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Canadian Rail 254 1973

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Canadian Rail 254 1973

NO. 264-
FE::EI:R..UA.:FI..V 1973

I….~
JACQUES PHARAND
MJI[M he enterprise and courage of those
explorers who first came to North
America from France ts very well­
known. Their voyages of discovery to
the west and south of New France in
North America have been described in
history books many times in most of
the countries of the world.
It might be concluded that, more than 300 years later,
this spirit of adventure had dtsappeared among their
descendants. Thi.s is not at all true for, in 1972, yet
another Canadian set out to make a voyage of explor­
ation to the south. What would be more logical than a
vi.st t to the llKlSt famus city of the southern State
of Louisiana -New Orleans, U,S.A.!
La Nouvelle Orleans, or New Orleans of the twentieth century,
is known to musicians round the world as the cradle of jazz. But to
trolley fans, it has, in addition, the supreme distinction of oper­
ating in the 1970s a streetcar line ith 50-year-old equipment, as
a regular urban service. Described quite stmply as Line 31 -St.Ch­
arles this servtce ts the last remnant of a once large streetcar
system. Line 31 may be only the remainder of the New Orleans Public
Servtce Companys network, but it is a very acttve one.
13.128 miles of street railway are still available to pas­
sengers, on a route which combtnes most happily the service re­
quirements of its daily users wtth the charm of nostalgia -always
a part of la Nouvelle Orleans -created in part by the lavishly­
scrolled balcontes of the buildings and the gaslight lamp-posts of
the streets, Here, tramway enthusiasts will find those last thirty­
five double-ender cars, built way back in 1922-24 by Perley A.
Thomas of High Point, North Carolina and, whats more, still in
really excellent operating condition.
middle When you start from the private right··of-1ay in the
of Canal Street (beyond this pOint, the right-of-way was
used
by streetcars on the Canal Street line and is today
buses on this busy artery), your car swings westbound on
formerly
used by
the one-way
.A AFTER A fVlIDWINTER BLIZZARD, MONTREAL PARK & ISLAND RAILWAY CDI~PANY I S
~I Car 1030 -built in 1897 by the Rathbun Car Company of Deseronto,On­
tario -poses for a photograph on the return trip from Ahunsic on the
company~s Back River line. The picture was taken in 1905 and the
car was scrapped in 1939. Photo MUCTC Collection •
… IN NEW ORLEANS, LOUISANA IN 1972, CAR 947 SlllITCHED OFF LEE CIRCLE TO
Howard Street, en route to the downtown terminal at Canal Street.
Photo Jacques Pharand.
CANADIAN
36
R A I L
section of St, Charles Street, with its tall office-buildings, to
Lee Circle and then on to the central double-tracked mall of St.
Ch~les Street itself, The avenue has the air of a quiet residential
street, rather than that of a busy thoroughfare, This impression is
accentuated by the venerable shadetrees which literally transform
the street into a tunnel of greenery. The shrubs along the tracks
and the bright green grass of the mall, trimmed to a golf-course
neatness, fortify the impression of countryside. Blending with the
greenery, in its dark olive livery, your car then turns north on
Carrollton Street to South Claiborne Avenue, with its stub-end ter­
minal, ,barely half-a-mile from the Carrollton Car barn and Shops.
The return route inbound to the city centre is via the same
streets to Lee Circle, paSSing Tulane and Loyola Universities once
more, then on Howard and Carondelet Streets (one-way east) to Canal
Street, which is the inbound terminal.
The 35 cars left in operation are the survivors of the 900-
class, which originally included cars Numbers 900 through 972. They
are two-motor, double-truck cars, with wooden reversible cross-seats
and weigh 47,000 pounds light. Originally two-man cars, they are
today operated as one-man cars, the controller-handles being trans­
ferred to the other end of the car at the Carrollton Street end of
the line.
Major modifications on these cars since they were purchased
include alUminum reroofing, burnt-orange colour door-panels and
insulated trolley poles with contactors. Most of these changes were
completed in 1964 at the Carrollton Shops. Operation of the rear­
exit doors is done by the passenger himself, by pushing outwards on
the two centre door-panels when a green light, inside the car over
the door, lights up.
The exact fare for a one-way trip is 15 cents, the motormen
carrying no change. For this fare, restricted transfer privileges
are granted. Transfers are of the tear-off type, with the date im­
printed under the time-intervals.
Characteristic oddities of operation on the St. Charles line
include running the cars with the front windows open, to reduce the
high temperature and humidity somewhat, as the cars are not air­
conditioned. By contrast, the latest models of the buses are! It is
also quite normal to see the motorman-conductor leaning out of the
front window at the outer terminal, to change the trolley poles. In
operation, the right-hand destination roller-sign, indicating the
terminal, is left in the blank position, save for the CARROUSE
indication of a last Short-run. The run-number sign on the left­
hand side is still used for control purposes, especially at the
check-points, still another curious practice is the position of the
switch-iron while the car is running, probably so placed to make
its infrequent use less complicated. On most cars, the switch-iron
is hung from the front window-ledge, across the trolley retriever.
Another accessory in constant use is the foot-gong. Each cross­
street along St. Charles is a railway crossing and the streetcars
have the right-of-way, as one might normally expect.
CANADIAN
37
R A I L
It is also worthy of note that hazardous conflicting moves
involving streetcars and general traffic are governed by special
traffic lights. One such instance occurs when the streetcars leave
the Canal street right-of-way at St. Charles. Another is encounter­
ed at the access to the Greater New Orleans Bridge at Calliope Av­
enue, a stone Is-throw west of Lee Circle.
Line operation is relatively simple, wi.th electromagnetic
switches in key locations and for the access tracks to the Carrol­
lton Carbarn. Interesting trackwork can be seen at the Carrollton
Street terminal, at South Claiborne Avenue, where a scissors cross­
over is located, both stub-tracks being used as boarding points, as
incoming cars switch to either track and are then correctly rerout­
ed by spring-switches. There is also intensive car activity at Lee
Circle, as both inbound and outbound cars must go around the traf­
fic circle~. Utility cross-overs, all of them installed in the tra­
iling position, are located at approximately 3/4-mile intervals.
Watching the operation of the St. Charles Street cars
Canal Street, it is hard to realize that this busy artery was
one of the greatest of all the streetcar thoroughfares in
on
once
Worth
CROSSOVERS
I. Plum Sl.
2. Snerl $1
3. P,ne st.
4.
Calhoun SI
5 Je If erson sl
6. Jena 51.
7. Sih. it.
8 Josephine 51
9 Terpsichore sl.
10. Calliope sl,
(n
earest cross 51)
SIT E S
A. Tulane un,v.
B Loyola uni
….
C AudUbon pork
D. Greolel N.O br
E. Lae Circle
F. French Quarter
MILE
.25 .SO .7S 1.0
SCALE
~G_~!!.Q
:~ Private R//(.
(s Inbound boordlnq crl!O
;:=:: Bridge
o Oulb~:.J{d oco((.;;n~ pt.
P PriV. R/W Wesl of II:!:; pi
ST Street :tlYet; .donldieolu::tl
S Corroiltl)l1 shops/car house
Trafhc direcTion
Slru outti ne
NOTE S
J. Trockwolk, inseTs a landmorkS
nOI 10 scole
2. 81dgs locollon is .o;>p,oximale
3. Conal
51. is orb. E-W OItIS
4. Troekoge on Howard SI., North
of
Coroooelel $1 IS nol corll lied
(Trac)(ogtl Info. I courtes), of NOPSCl
f
Drown by J.P. (11-72)
MISSISSIPI RIVER
ABOVE, CAR 911 IS CAUTIOUSLY NEGOTIATING THE EASTWARD CURVE BETWEEN
sections of the private right-oF-way at Carrollton Street and St.
Charles Avenue.
Below,
Car 969, with both trolley poles on the wire, is being readied
to receive its waiting passengers beFore being rerouted on the in­
bound track For the six-mile run to Canal Street. Photos Jacques Pharand.
CANADIAN
39
R A I L
America. At the peak of streetcar popularity in New Orleans, almost
solid lines of cars moved up and down in the centre of the boule­
vard and the terminal at the foot of the street accommodated the
cars of 20 different streetcar lines. Alast All this has passed away,
but thankfully the St. Charles line remains. This particular line is
the oldest surviving street railway in the United States, having
run continuously since 1835, using horse, steam and electric power,
in succession.
As Line 31 is heavily travelled, 30 cars are constantly used
in rush-hours on a 3t~minute headway. Each day, the cars to be used
in service are selected according to a predetermined plan, the five
not in use being in the shops for inspection and maintenance. If
one of the cars scheduled for inspection is to go on a charter run
the following day, an alternate schedule of inspection is followed.
However, all of the cars are inspected and maintained in groups of
five on successive days and, in this way, the maintenance programme
is kept up-to-date.
Although a NOPSC bus may be chartered for only $ 20.00 per
hour, while the streetcars cost $ 25.00 per hour, the latter are
very popular and are frequently reserved for celebrating (childrens)
birthday parties.
Maintenance of the cars is definitely of first importance to
the Company and track, ballast and ties are constantly inspected for
damage. Faulty portions are rapidly replaced. There is only one ser­
vice car, rail-grinder Number 29, a former single-truck passenger
car of 1896 vintage, with reversible Single pole. Overhead wiring
is repaired using a giraffe-type truck. The Carrollton Shops boast
of a somewhat unique paint-shop, where streetcars and buses are
brought into the building and an outer platform is raised hydraul­
ically so that there is easy access to any surface on the vehicle ,
even the roof 1
As one might conclude, Carrollton Shops must fabricate all
the replacement parts -except wheels and axles -and it is equip­
ped to do so, as all of the modifications mentioned above were com­
pleted by the Shops and its ingenious staff.
In short, the St. Charles street line of the New Orleans Pub­
lic Service Company might be described as a sort of Model Railway
for Adults!. But the visitor can sense that this courageous remain­
der of a once-larger system is the pride and joy of its operator
and will remain so for a long time to come.
It is true: there is not A Streetcar Named I Desire I anymore.
In fact, there was not one at the time that Tennessee Williams wrote
his famous play. Nevertheless, car Number 922, which is still running,
ultimately made it to movie fame. But the St. Charles street line of
the New Orleans Public Service Company is nevertheless still alive
and strong. Happily for trolley fans everywhere, these cars are bound
to run until they fall apart all at once, which is a situation quite
unlikely to occur in the near future, because of the excellent main­
tenance and inspection which they receive from a truly dedicated op­
erating and repair staff.
CANADIAN
40
R A I L
ROSTER OF EQUIPMENT
29: single-truck rail grinding car, built in 1896.
900 903 904 905 906 907 910 911 914 915 920 921 922
923
926 930 932 933 934 937 940 945 947 948 951 953
954 961 962 963 965 968 969 971 972
These cars were built by the Perley A. Thomas Car Works,High Point,
North Carolina, U.S.A., from 1922 to 1924. Originally, the Thomas
Works were
part of the Southern Car Company (1904-1917),which were
an outgrowth of the Briggs Car Company (1890-1903) of Amesbury,
Massachusetts, U.S.Ao The Thomas Works built well-constructed cars
for nearly every streetcar system in the United States, as well as
for companies in Cuba, Puerto Rico and Central and South America.
Electric car production ceased in 1930. The Company was still pro­
ducing steel bus-bodies in 1967.
1-c:.T r ADr ..

~
w
.on
a
ANY CONN CT 0 LIN.
r—
ANY II E
tD
0
IN CANAL II: ZONI
0
VAll

, .. ~-TORN
2-ST. CHARLES
1 w
0 000 e -…. =
PalmeT Pk. 1–
NOT GOOO IN A At ST. ZONE c.n
ON, 70, 71, S. (lib Poydl g
VALID 45 MIN. AFTER TIME TORN
. 3-ST . CHARLES
!!: •• ., ~ •. . <.0 roadway Frerel G IV~I. Jochon, c:>
~e~i~i~. P!I:!~ p , SI~Qtl:I::;: r–
S. Cloibofte, rula e c..o
NOT GOOD IN A Al ST. ZONe c>
~~r;on:~.,. ;1~Betno,~ ClfY Pa,., c=t
VALID HI HRS. AFTER TIME TORN
r-ST. C~RLES <.0
GOOD ON, C til, [)()wn,on. c::>
Hoyne, loko. loul • ofcon. Poria r–
GOOD OUTSID!: A AL ST. ION en
g~~ol (~kOVrs),9~. d:~IPro~~~:) g
VALID 1 HRS. AFTER TIME TORN
5a. m.
MAR. 0
6a. m.
~
15
7a. m. 30
8a. m. 45
9a. m.
~
0
10a. m. 15
11 a. m. 30
12 noon 45
1 p. m.
~
0 2
p. m. 15
3p.m. 30
4p. m. 45
t
RAIL-GRINDER CAR 29 OUTSIDE THE CARROLLTON
Carhouse. Note filled inner tracks in the
foreground, evidence of NOPSes dUffl-
gauge operation, over the years.
Photo Jacques Pharand.
CA NAD IAN
41
R A I L
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
This article could not have been written without the assis­
tance of many people who really went out of their way to provide
data and information, both verbal and documentary. My most sincere
thanks are tendered to the following gentlemen, members of the staff
of the New Orleans Public Service Company:
Mr. W. McCollam,jr. President
Mr. R.B.James General Manager,Transit Deplt.
Mr. H.Q.Neidermeier Manager of Transportation,
Mr. E. Champagne
Mr. E. Frisard
Transit Department
Supervisor
General Foreman, Carrollton
Shops.
Special thanks are also
treal, for supplying essential
who assisted with the text and
expressed to Mr. Denis Latour, Mon­
information and to Miss G. Legare,
editing.
Ir ~-2–~—–
47-8 —–.. -, ——–~———-
-3
4- z·———-..~ –< 6Z--
NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC SERVICE, INC.
ROLLING STOCK ANO SHOPS DEPT,
3~ ·!;e~~N£:%::i..rifU~j~c~;JL3.D .1~·; f£ .~J~J::
C:510N~. sc …. r~ .• /:O.;J.} _.)C~~
. Jvn~ 20.:)0 0/.. e. 1., ,.:,,
o .. ~w .. (H .r.P-~V:;:-,;,,·/./ e;~ .• ;
,..,,<..oo,;fG-C .. ..-...
., .. (c •.• r-ro WS~ O., .. c,.. . .,I:;·!J.b
I
I
OPJERATION 66 HUM99
FoF. ANGUS.
66
M
ontreals electric cars ran yesterday. They didnt
run very far or very fast; but they established the
fact that Montreal is in the procession and on the
JOC)ve. II
This sentence is the complete text of the lIeditorial
ll
which
appeared in the Montreal GAZETTE on Thursday, 22 September l892,the
morning of the day after which Montreal Street Railways car, the
Rocket II began the era of electric tramways in Canadas metropoliS.
Eighty years later on 21 September 1972, the trams had been
gone from Montreals streets for almost thirteen years, but on that
day at the Canadian Railway Museum, Saint-Constant, Quebec, another
streetcar of the l890s inaugurated operation on Canadas newest el­
ectric railway. At 1815 hours that evening, M. Lucien L,tAllier, the
Chairman of the Montreal Urban Community Transportation Commission,
stepped up onto the front platform of the Museums open car Number
8, grasped the controller, released the brakes and started the car
on its first official trip -the first electric streetcar operation
in the Montreal area for more than 10 years.
This first run marked the realization of a long-standing am­
bition of the members and friends of the Canadian Railroad Histor­
ical Association. The origin of the ambition dates back to the days
before the Canadian Railway Museum was founded and the actual build­
ing and equipping of the new line was the end-result of a great deal
of work on the part of a considerable number of enthusiasts.
In order to tell the complete story of this project, it is
necessary to go back 23 years to 1949, when Montreals streetcar sys­
tem was still largely intact and nearly 1,000 trams ran over about
200 miles of track. In those days, a great variety of equipment was
still in service, including some IIsalt cars, which were formerly
passenger cars of the l890s. When the-then Montreal Tramways Company
announced the retirement of these salt cars, the Association,which
then numbered only a few dozen members, sought to acquire one.Fears
lere expre ssed that it was biting off JOC)re than it could chew in the
acquisition of a full-sized piece of rolling stockl
~ AT 1000 HOURS ON 23 SEPTEMBER 1972 -OPENING DAY FOR THE TROLLEY LINE
at the Canadian Railway Museum -the Associations Honorary President
Mr. Donald F. Angus took the controls of Number 8, while Dr. R.V.V.
Nicholls, President Emeritus, assumed the role of conductor for the
inaugural trip. Photo M. Peter Murphy.
CANADIAN 44 R A I L
The result of the Associations application was that the MTC
donated car Number 274 to the Association. This was a Newburyport
Car Company product of 1892, For more than five years, several mem­
bers spent Thursday nights and Saturday afternoons at Saint-Denis
Carbarns and, later, at Saint-Paul and Saint-Henri Carbarns,scraping
rust from the single truck and grey paint from the body. Gradually,
the car was restored to its turn-of-the-century appearance,
What was probably the high point in the restoration operation
occurred a~ the Saint-Paul Carbarns one Thursday evening in 1954,when
the members present participated in the first operation of car 274,
under its own power, over about 100 feet of track inside the carbarn.
It was probably on that night that the idea was first con­
ceived that some day, when Montreals streetcars were no more, the
Association would have a museum of its own, where car 274 -and pos­
sibly one or two others -could still be operated, thus perpetuating
the memories of the time of the trolley.
The task was a hard one and there were disapPointments, but
by 1956, car 274 was completely restored and, much to the satis­
faction of the members of the Association, it rumbled along in the
procession organized to mark the end of streetcars on Sainte-Cath­
erine Street in Montreal. This was the moment of decision; the
target-date for complete elimination of trams in Montreal was only
three short years away. However, with great foresight, the Montreal
Transportation Commission decided to preserve as many examples as
possible of the major types of streetcars still in existence. This
historical collection eventually came to the Canadian Railway Mus­
eum,
but in the year 1956, this was an event far in the future.
But the museum project continued to gain momentum and two
cars from the Montreal and Southern Counties Railway were acquired
late in 1956, followed by the body of open car Number 8, the fol­
lowing year. This latter car-body, donated by Gillies Brothers of
Braeside, Ontario, was a real basket case, but after a year of
hard work by members of the Association and others at the Youville
Shops of the Montreal Transportation Commission, it was completely
restored and ready for operation. And it did operate and was used
on several nostalgic excursions in 1958 and 1959. The Association
now ~ two operating streetcars 1
30 August 1959 was a black day for traction fans in Montreal,
as it was on that day that the last streetcar rumbled into Mount
Royal Carbarns, ending the streetcar era in Montreal. Alasl No more
trolley rides on regular cars. No more streetcar excursions. Now
car 274, Number 8 and the other cars in the historic collection of
the MTC would be carefully stored away until some day in the future
when a museum, with facilities for streetcar operation, could be
built.
But suddenly the steam locomotive began to disappear from the
railways of Canada. The question of establishing a railway museum
became more
important. The necessity became more urgent.
Less than a year later, arrangements were concluded with
DOMTAR Limited, for the lease of a IG-acre site suitable for the
CANADIAN
45
R A I L
long-awaited museum. Construction of the museum began at once and
it was none too soon. In 1963, the Montreal Transportation Commiss­
ion demolished Youville Shops and the marvellous collection of his­
toric streetcars, carefully preserved there for five years, was
donated to the Canadian Railroad Historical Association.Along with
cars 274, 8, M&SC 104 & 611 and Ottawa Transportation Commission
car 859, ~he MTC collection was brought to the museum that summer.
In 1964. Canadian National Railways generously donated a 1924
Crocker-Wheeler motor-generator set, together with switches, controls
and 4000 feet of copper trolley wire and associated hangers and
poles. All this equipment had been used at eNs Neebing Yard, Fort
William, Ontario, to provide power for single-truck crew car Number
15702 which, by the way, also came to the museum. The motor-genera­
tor set was essential to convert the alternating current supplied by
Hydro Quebec
to the necessary 660 v, direct current required to op­
erate streetcars, So, by the end of 1964, the museum had, in effect,
a do-it-yourself streetcar kit and all that was needed to make
it run was to put it together.
During the next several years, the ~ntire resources and ef­
forts of the workers at the museum were devoted to laying track to
receive the various pieces of rolling 3tock and to erecting build­
ings to house them. Everyone was very busy preparing the Canadian
Railway Muse um for the grand opening to the public, Consequently ,
little progress could be made in the project for streetcar opera-·
tion. Preventive maintenance was of course carried on, to minimize
deterioration of the vehicles.
The project to achieve operation of streetcars at the Museum
was
revived in November, 1966 and the foundation was laid for the
substation building, the rnotor-genera-(;or set was put in place and
the next year, the building itself as elected by Messrs. Cooke and
Leitch, as a donation to the Association and the ~useum. ASSOCiated
electrical equipment was installec in the substatlon buildlng and
the main power entry for the whole Museum was relocated, 30 that
electricity for the entire Museum was distributed from this loca­
tion. At the same time, the wiring renuired for eventual operation
of the motor-.generator set was instaLLed,
Operation of diesel-powered equipment at the Museum began
about this time and was followed by stearn operation -the JOHN MOL­
SON -in 1971. The public had been visl tJng the Museum for six years.
The time had at last arrived for electri;:: operation too, and in 19{l,
there began the big effort which culmina.e,j lr. the start of street­
car operation a year later,
The project was titled Operation HUM and was scheduled for
achievement by 21 September 1972. Member<; of the Association were
invited to lend their support to the project and initial contribu­
tions toalled $420.00 • Although the substation had been built, the
overhaul and connection of the M-G set would require considerable
work and expense. The members responded to the appeal and provided
the financial support essential to the continuation of Operation
HUM. Snoopy helped, too. In the spring of 1972, the project was
CANADIAN
46
R A I L
structured and on 15 June 1972, a meeting of the Associations
traction enthusiasts was held and the project timetable was discus­
sed. At this juncture, the scheduled opening day of 23 September –
the nearest Saturday to 21 September -was exactly 100 days away.
One hundred days meant that 1 percent of the project per day would
have
to be completed if the total plan were to be achieved on time!
EX-NAPIERVILLE JUNCTION RAILWAY
caboose Number 35 was converted
into a line-car for the installa-
tion of the bracket-arms and overhead wire. Sometimes a step-ladder
was necessary to reach the top of the bracket-brac~. F.F.Angus.
Ed Lambert and John Doyle install the copper wire on the trolley-wire
ears which, together with many other parts, were donated to the
project by the Toronto Transit Commission. Photo Peter Murphy.
Work began in earnest on 17 June. Much of it was unfamiliar
to the volunteers. It was a difficult challenge. The substation was
cleared out, preparatory to the installation of wiring. A second
crew began the conversion of ex-Napierville Junction Railway caboose
Number 35 to a line-car. Cross-arms and trolley hangers were cleaned
and painted preparatory to installation on the poles, which were
already in place along the south perimeter track of the Museum. Al­
most Simultaneously, the electrical equipment -panels and switches­
was being installed in the substation, the AC control circuits wir­
ed and tested and the MG set moved to its final position and bolted
firmly to the concrete floor. When the work lagged behind the sched­
ule, the volunteers worked one night a week, in addition to Satur­
days, to catch up. The members of the Association kept supplying the
finances; by July, Snoopy and his friends reported a total of $ 1160
in contributions.
CANADIAN
47
R A I L
5 August: 50 of the 100 days were gone. The line-car was all
ready, most of the sUbstation wiring was complete and the ground­
circuit was in place. The latter, albeit hidden under several feet
of earth, required a good deal of hard work. Five 10-foot steel rods
had to be driven into the clayey earth and connected by about 100
feet of heavy copper wire, all buried in the heavy soil. A great
achievement was recorded on 15 August, when the motor-generator set
was powered up for the first time. It purred like a satisfied kit­
ten, turning out 600 v.DC without any difficulty. On the same day,
a crew from the Montreal Urban Community Transit Commission bonded
the rail-joints on the track and, barring mishaps, it was certain
that the project deadline would be met.
The next import~nt part of the project was to prepare a car
for operation. From the start, open car Number 8 had been the can­
didate for several reasons. Number 8 was small and the power re­
quired to move it would not place a strain on the MG set. It is a
double-end car; it would be easier to operate on the line available
initially. It was in good condition, having been rebuilt in 1958.
Last, but by no means least, it was an old-time open car of a de­
sign which would appeal to the public. Number 8 proved to be a good
choice and required little preparation to ready it for operation,
after its thirteen-year rest.
Meanwhile, the railway rolling stock and motive power had
been removed from the perimeter track on the south side of the Mus­
eum and
the only major undertakings left to complete were the in­
stallation of three poles and erection of the trolley wire. On the
first weekend in September, the poles were set in place. All of the
trolley wire was hung in a single day – 9 September -when a large
number of volunteers combined forces and had the wire fully strung
and connected by midafternoon of that day.
Then came the moment of truthl Number 8 was brought out and
switched across the yard to a position under the wire. The MG set
was started and current was fed into the wire. No arcs or short­
circuits! Number 8s pole was raised gingerly and eased into con­
tact with the wire. No arcs or short-circuits! A brave volunteer
climbed onto Number 8s front platform, released the hand-brake and
fearfully notched up the controller. Number 8 moved away quietly and
briskly down the track. Anxieties were groundless; Number 8 purred
like a kitten and Project HUM had been successfully realized.
Less than 15 days to go to HUM-Day, It was decided to make
the official inaugural run on the evening of Thursday, 21 September,
as this was the actual anniversary of the Rockets first official
run way back in 1892 -eighty years ago! Mr. Lucien LAllier,Chair­
man of the Montreal Urban Community Transportation Commission, kind­
ly accepted the Associations invitation to operate car Number 8 on
this historic occasion, a very fitting gesture indeed, in view of
the invaluable encouragement and assistance provided by the MUCTC
and its predecessors over many years. The inauguration of streetcar
service at the Canadian Railway Museum was an unqualified success •
THE ASSOCIATIONS CAR NUMBER 8 WAS A SAO SIGHT AS RECEIVED FROM THE
Gillies Brothers Lumber Company of Braeside,OntaTio.(Ed Lambert Call.)
After extensive rebuilding, Number 8 emerged from the Youville Shops
looking aB good as she did when she was originally built. (ED Lambert)

t
THE FIRST RUN OF NUMBER 8 AT THE CANADIAN RAILWAY MUSEUM, WITH MR.
Lucien I .iUlier of the MUCTC at the controls. Among the passengers
were Mrs. R.W.Webb, Mr. R Mrs. Glenn Cartwright, Dr. R.V.V.Nicholls
and Messrs. G. Hill, M.P.M.urphy, L. Leach and Jacques Loiselle.
Photo MUCTC.
The Montreal STAR of Friday, 22 September 1972, had a large picture
of Mr. LIAllier at the controls of Number 8 spread all across the
front pagel With the indispensible help of the members who had pro­
vided the financial support, 1I0peration HUM
II
had been translated
from idea to reality.
Regular streetcar service at the Canadian Railway Museum be­
gan on Saturday, 23 September, right on schedule, as the Associations
Honorary President, Mr. Donald F. Angus, drove car Number 8 through
a cerem:mial banner. The line was declared openl The response from
the visitors at the Museum was prompt and enthUSiastic that week­
end and every weekend thereafter.
Since 23 September 1972, the trolley service has run Sundays
and holidays, weather permitting. Nearly 2,000 viSitors have ridden
on Number 8 and on one day, 1 October, a record 672 passengers were
carriedl But the winds of winter blew sharper and sharper and 9 Oc­
tober operation was maintained during a short snowstorm. In spite
of the warmth of the enthUSiasm, the line had to close for the 1972
season and on Sunday, 29 October, the power was reluctantly shut
off and Number 8 was put away carefully until next year.
… ON SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23,
1972~ The Canadian Railway
Museum welcomed a large num­
ber of the employees of the
MUCTC and hundreds of them
rode on Number 8, over the
right-oF-way and under the
live wire, made possible
by the members of the Asso­
ciation who had contributed
to OPERATION HUM. Motorman
Jacques Loiselle drove Num­
ber 8 on this return trip
From the end-oF-track to
Hays. Photo S.S.Worthen.
The successful completion of Operation HUM does not mean
that work on streetcar projects at the Canadian Railway Museum has
terminated. Far from itt Plans for 73 are as big or bigger than
those which were formulated at the beginning of 1972. First on the
list of things to do in 73 is the extension 01 the streetcar
line behind Building Number 1 to Barrington Station, with a possible
extension around the north perimeter track of the Museum. At least
one other car from the Museums collection ought to be prepared for
service.
Eventually -and the date of realization depends largely on
the availability of money and materials – a complete belt-line is
to be built around the entire Museum property. This will provide a
continuous ride of over half-a-mile, not as long as some streetcar
lines but longer than others. And nowhere else can you find a tram
line that provides such interesting and ever-changing views of rail­
way equipment of all kinds, including electric interurban cars!
From start to finish, Operation HUM was one of the mst suc­
cessful projects ever undertaken at the Canadian .Railway Museum. It
was well planned. The members of the Association gave the plan their
unqualified support. The volunteer workers set themselves an ob­
jective and, despite the hard work that it necessitated, met it. The
completed project represents the creation of yet another facet of
rail transportation at the Museum and, at the same time, can earn
sufficient revenue to be self-sustaining -nearly. A good deal has
been accomplished; a good deal can be done in the future, now that
there is a strong base on which to build.
To paraphrase the writer of the GAZETTEs editorial of eighty
years ago: The Museums car didnt run very far or very fast, but
it established the fact that the Museum is in the procession and on
the rove, just as Montreals electric cars were, way back in 18921
Editors Postscript.
The following members of the Association were mainly
responsible for the planning and completion of the
project Operation HUM:
Fred Angus
John Doyle
Gord
Hill
Ed Lambert
Jacques Loiselle
Peter Murphy
Bob Smythe
The
Association is most particularly grateful to the
many members who gave their support to the project
and thus enabled its successful completion.
~
·UI!
,-. .
I ~ ,. :
M.P .lilurphy.
(l!rtunatelY several Montreal streetcars have been preserved in
various museums throughout North America so that future generations may
have an opportunity to see, and possibly ride a Montreal trolley. We are pleased
to present here a complete list of all the Montreal streetcars preserved,
and where you may see, and even ride them in some cases.
THE CANADIAN RAILWAY MUSEUM, is a project of the Canadian Railroad
Historical Association, and is located on St. Pierre St. in St. Constant, about
one mile south off highway 9C on Montreals south shore. The Association is
favored with the M. T.C. historical collection of streetcars. This has to be the
finest collection of trams from anyone city ever assembled under one roof,and
contains
the first electric car to operate in Montreal, as well as the last. The
ensuing gap is filled in with a carefully selected cross section of trams that
completes the collection. Most cars are on public display, and operation of
some of them is planned in the near future.
No.
3
7
20
51
200
274
350
859
997
1046
1317
1339
1801
1959
2222
3015
3151
3200
3517
Year built
1905
1924
1875
1875
1928
1919
1892
1892
1907
1911
1924
1913
1913
1924
1928
1929
1907
1925
1928
1944
Builder
M.S.R.
Tramways
Lariviere
Lariviere
Ottawa Car
J.G.Brill
Newburyport
Jjrownel1
J.G.Brill
Ottawa Car
Tramways
Ottawa Car
Ottawa Car
C.C.F.
C.C.F.
C.C.F.
M.S.R.
C.C.F.
Tramways
C.C.F.
Company represented and notes.
DT SE observation car (golden chariot)
DT SE observation car (golden chariot)
M.C.P.R. horse omnibus
M.C.P.R. horse sleigh
ST DE sweeper
M.T.C. Birney car, ex Detroit Rys.
M.S.R. ST SE closed car
M.S.R. Rocket First electric car
M.T.C. DT SE Closed car curved sides
M. T .C. DT SE closed car PA YE type
M. T. C. DT SE suburban car
M. T .C. DT SE closed car
M.T.C. DT SE closed car,dynamic brakes
M.T.C. DT SE closed car, trailer puller
M. T.C. DT SE closed car, one man type
M.T.C. DT SE closed car, two man type
flat trailer double truck
M.T.C. motor flat car, double truck
M. T.C. DT SE tool car
M.T.C. DT SE PCC type last Mtl. trolley
CANADIAN
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5001 1917 Tramways M.T.C. DT DE locomotive
W – 2 1923 Tramways M.T.C. DT SE crane car
W -63 1945 Tramways M.T.C. ST SE g rinde r >;
4042 1947 C.C.F. M.T.C. trolley bus
Y – 5 192n Tramways ST shop motor
Sludge 1935 Tramways ST sludge car ~,
1953 lQ2P C.C.F. M.T.C. DT SE closed car, one man type
owned privately in the Montreal area.
* W -63, and the sludge trailer were both preserved for the use of their trucks,
and in the case of the former, the body has been dismantled, and the motor truck
is soon to be used under another car body.
t
WHILE NUMBER 8 OF THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION MAY NOT
have operated on the streets of Montr~al, this single-truck car is
representative of the kind of car once used on the Montreal Street
Railway at the turn of the century. Photo S.S.Worthen
THE WAREHOUSE POINT TROLLEY MUSEUM, located at Warehouse Point Conn.
is a short distance north from the insurance city of Hartford. A fine ride is offer­
ed along its line, which is again a former Connecticut Company right of way. This
museum has both steam, and electric exhibits, the majority of which are in better
than average condition. The following ex-Montreal cars find their home there.
4 1924 Tramways DT SE observation car (golden chariot)
2056 1927 Wason DT DE ex-Springfield Mass.
2600 1929 C.C.F. DT DE one man closed.
W-l 1912 Tr,qmwavs DT SE crane car.
AT WAREHOUSE POINT, CONNECTICUT, YOU CAN STILL ENJOY A RIDE ON ONE
of the marvellous Golden Chariots of the Montreal Tramways Com­
pany, that once carried hundreds of happy passengers around the
two mountains of Montreal. Gentp-e 8etanr.ourt, l1orth Sast lltil:i ti ~S.
CANADIAN
58
R A I L
THE BRANFORD TROLLEY MUSEUM, is located off US route 1, in East Haven
Connecticut. Like most US trolley museums the right of way is located along
that of a former electric line, and so an authentic ride can be offered. The
Branford Museum. was fortunate in obtaining the following Montreal streetcars;
1403 19H Ottawa Car DT SE closed car, two m.an type
1972 1929 C.C.F. DT SE closed car, one m.an type
2001 1929 C,C,F. DT DE closed car, double end. one man
5 1910 Peckham. DT DE rotary snowplow. only one existing
5002 1918 Tram.ways DT DE steeple cab locom.otive
W -3 1929 Diffe re ntia1 DT horizontal boom crane car.
Charlie ]Q20 Tramways ST shop m.otor
FORMER MONTREAL STREETCARS ABOUND AT THE BRANFORD TROLLEY MUSEUM AT
East Haven, Connecticut, not far from the city of New Haven, an easy
drive via Interstate highway. Top photo S.S.Worthen; bottom, F.W.Schlegel.

CANADIAN
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THE SEASHORE TROLLEY MUSEUM, is Americas oldest, and largest museum
of its type. Over 100 cars are on hand, and a mile long ride is offered over the
former Atlantic Shore Line Railway right of way. Cars from all over the world
make up their collection, among which are the following ex-Montreal cars. The
Seashore Museum is located south of Portland Maine. at Kennebunkport Me.
957 1910 Ottawa Car DT SE closed car. two man type
2 1906 M.S.R. DT SE observation car (golden chariot)
2652 1930 C.C.F. DT SE closed car two man
il76 1943 Tramways DT brine car
1177 1943 Tramways DT training car
2052 1927 Wason DT DE closed car ex-Springfield Mass.
YES, MONTREALS STREETCARS DO OPERATE AT THE SEASHORE TROLLEY MUSEUM,
but any passengers familiar with the once-extensive routes of the
system in Montreal are cautioned not to be guided by the destinations
announced on the route (destination) signs! Allgemeine Photodeinst.
t
MOUNTAIN-PLACE DARMES (7) ROUTE 77 (77) -WELL, ITS PROBABLY ALL
right for a Montreal streetcar to have this destination at the Sea­
shore Trolley Museum, Kennebunkport, Maine. But if this had happened
in Montreal, the passengers would have rioted! Photo allegemeine
photodeinst.
Abbreviations used: C.C.F. Canadi.an Car & Foundry Company, Montreal
M. T. C. Montreal Tramways Company
M.S.R. Montreal Street Railway Company
M.C.P.R. Montreal City Passenger Railway
ST and DT single or double truck
SE and DE si.ngle end, or double end cars
FEBRUARY, 1973.
RAILWAYS ON BOTH SIDES OF THE INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY
had a number of unfortunate accidents as 1972 became 1973.
M. A. dlAstous, notre lecteur de Ste-Foy, Quebec, nous a
signale les numeros des locomotives impliquees dans la collision
sur les chemins de fer Nationaux a Saint-Germain de Grantham (en­
tre Saint-Hyacinthe et Levis, Quebec) Ie soir du 9 decembre 1972:
vers llest, Nos. 2307 & 2011; vers llouest, Nos. 2319, 4451, 3642
et C&o 6038. La 2319 est montee sur la 2307, demolissant entiere­
ment la cabine de cette derniere et tuant llaide-mecanicien et Ie
serre-frein. Le mecanicien slen est tire miraculeusement.
The southbound AMTRAK Montreal-New York overnighter of 4-5
January 1973, consisting of two units and eight cars -one a CN
sleeper -was completely derailed at Braintree, Vermont, about 3e
miles north of White River Junction. Cause of the derailment was
an open siding switch. The engineer spotted the open switch the
moment it appeared in the headlight, but could not bring the train
to a stop before it passed over the switch and derailed, Fortunate­
ly there were no injuries to the 80 passengers and 7 crew. They
were
taken omvard to New Haven, Conn., by bus, Service was restor­
ed on 6 January. Passengers with reservations for the trains of
5-6 January were bussed between Montreal and New Haven. The possi­
bility of sabotage is being investigated.
The RAPIDO Train 51 of 5 January 1973, Canadian National
Railways five-hour flyer from Montreal to Toronto, derailed at
75 mph. between Port Hope and Colborne, Ontario, ripping up about
half-a-mile of track and putting both units and all 11 cars on
the ground, in the ballast. None of the 362 passengers were hurt,
but there were some minor cuts and bruises. Newspaper accounts of
the derailment by passengers on the train were incredible. The
cause of the accident vlaS not immediately determined.
Edi torial Staff
THE DELAvARE & HUDSON RAILROAD HAS RELEASED FIVE RS 3s
from local service and is preparing them for lease to the
Providence and Worcester Railread, in order to help this
new company overcome start-up problems. The five units have been
scraped but not yet repainted (8 January), as the P&W have not se­
lected a colour scheme. It is presumed that the RS 3s will be used
until the Providence and Worcester can order and receive new units
from MLW Industries, Montreal, Canada. Wayne Hoagland
CA NAD IAN
63
R A , L
LA COMMISSION DE TRANSPORT DE LA COMMUNAUTE URBAINE DE QUEBEC
a commande quinze autobus de la division diesel de la Gen­
eral Motors of Canada a London, Ontario. Ces autobus ont une
capacite de 53 passagers chacun. Redaction general
THE PROPOSED MUSEUM OF SCIENCE & TRANSPORTATION
at London, Ontario, has apparently received its death-blow.
In an editorial in the London FREE PRESS recently,the Editor
commented on the fact that the Historical Museums Advisory Commit­
tee of the Citys Library Board had recommended that plans for the
rail transportation museum should be abandoned and the several
pieces of rolling stock of the former London & Port Stanley Rail­
way, which have been collected, be sold.
Sixteen months ago, the Editor wrote, a howl of protest
went up because the equipment was to be sold to an American firm
at $ 1 an item. Before that and since, Londoners have regarded at­
tempts to provide a home for the engine and cars with overwhelming
apathy .•••• The committee can hardly be blamed for wanting to throw
in the towel. The strongest endorsement it received in the five­
year struggle to establish the museum was approval in principle fr­
om the city council. Unfortunately, council has never seen fit to
augment that decision with action ••••••• The museum seemed like a
good
idea five years ago and it still does, especially in view of
the scarcity of historical attractions in a city of this size.How­
ever, if the indifference of most Londoners is a measure of the
care and attention such a museum could be expected to get, perhaps
we are better off without itll.
It should be noted that in this latter opinion, the Editor
may be partially in error. The Forest City Railway Society of London
has constantly supported the project and has declared its avowed
intention to provide as much care and attention as possible to the
rolling stock and motive power assembled for the museum.
While
it is likely that it will be impossible to overcome the
apathy of the citizens of London, it should be recorded that the
project did not fail because the railway enthusiasts in and around
the city withheld their earnest support and participation.
It failed because the citizens of London just didnt care.
S.S.Worthen
CANADIAN
64 R A I L
ALTHOUGH AMTRAK MAY BE SUFFERING LOSSES IN THE PASSENGER OPERATION
segment, there is apparently no shortage of capital funds from
the government. In addition to the $ 6.3 million for purchase/
lease of ex-CN TURBOtrains and SNCF turbine-powered equipment, AMTRAK
has also ordered forty 3000 hp. SDP 40F passenger units at a cost of
$ 18 million from ElectroMotive Division, General Motors Corporation.
In June, 1972, the United States Congress authorized $ 147 million
for capital improvements in 1973.
The new units are to be assigned to Chicago-Fort Worth-Hous­
ton, Texas, Chicago-Kansas City-Los Angeles and San Diego-Los Angel­
es service. They will replace 74 older 1500 hp. units now leased
from AT&SF • AMTRAK says the new units can do the same job as the
old 74, because they will be more reliable and less costly from an
operating and maintenance point of view. Unstated were any queries
regarding the improvements anticipated in on_time arrivals. SSW
IT SEEMS THAT 18 NOVEMBER 1972 MARKED THE LAST DAY OF SERVICE
of any kind on Vermont short-line, the St. Johnsbury and La­
moille County Railroad, Mr. Samuel Pinsleys 98-mile carrier.
On that sad day, three cars of a 28-car freight derailed near Cam­
bridge Junction, Vermont, once the junction with the Burlington and
Lamoille Railroad for Cambridge, JeriCO, Essex Junction and the
II Queen City.
One of the derailed cars landed in the adjacent Lamoille Ri­
ver and -most unfortunately -its load was an expensive ($ 900,000)
gas-turbine generator, en route from Schenectady, N.Y. to Bath,Maine
(D&H-B&M-CVRy-STJ&LC-MEC). Mr. Kenneth Lemnah, STJ&LC Vice-President,
said that the loss of the gas-turbine generator VOuld undoubtedly
result in a close-down of the railroad. He reiterated that the road­
bed Ias in such a deplorable condition that the best possible opera­
ting speed was 10 mph. over the whole 98 miles of line, Despite the
impassioned request for postponment of abandonment from Vermont
Governor Dean C. Davis, the Railroad subsequently (20 November 1972)
petitioned the ICC to abandon its entire line, THE ~70-Dwight Smith
THE OTTA1A-CARLErON RIDIONAL TRANSIT COMMISSION HAS PLACED AN ORDER
with Diesel Division, General Motors of Canada, London, On­
tario, for twenty 53-passenger buses, bringing to 70 the num··
ber ordered by O-C Transit in the autumn of 1972. Wayne Hoagland
SIXTEEN G 26cw DIESEL UNITS, PART OF DIESEL DIVISIOf.r,
General Motors of Canadas order for the ra:Uways of Yugo­
slavia, Nere loaded on the MY RUMBA, a lest German container
ship, for the trip to Yugoslavia, via. the Atlantic, Mediterranean &
Adriatic. Ei.ght were in the hold and eight were deck cargo. The ship
encountered gale force winds and heavy seas 200 miles southeast of
Newfoundland and, during the storm, some of the locomotives in the
hold reportedtrbro ke their tie -downs. The crew could not secure the
locomotives and the captain of the ship, fearful that the heavy lo­
comotives might rupture the ships plates, ordered the crew to aban­
don ship. Six of the crew were transferred to a tug, which had come
to the ships aSSistance, but when the storm increased in intensity,
CANADIAN
65 R A I L
the remainder of the crew had to be evacuated by Canadian Armed For­
ces helicopter,a feat of extraordinary skill and bravery.
The MV RUMBA was taken in tow by a salvage tug, in an effort
to bring back ship and cargo to St. Johns, Newfoundland. While
this operation was in progress, three of the locomotives on the deck
of the ship broke loose and were lost over the side. They never turn­
ed a wheel in service on the railway which ordered them.
DieseLines: DDGMC
RATIONALIZATION OF PASSENGER SERVICES ON CANADAS RAILWAYS –
a
first move? Glenn Cartwright asks us if we thought that Can-
adian National Railways Red, White and Blue
n
fares were
strictly a aN innovation. Not any more, they arent, according to
CP RAIL officials. 1 February 1973 was proposed as the date for im­
plementation of a similar fare structure by rrVan Hornes Road rr. The
proposed fare plan, as yet unnamed, was structured to correspond
exactly with that of CN, thus apparently representing the first con­
crete step towards integration of transcontinental passenger train
services. Meanwhile, CN was busily recolouring the calendar for 1973.
DIESEL DIVISION, GENERAL MOTORS OF CANADA, HAS RECEIVED ORDERS
from the following railways for 1973 delivery:
Ontario Northland Railway -five SD 40-2s;
~u6bec, North Shore and Labrador Railway -twenty more SD 40-2s;
CP RAIL -ten SD 40-2s. The second portion of the order for the rail­
ways of Jugoslavia, fifty-eight G 26cw locomotives, is scheduled for
production in 1973.
Added to this are three SD 40-2s for the Algoma Central Rail­
way. Presumably, one should add three G 26cw units to the Jugoslavian
order to replace the three nlost at sean. Editorial Staff
AMTRAK, THE UNITED STATES PUBLICLY-OWNED PASSENGER TRANSPORT
company. in late December 72 announced that high-speed,tur­
bine-powered passenger trains would be running in midwest U.
S.A. in the summer of 73. Routes to be established are Chicago-St.
Louis and Chicago-Milwaukee and equipment to be used will be the
United Aircraft of Canadas TURBOTRAINS, surplus to Canadian Na­
tional Railways Montreal-Toronto TURBO operation. AMTRAK will also
purchase two French ANF-Frangero turbotrains, developed by that
Company and the French National Railways. This design has been suc­
cessfully used on the S.N.O .F. since 1967. The two units will be
acquired under a two-year lease agreement, lith option to purchase
through an arrangement with the S.N.C.F.
United Aircraft of Canada is said to have spent more than
$ 25 million making an estimated 100 modifications on the original
five 7-car TURBOTRAINS. AMTRAK will purchase four power units and
four cars, to provide two 4-car trains, while CN will consolidate
the remaining equipment into three 9-car TURBOTRAINS, to be re­
introduced in the Montreal-Toronto service in March, 1973.
Editorial Staff.
FORD OF CANADA HAS ANNOUNCED THAT THEY WILL NOT PARTICIPATE
in building a prototype advanced urban transit system, which
CANADIAN
66
R A I L
Ontarios Premier William Davis has proposed for possible use
in and around Hamilton, Toronto and Ottawa. The prototype was sched­
uled for exp0sition at the Canadian National Exhibition in Toronto
in August 1973. Mr. Davis says s ub/ays are too expensive, motorways
are awful and besides, they pollute, So a transit system using the
existing railway rights-of-way MUST be the answer,
Fords withdrawal, due, according to Ontarios Minister of
Transport Gordon Carton, to inability to meet speed and capacity
requirements established by the Ministry, leaves Hawker Siddeley
Canada Limited and Krauss-Maffei AG, Munich, vlest Germany, in the
running, The system proposed should be able to serve as the basis of
an intermediate mass transit system for use in the three Ontario
cities named. W.J .Bedbrook,
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS WILLOW PARK FREIGHT YARD,
just off Kempt Road in Halifax, Nova Scotia, was the scene of
one of those once-in-a-decade runaways on 9 December 1972
at about 1700 hours. A cut of three boxcars and two gondolas, one
loaded with scrap metal, got loose, gained momentum on the downgra­
de 1inding through the street approaches to the A. Murray MacKay
(Narrows) Bridge and headed out onto the water line, which termina­
tes at Pier 2, The fJ.ve-car cavalcade raced over three miles of
track, reaching speeds of 40 mph through four level crossings,
nearly causing an accident at one,
At the bottom of the spur to the pier, the runa.,ay crashed
through eight transport trucks belonging to CNs subsidiary, Eastern
Transport, collapsing them as if they were made of cardboard, The
cars sliced off the sidewall of the trucking companys terminal
building, killing two men and injuring two others, The runaway fin­
ally partially derailed and came to a stop amid a pile of wreckage,
A CN spolcesman said that the damage could run into hundreds
of thousands of dollars, Railway and municipal police were charged
with investigating the affair.R.D.Tennant,jr.,THE MARITIME EXPRESS,
IN HIS YEAR-END REFJRT, iIT.J .MACMILLAN, CHAIRMAN AND PRESIDENT
of Canadian National Railways, drew attention to the Companyls
accomplishments in 1972. Carload freight volume increased by
more
than 7% to 117,190,000 tons during 1972. CN handled 150,000
import .. export containers, a 560% increase since CNs first full year
in container systems in 1969. CN intends to push domestic containers
in 1973, adding tLis type of freight carrier to the existing 87 types
already moving goodG in Canada,
Four hundred milli on bushe Is of grain were moved during the
1972 crop year, another record volume, 800 rebuilt boxcars, 1000
leased hopper cars, 40 diesel units and ~., 000 extra boxcars, leased
from United States railroads, ,ere required to transport this record
volume,
In anticipation of things to come, eN upgraded rail faciE ties
at Matagarni, Quebec and prepared its Matagami Subdivision for the 5
million tons of construction materials required by Quebec s J-ames
Bay hydroelectric project between 1973 and 1977.
CN passenger trains carried about 12 million passengers in
CANADIAN
67
R A I L
1972. DAYNITER coaches and AUTO-WITH-YOU were added attractions.Most
imp
ortant, agreement was reached with United Aircraft Corporation for
the return of TURBOTRAIN service between Montreal and Toronto
in the first half of 1973.
Contract negotiations with 57,000 non-operating and shopcraft
employees, trainmen and firemen started about 3 January 1973. S~ft
THE VERMONT RAILWAY HAS PURCHASED THE CLARENOON &: PITTSFORD
Railroad, 14.82-m11e short-line 1n Vermont, which serves the
marble quarries in and around Proctor, Vermont. It ls sald
that the Vermont Railway will abandon the Proctor-Florence Junction
portion of the line, because of the severe gradient and ln vlew of
the fact that VTR has an alternate connection With the C&P at Cen­t
er Rutland, Vermont, where there 1s an lnterchange with the Dela­
ware
~ Hudson Railroads Whitehal1-Castleton-Rutland branch. Along
with the right-of-way, the VTR also acquired the C&Ps two center_
cab Whitcomb diesel units, which they intend to use,
The
C~PIS GR 70-ton diesel unit, ex-Rutland Rallroad Number
500, was sold to the Kelleys Creek &: Northwestern, a line located
somewhere in West Virginia. U.S.A.
Concurrently. the VTR took delivery
brand-new OP 38-2 from GMCs ElectroMotive
ful way to start the New Year.
on 2 January 1973 of a Di
viSion. What a wonder­Fr
ank Orr.
THE GOVERNMml OF CANADA, THROUGH THE ~ONOMIC D.E.VELOPMENT
Corporation, has made available to the Government of Greece
credits to the value of $ 8.1 million dollars. With these
credits, the Greek government will purchase twenty MX 627 2700 hp.
Ko-kO units from MLW Industries of Montreal. The date of delivery
has not been announced, but will probably be late 1973. SSW
PROVIDENCE AND WORCESTER COMPANYS PRESIDElfl ROlURT H. EOER.
with great optimism. noted that his Company had placed a firm
order with MLW Industries of Montreal for two new M 420TR
~its, similar to those recently delivered to the Roberval &: Saguen~
ay. Mr. Eder further stated that one unit would be delivered in 3-4
months with the second due about three months after that. This un­
anticipated order will have to be fitted in to MLW Industries al­
ready very busy schedule for early 1973. Cecil Brumbach
TRADf-WATCHllfG IN NEW HAV:m, CONNroTICUl, HAS IMPROVED REXl.mTLY,
accordIng to David Derow, Ed1tor of the NARRAGANSETT NEWS­
LETTER. The improvement was obser~ed when two Canadian Na­
tional Railways pp 9s in an A-B lashup appeared on 8 December 1972,
powering southbound AMTRAK Washingtonian. The PC ms, oorma1ly
used on this train, gave up the ghost in Montreal and were returned
south behind the PP 9s. Conversely, the PP 9s deadheaded back to
Montreal. the next day behind the PC E 8s.
~ OVERLEAF, FORMER MOOT REAL TRAMWAYS C[J04PANV CAR MJMBER 2001 PAUSES ON
.~ the pr1vete right-of-way of the Branford Trolley Mu~eum. East Haven, Conn., on
the east end of the line. Photo Frank W. SChlegel.
CANADIAN AAIL
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