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Canadian Rail 256 1973

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Canadian Rail 256 1973


1110_ 258
.A.PR.IL 1973

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J. Derek Booth
~hrOUghout the length and breadth of
Canada, rural landscapes are to­
day experiencing a period of rapid
change, in response to continuing
shifts in the economic framework
of these areas. The reorientation­
of agriculture, ongoing urbaniza­
tion -with its corollary of ru­
ral depopulation -the growth of
new industries and, particularly
in the Eastern Townships of the
Province of Quebec, the progres­
sive expansion of recreational
land uses, have all contributed
to alterations in some of the
dominant economic and human char­
acteristics of the region.
Change in any landscape, whether related to natural phenomena
or mans activities, is a continuous process. The human landscape,
in particular, demonstrates changes often reflected in land-use pat­
terns, population distributions or in physical structures, such as
buildings, associated with a particular stage of regional develop­
ment.
When we consider some of the remnant features in todays
landscape, we can achieve insight into many of the formative factors
in the historical evolution of a district, in addition to the more
complete picture of existing regional characteristics. In this
present period of rapidly changing countrysides, when many of the
traditional patterns of human activity, established during the n~ne­
teenth and early twentieth centuries, are changing, so too are many
of the buildings associated with the settlement of the region.These
include churches, schools, mills of various kinds and many other
structures, not to mention railway stations. Although these rem-
ALTHOUGH THE STANSTEAD, SHEFFORD & CHAMBLY RAILWAYS ENGINEHOUSE AT
Waterloo, Quebec, has long since disappeared, the turntable remains
in a cover of long grass.July 1965. Photo courtesy J.D.Booth.
BROOKPORT, QUEBEC -JUNCTION OF CP RAILS NEWPORT, SHERBROOKE & ADIR­
ondack Subdivisions on the night of 10 Januar~73. Freight Train
947 west from Saint John, N.B. waits for clearance into CTC territory.
Photo courtesy Dane H.G.Malcolm.
CANADIAN
104
R A I L
nants have hitherto largely remained intact, they are now
being altered to fulfill new functions or are vanishing at a
rate.
either
rapid
Just as the railway was, in the period after 1850, the prin­
cipal catalyst to the economic development and growth of the prov­
lnces later to become Canada, at the same time it was the single
dominant factor in changing the appearance of rural, southern Que­
bec in the century between 1850 and 1950.
Before the automobile and good roads, the railway was un-
questionably the chief economic and social link between the small
agricultural and industrial communities, which then flourished in
this region. The daily routine in these towns and villages was punc­
tuated by the arrivals and departures of the trains. Moreover,these
same trains provided a hitherto unavailable means of transporting
relatively high-bulk -but low-value -goods to external markets.
The railway was the initial impetus which promoted a wide range of
economic activities, including lumbering, mining, greater agricul­
tural production and the growth of manufacturing. Each of these
activities, in varying degrees, has left its indelible stamp on the
countryside of southeastern Quebec.
The railway in its role as an enhancer of economic develop­
ment has left a substantial legacy of remnant features in the land­
scape and, in some instances, continues to maintain a considerable
physical plant which still functions. And here and there in the
countryside there are many indications of the extent of former rail
networks. Rusting turntables, overgrown but still identifiable old
rights-of-way, converted pieces of rolling stock -all these bits
of railway history -are scattered through the region which the
railway served to shape.
Although shiny rails still penetrate many corners of south­
eastern Quebec, trains today are less numerous, passenger service
is skeletal and many structures on these lines -notably the rail­
way stations -are either abandoned or have already been demolished.
This is the inevitable result of internal changes in railway opera­
ting policies and procedures and the emergence of alternate forms
of transportation and communication such as the automobile and the
highway bus and truck. These latter have, of course, largely usurped
many of the traditional functions of the railway as a mover of
goods and people.
The railway station used to be the single most common
familiar feature of the villages and towns of every province
Canada. It was the contact point between the town and the
region, the interface between the somnolent agricultural
the bustling industrial town and the world away and beyond;
point where journeys to an unknown land began and ended.
and
of
whole
hamlet,
the
This ubiquitous building, once so common, is todoy fast fad-
ing from the rural landscape. There are many reasons for its dis-
appearance, the simplest of which include large-scale branch-line
abandonments, reduction and elimination of passenger train service,
technological advances in railway operating practices, changing
demographic patt~rns and, most significant of all, the advent of
the automobile, the highway truck and the autoroute.
Formerly, the term railway station was familiar and, to a
degree, self-evident. Today, it is becoming increasingly difficult
to define precisely what constitutes a railway station. Many such
are now only physical structure~~ retaining few if any of their func-
CANADIAN
105
R A I L
tions, which formerly varied according to the location and size of
the community they served and the nature of the traffic handled. In
former times, the public services commonly provided included tele­
graph and ticket offices, freight, express and baggage facilities
and waiting rooms with what was, in many communities, the important
facility of a public toilet.
In southern Quebec, principally because of its geographical
location, the railway station was a particularly common sight. This
district, lying between Montreal and its southwestern hinterland and
the rapidly growing urban markets of the east coast of the United
States, enjoyed a strategic location during the episodes of railway
expansion in the latter half af the nineteenth century. These per­
iodic expansions of the rail networks resulted in a dense complex of
lines constructed for the most part to capture a portion of the
trade between eastern Canada, the central United States and the
Atlantic seaboard, where there were wintertime, ice-free ports.
Indeed, this was the primary reason for the construction of
trunk lines, such as the St. Lawrence & Atlantic-Atlantic & St.
Lawrence -later the Grand Trunk Railway Company -and regional
lines such as the Stanstead, Shefford & Chambly and the South East­
ern Railways. In addition to those railways with international as­
pirations, there were the familiar local, independent railways con­
structed primarily to serve a particular area or to fulfill a spe­
cific role in the development of natural resources. For example,the
Orford Mountain Railway was built primarily to transport the pro­
ducts of the forests and the mineral-rich areas of Brome, Shefford
and Richmond Counties. Similarly, the Waterloo & Magog Railway car­
ried copper ore-concentrates from the valley of the north branch of
the Missisquoi River, but was intended originally to hasten the
development of the town of Magog as the leather-tanning centre of
the Eastern Townships.
a
for
Mis­
miles
at
There grew up in southern Quebec, between 1836 and 1916,
railway network which at its peak averaged one mile of track
every 7.2 square miles of area and, in specific cases such as
sisquoi County, achieved a density of one mile per 4.2 square
of countryside. This development reached its maximum in 1916,
which time there were approximately 1,150 miles of railway in
area of 8,076 square miles.
an
The area included in the above statement comprises the coun-
ties of Bagot, Beauharnois, Brome, Chambly, Chateauguay, Compton,
Drummond, Huntingdon, Iberville, Laprairie, Missisquoi, Napierville,
Richelieu, Richmond, Rouville, St-Hyacinthe, St-Jean, Shefford,
Sherbrooke, Stanstead, Vercheres, Wolfe and Yamaska. Located within
this area were 273 stations, or an average of one for every 29.5
square miles. Clearly then few areas were more than six or seven
miles from a railway station.
As seen from the map (Figure 1), the pattern of station dis­
tribution was particularly dense in the agricultural areas closest
to Montreal, reflecting both 6 lorger and more evenly distributed
rural population than that which existed in the more distant parts
of the Eastern Townships. Evident, too, was the more regular spacing
of the stations, particularly in the St. Lawrence lowlands. Here,
the interval was usually four to five miles, corresponding roughly
to the location of the many rural market villages which dotted the
plain. Interspersed with these villages were a number of growing
industrial towns, such as Granby, St-Hyacinthe and Sherbrooke.
: .. ~~ :~~-:
….
:f..~…:-t– -~-……..
,r,~(Cr
CANADIAN
RAILWAY NETWORK
AND
STATION LOCATIONS
IN
S9UTHERN QUEBEC
1920
mil ..
l.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
ll.
12.
13. 14. 15. 16.
17.
18. 19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25. 26. 27. 28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
CPR-Abbotsford 36.
MSC-Abbotsford 37.
CP~-Abercorn 3a.
GTR-Acton Vale 39.
CPR-Acton Vale 40.
CPR-Adamsville 41.
CPR-Adirondack Jct. 42.
CVR-Angeline 43.
OCR-Ascot Corners 44.
NYC-Athelstan 45.
GTR-Aubrey 46.
MEC-Aukland 47.
B&M-Ayers Cliff 48.
GTR-Ayrness 49.
GTR-Bagot 50.
GTR-Barrington 51.
NYC-Beauharnois 52.
GTR-Beaver Crossing53.
CPR-Bedford 54.
B&M-Beebe Plain 55.
B&M-Beebe Junction 56.
NYC-Bellevue 57.
GTR-Beloeil 58.
CPR-Birchton 59.
OCR-Bishopton 60.
OCR-Black Lake 61.
CPR-Bolton Centre 62.
GTR-Bon Conseil 63.
OMS-Boucherville 64.
B&M-Boynton 65.
CPR-Brigham 66.
GTR-Britannia Mills67.
CPR-Brome 68.
GTR-Bromptonville 69.
MEC-Brookbury 70.
106 R A I L
STATION INDEX
CPR-Brookport 71.
GTR.Brosseau 72.
GTR-Brysonville 73.
CPR-Bulwer 74.
CPR-Bury 75.
CPR-Canrobert 76.
GTR-Cantic 77.
B&M-Capelton 78.
GTR-Carmel 79.
OMS-Caroline 80.
GTR-Carr 81.
CPR-Cavignac 82.
NYC-Cecile 83.
MSC-Chambly Canton 84.
NYC-Chateauguay 85.
NYC-Chateauguay Basin86.
OMS-Clarenceville 87.
CPR-Cleary 88.
MEC-Clifton 89.
GTR-Coaticook 90.
OCR-Coleraine 91.
GTR-Compton 92.
GTR-Coney Island 93.
OMS-Contrecoeur 94.
MEC-Cookshire 95.
CPR-Cookshire 96.
GTR-Corris 97.
GTR-C6te-Ste-Therese 98.
CPR-Cowansville 99.
GTR-Danby 100.
GTR-Danville 101.
CPR-Delson 102.
CVR-Des Rivieres 103.
GTR-Dewittville 104.
OCR-Disraeli 105.
GTR-Dixville
MEC-Dominion Station
GTR-Drummondville CPR-Drummondville MEC-Dudswell
Junction
GTR-Duncan CVR-Durocher OCR-East Angus MEC-East
Hereford
CPR-Eastman
CPR-Eastray
MEC-Eaton Corners
CPR-Enlaugra
B&M-Eustis CPR-Farnham CPR-Flodden OMS-Fleury MSC-Fort Chambly
CPR-Foster
CVR-Frelighsburg
CPR-Fulford
OCR-Garthby OMS-Gerard GTR-Girard CPR-Glenton CPR-Golden
Boy
CPR-Gould CVR-Granby GTR-Grande
Ligne
GTR-Hemmingford
GTR-Henrysburg
OMS-Henryville
MEC-Hereford CPR-Highwater GTR-Holton
106.
107.
108.
109. 110.
111 • 112. 113.
114.
11 5.
116.
117.
118.
119. 120. 121.
122.
123. 124.
125.
126.
127.
128.
129.
130.
131.
132.
133.
134. 135.
136.
137. 138. 139. 140.
141.
142. 143. 144.
145. 146.
147. 148.
149.
150. 151. 152.
153.
154.
155.
156. 157. 158. 159.
160. 161.
CANADIAN
GTR-Howick 162.
NYC-Huntingdon 163.
GTR-Huntingdon 164.
CPR-Iberville 165.
OMS-Iberville 166.
CVR-Iberville 167.
GTR-Johnsons 168.
CPR-Johnville 169. CPR-Kartoum 170. CPR-Kingsbury
171.
GTR-Kingsey 172.
CPR-Knowlton 173.
CNR-LAcadie 174.
CPR-LAcadie 175.
D&H-L acoll e 176.
GTR-Lacolle 177.
CPR-Lake Park 178.
GTR-Laprairie 179.
CPR-Lawrenceville 180.
GIR-L ennoxville 181 .
CPR-L ennoxville 182.
MEC-Lime Ridge 183.
GTR-Lisgar 184.
OMS-Lisieux 185.
CPR-Long Swamp 186.
OMS-Longueuil 187.
CPR-Magog 188.
MEC-Malvina 189. CPR-Mansonville 190. CPR-Mapledale
191.
OCR-Marbleton 192.
MSC-Marieville 193. B&M-Massawippi 194. NYC-Melocheville
195.
CVR-Menardville 196. GTR-Mitchell 197.
OMS-Mount Johnson 198. CPR-Mount
Orford 199.
CPR-Mystic 200.
D&H-Napierville 201,
NYC-New Erin 202.
B&M-North Hatley 203.
CPR-North Stukely 204.
GTR-Noyan 205.
CPR-Orford Lake 206. GTR-Ormstown 207. CPR-Papineau
208.
MEC-Paquetteville 209.
CVR-Phillipsburg 210.
OMS-Pierreville 211. NYC-Primeau
212.
CPR-Racine 213.
CVR-Riceburg 214.
MSC-Richelieu 215. GTR-Richmond 216. CPR-Rock
Forest 217. 107
R A I L
B&M-Rock Island
MSC-Rougemont OMS-Rougemont CPR-Roxton
Falls
OMS-St-Aime
CVR-St-Alexandre
MSC-St-Antoine CVR-St-Armand
OMS-St-Barnabe-s.
GTR-St-Basile
GTR-St-Bruno MSC-St-Ci!saire
CPR-St-Constant
GTR-St-Constant
GTR-St-Cyr
GTR-St-Cyrille
OMS-St-Damase D&H-St-Edouard GTR-St-Edward GTR-St-Eugene
OMS-St-Fran~ois
GTR-St-George
QCR-St-Gerard
GTR-St-Germain
CPR-St-Gregoire
CPR-St-Guillaume
GTR-St-Hilaire
GTR-St-Hubert
CPR-St-Hughes
QMS-St-Hyacinthe
GTR-St-Hyacinthe
CPR-St-Hyacinthe
MEC-St-Isidore
GTR-St-Isidore
GTR-St-Isidore Jct.
CPR-St-Jean
GTR-St-Jean
QMS-St-Jude
GTR-S t-Lambert
GTR-St-Liboire
QMS-St-Louis
GTR-St-Louis(Gonz.)
MEC-St-Malo GTR-St-Michel
CPR-St-Philippe
CPR-St-P ie (Bagot)
CPR-St-Prime
GTR-St-Remi QMS-St-Robert QMS-St-Roch CPR-St-Simon
NYC-St-Stanislaus
NYC-S t-Timothee
GTR-Ste-Agnes(Dundee) CVR-Ste-Angele(Mon.) QMS-Ste-Angele(Mon.) 218. 219.
220.
221.
222.
223.
224.
225. 226.
227.
228. 229. 230.
231.
232.
233. 234. 235.
236.
237. 238. 239.
240.
241. 242. 243.
244. 245. 246.
247.
248.
249.
250.
251. 252.
253.
254. 255. 256. 257. 258.
259.
260.
261. 262.
263.
264. 265. 266.
267. 268. 269.
270.
271.
272.
273.
CVR-Ste-Brigide
CPR-Ste-Brigide
GTR-Ste-Madeleine
QMS-Ste-Madeleine
GTR-S te-Ma rUne
GTR-Ste-Perpetue
GTR-Ste-Philomene
CPR-S te-Rosalie
CPR-Ste-Sabine
OMS-Sabrevois
MEC-Sawyerville
CPR-Scotstown
CPR-Sherbrooke
GTR-Sherbrooke
GTR-Sherrington
GTR-Smellie OMS-Sorel CPR-South
Bolton
GTR-South Durham CPR-South Roxton CPR-South
Stukely
CVR-Stanbridge
CVR-Stanbridge East
B&M-Stanstead Pl.
CVR-Stone
GTR-Stottsville
CPR-Sutton CPR-Sweetsburg
QCR-Thetford Mines
GTR-Titus
B&M-Tomifobia
CPR-Tourville
GTR-Upton CPR-Valcour
NYC-Valleyfield
QMS-Varennes QMS-Vercheres
CPR-Versoilles
GTR-Victoriaville
GTR-Walker CPR-Warden GTR-Warwick CVR-Waterloo CPR-Waterloo
GTR-Waterville
OCR-Weedon
CPR-West Brome
CVR-West Shefford
CPR-West Shefford
GTR-Whites CPR-Wickham GTR-Windsor CPR-Windsor
Mills
NYC-Woodlands
QMS-Yamaska
OMS-Yamaska East
CANADIAN
108
R A I L
B&M Boston & Maine Railroad
CPR Canadian Pocific Railway
CVR Central Vermont Railroad
D&H Delaware & Hudsa~ Railway
GTR Grand Trunk Railway
MEC Maine Central Railroad
MSC Montreal & Southern Counties Railway
.NYC New York Central Railroad
QCR Quebec Central Railway
QMS Quebec, Montreal & Southern Railway
Natural waterpower facilities dictated the location of these
towns, whereas the spacing of most rural villages was primarily due
to the primitive wagon roads which prevented marketing of farm pro­
duce at any great distance from the point of production. In turn,
this forced the proliferation of small service communities, each
providing for the daily needs of a restricted hinterland.
The early 1920s marked the apex in this district of both to­
tal miles of railway track and number of stations. But even before­
this time, some stations had already been abandoned. Included were
stations on the line of the Waterloo & Magog Railway, completed in
1884 from Waterloo (Frost Village) through Magog to Sherbrooke. The
stations at South Stukely and Bolton Forest were among the first to
go. Sub~equently, the W&M was purchased by the Canadian Pacific
Railway Company, during construction of its Short Line to Saint
John, New Brunswick and most of the original W&M line was abandoned.
The very few stations built in southeastern Quebec after this
period were for the most part those directly related to the growing
suburban areas on the south sho~e of the St. Lawrence River, oppos­
ite the city of Montreal.
An interesting exception to this general rule were the sta­
tion facilities of the Three Villages -Stanstead and Rock Island,
Quebec and Derby Line, Vermont -clustered on the International Bo­
undary about 120 miles southeast of Montreal. A single railway sta­
tion originally built in 1870 by the Massawippi Valley Railway ser­
ved the three communities. In 1899, the town of Stanstead success­
fully persuaded the Boston & Maine Railroad, lessor of the Massawippi
Valley, to extend this branch one mile to a location in the town of
Stanstead Plain, where a station of the traditional Boston & Maine
design was built. Simultaneously, a new station was constructed to
serve the towns of Rock Island and Derby Line at an intermediate 10-
cation(Passenger Street) on the branch. In the 1930s, the Stanstead
extension was abandoned, the station at Stanstead demolished and
that at Rock Island closed and sold. The branch extension was taken
up and a new, modern brick station was built about half-a-mile from
the original railway station at Rock Island and suitable designated
as Stanstead, Rock I sland and Derby Line.
Many of the railways incorporated and constructed during the
railway-building mania in the latter years of the nineteenth century
~ THE STATION AT ABERCORN, QUEBEC, ON CP RAIL 1 S NEWPORT SUBDIVISION BE­
tween Sutton, Quebec and Richford, Vermont, exemplified the character­
istic South Eastern Railway station, with living quarters for the
agent/operator on the second floor .• This station was demolished in
the mid-1960s. Photographed July 1965. Photo courtesy J.D. Booth.

.-.
THREE YEARS AFTER ITS ABANSONMENT IN 1962, THE JUNCTION OF CP RAILS Newport
& Drummondville Subs. at Enlaugra (Sutton Junction) has al­
most been obliterated by grass and bushes. Photo courtesy J.D.Booth .
.I. FORMERLY THE STATION OF THE ORFORD MOUNTAIN RAILWAY AT MANSONVILLE,
T Quebec, this building is now a dwelling. Its ancestry,however, is
clearly apparent. July 1965. Photo courtesy J.D. Booth.
,
)
t
CANADIAN NATIONALS STATION AT COATICOOK, QUEBEC IS CHARACTERISTIC
of the larger wooden stations found in many industrial towns in
southern Quebec. July 1969. Photos courtesy J.D.Booth.
~ THE STURDY BRICK STATION ON THE FORMER MONTREAL & SOUTHERN COUNTIES
Railway -now CN -was unusual for 0 town of the size of Chambly –
or, more correctly, Fort Chambly. Ca. 1966.
CANADIAN 112 R A I L
were not soundly founded in terms of either capital assets ar loca­
tion of lines. This fact became clear within a few short decades
The process of enforced retrenchment began in the 1920s, almost as
soon as the last rails of the network had been laid.
From that time to the present, some 240 miles have been aban-
doned, the rails lifted and stations and other structures removed
(Figure 2). For the most part, these abandonments occurred when many
of the smaller, independent lines were absorbed into the two
majar systems of Canadian National and Canadian Pacific Railways. A
number of branchline operations became redundant. Later, traffic
dwindled in the face of highway competition. But even with the loss
of 240 miles of main-line track, the railway network of southeastern
Quebec today retains a density of one mile per 8.8 square miles.
More apparent to the observer and a particular reflection of
the decline in rail passenger transportation in these counties is
the decrease in the number of railway stations. From a high of 273
in the early 1920s, the number has declined to only 47 in 1971, as
shown in Figure 2. Today, only 46 localities and 306 miles of rail­
way in southern Quebec have any form of passenger service. Commuter
services to and from Montreal account for much of this mileage. But
more specifically, only 23 of the 46 scheduled passenger train stops
have station buildings while the remainder either have small shel-
ters, hardly worthy of the designation of 11 station, or no facil-
ities w~atsoever.
The substantial total number of railway stations which exis­
ted during the peak years of railway operation was, to a large de­
gree, a function of the similarly numerous small rural hamlets which
clustered along the lines. Once vigorous and important, these set-
tlements have experienced a long period of decline, reflecting a
basic demographic trend in southeastern Quebec, operative since the
turn of the century. Although the total population of the region
has grown from 413,722 in 1921 to 996,087 in 1966 -an increase of
140.7% -the simultaneous increase in the urban portion has been
307.9% with but a 12.2% increase in the rural population. Thus, the
si tuation which existed in 1921, with 56.5% of the population clas­
sed as rural, has been radically altered so that, by 1966, only
26.3% of the citizens of the region lived outside of centres of
1,000 or more inhabitants. One by one, as the villages decreased in
economic significance over the years, their railway stations dis­
appeared.
One of the characteristics which made the railway stations a
particularly distinctive part of the landscape was the wide variety
of architectural styles used in their construction. Since there were
many independent railway companies in southern Quebec and their
lines were often built piecemeal over a period of years, uniformity
of style was usually lacking. In addition, style variations were
further proliferated since it was a common practice to employ local
contractors to construct buildings along each segment of the rail­
way. This accounted for the not uncommon phenomenon of two or three
successive stations being identical in design, although differing
completely from others on the same railway, e.g., CP RAILs present
station at Saint-Constant and the former station at LAcadie, not
far from Montreal. While certain characteristic building styles were
associated with particular railways -the spacious stations of the
South Eastern Railway were notable -for the most part, stations
tended to exhibit a substantial measure of individuality in design
details.
CANADIAN
RAILWAY NETWORK
AND
STATION LOCATIONS
SOUTHERN QUEBEC
1971
miles
10 15 2,0
113 R A I L
Constraints of utilitarianism, nevertheless, did impose cer­
tain limitations on basic layout. The dimensions and arrangement of
the several station parts varied somewhat, but conformed to a stan­
dard plan in most cases. Exterior dimensions generally ranged from
40×20 to 80×20 feet. Stations in larger towns or cities sometimes
exceeded these dimensions. The majority were single-storey structur­
es, but some -notably those on the South Eastern Railway -had
second storeys, generally designed as living quarters for the oper­
ator-agent and his family.
Stations at important operating points were frequently quite
spacious, the structures at St-Hyacinthe and Richmond on the Grand
Trunk Railway and the former South Eastern-Canadian Pacific station
at Farnham, Quebec,destroyed by fire in the late 1940s -being il­
lustrative of this class. In the 1860s and early 70s, the provin­
cial-gauge Grand Trunk boasted a double-tracked covered train-shed
station at Sherbrooke, used by passenger trains of four railways.
Figure 3 illustrates a typical floor-plan of a small, rural
railway station. As noted above, the arrangement of the rooms var­
ied.
The operators bay-window, a feature common to all stations,
was usually centrally placed in the building, but was occasionally
located at one end. In a few smaller stations, no separate freight
room facilities were provided, although separate ladies waiting
rooms were not uncommon. The sometime use of turrets or towers to
embellish the station was practiced even in the smallest centres.
Canadian National Railways stations at St-Bruno and Compton were
notable examples.
The most common roof design, especially on single-storey
tions, was one with a straight, relatively steep-pitched slope,
wide, overhanging eaves. Sometimes the eaves extended out on
four sides of the building, while others had an overhang only on
platform side, with gable ends on the long axis of the building,
allel to the track.
sta­
with
all
the
par-
Stations in southern Quebec were most commonly of wood-frame
construction. The majority had no basements and heating was provided
CANADIAN 114
R A I L

16
… 14
••
20

Bench
I ISlove/
Waiting Freight
Office
20
Room Room
Tickel
Window
I
Operators Desk
J
f
10
Platform

60

FIGURE 3
by
stoves of various types, located within the building itself. The
exterior colour schemes of the buildings did not always display the
uniformity of the CN grey and CP red commonly used today, but were,
in most instances, as varied as the colours of the wooden buildings
in the towns which they served.
In only a few communities -usually the larger ones -were
stone or brick stations to be found. Granby, Sherbrooke, Richmond,
Drummondville and St-Jean were fortunate in this regard, although
scattered settlements of lesser importance, such as St-Hilaire,Fort
Chambly and East Angus boasted of such stuEdy structures.
While in the majority of cases, railway stations in southern
Quebec abandoned in the past half-century have been demolished on
site, a significant number remain as remnant features in the land­
scape. They are, however, frequently located at some distance from
the nearest railway, fulfilling functions far removed from their
former roles.
Included in the various secondary uses for stations are pri­
vate dwellings or commercial enterprises (Mansonville: Orford Moun­
tain Railway; South Durham: Grand Trunk Railway), summer cottages
(Massawippi: Boston & Maine Railroad), agricultural or industrial
outbuildings (Fulford: Canadian Pacific Railway; Bury: Canadian Pa­
cific Railway), while the railways themselves maintain a small num­
ber of stations essentially for storage of maintenance-of-way equip­
ment (Lennoxville: CP RAIL).
In this end-use consideration, it should be noted that one
rural railway station -Barrington: Canada Atlantic-Grand Trunk rail­
way -was removed over a distance of some 30 miles to be preserved
at the Canadian Railway Museum/Musee Ferroviaire Canadien, Saint­
Constant, Quebec.
The process of station abandonment will continue as passen­
ger service is curtailed and local freight and express shipments
are transported increasi~ly by highway trucks, dispatched from
centralized distribution points. In many localities where stations
t
CP RAILS STATION AT LENNOXVILLE, QUEBEC IS TYPICAL OF SMALL STATIONS
particularly on CP RAIL lines, with overhanging eaves only on the
platform side and gable ends on the long axis of the building.
July 1970. Both photos courtesy J.D. Booth .
.I. CANADIAN NATIONALS STATION AT WATERVILLE, QUEBEC ILLUSTRATES THE
T variety in architectural style in rural railway stations. The sta­
tion, now owned by the Town, had the usual floor layout but a var­
iable roof design. September 1971.
t
-.. ~~
THE OLD BOSTON & MAINE RAILROAD STATION AT MASSAWIPPI,QUEBEC,HAS BEEN
Converted into a summer cottage and moved back from the right-of-way
of Quebec Centrals Beebe Sub. May 1969. Photo courtesy J.D.Booth .
-XIf
.I. THE OLD AND THE NEW. THE STOKY OF STATION DEMOLITION IN SOUTHERN QUE-
• bec is told in this picture of Canadian Nationals station at Ayrness.
It was of the same design as Barrington station, preserved at the Can-
adian Railway Museum. April 1969. Photo courtesy J.D.Booth •
. . . ~ :. ~.
.::;.
. …….. .
t
THE STATION BUILDING AT NORTH HATLEY, QUEBEC, ALTHOUGH STILL LOCATED
at trackside on Quebec Centrals Beebe Sub., has lost its signboards
and has been converted for use as a laundromat and municipal offices.
September 1968. Photo courtesy J.D.Booth.
have been demolished, the more functional freight shed nearby has
remained to become the new focal point for local rail freight traf­
fic.
While the station in its greatly reduced numbers remains as
one of the chief reflections of the changing role of rail transport,
there are a variety of other remnants of the halcyon days of rail­
roading in southeastern Quebec. These may be discovered in the land­
scape by the sharp-eyed observer.
Some 240 miles of abandoned rights-of-way criss-cross the
countryside. These roadbeds, where they have not been obliterated
by farming, road-building or other activities, have slowly reverted
to a natural cover of vegitation. South of Eastman, the former line
of the Orford Mountain Railway today carries a modern highway. The
roadbed of the primitive Huntingdon Mining Railway, east of South
Stukely, is today an almost overgrown track, but can still be fol­
lowed around the shore of Lake Libby. Even lines such as the Water­
loo & Magog, abandoned over 80 years ago, are discernable to the
explorer and can be traced relatively easily on aerial photographs.
Buildings such as the former engine house of the South East­
ern Railway at Sutton Junction, Quebec -once Enlaugra on the Can­
adian Pacific -provide an indication of the past significance of
this village as the junction of the Canadian Pacifics Drummondville
and Newport Subdivisions.
An overgrown turntable and pit and the foundations of the
Stanstead, Shefford & Chambly Railways engine house are to be seen
at Waterloo, Quebec, identifying this town as the lines eastern
terminus, following the sale of the Waterloo & Magog Railway to the
CPR in 1887 and its subsequent abandonment by that Company.
More
direct evidence of the railways presence on the face
of the land is the widespread use of superannuated railway rolling
CANADIAN 118 R A I L
stock of various kinds. Boxcars, ice-refrigerator cars,cabooses and
occasionally pieces of passenger equipment find end-uses as agri­
cultural outbuildings, chicken houses and summer cottages. Frequent­
ly, these remnants are today located in areas which have been bereft
of rail lines for many years.
It may safely be said that the railway has been eclipsed as
a formative factor in the social and economic life of southeastern
Quebec. Everywhere its tangible physical components are less wide-
spread than in its former days. Nevertheless, wherever mans hand
has left its imprint on the land, the signs of his activities re-
main long after he has moved to new areas or has abandoned former
endeavours in the face of new technologies.
Today, the rapidly vanishing landscape remnants -both urban
and rural -of an earlier time in Canadian history deserve greater
attention from the historian and the geographer. So also do those
features which relate specifically to railway history, such as stone
foundations, bridge abutments, rights-of-way and relict buildings.
All these things are evidence which can fire the interest and imag­
ination of the railway historian, as well as providing him with
tangible information necessary to complement his findings from the
available documentary sources.
This article is a report on a project being carried
out by Professor J.D. Booth, Professor of Geography,
Bishops University, Lennoxville, Quebec.
Professor Booth notes that since the time that the
article was written, the stations at Sutton, Cantic,
Cowansville, Compton, Waterville, Ormstown, Hawick,
Ste-Martine and St-Guillaume have been removed.
———————————————–
SOMETIMES A JOYfUL
SOUND
Arthur C. Riddington
~o a trackside railroader,
whose span of interest extends
from the days of the single shout
of the steam locomotive of the early
twentieth century to the melodious, deep­
throated chime of a Canadian Pacific 2800,
that joyful sound may now be ended, but the
melody lingers on.
It was the sweet refrain of a steam locomotive whistle that
was wafted into the semi-consciousness of an after-lunch catnap one
day in late May 1958. At first, it seemed as though the repeated
tone was port of one of those nebulous dreams that -now and again­
emerge in natural repose. After all, this gladsome sound hod not
been heard around the neighbouring railway for many months, the in­
terval being more than replete with the asthmatic eructations from
those track-locked trailer-trucks -otherwise, the diesels.
But ever and again the some clear harmonious sound broke the
afternoon silence, this time loud and clear and sufficiently per­
suasive to motivate me to grab my camera and short-cut my way to
the Val dOr station of Canadian National Railways, somewhat in the
manner of a bull-moose in the mating season~
Incredible it was but, sure enough, there was a CN 5200-class
steam engine working the siding to the bulk oil-storage tanks, just
west of the Senneville crossing~ Incredible~ Apparently, the old
girl was doing some spotting of the cars in and out of the slot, with
her pilot now and again nosing over the crossing. The engineer might
have used the bell with adequate effect, but perhaps what mode him
pull away at the whistle-cord was a generous portion of nostalgia ,
all intermixed with what he figured was a lost chance to ploy on old
and familiar refrain that, for more years than most people can re­
member, hod been a characteristic and integral port of the romance
of the age of railroading.
Switching moves completed, Number 5255 chuffed up to the
freight shed with some empties, to couple up to the Senneterre-bound
consist. The old Pacific hod not hod her face washed in a month of
Sundays~ The tattle-tole grey on her formerly burnished-block boiler
evidenced neglect -intentional or otherwise. Somehow, the compar­
ison with the condemned Joan of Arc was natural. Her attire was now
no longer important, as she mode her slow, funerial journey down
the last mile.
~ THE LAST STEAM ENGINE THROUGH VAL DOR, QUEBEC ON 16 MAY 1958.
Present for the occasion, left to right, Brakeman William Quirk;
Brakeman William Edwardson; Conductor Vincent Burton; Clerk Milen
Joncas; the Author, in his official uniform; Engineer Edgar
Bisson and Fireman Jean-Louis Houle. Photo from A.C.Riddington.
CANADIAN 120 R A I L
But despite the inevitable terminal stage af her existence,
her valve-settings were right an and the main rads were substan­
tially free from clatter and clank, as her intricate valve-motion
revolved to a halt only a few feet away. A wave of the camera to
the engineer was enough to get the message to him and he held his
iron steed still for the instant that was necessary to make the es­
sential film record. Later, there were some photos of the crew, who
said that 5255 had been kept at Rouyn all the previous winter, heat­
ing passenger equipment. Now she was working her way to the scrap­
yard, prabably to run deadhead from Senneterre aver the long irrev­
okable miles to Montreal.
Pictures being taken, the engine crew got back on Number 5255
and waited for the highball from the conductor. A signal from the
van and Number 5255 exploded a pillar of black smoke to the skies ,
slipping severely a couple of times, as the steam ta the cylinders
beat the sand to the track. Then, getting her footing, she began ta
pick up speed, her throaty exhaust clearing and steadying, with the
beat picking up at every turn of the drivers. Gradually, the sounds
of her departure faded, but she left a final, persisting echo, one
af the characteristics of her breed, the familiar saund diminishing
in the distance to a silence filled with sadness and regret. The
kind of silence that a diesel enthusiast can never understand until
the last of that burbling brotherhood is finally suppressed by the
cold, r~lentless hand of progress.
The remark of Mr. Ian Sinclair of CP RAIL about not being
much moved by nostalgia is, in such circumstances, very hard ta
understand.
Editors Postscript .•••••.••.••••
Mr. A.C.Riddingtan, the author of the above impressions,
was chief of police of the town of Bourlamaque in northwestern Que­
bec when these events transpired. He admits a weakness for Canadian
National Railways J and K-class steam engines, which for many years
powered most of the passenger trains on both the Senneterre-Rouyn
and, for a time, the Rouyn-Parent runs. These engines maintained the
essential daily passenger services during the catastrophic forest
fires which swept the northwestern Quebec mining district in 1942 .
One
of CN s old consolidations hauled the water-tank train, keeping
the roadbed wet and the ties from catching fire. The authors first
caboose ride was behind the water-tank train, during an attempted
evacuation of the town of Pascalis. Mr. Riddington recalls that, with
the smoke from the forest fire thick enough to lean against, he
didnt have much of an opportunity to enjoy this long-anticipated
experience.
Nowadays, Mr. Riddington resides in Shawbridge, Quebec.
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS PACIFIC NUMBER 5255 WAS SHUNTING SOME
tank cars in and out of the bulk oil-storage tank farm at Val DOr,
Quebec, on 16 May 1958. While spotting the tank cars, the engineer
had to take the engine over the road crossing and this rather re­
quired the use of the whistle~ The effect -while perhaps annoying
to the population -was music to the ears of any railfan.
Photo .courtesy A.C.Riddington.

N
DIESELS
EAST
THIRD SECTION
s
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
t
WITH A CONSIST OF SOME 16 CARS, CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS TRAIN 1, The
Super Continental, with units Numbers 6539, 6635 and 6527, stops
at Ottawa Canada on 5 June 1971. Both photos courtesy P. Patenaude.
I TRAIN 45 -CANADIAN NATIONALS OTTAWA-BROCKVILLE CONNECTION, READY
• to leave Ottawa on 5 June 1971 with 2 MLW FPA4s,Numbers 6782 & 6773.
t
CANADIAN NATIONAL 5 SUPER CONTINENTAL AT ANOTHtR PLACE -DORVAL,
Quebec -and anather time -12 June 1971. Heavy summer traffic re­
quires GM units Numbers 6536, 6625 and 6542.
I. THE LAKESHORE -TRAIN 51 OF CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS -WITH GM
• built units Numbers 6535 & 6618 on the head-end, at Brockville, On­
tario, 5 June 1971. Both photos courtesy Pierre Patenaude.
APRIL 1973
ADDITIONAL EXCITING INFORMATION ON DELAWARE & HUDSON RAILROADS
sesquicentennial Display Train and Steam Excursion of 28-29
April 1973 has been forwarded by Jim Shaughnessy, together
with the two accompanying photographs.
The Exhibition Train will be in Montreal on 28 April and
will consist of a new D&H boxcar, a flat car carrying the replica
of the Stourbridge Lion, an old-style D&H baggage car, freshly
painted in blue and yellow, a second stainless steel baggage car and
a traditional, radio-equipped red caboose, bringing up the rear.
The first baggage car will contain exhibits illustrating the
history of the Delaware & Hudson. These exhibits have been assembled
by the Mohawk & Hudson Chapter, Notional Railway Historical Society,
who own the cor.
The stainless steel baggage car will contain exhibits from
industries served by the D&H.
The Steam Excursion was overwhelmingly popular from the mo­
ment the news got out. In the beginning, it was postulated as on
8-9 car train, to be powered by ex-CPR Steamtown Number 127. In a
matter of weeks, all 650 seats were sold, including the $ 100 var­
iety in the business car on the toil-end.
Because of possible operating difficulties, it was thereafter
decided to use High Iron Companys ex-Reading Railroad 4-8-4 Number
2102 as motive power. This allowed the addition of four ex-Central
Railroad of New Jersey coaches from High Irons equipment pool at
Lebanon, New Jersey.
As of this writing, the train will be composed of one bag-
gage cor (tools & parts) I two baggage cars (lunch cars), four ex-
CNJ coaches, four D&H coaches, six Steamtown coaches, D&H business
car Number 200 and Cooperstown & Charlotte Volley Railroads bus­
iness cor, for the staggering, impossible total of NINETEEN CARS,
to carryon estimated 900 passengers~
And, believe it or not, every seat in the train was said to
have been sold by 15 March, more than one month in advance of the
event. What a trip this will be~
The ex-Reading Number 2102 arrived at Colonie Shops during
the evening of 12 March. Coming north out of Carbondale, the freight
ahead of her (AM-I) hod a unit failure. The 2102 snuggled up to the
van of the freight and shoved the whole works over the summit at
Arrat~ This resulted in the use of almost all of the cool in 2102 s
tender, so that when she reached Oneonta, a diesel unit hod to pull
her north through Schenectady to Colonie, with the locomotive work­
ing just enough steam to keep the cylinders lubricated.
The 2102 will be painted and lettered Delaware & Hudson ,
and numbered 302. Smoke-deflectors will be added.
When she is finished, she will probably resemble a D&H 300
more closely than the ex-CPR Number 127 would have resembled a D&H
600 -even with smoke-deflectors.
MORE …. MORE •••• MORE •… ON THE DELAWARE & HUDSON STEAM TRIP:
23 March Jim Shaughnessy reported that it was proposed to
d~uble-head ex-CPR Steamtown Number 127 with ex-Reading High
CANADIAN 125 R A I L
Iron Number 2102 from Port Henry, N.Y. north to Rouses Point and
Montreal on 28 April 1973. vIe all hope it s true~
CANADIAN 126 R A I L
MESSRS. MICHAEL LEDUC OF MONTREAL AND BARRY MACLEOD OF SYDNEY,N.S.,
have combined to provide the following information on the pas­
senger cars of the Cape Breton Development Corporations tour­
ist train, scheduled for operation in Summer 73 between Grand Lake
and Lingan Mine, N.S.:
-CN work car Number 15035 was originally a passenger coach
built in 1881 for the Midland Railway Company of Canada.
When the Grand Trunk Railway Company of Canada absorbed
the Midland, this car became GTR 2500, was later renumber­
ed 2906 and, after the GTR was amalgamated with the Can­
adian National Railway Company, it became CNR Number 49.
More recently, it was a rules instruction car (in 1960)
and was held in St. Lawrence Region of CN before being
retired and given to DEVCO.
-Second oldest vehicle is CNR business car Number 83,which
was built in 1899 as the sleeping car DAUPHIN for the Can­
adian Northern Manitoba Railway Company by the Pullman
Company of Pullman, Illinois,U.S.A. It became Canadian
Northern business car Number 54 and was Canadian National
Railway business car Number 54, after the formation of
the CNR. Later, it was CNR business car Number 83 and
was held at Moncton, N.B. by the Atlantic Region of CN
before it was donated to DEVCO.
-Next in order of seniority is car Number 7377, which was,
in its last days of use, a combination baggage/passenger
car. Built as a cafe-lounge car in 1912 by the Canadian
Car & Foundry Company (Montreal) for the Canadian Northern
Ontario Railway Company, it operated under the name
OTONABEE. It was converted to a combo by CN in 1951.
The locomotive to be used on the DEVCO Tourist Train is Number
42, formerly of the Sydney & Louisburg Railway and today owned by Mr.
R.C.Tibbetts, Association member of Trenton, Nova Scotia.
Originally built as a 2-6-4 in 189~ by the Schenectady Loco-
motive Works, Schenectady, New York, Number 42 was sold by the Sydney
& Louisburg to the Dominion Coal Company in 1945 and to the Acadia
Coal Company in 1954. The latter Company converted her to a 2-6-0
tender locomotive. Mr. Tibbetts purchased Number 42 in 1963. This
engine was pictured, together with others owned by Mr. Tibbetts, in
the June 1972 issue (Number 245) of CANADIAN RAIL.
In his letter, Mr. MacLeod wrote as follows:
I would just like to add that it is understood that the
train will operate this summer, possibly on a daily basis,
between Victoria Junction -four miles southeast of Sydney -and
the new Lingan Coal mine in New Waterford, about 7-8
miles from Victoria Junction on the Sydney & Louisburgs
New Waterford branchline. This trackage is used on a reg­
ular basis by the DEVCO Railway.
An inspection of the proposed route was made (week of
January 1973 .••• Ed.) by DEVCO tourist bureau officials,
travelling on the DEVCO Railway. The Cape Breton Develop­
ment Corporation hopes eventually to run this steam train
to Louisburg, a distance of 39 miles from the Junction.
The Corporation has talked about rebuilding the old original
S&L narrow-gauge line to Louisburg, except that the re­
built line,would be standard-gauge.
The Louisburg Branch of the former S&L was operated up to
seven years ago. In mid-1968, the S&L tore up the tracks
from Louisburg to Broughton Junction, about 11 miles from
CANADIAN 127 R A I L
Glace Bay. The trackage from Glqce Bay to Broughton Junc­
tion is still there, but is heavily overgrown and the
roadbed is hardly distinguishable from the woods.
Whether or not DEVCO has considered using this right-of­
way is unknown. Most of it is said to have been sold to
private citizens and an important railway bridge over
Mira Gut has been converted to a highway bridge. The
railway overpass on the Main-a-Dieu highway has been
bulldozed to the level.
No matter which route is taken, the line will terminate
at the former S&L railway station at Louisburg. This
station has been refurbished by the Sydney & Louisburg
Railway Historical S~ciety.
In late January, I visited the ex-S&L roundhouse in Sydney
and found 42 up on blocks, with her driving-wheel tyres
removed and their replacements ready nearby. The boiler
lagging had been removed and some of the tubes taken out.
The tender was in bad shape, considerably rusted and holed
through in some places. But, the important thing is that
they are working on her.
Of the five passenger cars, one is in the roundhouse, while
another is outside with a steam line from the boiler house
connected, so that workmen restoring the interior con keep
on working in the cold weather. The other three cars are
stored in the yard.
MR. ROBERT UNDERWOOD, OUR MEMBER IN PERU, NEW YORK,
sends us additional information on the previous ownership of the
coaches and sleepers in the consist of AMTRAKs first train from
New York to Montreal (CANADIAN RAIL, November 1972, Number 250):
AMTRAK
number
7002
7003
3952
5611
5613
7000
8300
2633
2619
2616
8301
2608
2606
3212
Information
ex-Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac 70-seat coach,
built by American Car & Foundry in 1947;
– – – – – – – – -same as above – – – – – – -ex-New York
Central snack-bar coach; built by Pullmon­
Standard in 1946;
ex-Seaboard Air Line Railroad 56-seat chair-car; built
by the Budd Company in 1939;
ex-Seaboard Air Line Railroad, ex-Florida East Coast
Railroad MELBOURNE, 56-seat chair-car;
ex-RF&P 70-seat coach; built by ACF in 1947;
ex-Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad diner-lounge; built by
the Budd Company in 1948;
ex-Union Pacific Railroad 10-6 sleeper PACIFIC SKIES;
built by the Budd Company in 1950;
ex-UPRR 10-6 sleeper PACIFIC MEADOW; built by the Budd Company
in 1950;
ex-UPRR 10-6 sleeper PACIFIC HOME; built by the Budd Company
in 1950;
ex-C&O diner-lounge; built by the Budd Company in 1948;
ex-UPRR 10-6 sleeper PACIFIC CREST; built by the Budd Company
in 1950;
ex-UPRR 10-6 sleeper PACIFIC COMMAND; built by the Budd Company
in 1950;
ex-New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 6-DBR-Lounge;
built by Pullman-Standard in 1955 for former CN-CV-NH-
CANADIAN 128 R A I L
PRR Montrealer-Washingtonian service;PINE TREE STATE.
Mr. Underwood
included the following comments on the new AMTRAK
service:
I rode the second southbound run from Montreal to New York on 1
October 1972. The atmosphere was still festive, due to the
newness of the train. We left Montreal on time ••••••. On this
run we had many AMTRAK officials, plus one groovy blonde, who
talked to all of the passengers before the hour got too late •
•••• Passenger loading was quite good, but there were seats
left at all times. Arrived New York 0900. Due at 0733. Rather
late~ I returned the same evening from New York. The consist
was similar but without 3212 -PINE TREE STATE. Left NY on time.
Arrived Montreal 1028. Scheduled 0940.
My next ride was on 21 November, Montreal to New york •••.•••••
I was unable to reserve in ex-SP coach 4411 so took one in ex­
RF&P 7000-class •••••• two-thirds full leaving Montreal; 9 min­
utes late ..•.••.•. At Essex Junction, 3-dozen passengers, mostly
University of Vermont students, entered the car. More passen­
gers boarded beyond Essex Junction. By the time we reached
White River Junction, the coach was filled.
B&M crew took over here and, in the true old-time railroading
fashion, the brakeman shouted out Bellows Falls next in the
dark of the coach (and the night). This woke up many of us.
Leaving White River, there were people standing and sit-
ting in the aisle. Nearing Brattleboro -also shouted out
in the coach by the B&M crew -the train crew were beside
themselves. A crowd of about 75 passengers was waiting to
board the train. People were jammed in the aisles of both
coaches, allover the tables and floor in the diner-lounge
and even in the aisles of the sleepers~
We had 387 coach passengers when we arrived at Springfield.
At New Haven, one P-C coach was added and was filled up im­
mediately. The diner was full of 9tandees, so that passen­
gers from Montreal wanting breakfast, had to go without •••..
We arrived New York about 1 hour late and, almost until the
train stopped, the train crew were frantically selling cash
fares to those passengers who had boarded back at Brattleboro~
My return from New York on 25 November ••••••••• we had five
coaches, two of which had reserved seats. The (U.S.) Thanks­
giving rush was in full swing. We had standees New York to
New Haven •••• The train was 20 minutes late into Penn Sta­
tion NY and left 20 minutes late ••••• Leaving Hartford, the
steam hose on a coach parted with a loud whoooooosh and a
mechanic was waiting at Springfield to fix it. North of
Springfield, we rocked rhythmically back and forth on the
B&M track, which put me to sleep. It was like riding on an
RDC. About 75 passengers must have detrained at White River
alone. Unloading was heavy at all Vermont stops. Arrival at
Montreal was 1040; scheduled 0915.
The train seems to be one of AMTRAKs most smashing successes,
but everyone who rides it tells me it is never on time. AMTRAK
has hired passenger agents for St. Albans, Essex Junction,
Waterbury and Brattleboro, in Vermont.
In Montreal, it is reported that the northbound AMTRAK train has
been on time only once between 30 September 1972 -when it was inaug­
urated -and 31 January 1973.
CANADIAN
129
R A I L
DAVID GARRICK, CANADIAN NATIONAL EXHIBITIONS GENERAL MANAGER
announced in February that the provincial governments pushbut­
ton train would be complete and fully operative by the 1975 CNE.
Twa companies, Hawker Siddeley Canada Limited and Kraus-Maffei GMBH
of West Germany have submitted proposals. Right-of-way will be eleva­
ted and double-tracked. Car design has not been announced. The system
is said to be the forerunner of the Government of Ontarios $ 1.3 bil­
lion transit scheme for Metro Toronto, Hamilton and Ottawa. J. Welsh.
EDITOR LEN HALL -IN THE TORONTO & YORK BRANCHS PUBLICATION
The Turnout, reports that ex-CN 4-8-2 Number 6069, property of
the City of Sarnia, Ontario and maintained by the Bayview Rail­
road Society at the Bluewater Railway Museum near the Canadian appro­
ach to the Bluewater International Bridg~, has been removed from its
former location to the CN roundhouse in Sarnia, until a new site is
prepared in Centennial Park, not for from the old stand. Removal was
necessitated through requirements of the site for enlarging the
approaches to the bridge. The GTW caboose, C&O caboose and CN baggage
car, also exhibited previously, will also be kept in Sarnia and ex­
hibited with the Bullet-nosed Betty at the new location.
STEAM LOCOMOTIVE ENTHUSIASTS EVERYWHERE WILL BE SORRY TO LEARN
that the Ontario Northland Railways roundhouse and stores buil-
ding at Englehart, Ontario, were almost totally destroyed by
fire on 24 October 1972. The major loss in the fire was the restored
Centennial Train of the ONR and ex-CNR steam locomotive 2164 (2-8-0)
repaired and renumbered 137 by the ONR in 1967. The wooden running
boards and cab were totally burned in the fire. The damage to the
10comotivB is impossible to estimate. Also destroyed in the fire were
maintenance-of-way cars 1627 and 1619. Engine Number 137 last opera­
ted 30 September 1972 for a Michigan Railfan Club trip. W.J.Bedbrook.
ALMOST OMITTED FROM THE CONSIST THIS MONTH WAS THE SCHEDULE
of the Exhibition Train of the Delaware & Hudson, which
is scheduled to be in Montr~al when the steam-hauled ex­
cursion arrived on 28 April. Here it is:
23-24 April
25 April
26 April
28-29 April
30 April
I May
2 May
CANADIAN
-Colonie, NY
-Saratoga, NY
-Glens Falls, NY
-CP RAIL, Montreal
-Plattsburg, NY
-Whitehall, NY
– R u tl and, VT
130 R A I L
3 May -Oneonta, NY
5 May -Binghamton, NY
7 May -Wilkes Barre, PA
Can8 Moy -Scranton, PA
9 May -Carbondale, PA
11 May -Altamont, NY (nr.Albany)
12 May -Mechanicville, NY
THE GOVERNMENT OF ONTARIO (GO) TRANSIT HAS PLACED AN ORDER
with the Diesel Division, General Motors of Canada, for four GP
40-2 diesel locomotives, to be delivered in December, 1973.This
is the first order from GO Transit that DD GMC has received since De­
cember 1966, when eight GP 40TC units were delivered for the inaug­
uration of this service. W.J.Bedbrook
GO Transit GP 40TC Unit in Service at Toronto
IN MID-DECEMBER 1972, CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS ASKED FOR
proposals to redevelop 65 acres of land it owns in Niagara Falls,
Ontario. The property is in three parcels in the area bounded by
Bridge Street River Road, Victoria Avenue and Buttrey Street and in­
cludes CNs Niagaro Falls passenger station and express office.
What are they planning to do with the land? Well, it overlooks
the Whirlpool Rapids and the Lower Bridge and is about three miles
downstream from the famous Falls themselves. The area immediately
adjacent to the Horseshoe Falls is now wall-to-wall motels and res­
taurants. The squeeze is so severe that there are three observation
towers, as well.
If redevelopment of the area takes place, the CNs main line to
the bridge over the Niagara River and Suspension Bridge NY, would
be relocated to the north of the existing right-of-way and a new pas­
senger station would be built. The express offices would be moved to
some other part of the city.
CN said they would consider long-term
land-exchange, in that order. Redevelopers
to submit proposals.
lease, outright sale or
have until 15 March 1973
W.J.Bedbrook
,
~
1
———————————————————————–
CANADIAN 131 R A I L
CN
INVITES PROP(lSA~$
Olt REOEVI!LOPM!Ht OF PRQPEIITI
NIAGARA F.t.U..S.O/jTARIO
, ……… -,-………. —~–.
…. –~.–…. –.. -. . -~
_ …… _-… _-_ .. _ .. _ …. _ …..
— ……………. -.. -.. -~–…. _ .. _ …….. – … —_._-……

CANADIAN PACIFIC LIMITED CAN BOAST THAT IT NOW SERVES
nine of Canado s ten provinces and has since 14 Novellber 1972.
On that day, the 5.S. HENRY OSBORNE of CP RAIL, ex_5.S. PRIN_
CESS OF ACADIA, ex_5.S. PRINCESS OF NANAIHO, mae her (his, its)
first trip from Soint John, New Brunswick to St. Johns, Newfoundland
with a COIgO of new auto_abiles and trucks. Thi~ new ferry opera-
tion began about 15 months ogo (October, 1971), when CP RAIL begon
transporting some of the annual traffic of 15,000 new motor vehicles
to Newfoundland. T
his traffic WOI first handled by two chartered vossels, the MV
RORO NEWFOUNDLAND ond the MV RORO NEW BRUNSWICK (RORO= Roll On-Roll
Off). No one kno …. s for certain how Ne …. foundlond is absorbing 15,000
rood vehicles annually, but CP RAIL hopes that, in 1973, there will
be the possibility of return traffic in used cars and trucks~
Originally, the 5.5. PRINCESS OF NANAIHO wos brought east to
replace the S.S. PRINCESS HELENE on the Saint John, N.B._Digby, N.S.
run. Renomed the 5.5. PRINCES OF ACADIA, she continued in this ser­
vice until CP RAIL s new trans-Boy of Fundy ferry, the MV PRINCESS OF
ACADIA (nee MV PRINCESS OF NEW NOVA, during her triols) was corallis-
5ioned in June, 1971. Thereafter, the old S.S.PRINCESS OF ACADIA >lOS
pa
id up at Saint John, N.B.
She …. os recommissioned in November 1972 and renamed S.S. HENRY
OSBORNE, after the first Governor of Newfoundland. While her conver­
sion wos then incelnplete, she steemed proudly into the harbour at
St. John 5, Newfoundland on 14 Novellber >lith the CP RAIL multillork
emblazoned on her funnel~
Rebuilding of the 5.5. HENRY OSBORNE begen late in 1971. The
saloon deck of the ship was converted for autolnobile and truck trans­
port, increasing the vessel 5 vehicle capacity from 120 to 225 rood
vehicles.
Utilization of drydock facilities ot Saint Jahn ond Halifax
>lOS 50 intense that only in January 1973 could the ship enter drydock
in Holifox to complete the conversion.
CP RAIL does not offer service under word
Island _ yet: But who knows …. hot the
ita o …. n flog to Prince Ed. fu
ture has in store:
Captoin Horry Anderson ..
PIERRE PATENAUDE CAUGHT ONTARIO NORTHLAND RAILWAY 5 fAMOUS POLAR
Bear Express ot its northern terlllinu. ot Moosonee, Ontorio, on 18
August 1972, headed by a poi:r of DO GHC FP 7A units, Nos. 1502 &1519.
CANADIAN R.AII­
pUl::)I •• h.d lOy t.h.
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Aa&OOIATION
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