north of Vancouver and twelve
miles south of Squamish, as a bulk-loading port for the shipment of
coal and other large-volume commodities. When Coalition Coal Limited
begins mining the Sukunka Rocky Mountain coal deposits, north of
Chetwynd on the British Columbia Railway, Premier Barrett would much
rather have the black diamonds come all the way south over the BCR
rather than switching to the CN at Prince George and winding up at
the Ridley Island site at Prince Rupert, B.C.
The cost of developing Squamish as an alternate bulk-loading
port would be about equivalent to the development cost for Britannia
Beach, Premier Barrett said.
On the north end of the BCR, the railway will have to spend
about $ 6 million to build 37 miles from its present main line to
the Sukunka coal deposits. Editorial Staff.
WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORPORATION (U.S.A.) HAS LICENSED
the manufacture in the United States of urban rail transit
equipment, produced by the French firm Societe MTE. The li­
cense is for the manufacture of vehicle trucks, including wheels,
axles, gears and brakes and motor assemblies for rail vehicles such
as streetcars and subway cars. MTE-designed equipment uses one motor
to drive two axles per truck. Editorial Staff.
CANADAS HOUSE OF COMMONS GAVE FIRST READING, ON 19 MARCH 1973,
to Bill C-164, to authorize the provision of monies to meet
certain capital expenditures of the Canadian National Rail­
ways System and Air Canada, for the period 1 January to 30 June 1973.
Estimated requirements for CN were:
Road property •••••••••••.•• $
Branch lines •••••••••••••••
Equipment ••••••••••••••••••
Telecommunications ••••.••••
Hotels ••••••••••.••.•••••••
138,978,000
13,000,000
31,897,000
25,946,000
5,679,000
CANADIAN 161
C.N.Tower Limited ..•••••••.
Investment in affiliated
companies …•
R A I L
8,800,000
1, 200, 000
Bill C-164 would also authorize CN to enter into contracts
prior to 1 July 1974 for the purposes of acquiring new equipment and
for general additions and conversions that will come in course of
payment after the calendar year 1973, in amounts not exceeding in
the aggregate$ 167,500,000. Editorial Staff.
HEAVY SPRING RAINS IN TORONTOS DON VALLEY AREA
forced the closure of a section of CP RAIL normally used by
the daily commuter train from Peterborough, Ontario to Tor-
onto Union Station. The embankments in the Don River valley, west
of Leaside, were unstable.
CP RAIL Trains 381 & 382, Havelock to Peterborough to Toronto
Union -and vice-versa -were rerouted through North Toronto. Many
of the passengers found the detour more convenient; they detrained
and entrained at North Toronto, taking the subway to and from work,
thereby apparently shortening their travelling time. W.J.Bedbrook.
PROCTER & GAMBLE CELLULOSE OF SHAVER, ALBERTA
recently took delivery of a new diesel switcher, Number 1,
writes Vince Coley of the Associations Rocky Mountain Bran­
ch. Number 1 is new to P&GC but is, in fact, second hand. It looks
like an ALCO Schenectady RS 1 and came from the Lake Erie, Franklin
& Clarion Railroad, a short-short-line in Pennsylvania, U.S.A. The
units original paint scheme was green and yellow, about the same
shades as the old CN paint scheme.
Vince says that the unit was billed west via PC from New York
to Chicago,$00 Line to Duluth, Minnesota and Duluth, Winnipeg & Pac­
ific to Fort Francis, Ontario, where it hit CN steel for the remain­
der of the trip west.
On arrival at CNs Calder Yard (Edmonton), the 120-ton unit
was taken to the Dunvegan Yards of the Northern Alberta Railways ,
where it was sand-blasted and repainted by Tower Paint and Labora­
tories Limited. Three coats and 30 gallons of paint were required
to refurbish the unit in Procter & Gamble Celluloses red and yellow
colour scheme. She went forward to Shaver, Alberta -south of Grande
Prairie, on the CN -on 19 March 1973.
CANADIAN 162
R A I L
IN CANADAS HOUSE OF COMMONS RECENTLY MR. L. BENJAMIN,
Member for Regina-Lake Centre {Saskatchewan) asked Minister
of Transport the Honorable Jean Marchand to make representa­
tions to the Canadian Transport Commission to disallow passenger
fare increases proposed by CP RAIL. The Honorable Mr. Marchand re­
plied that the proposed fare increases -which would put CP RAIL on
the same footing as Canadian National Railways -would only apply
to Sleeping cars and not to ordinary cars which are designated as
third class transportation. ??? Editorial Staff.
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS ANNOUNCED IN DECEMBER 1973 THAT
it would build its own diesel locomotive operation simulator
for the training of diesel unit engineers at the Companys
training school at Gimli, Manitoba. The new simulator was described
as the third in North America, the other two being installed in the
United States. CN s Technical Research Centre in Montreal would be
the focal point for development of the simulator and it was expected
to be fully operational no later than 1975.
Besides simulating actual operating environments with a high
degree of realism, the simulator would also provide instantaneous
and continuous displays of force levels that occur at all points in
the theoretical train being operated by the student. The elementary
train mock-up with engine-cab controls and some visual and computer
assistance, would be ready by early 1973 and a complete cab system,
with sound, visual and motion effects, would be in service by early
1974.
To help engineers control the slack-action in the train,which
is indeed the principle problem confronting them, CN, with the help
of modern computer technology, has created a simulation program that
can instantaneously calculate the forces resulting at any point in
the train when changes in speed, braking, track gradient or curva­
ture occur.
In this controlled situation, the trainee can become accus­
tomed to train response, resulting from his manipulation of the
controls, before he has to contend with similar conditions on the
main line. Acquisition by trainees of the necessary knowledge and
skills of diesel locomotive and train operation will thus be impro­
ved and the time required to qualify as a locomotive engineer short­
ened.
Canadian National trained 69 men for engine service at Gimli
in 1972. In 1973, CN plans to train 585 men there, including 180 en­
gineers, 80 train dispatchers, 300 supervisors and 25 master mechan­
ics.
British Columbia Railway, Ontario Northland Railway, Duluth,
Winnipeg & Pacific Railroad, Guinean Railways (Africa) and Inter­
national Nickel Company (Canada) have already made use of CNs tea­
ching facilities at Gimli. The
purpose of CNs school for operating personnel is to
ensure a continuous supply of qualified locomotive engineers, since
the traditional source, the locomotive firemen, began to disappear
rapidly. Forty percent of CNs 2,800 engineers are over 55 years of
age and the volume of traffic -and hence, the requirement -has
been climbing steadily, increasing 61 .2% in the last ten years and
with a forecasted annual rise of 5%. There are presently 30 men from
the four western provinces and northern Ontario taking training at
Gimli. Meanwhile, the first of 200 train dispatchers needed by CN
over the next five years have started their training program.
Photos at right courtesy Canadian National Railways.
Locomotive and Train Simulator CN Simulateur
I.., ACCELERATING AWAY FROM ADIRONDACK JUNCTION,QUEBEC, 2 PC U-30 Bs BARK­
·~ bark around the curve at Kanawaki and wind up for the climb to Chat­
eauguay, Quebec. Summer, 1969. Photo courtesy K.R.Goslett.
CANADIAN RAIL
published by the
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORlCAl ASSOCIATION !:.;~:,!1.c1.~.
100
·•·
Associate Membership including 12 issues
Canadian Rail s. oo annually
EDITOR S.S. VITorthen LAYOUT & PRODUCTION P.Murphy
VISIT THE
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VISITEZ LE
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OPEN MAY -SEPT.
Lle9e
OUVERT MAI -SEPT_
ASSOCIATION BRANCHES
CALGARY & SOUTH
OTTAWA
PACIFIC COAST
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
TORONTO & YORK
WESTERN L.M.Unwin, Secretary,
W. R.Linley, Secretory,
R.H.Meyer, Secretary,
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DIVISION P.Shergold,Secretary,
1727 23rd.Ave.N.W., Calgary, Alto.
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Copyright 1973
L .S .Launi tz-Schu rer, Dept .History, National Univ .Canberra ,Aust.
W.D.McKeown, 6-7, 4-chome, Yamate-cho, Suito City,Oaoko,Jopon.
K.G. Younger, 267 Vernon Rood, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3J 2W1
J.S.Nicholson, 2306 Arnold Street, Soskotoon, Sask.
D.J.Howord,Price,Waterhouse & Peote,Caixa 1978, Sao Paulo,Brazil.
E.W.Johnson, 4019 Verdell Rood N.W., Calgary, Alberta T3A OC3
W.J.Bedbrook, 50 Cedarbrae Boulevard, Scarborough, Ont.
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Printed in Canada on Canadian Paper.

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