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Canadian Rail 252 1973

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Canadian Rail 252 1973

A Letter From
Summer.
George L. Coop.
Editors Preface
I
n the State of Victoria, Australia,
around this time each year, everyone
is enjoying the pleasures of Summer.
There is little talk about skiing in
the mountains and there are many dis-
cussions about beaches, sailing and
holidays. As the seasons north and sou­
th of the equator are midway in their
annual exchange, our member in Victoria,
Australia, Mr. George L. Coop, writes us
a letter from summer.
For the past twelve months and more, I have been a member
of the Canadian Railroad Historical Association and, for a time back
beyond that, I have a good collection of CANADIAN RAIL. Having been
the grateful recipient of many of the Associations services, it
seems to me to be about time that I tried to make some kind of a
contribution, perhaps to CANADIAN RAIL, and thus this letter and
accompanying photographs have been prepared.
Naturally enough, the bulk of the Associations membership
is in North America, although from time to time I note in the 11 New
Members 11 list the names of people from other countries. Why is it
that we railway enthusiasts often become interested in something
that we may never have actually seen or, at best, .lith which we have
enjoyed only a passing acquaintance?
My Oi~ interest in the railways of Canada began in the
interval 1964-1967, when my wife and I were teaching school in the
central part of British Columbia. Our schools were in Trail, whilst
we lived in nearby Rossland. What a change in environment from our
previous home in Australial The country there is so flat that if
the elevation changes by only 40 or 50 feet, this prominence is
graced with the title of IIhill l
JIHAT COULD 8E r·10lE APPROPIHATE FOR OUR JArJUARY COVER TiiAN A WI~ITER
scene in the Canadian Rockies, with Canadian National Railt~ays fam­
ous Sceneramic full-length dome car in the consist of a trans-
continental passenger train. Photo Canadian National.
I iJJAS UTTERLY ENTHRALLED BV CN S FULL LE~JGTH DOME CARS •••••••
Mountain scenery certainly looks better from this vantage point.
The time is the summer of 1967 -prime travellinq time in EXPO
year. G.L.Coop.
CANADIAN
4
R A I L
.••••• there are trains at the bot­
tom of my garden! No wonder the
crew of this CPR C-line diesel
look somewhat startled. It is just
0700 hours and they have suddenly
spotted a lone photographer near
the end of their run up the hill
from Trail to Rossland, R.C.
Shades of the Shays! Summer 1965.
G.L.Coop.
In Canada, I had expected to see some logging railway ac­
tivity, complete with Shay-geared locomotives. Of course it was too
late for the real thing, but some almost instant replay was avail­
able at the Cowichan Forest Museum at Duncan,B.C., on Vancouver Is­
land, or at the North Vancouver wharves, where a duo of PC-Shays
used to snuffle up and down.
The
Kootenay area of south-central British Columbia was
encountered purely by chance and what a lucky chance it was! Beau­
tiful scenery, interesting work, friendly people and an introduction
to the Canadian Pacific Railway all combined to make a truly enthral­
ling and rewarding life-style, It was not long either before I found
that, at the foot of our street in Rossland, there were railway
tracks -those of the famous Rossland Branch of the CPR. The land­
lord said we would not be disturbed by railway nOises, as ••••. the
trains never come by these days. Happily for me, he was not preCise
in this opinion. There was still a casual freight service whenever
suffiCient traffic was offered.
My first encounter with a Canadian (Pacific) train occur­
red in the depths of winter and the dead of night. It was well past
midnight and I was fast asleep. Slowly and gradually, an extra di­
mension began to be added to my slumbers, as a low throbbing sound
ebbed and flowed around the periphery of my unconsciousness. It was
so persistent that it eventually awakened me and thereupon I was
forced by curiosity to jump out of bed to look out of the frost­
encrusted window.
Down across the valley, a bright light -the headlight of
an engine, perhaps -was piercing the darkness with sweeping arcs
of light, around and through the snow-covered trees, as the engine
to which it seemed to belong, followed the sharp curves in the
track on the valley wall, up the hill. Needless to say, I was all
at once very excited, as this, my first Canadian train, was evident­
ly going to pass almost at my (COld) feet. The train came closer and
closer, occasionally passing out of sight in the cuts.
The growing glow of the headlight heralded its arrival.
Then, a sensation! Instead of the anticipated square boxy diesel-el­
ectric locomotive, a black angular form, all legs and arms like a
great giant, frozen grasshopper, came urging forward, thrusting aside
the snow on the track, as it approached. In the dark of the night,
no immediate understanding of this midnight spectre was possible. It
was a few days later that I discovered that what I had seen was my
first Jordan spreader!
CANADIAN
5
R A I L
This nocturnal apparition on the Canadian Pacific was more
than sufficient to stir the depths of my imagination and curiosity.
It became absolutely imperative to investigate this vast railway,
with particular emphasis on the East and West Kootenay districts
But, alas, 1967 saw our departure from Rossland and, ultimately ,
from Canada, but only after one final fling in enjoying the railways
of Canada. Our return to our homeland was via the-then Pacific Great
Eatern and Canadian National Railways to Prince Rupert, from whence
we journeyed by coastal steamer to Skagway, Alaska and the terminal
of the fabled White Pass & Yukon Route, for the onward journey to
Whitehorse, Yukon Territory.
Apart from the gargantuan repast provided by the IrP&YR at
Lake Bennett, one of the most human highlights of the trip occurred
when we managed to leave behind the Canadian Customs & Immigration
officer. He must have been enjoying his lunch to the exclusion of
his duties, for the train had gone scarcely half-a-mile when it ca­
me to a grinding halt, after which it reversed in the direction of
Lake Bennett. The highly embarrassed and out-of-breath Customs and
Immigration officer TaS encountered, stumbling along the tracks in
pursuit of the narrow-gauge train in true Keystone Cops fashion.
The gentleman in question deserves much praise for re-
taining his composure in a very trying situation, where the entire
train-load of passengers were thoroughly enjoying his discomfiture.
Nevertheless, he persevered and, with solemn mien, completed his
normal, routine duties.
We thereafter returned to Vancouver, British Columbia and
joined Canadian National Railways Super Continental for the
journey east. Feeling rather guilty at abandoning my first love,the
Canadian Pacific, I was nevertheless anxious to sample new exper­
iences and the alleged benefits of Red, White and Blue fare plans.
To me, dinner in the diner is always a very real pleasure and a
graceful one as well. I TaS utterly enthralled by CN s full-length
dome cars and the ten-minute stop to view the majesty of Mount Rob­
son on a most beautifully clear day -you could see forever -was
a memorable
experience.
By prior arrangement, I was privileged to travel the last
100-odd miles into Winnipeg in the cab of the diesel. Likely the
true enthusiasts will think me strange, for I made no notes of tech­
nical details such as engine numbers or modelS. For me, this exper­
ience was one to excite the sensations, coupled with the sheer pl­
easure of doing something hitherto quite outside my experience. Us­
ually in these ventures, a deeper insight is gained into aspects of
daily life quite foreign to ones own and thus they are subsequently
of considerable benefit inUW practice of a profession such as teach­
ing, which is my own.
There lingers in my mind the distinct impression of surpr-
ise when my eyes happened to rest on the speedometer, as we were
speeding away, after a station stop on the prairies west of Winnipeg.
Watching the telegraph poles and the scenery flying by, I estimated
our speed to be about 50-60 miles per hour. The speedometer needle
said something quite different. It was pointing at 90, or very near-
ly that!. .

CLOC~WISE:
~t
Whitehorse,
Yukon,
there
are
ex­
tremes
in
railway
technolo
oy
. A
GE
diesel
poses
with
an
antidiluvian
stub-switch.
Nex
t,
another
GE
unit
ooses
with
river
sternwheelers.
In
our
third
gli~pse,
a
living
anachronism
-a
stub­
switch
in
the
Whitehorse
ya
rds.Then,
an
interior
view
of
WP&YR
car
No
. 222
LA
KE
LI
NDERM
AN,
surely
a
candidate
f
or
preservation
some
da
y!
Exterior
­
al
ly,
the
LAKE
LI
N
~ERMAN
is
no
less
imoressive.
In
kee~ing
with
the
historic
theme
,
the
observa
­
tion
end
of
this
car
reflects
the
elegance
of
the
80
s,
complete
with
cast
olates
(above)
for
public
notices
•.
All
nh
otos
Su
mmer
1967
G.L.Coop.
TRAIN c, CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Super Continental slows to 35 mph.
approaching Winnipeg, Man., after the
100-mile run from Portaqe La Prairie.
PRAIRIE MEET. EASTBOUND AND WESTBnUND
Super Continentals salute each other
between Portage La Prairie and Winnipeg.
THE END OF THE SUBDIVISION: CNS TRAIN
c about to enter the station at Winnipeg.
All photos Summer of 1957 by G.L.Coop.
CANADIAN
9
R A I L
t
F!)O~1 A PASSING TRAIN: A liOI1E~:T OF ,·!ELAXATION IN THE LIFt: OF I~
engineerl Summer, 1967. G,L.Coop
From Montreal, we made the obligatory visit to the great
metropoliS of New York, travelling south over the Delavtare and Hud­
son Railroad, with one of the famous PAl diesel units for power.Our
departure from Montreal was rather complicated by the fact that, al­
though the train was waiting at the departure platform, we were not
allowed to board it until about one minute to departure time. There
was,
consequently, a stampede for the trainl This is a practice ra­
ther different to that to which we were accustomed in Australia ,
where trains at terminals may be boarded up to half-an-hour before
departure time. Probably this extraordinary situation was the result
of causes unknown to me and certainly unexplained to the passengersl
I
have enclosed several photographs that might best be de­
scribed as reflections from the many facets of the railway scene as
observed whilst on my several perambulations and, at the same time,
an indication of my personal interests in railways.
In retrospect, there are times when I can evoke a con-
siderable degree of nostalgia for Canada. It was indeed a foster
home and I miss the way of life in Rossland and the people who adopt­
ed me so easily, in addition to the dramatic changes that each season
brought to the countryside.
Yes, I 1ould like to come back to Canada and I am certain
that, one day, I shalll
The Fate OJ The LACHINE
John Beswarick Thompson.
S
hown in the photograph of Adam Sherriff
Scotts painting of the opening of the
Montreal and Lachine Rail Road in 1847
(CANADIAN RAIL, August 1972, No. 247 ,
page 250) was the locomotive Lachine.
The caption accompanying this photograph stated
that in 1848, the locomotive was 1I10st in the
swamp to the west of Tarmeries Village
ll
• From
John Beswarick Thompson of the National His­
toric Sites Service in Ottawa -author of the
article with which the illustration was used –
comes
this documentary correction of the true
history of the Lachine, the first steam lo­
comotive on the Island of Montreal.
A recurring myth in Canadian railway history concerns the aw­
ful fate Of the locomotive Lachine of the Montreal and Lachine Ra­
il Road. In 1847, this engine gloriously hauled the first train on
this line, carrying Governor-General Lord Elgin and Lady Elgin from
Montreal to Lachine in 21 minutes, on Montreal Islands first train.
A year later, this locomotive had vaniphed from the roster of the
railroad. A fanciful account, which seems to have first appeared in
CANADIAN
11
R A I L
BULLETIN 56 of the Railway and Locomotive Historical Society (Octo­
ber 1941) explained the disappearance thus:
Lachine: This engine was lost in the Turcot s>lamp
about 1848 and little is known about it.
Romantic this tale might have been. True, it is not!
As the following extracts from document.s in the Public Archi­
ves of Canada indicate, the Lachine was purchased from Norris Bro­
thers of Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A., in the fall of 1847 and was ready
to haul the official first train on the Montreal & Lachine on 19 No­
vember 1847. A year later, the Company, having acquired tViO neVi lo­
comotives from Kinmonds, Hutton and Steel of Dundee, Scotland, sold
the Lachine to the Champlain & St. Lawrence Rail Road for n 100
less than they had paid for it.
Having thus avoided interment in the terrible Turcot swamp,
the Lachine las rechristened Champlain and, up to 1860 Vlhen
she was declared out of use 1, had run about 33,600 miles on the
line. This Vias not an exceptional mileage and the locomotive ap­
pears to have been rather a mediocre machine. Beyond the fact that
she hauled Montreals first train, perhaps this engines most inter­
esting claim to fame Vias her untimely interment that never wasl
DOCUMENTS
13 October 1847
Hon. James
Ferrier (President) & A. Millar (Superintendent)
to Philadelphia purchasing a Locomotive ••••••••• L 33.6.0
(Account Book, Public Archives of Canada, RG 30 Vol.281 p.2)
Remitted to Norris Bros. in full for locomotive.n 2062.10.0
(RG 30,Vol. 28l,p. 71)
6 November 1847
1e saw the engine recently purchased in the United States, two
others being ordered from England, moving in great state along
St. Antoine Street; to be set up and placed on the line. It
Vleighs no less than seventeen tons and the boiler was drawn
by eighteen horses. We at first started as if we had seen a
gJ1ost .• • , , , , , • , , , , , ,
(Montreal GAZETTE, 8 November 1847)
19 November 1847
For some days this road has given note of preparation for ac­
ti vity, in the puff and roll of the engine connected lith it.
This is now the day fixed and at noon the formal opening
Vlill take place. II
(Montreal GAZETTE, 19 November l8L~7)
CANADIAN
12
R A I L
30 November 1847
The
engine and tender were thrown off the track, about five
miles from town, a consequence 8f the starting of the joint
of a rail or rather the iron which fastened it to the wooden
sleeper.
(Montreal GAZETTE, 1 December 1847)
27 June 1848
Paid W. Hall provincial duty on the above locomotives
(J. Ferrier and Montreal) ••••••••••••••••••
•••••• n 483.3.3
(RG 30, Vol. 281, p. 94)
15 November 1848
For the sale of the Locomotive and Tender Lachine to the
C&St. L.R.RCo. ……………………………….:t 1962.10 .. 0
(RG 30, Vol. 281, p. 71)
7 April 1849
For painting the Engine Champlain…………… n 8.5.0
(Record Book of T.L.Dixon: Bulletin of the Canadian Railroad
Historical Association, NUMBER 3, 1937.)
20 March 1849
Al101lance made to the C&St. L.R.RCo. for imperfections in one of
the wheels…………………………………. n 50.0.0
(RG 30, Vol. 281, p. 71)
29 August 1849
To Norris Bros. for fueel for Champlain •••• ·•• n 43.18.7
(RG 30, Vol. 134, p.395)
31 December 1860
Champlain •••••.••••••••• Total Miles ••••• 33,676 ••• 0ut of Use
(Keefer Report, 1862)
I

MODELliNG ~
T
Photographs: J,H,Saur.ders
fext : S, S ,jforthen
L
eaving Canada to take up residence
in England may be all very well ,
and a IIconsummation
devoutly to
be vii shed 11 (by some) but, as our
United Kingdom Representative John
H, Sanders observes, it is hard to
undertake the construction of a
Canadian National Railways 4-6-2
or a Canadian Pacific IISelkirkll
without proper drawings,
And the drawings for these and comparable steam locomotives can
be rather bulky and not too easily taken along with the family be­
longings!
Once you have decided to do a little modeling of these
very attractive locomotives, the next question that
arises is the choice of scale and the possibility of
operation, Naturally, the models should be reasonably
large, so that the detail will be readily appreCiable,
III build 7 mm, to 1 foot scale -British 0 gauge
ll
, writes John.
IILast year I represented the Canadian Railroad H:!.storical Asso­
ciation by having a stand at the Bedford Model Raih.ray Exhibi­
tion. It was very encouraging to see tile amount of interest. I
hope to do the same thing in 1972, as I have built quite a few
models since the last exhibition,
Lack of space prev~nts me from having a model layout and for
this reason, I prefer to scratch-build my engines, with a minimum
of machinery. Hov18ver, I hope to put down a 25-foot te st track in
the garden next year and my friend in the next village intends -in
the next year or so -to build a large O-gauge layout in his garden­
about a 600-foot run.
This afterno.on, Im taking a friend of mine to see a HO garden
layout and vIe are taking along some of our olm power, an attempt –
obviously -to ShOlI our .host that Nortl1 American power is superior
to British !!
. My friend has just invested in a German Federal Railways class
50 2-10-0 by Fleischmann, It runs like a dream. Im taking a Santa
Fe 2-8-4 No, 4100 by United. Regrettably, I do not have a place to
put up the HO layout and that is probably why I have gone to scratch­
building.
My namesake, John Saunders from St. Lambert, Quebec -now of Cal­
gary, Alberta -started me off in scratch-building by giving me a
drawing of Canadian National Railways Number 5107. The result whic])
t
CANADIAN
14
R A I L
I achieved perllaps has many faults, but I [lad a good deal of fun
build ing it.
Dr. NicllOlls sent me a big side-elevation of a Canad ian Pacific
Selkirk and, as this model is almost finished, I will send you a
picture of it near the years end. Dont be surprised at the resultl
I have built tllis one lith a minimum of machinerylll
Presented herewith are some pllotographs of John Sanders I scratch­
built models. John feels tllat they represent a way of satisfying llis
i tcll to build scale models of some really remarkable Canadian steam
locomotives.
CANADIAN r,ATICNAL RAILlJAYS 1?-B-2 MHADO TYPE; CLASS S2A, ~JD. 3526,
mostly brass construction; mild steel bar-frame; sprung boxes; Pitt­
man motor; scale 7 mm. to 1 Foot.
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS Drovers Caboose; wood construction with
interior detail.
r:;Af~ADIAf·: NATlOflAL RAILitJAYS 4-5-2 PACIFIC T(PE, CLASS J4D: ROAD -,0.
5107; tin-plate and brass construction; mild steel frame; unpowered
at the moment; scale 1/4 inch to the foot.
r. r. , .. ~.-…. ). f …… : •• •• ~-_ .,1. .1.,. –;. …. ·t. .. , .. q: -… .lo ~ ,-lr, So Ji …. ~ ,, _. … .1.:-..
. :–~
r.:ANADIAN PACIFIC RAIL!tJAY 4-5-4 HUDSON TYPE CLASS H1b,ROAD NO.
tin-plate and brass construction; duraluminum bar-frame; motor
DC Japanese; scale 7 mm to 1 foot.
2811 ;
12v.
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAIlI~AYS 2-10-2 SAr.JTA FE TYPE T-2-a
No. 4190 (ex-4100). Tin-plate and brass construction;
steel har-frame; sprung boxes; rittman DC 105 motor;
7 mm to 1 foot.
r:LASS
mild
scale
ANTICOSTI
RAILWAYo
From information supplied by:
Major C.~.Anderson
Mr. R.F.Corley.
][ n response to the request for
information from Mr. J.M.Can­
field of Northbrook, Illinois,
U.S.A., on the railway on the
Island of Anticosti (Waybills
CANADIAN RAIL, ~ebruary 1972),
the following notes have been
received:
Major C. Warren Anderson of Sussex, New Brunswick, describes
Anticosti Island as being 120 miles long, with a breadth of 30 mi­
les at its widest point. It lies in the Gulf of St. Lawrence about
30 miles south of Havre-Saint-Pierre, across Jacques-Cartier Strait
and 60 miles north of Grande Vallee, Gaspe, across Honguedo Strait,
in the eastern part of Quebec.
The
Anticosti Railway was originally built by Monsieur Henri
Menier, the Chocolate King of France in 1909-10, when he owned the
Island. Monsieur Menier established the town of Port Menier on the
southwestern end of the Island on Ellis Bay and, from this locale ,
the railway was built to Lac Zebe in the direction of the north sh-
ore. A branch line was also constructed from a point near Lake
Princeton, towards the centre of the Island.
The total length of the railway and its branches varied from
18~ to 25 miles, according to the amount of lumbering being carried
on in the Island, this being the chief reason for the railway.
The Anticosti Railway was afterwards sold to and operated by
the Anticosti Corporation, which purchased or otherwise acquired the
Island, after M. Meniers tenure.
Major Anderson notes that the railway, when owned by the Cor­
poration, had five locomotives, 10 steel cars (presumably flat cars),
3 boarding cars, 20 dump cars, 25 wooden cars (probably flat cars),
and a steam-shovel!
The accompanying photograph of Engine Number 1, sent by Major
Anderson, vtaS from Mr. Keith Pratt of Bloomfield, Prince Edward Is­
land, in May, 1942. The locomotive is a 2-4-0 built by Montreal Lo­
comotive Works, Limited, in October, 1910 (BIN 48736).
Major Anderson adds that parts of the Anticosti Railway were
still extant as late as the middle 1930s.
Mr. R.F.Corley of Peterborough, Ontario, sent a copy of the
CANADIAN MAGAZINE, included with the lloronto DAILY STAR of 30 Octo-
CANADIAN
18
R A I L
ber 1971. In this publication was an article You Pay Your Money and
You
Shoot Your Deer, by Mr. Peter Moon. The following portions of
the article are presented:
Anticosti is half as big as the Province of Prince
Edward Island and it is entirely ovmed by one com­
pany -Consolidated Bathurst Limited – a wholly~owned
pulp and paper company and a subsidiary of Power Cor­
poration of Montreal. It is the largest privately –
owned
island on the continent.
The isl::l.nd, which is part of the Province of
Quebec,
lies in the Gulf of St. Lawrence
about 50 miles northeast of Gaspe. It is a
long, low island, 135 miles long and 35 miles
across at its widest poont and it is criss­
crossed with hundreds of sparklingly clear
rivers and streams and dotted with hundreds
of unpolluted lakes. One river, the Jupiter,
is one of the finest Atlantic salmon rivers
in the world. Another, the Vaureal, has a
spectacular waterfall that drops 100 feet,
tall as an 18-storey building.
Today, the island is occupied by only 450
permanent residents, who live in the small
company village of Port Menier at the west­
ern end of the island. The only work is pro­
vided by Consolidated Bathurst, which has a
small logging operation on Anticosti. The
wood
is shipped out to pulp plants at Trois­
Rivieres and Port Alfred on the Saguenay River.
Anticosti was discovered by Jacques Cartier in 1535 and France
granted it to the explorer Louis Joliet in 1680. In 1763, it was an­
nexed by Newfoundland but was returned to Canadian ownership in 1774.
The island changed owners several times until 1895, when it was pu~
chased by Henri Menier, a wealthy 7rench chocolate manufacturer, who
paid $ 125,000 for it at a sheriffs bankruptcy salel
Menier, who lived in PariS, Visited his island as often as
he could, crossing the Atlantic in his own steam-powered schooner •
He built a four-storey, 30 room chateau for himself on the island.
It was designed in a strange mixture of Swedish and French archi­
tectural styles and furnished with a wierd variety of European and
oriental decorations. Its chief feature was a massive baronial hall
at one end of which was a copy of the throne of Louis XV, in which
Menier would sit and hold court, giving instructions to his employ­
eeS and settling disputes between island residents.
Consolidated Bathurst burned the chateau to the ground in
1953, because its dilapitated condition had made it a hazard. Many
of the furnishings and decorations were removed to the Companys
offices and a hotel it owns at Grand Mere, Quebec.
Menier died in 1913 and his brother, Gaston, a French senator,
became the Islands owner until he sold it in 1926 to a group of
c.,..R……. t
. (:,.«)_(;; THIS IS AfHICOST! RAILWAY 2-1,-0 rJlJfir:JER 1, BLILT I,W
~ (~, flontreal Locomotlve clorks, f:ontreal, Canada, In
c.,u~; .. ·
.. PoMOO; – OANrlCOrI October, 1910, BIN 48735. Collection C.IJJ.,~nd8rson.
Canadian pulp and paper companies, which formed a closed corporation
called the Anticosti Corporation. The purchase price was close to
$ 6.5 million.
Mr. R.J.! .Corley has kindly provided the following data:
ANTICOsrI RAILWAY
Location: Anticosti Island, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Quebec.
Gauge: 36 inches Headquarters: Port Menier,
Anticosti Island.
Year built: 1910 Owner: M. Henri Menier
Roo ter of Motive Power
Road
Serial Date
number Builder number built
~
weight Notes
1 MLW Ltd. 48736 9/1910 2-4-0 44,000 Ibs. A
? Vulcan 3499 1~/1924 0-4-0 B
GM 1000 hp.
(IIBII )
? Heisler 1323 /1916 B-B 100,000 Ibs. C
? ALCO-48414 5/1911 STEAM SHOVEL Bought new.
Rogers
NOTES:
-A–Bought new; lettered Anticostill on tender sides, IINo. 1 on
rear of tender.
B EX-E.B.Eddy Company, Hull, Quebec.
C Sold to Tionesa Valley Railroad, Sheffield, Pa., U,S.A.
JANUARY 1973
lfAiTf III 1» 1f lr J( ~
D A ~ J!)j J!J/J)~O
THE ST. LAWRENCE SEAWAY AUTHORITY, CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
and Penn Central Transportation Company have begun construc­
tion of an eight-mile unobstructed bypass in and around
Welland, Ontario, to eliminate once and for all the mess of swing­
bridges which, in the past, caused frustrating delays to trains and
potential hazards to ships using the Welland Canal. With the in­
creasing traffic on the St. Lawrence Seaway and the modern length
of freight trains, something had to be done.
C.A.Pitts Eastern Limited of Toronto began the job early in
December, 1972, near the city of Welland. Cofferdams were erected
in the canal, parts of it were pumped dry and three approach tracks
were lined up with the newly-constructed triple-track tunnel. Two
of the tracks are for PCs ex-Michigan Central main line, while CN
owns the third.
Advantages: elimination of bridge hazards and curves on CN
and Penn Central; provision of a stretch of water more than 50 feet
wide, with no interruptions, for ships in the Seaway, with a con­
sequent reduction of half-an-hour in canal transit times. Everybody
benefitsl Everybody? Well, maybe the citizens of Welland, Ontario
will be a little uptight about their new station, which is now more
than walking distance from the city centre.
But you can believe that PC + TH&B and CN + N&W will be glad
to see the last of those tedious delays that they used ta have to
endure, while the ships pursued their slow way through the Welland
Canal. Editorial Staff.
THE SCOTIAN RAILROAD SOCIETY OF HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA,
is receiving congratulations from far and wide on the occas-
ion of the completion of PROJECT GEORGIA PEACH. After 21
visits to Westville, 8400 miles of travel and 1500 man-hours of
hard labour, Number 4, the GEORGIA PEACH, arrived in Halifax at
1900 hours, Tuesday, October 31, 1972. On 7-8 November, she was
sent to PROCOR Limited, Windsor Junction, N.S., for exterior clean­
ing and a coat of primer. Because of wet weather, the work was de­
layed but the job was completed on 16 November. 0-6-0 Number 4 was
thereafter returned to Halifax on 17 November and off-loaded at the
Societys Museum on Tuesday, 21 November.
Bob
Tennant, jr., Editor of the Societys MARITIME EXPRESS
reports that the Georgia Peach Basket has collected 1085 peaches
(as of 10 December 1972), but since it took 1488 peaches to pacify
the peach-hounds, there is still room for a few more peaches in the
Peach Basket. Just send your peaches to PEACH BASKET, Scotian
Railroad SOCiety, P.O.Box 79~, Armdale Postal Station~ Halifax,N.S.
CANADIAN
21
R A I L
OUR PERCEPIIVE READER, MR. R.F • CORLEY, OF PETERBOROUGH,
Ontario, has written to point out that the captions for some
of the pictures in Hr. Harvey Elsons excellent article, Acr­
oss the Great Divide by CP RAIL (CANAJ..>IAN RAIL No. 250, November,
1972) are slightly misleading. On page 327, the double-headed east­
bound freight is passing the track-walkers house, located at the
west mile-board for Partridge, B.C., not at that operating point
itself. Similarly, Mr. W.R.Linleys picture on page 332 was taken
at the same location, as was the picture of the westbound train on
page 335. The repetition of this error in three pictures is regret­
table.
RECEMMENT, LE MUSEE FERROVIAIRE CANADIEN A ACCEPlE AVEC PLAISIR
le don, par lHydro-Quebec, dune locomotive a essence Plym­
outh. La presentation de la locomotive a ete faite par M.
Paul Dozois, commissaire de lHydro-Quebec, au Dr. Robert V.V.Nich­
olls, directeur, et M. Donald ~. Angus, president-honoraire de lAs­
sociation canadienne dhistoire du chemin de fer.
La locomotive Hydro-Quebec
ll
, qui a ete construite dans les
annees 20, pese 15 tonnes et est encore dans un etat remarquable
pour son ~ge. Tout en servant de piece dexposition au Musee, elle
pourra aussi €tre utilisee pour remorquer certaines pieces a lin­
terieur meme du terrain dexposition.
Vers la fin des annees 20, la Gatineau Power Company -main­
tenant integree a lHydro-Quebec -utilisait cette locomotive pour
le transport du materiel lourd, destine a la construction de la cen­
trale hydro-electrique Farmers Rapids et de Chelsea, sur le cours
inferieur de la riviere Gatineau, a quelques dix milles au nord de
notre capitale, Ottawa. La locomotive circulait sur un embranchement
d un mille, qui relait la compagnie ·aux voies ferrees d u Canadian
Pacific -aujourdhui CP RAIL -a Chelsea, Quebec.
11 y a dix ans, la petite locomotive servait encore au trans­
port de lequipment de la centrale quon envoyait reparer. Mais les
rails legers de lembranchement se sont averes incapable, a la lon­
gue, de supporter des chargements lourds, bien que la locomotive
elle-m€me pese 15 tonnes seulement. Lembranchement a ete ferme et
les rails ant ete envoyes a la feraille.
Heureusement, la petite locomotive dans sa quarantaine na
pas subie le m€me sort. Nous sommeS heureux de la recevoir au Musee
Ferroviaire Canadien, grace a la generosite de lHydro-Quebec.
S.S.Worthen.
RECENTLY, THE CANADIAN RAILWAY MUSEUM ACCEPTED WITH PLEASURE
a gift from Hydro-Quebec. This was a l5-ton Plymouth gas lo­
comotive. The engine was presented by M. Paul Dozois, a com­
missioner of Hydro-Quebec, to Dr. R.V.V.Nicholls, director and Mr.
Donald Forbes Angus, Honorary President of the Canadian Railroad
Historical Association.
The locomotive, which could be called lIHydro-Quebec, was
constructed in the 1920s and is still in remarkably good condition,
CANADIAN
22
R A I L
. U
despite its age. Besides being a very presentable locomotive for
display at the Museum, the engine can be used to move some of the
lighter cars around the Museum grounds.
Toward the end of the 1920s, the Gatineau Power Company -t~
day part of Hydro-Quebec -used this locomotive to transport heavy
material for the construction of the power plant at Farmers Rapids
at Chelsea, Quebec, on the lower course of the Gatineau River, some
ten miles north or our capital city of Ottawa. The locomotive ran
CANADIAN 23 R A I L
on a branch about a mile long, which linked the construction site
with the Canadian Pacific Railway -today CP RAIL -at Chelsea.
Up until 10 years ago, the Hydro-Quebec was used to move
heavy equipment from the power house to the CPR, on its way to be
repaired. But the light rails of the branch were finally unable to
support heavy loads. The branch was closed and the rails were taken
up and sent away for scrap.
Happily, the little locomotive, now in its forties, was not
the victim of the same fate. -le are very happy to welcome it to
the Canadian Railway Museum, Saint-Constant, Quebec, thanks to the
generosity of Hydro-Quebec. S.S.Worthen.
THE 470 -MONTHLY NEWSLETTER OF THE 470 RAILROAD CLUB
of Portland, Maine, U.S.A., has to be one of the best read­
ing values of this or any other year. Now including a full­
page 8~xll-inch black-and-white illustration with each issue, THE
470 contains interesting items about railroading in New England
and elsewhere such as the following items, reproduced here with the
kind permission of Editor Dwight Smith:
-MOUNT WASHINGTON COG RAILROAD ALLOWED 60 DAYS TO STOP
smoking or else! New Hampshires Director of Air Pol­
lution served notice on the historic cog railroad to
cease smoking or cease operation within 60 days …•.•
The roads eight steam locomotives, including new Num­
ber 10 -the Colonel Teague -and its steam-powered
pumping station which supplies water for the on-line
water tanks and the Tip Top House -apparently put
out black smoke in excess of New Hampshires new em­
mission standards •••••••• In subsequent newspaper re­
ports, the New Hampshire official explained that this
action was taken hopefully to forestall more drastic
U.S.Federal government curbs at a more inconvenient
date.
-FREIGHT SHIPMENTS UP NINE MILES OF TWO PERCENT:
General Electric Companys South Portland plant re­
cently shipped the largest single piece of freight
ever to move over Maine Central trackage. The 250-ton,
77 feet long, 12~ feet diameter reheater occupied two
flat cars, each with 4 trucks, for a total of 16 axles,
to spread the ponderous weight. The shipment moved
from MeCs Rigby Yard, Portland to St. Johnsbury, Ver­
mont, up the nine,hard miles of the Mountain Division
grade through incredible Crawford Notch. Another sim­
ilar shipment will follow soon on GE No. 711, a twel­
ve-axled car, assigned to the South Portland plant.
-IN SEPTEMBER, 1972, HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION BETWEEN
Gorham and Berlin, New Hampshire, on Canadian Nation­
als Grand Trunk main line from Montreal to Portland,
necessitated a new trestle and bridge for the Boston
& Maines high line which spans road, railway and
CANADIAN
24
R A I L
the Androscoggin River just north of Gorham.
The main
girders for the new bridge left Bancroft &
Martins Portland fabricating plant, adjacent to the
Maine Central Railroads Rigby Yard, on three flat
cars, hauled by MeC GP7 No. 564, with add-on caboose.
The 264,000-pound load, 140 feet long, came north up
the MeC Mountain Division through Crawford Notch and
was delivered to the B&M at the ball-signal at White­
field, New Hampshire, for the trip east to the con­
struction site. The girders were swung into place on
14
September 1972, replacing the bridge originally
built in 1895.
-BOSTON & MAINE RAILROAD HAS INTERSTATE COMMERCE
CommiSSion authority to abandon its Conway Branch
from Mt. Whittier to Intervale, New Hampshire,via
Conway and North Conway .•….• (The latter town is
the location of the most distinctive railway sta­
tion east of Los Angeles .• Editor,CANADIAN RAIL.)
So far, B&M has not seen fit to exercise this au­
thority. This of course frustrates the founders
and friends of the Conway Scenic Railway, who are
anxious to see the last of the B&M north and south
of North Conway~
If youre interested in reading more from THE 470 -and by
now,you ought to be -address your inquiry to THE 470 ,P.O.Box 641,
Portland, Maine 04104.
JOHN WELSH SENT IN A CLIPPING FROM THE MONTREAL GAZETTE
of 29 September 1972, which announced that Canadian Nation~l
Railways was requesting tenders for the construction of a
drop-table pit for the TRUBOTRAIN facilities at track level,
Central Station, Montreal. Tenders were scheduled to close
12 October at 12 noon.
WHATS WRONG WITH AMTRAK?, ROGER LEWIS, AMTRAKS PRESIDENT ASKED
recently. To provide the answer -or rather, one answer –
Louis Harris & Associates pocketed $ 200,000 and told Mr.
Lewis that people like passenger trains, but not enough to pay mon­
ey to ride them. Only 4% of the people polled by Harris in May, 1972
had travelled intercity (100 miles or more) by train in the United
States in the previous 12-month period. But, Mi. Harris said, if
AMTRAK does its marketing job, the percentage could be doubled in
two years!
If and COUld are the active words.
Mr. Lewis responded that if ~% of the intercity travellers
made it by trains, AMTRAK operation would come close to break-
even.
Harris pollsters visited 30,000 households ~o find 1,000
intercity train-users (no commuters, of course). Additionally, the
Harris people took a national sample of 3,000 individuals to de­
termine basic attitudes on transportation by rail. Some results:
I
I

CANADIAN
25
R A I L
64% to 22% favoured continuing intercity passenger service;
-82% to 10% felt that the public must have the option of pas­
senger train service;
56% said that trains pollute the air less than any
other form of transportation;
-63% to 23% feel there is something exciting about a train
trip.
Mr. Lewis recalled that the recent AMTRAK inaugural train
trip from New York to Montreal was a great experience, but admit­
ted that he flew back to New York to make a press conference on 3
October. He is quoted as having said, I don It see anything wrong
wi
th it. I I m not trying to say the Hright brother s never lived •.
To this say we all Amen. S.S.Worthen.
FRIENDS OF THE ST. JOHNSBURY AND LAMOILLE COUNTY RAILROAD,
renowned short-line railroad in northern Vermont, U.S.A.,will
be sorry to learn that deferred track-maintenance problems
forced a freight embargo on the eastern portion of the line from
Morrisvi~le to St. Johnsbury, Vermont early in September, 1972.This
eastern portion of the main line and the connections at St. Johns­
bury with CP RAIL and the Maine Central Railroad was reopened on
6 November and
subsequently, an application was made to the Inter­
state Commerce Commission to abandon the entire line from East Swan­
ton to St. Johnsbury.
Mr. Samuel Pinsley of Boston, President of the line, confir­
med that the StJ&LC did not have the necessary $ 2 million to up­
grade the track to carry the still-considerable traffic which the
road handles. Therefore, he proposed that the State of Vermont pur­
chase the line and lease it back to the railroad company at an an­
nual rental. As the owner of the line, the State of Vermont would
complete the extensive rebuilding of the line which will be re-
quired to carry the heavier boxcars and locomotives essential to
present-day operation and the retention of the linels customers. It
is further noted that precedent already exists for such a procedure,
since portions of the former Rutland Railroad were reorganized in
a similar manner. Mohawk & Hudson (NRHS) QALL BOARD.
THE FIFTY GP38-2, 2000 HP. ROAD DIESEL UNITS, VALUED AT $ 17 MILLION
recently ordered by Canadian National Rail.vays from the Die­
sel Division, General Motors of Canada, London, Ontario, will
incorporate the CNls new locomotive cab design pictured on page 3L~7
of CANADIAN RAIL No. 250, November, 1972. CN NEWS.
DIESEL DIVISION OF GENERAL MOTORS OF CANADA ANNOUNCED
in November, 1972, that with the completion of the present
order for 58 G-26 export units for the Yugoslavian Railways,
there would be 147 London-built units in service on the railways
of Yugoslavia. Mr. Vlado Sodin, a representative of the Yugoslavian
Federal Chamber of Economy said that the excellent quality of Gen­
eral Motors diesel locomotives was the main reason why they were
selected. He also commented favourably on the finanCing arrangements
made by the Export Development Corporation. GM DIESELINES.
D&HS INSPECTION TRAIN AT ROUSES POINT,N,V,oN 30 NOVEMBER 1972.PA1s 18 & 19,
D&H c~ch 34,EL sleeper SPIRIT OF VoUNGSToWN,D&H lounqe car 43 CHAMPLAIN,DIH
business cars 500 & 200. On 3 December 1972, STEAMTOWN 127 joined PA1 No.18
in Colonie Shops for refurbishing. Both photos courtesy Jim Shaughnessy.
CANADIAN
27
R A I L
THE DELAWARE & HUDSON MAY NOT HAVE GOT AMTRAK,
but D&H President C.B .Sterzing did recover ex-Santa Fe, ex­
D&H PAls Numbers 16 and 18 from the Greenbriar Railroad and Number
19
from General Electric of Erie, Pa.
On Thursday, 30 November 1972, the D&H Presidential inspection
train, powered by PAls Numbers 18 & 19, made the round-trip from
Albany, N.Y. to De1son, Quebec. It was a super trip, complete with
steak dinner and the triwnings. President Sterzing was at the throt­
tle of Number 18 for at least part of the southbound trip, piloting
the train along the cliffs beside Lake Champlain, sometimes through
a blinding snowstorm.
Although many applications have been received for any or all
of these famous diesel units, in view of President Sterzings en­
thusiasm, it seems unlikely that he is about to give away any of
the PAls, including Number 16, which is in the Colonie N.Y. shops
of the D&H waiting for a decision on whether or not the crankshaft
and bearings of the prime-mover will be repaired. The disposition of
PAl Number 17, still at General Electric, Erie, is presently un­
Imown. J.J.Shaughnessy.
IN 1973, THE DELAVJARE AND HUDSON RAILROAD WILL CELEBRATE THE 150TH.
anniversary of the incorporation of the Delaware and Hudson
Canal Company, ancestor of the present corporation. To help
commemorate this anniversary, several special excursions are
planned, the first to operate on 28-29 April 1973, Albany to Mon­
treal and return, using ex-CPR pacific STEAMToVN Number 127, pre­
sently being overhauled in D&Hs Colonie Shops. The fare is es­
timated at $ 42 return and three photo-runpasts each way are plan­
ned. The trip will be operated by the High Iron people (Ross RovI­
land) on behalf of the D&H.
There may be additional shorter trips lith steam power and
there is the possibility of excursions with the PAl units.
A display train, powered by the D&Hs famous PAls, will tour
the entire system and the historic LION (1828) of the Delaware and
Hudson
Canal Company, on loan from the Wayne County Historical So­
ciety, will be placed on a flat car and will be included in thB dis­
play. Tile train dill visit all points on the D&H system, including
Montreal, during a 3-week period in April, 1973.
On 5-6 May, 1973, it is proposed to run an enthusiast excur­
sion from Hoboken, New Jersey to Binghamton, New York on the Erie­
Lackawanna Railroad main line, using ex-Reading Railroad 4-8-4 Num­
ber 2102 for power.
Should Canadian National Railways have their 4-8-2 Number
6060
ready about this time, it will certainly be a vintage summer
for the eastern North American railway enthusiast. J.J,Shaughnessy.
ALBERTA RESOURCES RAIViIAY viAS HARD-HIT BY AUTUMN FLOODING
which caused extensive damage to the line between Grande Ca­
che and Grande Prairie, Alberta. A portion of the line has
been closed pending rebuilding of bridges and right-of-way.No start-
CANADIAN
28
R A I L
up date for the repair work has been announced, as negotiations be­
tween Canadian National Railways (the operator) and the Province of
Alberta (the owner) have not been concluded. Alberta claims that
CN, as lessee, is responsible for the maintenance of the line. CN
contends that the magnitude of the damage is such as to classify it
as a capital cost, rather than a maintenance charge, Therefore, the
responsibility is that of the Province of Alberta, the owner of the
line. C,W,Creighton.
THE FORT NELSON EXTENSION OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RAILWAY,
featured in the September 1972 CANADIAN RAIL No. 248, ~las cut
in the autumn of 72 when Fontas Creek washed out the rail­
ways bridge which spans it. Repair of the bridge was under way soon
after the washout and the line was expected to reopen early in De­
cember, C.W.Creighton.
CP RAIL HAS ERECTED APPROXIMATELY 2200 FEET OF TEST CATENARY
at mile 89 of the Mountain Subdivision, between the sidings
at Flat Creek and Glacier, British Columbia. The test catenary is
not erected over the main line right-of-way, but is over a cleared
IIsecond rj.ght-of-wa/, along the south side of the main line.
Three types of suspension for the catenary are being evalua­
ted. Type I consists of steel I-beam uprights wi.th brackets to sup­
port the wirej Type II is wooden poles with brackets and Type III
is double wooden poles with a transverse steel I-beam, the wire
being hung from the middle of the I-beam.
These various types are arranged as follows: a wooden pole at
the end, then two steel poles, three wooden doubles, two wooden sin­
gles, three steel poles, two wooden Singles and a wooden pole at the
end.
This test section has been erected at the foot of a slide
area and is built around an S-curve, so that all possible operating
conditions are encountered. The first snowslide of the season is now
awaited with keen anticipation. K.R.Goslett.
ATCO (QUEBEC) LIMITEE OF VILLE LA SALLE, QUEBEC
vlill construct 122 mobile housing units for Canadian National
Railways, to accommodate Company employees working in remote
areas of the country. The 10 x 34-foot units, to be mounted on flat
cars, will be delivered in the first quarter of 1973. They can also
be off-loaded onto wheels for highway travel or can be placed on
foundations for stationary use.
Varying in interior design, they will provide modern two-to­
a-room living accommodation, power-generator supplied lighting and
other electrical services and built-in pressure systems with hot and
cold water for sinks and showers. Each unit is heated by thermostat­
ically controlled forced-air heaters and has aluminum-frame windows
and modern
sanitary facilities.
Certainly these housing units are superior to the old freight
and passenger cars now infrequently in use to accowfiodate crews in
CANADIAN
29 R A I L
places where alternative housing is not available. It seems that the
era of the boarding car is about to come to a close. CN NEWS.
RETIRED BUSINESS CAR NUlv[8ER 93 OF CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS,
recently on the list for disposition, was purchased by EATONS
Limited, Large Canadian department store company, in September
1972. Following some restoration work by CNR, including repainting
the car with its original name Eatonia, it was taken from Toronto
to Calgary, Alberta, to be placed on display in Heritage Park of the
Glenbow Foundation.
Built in 1916 by the Pullman Company of Chicago, Ill.,U.S.A.,
for Sir John C. Eaton, Eatonia was assigned the following year to
carry relief supplies to Halifax, Nova Scotia, in the aftermath of
the disasterous explosion in that port city on 6 December 1917.
Eatonia 1as sold to the CNR in 1930 and became business car
Number 96. It 1aS assigned to the Vice-President, Traffic and con­
tinued in that service for 25 years. In 19~5, the car was renumbered
101 and 1as assigned to the Government of Canada and based in Otta1a.
Three years later, Number 101 was returned to CN and became Number
93. It was based at Montr~al as an official business car until it
was retired in 1972. S.S.Worthen.
ONGE UPON A TIME, WHEN PEOPLE TRAVELLED BY TRAIN,
the Dominion At lantic Rai ltlay of Nova Scotia, Canad a, had a
real passenger train bet1een Truro, on the main line of the
Intercolonial Rail1ay to Halifax, and Windsor, on the main line of
the DAR from Windsor Junction to Digby and later Yarmouth.
In later years, as the number of passengers declined, the re­
liable passenger train 1as reduced to a mixed-train service, with a
combination baggage-passenger coach at the rear, ahead of the ca­
boose. For years, this combine trundled back and forth from Truro
to Windsor, until it 1as donated by the DAR/CP RAIL to the late Mr.
George Warden of Kentville, N.S., for his rail1ay museum ( CANkDIAN
RAIL Number 226, November, 1970).
The combine was replaced by one of the tuscan-red 2300-series
light1eight steel coaches of CP RAIL, 1hich continued in service un­
til early December 1972, when it was removed, .ostensibly for repairs.
CANADIAN
30
R A I L
After that, passengers between Truro and Windsor were carried
in CP RAIL caboose, Canadian Pacific Number L~35398, complete with
wooden bunks, spartan armchairs and an oil-fired stove to beat back
the cold in winter. Passengers were required to sign release forms
acknowledging that they were travelling at their own risk. The frei­
ght left Truro at 0700 hours, arriving at Windsor at 1000, in time
to connect with the Halifax-Yarmouth Budd ROC Dayliner, arriving
at 1045 hours.
The freight, minus the caboose, continued onward to Kentville,
where it terminated. At 1500 hours, the northbound freight left Kent­
ville, picking up the caboose at Windsor and arrived at Truro at
1730 if everything went well and set-outs and pick-ups were not too
many. The DAR estimated that from 10 to 12 passengers per month
travelled in the antique caboose.
Then the Canadian Transport Commision heard about the pas­
sengers riding in the caboose and promptly hit the roof! This bur­
eaucratic body told DAR/CP RAIL that they were NOT allowed to carry
passengers in a caboose, release forms notwithstanding.
Shortly thereafter, DAR/CP RAIL instituted a 112-mile pas­
senger service by taxi between Truro and Windsor, with a genuine
railway passenger agent on board. With map and train schedule on
his lap, the passenger agent directed the taxi-driver along the
back roads through Colchester and Hants counties, following the DAR
line, stopping at stations where possible and otherwise conforming
to the mixed-train schedule. After being in service for two days and
travelling almost 500 miles, the mixed-train-taxi had carried only
ONE passenger.
DAR/CP RAIL hoped to have its passenger car back for service
on the mixed train by mid-December, so that it might be relieved of
the heavy operating c11arges for the taxi and start collecting a few
more $ 3.50 fares for the 112-mile trip. In addition, the ONE pas­
senger on the mixed-train-taxi said that the meal service was ter­
rible and this might be just the comment which would stimulate the
Canadian Transport COmmission to begin agitation to require the DAR/
CP RAIL to provide a buffet car on the mixed train from Truro to
Windsor. Glenn Wallis.
OUR FRIENDLY CORRESPONDENT JOHN WELSH WENT LOOKING IN
one of his notebooks the other day and came up with this en­
try from 25 March 1937, the day before Good Friday. The place
where John made these observations was the old Svnnyside Station,
1est of The Open Door (Union station), Toronto. The observations
began about 5.45 p.m. (1745 hours):
-Sharp Travel Service Special
-Conducted Tour Special
-. CN Train 103-104
-Coach Special:Niagara Falls
-University Tours Spec.No.820
-University Tours Spec.No.825
-CPR Train 801 via NYC to
New York (7 sections)
CNR CNR CNR
CNR
NYC
NYC
CPR
NYC
NYC
eng. No.
eng. No.
eng. No.
eng. No.
eng. No.
eng. No.
eng. No.
eng. No.
eng. No.
6152
6140
61L~8
5250
5287
+ 12
+
8
+ 15
+
8
+ 12
5329 + 11
2714 + 12
5245 + 12
5211 + 13
cars
cars
cars
cars
cars
cars
cars
cars
cars

CANADIAN
31
R A
, ,
NYC eng. No. 5244 + 13 cars
NYC eng. No. 5276 + 10 cars
TH&B eng. No. 16 + 10 cars
via NYC & PRR to Wash-
C eng. No. 2715 + 11 cars
ington & Atlantic City
CRR: Lehigh Valley Railroad CNR eng. No. 6154
+ 11
oar
CNR Train 89-8 (no details)
CPR Train 821 (two sections) lH&.B eng. No. 11 + 11 cars
CPR cng. No. 2224
+ 9
cars
The last train cleared Sunnyside before 9.00 p.m. lTn!ortu­
nately I was not able to return the following Tuesday morning to sac
the inbound paradeL!, John writes. I.heard afterwards that the tie­
up at the border (Niagara Falls) ,~as massive, while customs and im­
migration o!ficials cleared the happy holidaymakers.
Imagine the picture possibili ties between Hamilton ar.::! Tor_
onto, with that many trains of that many railroads. Imagine the same
possibilities at Niagara Falls, where they were all stopped at one
place! Fantastic!
FORBES _ THE WALL STREET JOURNALI1 OF 1.liE GREAT UNITED STATES
foundations and the Cadillac II of the investment-financial
journals, unilaterally provided its readers in its HarCh,l972
issue .nth some remarkable information. In an article entitled Can­
adian Pacific-Arrericals Model Railroad, the following statements,
admittedly quoted out of context and therefore suspect, appeared:
_tllf the Canadian Pacific were a U.S. railroad, it might
well have joined Penn Central in the bankruptcy courts.
Building the CP line …. ·as a gamble. Track was paid across
the deserted prairies long before a route through the
mountains had been found to take the line to the Pa­
cific. But in the 18805, Canada had to act swiftly,
Its undeveloped western lands already t~ere falling
prey to U.S. land speculators.
Last year alone the Canadiall government pumped about
$ 90 million into Canadian National, most of it to re­
imburse eN for running unprofitable services that the
government deems necessary.
For years, CP had promoted little besides the luxuries
of its Empress liners, its sleekly domed transcont1nen­
tal trains and its swank hotels like the coppcr-turreted
Banff Springs in the Rockies, Good for travel brochurl!s,
maybe,
but not necessarily profito. 111m not motivated
much by nostalgia I, says Sinclair, 01
S.S.Worthen.
lUi . 5t1fi SEfo;O> Ul THI5 PICTUflf OF A en fNIl FqEIIi1T H::n,)~D .v Li ,:D
altilofe R Ohio unite NUIbJlfS 1,1087 8. 105133 at 8redenbury. Ssk •• en 27
CANADIAN RAIL
p ….. 1::>I.h.d 1::>Y ~ne
WAIW1 ~ 1ll::C..:~ A::Oc:..:.:r::ON :,;:~, ~ ..:~ …….
Canadian JUul H e 00 annually
EDITOR. B a vvcrt.nen LAYOUT … PRODUCTION P Murphy
-.1
•••
VISIT THE VIBITEZ L JC
(:,,, .. 1;,,,, lfa;I>.,,: Iu lUll
SEPT OUVJC~T WAI. SEPT OPEN MAY
ABSOCIATION BR.ANCHEB
~ .
J.. ,, A.

,0 10..
••
A.8SOCIATION ft,EPR.II:8ENTATIV.II: •
• apt • .-,.,_,~ 1M ………. ,_~.
,_-<110. •• ~ .~ . .-.,...,.
_-=1 .. _1.01100 •
…. ,. ·_,_….,._k .
… , a1 I __ …. 10. _,I.

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