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Canadian Rail 251 1972

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Canadian Rail 251 1972

401,.h annlVereB.ry
X>ECE J.IiTO. 251
~HEFl. 1972
I
RETIREMENT?
S .S.Worthen
A
t variable intervals, events forcibly remind
us of the stark truth of that hoary adage
that there is nothing so constant as change.
In July, 1971, the shareholders of the Canadian
Pacific Rail.ay Company had this axiom impressed
upon them when the Company, 1n supplementary let­
ters patent, changed its world-famous name to
Canadian PaCific Limited-Canadien Pacifique Lim­
itee. The simultaneous change 1n par value of
the Companys shares from $ 25 to $ 5 was,to the
general public, somewhat less remarkable.
Once upon a time about 70 years ago, the Canadian Pacific
R
ailway Company was a railway. It was a very long and very Import-
;:t ant one, to be sure. It had a notable President. Today, it can be
argued that the CPR was the greatest single influence that shaped
the destiny of Canada. There has been hardly a decade of Canadian
history that has not felt the inflUence of this Company and the men
who were instrumental in making it the wonderful, complex bu:;iness
that it was then and is now. Nor
ris Roy Crump, who retired as Chairman of the Board of
Directors of Canadian Pacific Limited at the Annual Meeting on Hay
3, 1972, is the last of a notable and unique kind of man and manag­
er,
first observed in tt,e person of Sir William Cornelius Van Horn!!.
Sir William, we remember, joined the Canadian Pacific in 1882,after­
wards built most of the railway and became its second Presidcnt in
1888. His contemporaries George stephen, Duncan McIntyre and R.B.
Angus were expert financiers. Van Horne, Shaughnessy and latterly
N.R.
Crump were railwaymen and expert managers.
In the interval before his official retirement, Mr. Crump
was lauded by the politicians, feted by his associates. felicitated
by his peers and contemporaries, and his departure was deplored by
everyone who knew him. He was well-known as a fair but u~relenting
adversary in debates on principles which he believed to be right for
t
he Country and the Company. He never brooked any ambiguity from
government regulatory agencies or contemporary public corporations.
After his advent to Montreal in 1948, his reputation within the
Company for straightforwardness continued to flourish. Indeed, he
may have frightened some people with this approach. His voice
was and is sometimes gruff and he still has a way of looking at
you very penetratingly, which is guaranteed to make the uncertain
flinch and the timid quail.
—-
• .,-. THIS MONTHS COVER IS A PHOTOGRAPH OF -WDI
M
CRUr~p AT THE
,… of hill career 1th the Cenodian Pec1f1c R81lw8y Compeny.
BEG! •• W:>
t
A MORE RECENT PHOTOGRAPH OF MR. NORRIS R. CRUMP OF CANADIAN PACIFIC
Limited is presented above. 80th photographs courtesy Canadian Pacific.
Although he is a reticent man, Mr, Crump tells the anecdote­
and he loves to tell them that when he was four years old, some­
one decided that he should be called Buck. Although he chose to
allow this deciSion to stand, some time about his fifteenth birth­
day, he began making his own decisions. When he told his English­
born father that he was going to work for the Canadian Pacific at
Revelstoke, British Columbia, instead of retusning to school, there
was no emotional remonstration. His fathers only advice was, that
if this was the choice he had made, then he should be sure to do
his best to be a success at ~ihatever trade he chose. This forbear­
ance was, in retrospect, entirely justified,
After an interval working with the track-repair gang, BUCk
Crump decided that there was a better future in the machine .. ·shop, so
he Signed a five··year apprenticeship agreement with the railway.His
sojourn in this capacity led him to the conclusion that the future
possibilities for a machinist appeared to be limited. Buck decided
that it was high time to get out of the enginehouse pit, where he
seemed to be spending most of his time. A transfer to Winnipeg pro­
vided the opportunity.
————
CA NAD I AN 356 R A I L
When Buck concluded that a uni versi ty degree would be a
most
desirable asset, his father said that such a document ~Iould
save answering a lot of questions. It was not, however, an easy pr­
ospect. First, he had to graduate from high school. This was a dif­
ficult thing to do, especially at night school, as anyone who has
done it will confirm. But obtain his certificate he did and subse­
quently went to Purdue University in the State of Indiana,U.S.A.,to
study mechanical engineering. At that time, the AssOCiation of Amer­
ican Railroads had all of its research work done at Purdue.
In four years, Mr. Crump got his university degree and one
other honour of much greater importance – a wife. Mrs. Crump, nee
Miss Stella Elvin, worked in the university library. They were mar­
ried in 1930, after Buck had returned to the Canadian pralrles ,
where he found a job as ,night foreman with the Canadian Pacific Ra­
ilway.
It would be easy to write a facile account of their first
years of married life on the prairies, but it was not always a com­
fortable experience. Few places west of Winnipeg in the 1920s and
dusty 30s enjoyed all of the amenities of city life. But after a
summons
received one fateful night in Outlook, Saskatchewan, when
Buck was
underneath yet another steam locomotive, he was on his
way by the next train to Montreal, to become Assistant to the Vice­
President of the Canadian Pacific RaihlaY Company. This was the
first rung of the ladder.
The success which Mr. Crump thereafter enjoyed in the Company
was
largely due to his own ability, reinforced always by the stead­
fast counsel of his tlife. During all of hi.s career, Mr. Crump never
forgot the progression of events which had increased his authority
and responsibility and, for that reason, he never missed an oppor­
tunity to ride with the crew in the locomotive cab, or to drop off
a train at some lonely division point to have a bull-session with
the men in the roundhouse, in the machine-shop or in the section­
house. Never, in all of the 52 years he worked with Canadian PacifiC,
did Mr. Crump insist on demarcations according to rank. He always
affirmed that he was an employee of the Company, like the next man.
In 1943, Mr. Crump was appointed General Superintendent, On­
tario District, Canadian Pacific Railway Company, with headquarters
in Toronto, Ontario. The following year, he was Assistant General
Manager, Eastern Lines. Promotions seemed to come on an annual basis.
From General Manager, he became Vice-President, Eastern Region and
then, in 1948, Vice-President with jurisdiction over lines system­
wide. That was the year that Mr. and Mrs. N.R.Crump began their 24-
year residence at 12 Kilburn Crescent, in Montreals suburb of Hamp­
stead.
After Mr. Crump was elected PreSident of the Canadian Pacific
Railway Company in 1955, he was in a position to do some of the
things that he thought needed doing. Of course, if you ask him about
these accomplishments, he will insist that they were achieved with
the cooperation of a good management team. This assertion is, without
doubt, quite true, but it does not incorporate the basic and eSsen-
CANADIAN
357
R A I L
tial component of management leadership. And at this important skill
of managing a very large corporation, Mr. Crump excelled. Had he
been less than excellent in his capacity as President of the Company,
it is probable that some of the following achievements would not have
been recorded:
1. Motive Power Conversion:
This was Mr. Crumpls first major task after he
became President. It meant the replacement of
more than 1,000 steam locomotives by diesel­
electric units in the brief period between 1956
and 1960. By 1960, the project was completed.
The capital cost was great, but the subsequent
savings in operating costs to the Company were
very substantial.
2. Increasing the Dividend:
In 1955 when Mr. Crump became President of the
Canadian Pacific Railway Company, the annual
dividend on the ordinary shares was $ 1.50. In
1971, it was $ 3.25. This is no mean accom­
plishment.
3. Repatriation of Ovmership of the Company:
Canadians owned only some 9% of the Canadian
Pacific Railway Company in 1946, shares being
held principally in England and the United Sta­
tes. Canadian control topped 67% in 1971. Share
value was well launched into its run from a low
of $ 20 in 1962 to its recent high of $ 91.25
in 1969. This is a remarkable achievement.
4. Divisionalization of the Company:
About
1958, it became clear that a restructur­
ing of the Company was necessary, so that all
aspects of its activity could receive adequate
attention, thereby enabling each division to
organize its own management team for more effi­
cient operation. Consolidated Mining & Smelting
of Trail, British Columbia, became COMINCO
Canadian Pacific Investments was incorporated
in 1962. Multimarked CP RAIL, CP SHIPS, CP
AIR and CP HOTELS, Canadian Pacific Oil & Gas
and
Marathon Realties were broken out and/or
organized as individual corporate entities .
Finally, Canadian Pacific Limited was estab­
lished in 1971 to provide overall direction
for these many and varied enterprises.
Concurrent with these accomplishments, Mr. Crump had captain­
ed the management team vlhich had brought the Company intact and un­
scathed through the troubled and uncertain business climate of the
1950s and 160s, into the entirely new environment of the 1970s. To
do this vii th a corporation the size of the CPR vias almost a super­
human feat.
But behind all of these accomplishments, the railwayman still
lives. Mr, Crump, in conversation, is fond of measuring attainments
CANADIAN
)58
R A I L
in rail-activity terms. He takes great pride, quite naturally, in
pointing out that the railway division grossed $ 658.8 million in
1971, generating net earnings of $ 45.8 million. Assets of Canadian
Pacific Investments may exceed $ 1 billion, he notes, but assets on
the transportation side are more than double that!
While the nick-name of Buck may have persisted through the
years, it is hard to associate it with a man who has accomplishments
of this magnitude in corporate management. Since Mr. is the most
honorary non-political, non-ecclestiastical title that our democracy
permi ts, then that is the title which Mr. Crump merits.
In other and perhaps less apparent areas, Mr. Crumps apprai­
sal of and judgement on various situations have stood the test of
time. i-lhen the Canadian Railway Museum was being established, and
afterwards during its construction, Mr. Crump was sometimes instru­
mental, sometimes responsible, for the many donations of exhibits
and materials essential to the growth and continuing success of this
enterprise.
Mr. Crump was first elected an Honorary Vice-President of the
Canadian Railroad Historical Association in 1956 and continued in
that capacity through 1972. In recognition of his significant con­
tribution to the Association and the Canadian Railway Museum, the
Board of Directors of the Association has elected him to Honorary
Life Membership.
It is reassuring to understand that, although Mr. Crump has
relinquished almost all of the many directorships which he held in
various corporations at the time of his retirement, he plans to re­
tain one important one. That is his directorship in his favourite
Company, Canadian Pacific Limited.
On 1 July 1972, Mr. and Mrs. Crump departed from Montreal in
the private car Laurentian of CP RAIL, in the consist of the west-·
bound Canadian, Train 1 • Their destination lias Calgary, Alberta.
Previously, Mr. Crump had said that after a suitable interval, he
wanted to finish the basement of the new home in Calgary and install
his machine-shop for gunsmithing. Concurrently, he intended to pur­
sue his hobby of ancient history and archaelogy.
But -not surprisingly -less than ninety days after his ar­
rival in Calgary, he was considerably involved in Railroad Daysat
Glenbow Foundations Heritage Park. There, he was invited to par­
ticipate in yet another modern-day Last Spike ceremony. After­
wards, he protested that he had been deceived. But at the climax of
the celebration, he drove the spike flush with the tie-plate,with a
good
dozen blows of the maul, at the opposite end of the tie from
where the hole to receive it had been preboredJ
Re tirement ?
Helll
RemtJue mill 16 ering It
Like It W<8L§
S.S .Horthcn.
some occult process Ihich is usually
completely unclear and seldom under­
stood,people,including historians,se­
em to remeniller the most curious th­
ings about the raillays that used to
run through their communities. Vlhile
you can meet occasionally a person
who has a clear and accurate recol-
lection,most of us cannot even re-
member That
~e had for dinner the
night before last, let alone wives
birthdays,wedding anniversaries and
the lil~e.
A good many of the older residents of the Bruce Mines,Ontario
region Hill have it that the famous cartoonist of the 1920 sand
30s, . Fontaine Fox,Vlas born and raised in that neighbourhood.Mr.
Fox was the cleator of the cartoon The Toonerville Trolley that
?-1eets all the Trains,Hhich for years ,las read avidly by an emer–
ging ge-,e rat ion of neophyte streetcar motormen. The characte rs por­
trayed in Fox I s Hork -The Terrible Tempered ?-1ister Bang, Aunt Ep­
pie Hogg,lUckey Himself Maguire, Suitcase Simpson and Flem Proddy, to
name but a feH, did not last quite as long as Ckorge McManus I l>1aggie
and Jiggs,but they 11ere every bit as Iell-Imom, to the readers of
hundreds of daily papers throughout North America.
It is difficult to conclude whether Fontaine Talbot Fox,jr .
portrayed himself as the Skipper,Hho superintended the convolutions
of the single-trucked,antique streetcar,or as Mickey Himself Maguire
the perennial Pecks Bad BOY and leader of the Little Scorpions
Club. Probably it was the latter. In any event,Mickey Himself be­
came such a bYilord that a juvenile actor of the time, Joe Yule, j r.,
changed his name to ?-1ickey t-1cGuire to further his HollyvlOod career.
Fontaine Fox Tent to court to protect his copyright on the name
and Joe Yule,jr. became Mickey Rooney.
Recently, in Nova Scotia, the old chestnut about the early
steam locomotives belonging to the General Mining Association TaS
revived. The Albion Mines RaihTay,the scene of early Maritime steam
operation, ,Ias a department of the General Mining Association at Stel­
larton,N.S. The designation of this activity as the South Pictou
Railroad (vlhich it Ylas not) had its genesis in a Hr. Robert Mitch-
t
THE FAMOUS SA~ISor OF THE ALmON {~HJES RAILIdAY OF THE GENERAL
{{lining Association, as she louked when she [,185 dis[llayed in the
Union Station at Halifax, ~J.S. on 30 ~Iay 1949.
Photo from E.A.Toohey Co11ection,C.R.H.A.
ell,a local resident,who also claimed to have run one of the ante­
diluvian monsters –the SAMs)N –himself. At any rate, the rail­
lay ran from Albion Mines (later Stellarton) to Dunbar Point, a dis­
tance of 10,694 yards or 6.1 miles. The kernel of the chestnut in­
volves the purported names of the first three steam locomotives IIh­
ich ,ere built in England for the railvlay. History records that the
three locomotives were named SAMs)N,HERCULES and JOHN BUDDLE. The
names for the first tVIO behemoths were appropriate, considering the
job that they had to do. The third one was named unromantically for
Mr. Johnnie Buddle, the vievier or mine manager viho selected the
three 0-6-os for Mr. Joseph Smith,the then .. m1A manager at Stel-
larton N.S.
Goodness lmoHs hml many years later,a local amateur historian
named Regan compiled a fairly useful little volume entitled First
Things in Nova Scotia. Beir.g a transplanted Hibernian lith a vivid
imaginat ion, he duly recorded that the locomotive HERCULES ,~as named
fo l England, the SAMOON for Scotland and the th ird, sa id to be called
the HIBERNIA vIas obviously named for Ireland. The reasoning in this
conclusion lias slightly obscure, since HERCULES has generally been
positively identified as a Greel~ 11hile SAHs)N Has, b~r all reliable
accounts, an Israe lite and HIBERNIA also inc luded Northern Ire land,
a classification at best unsuitable to Mr. Hegans purposes!
To keep the record accurate,Mr. Regans First Things ir: Nova
Scotia is fairly good as a reference 1ilOrk, but it should be borne
in mind that he included every single first 1ilithin a thousand or
more miles of Nova Scotia and his imagination about the steam en­
gines of the General Hining Association is inclined to be a little
florid,to say-the least!
CANADIAN
161
R A I L
lhc European and North American Raihlay from (rougtlly) I-Ionc­
ton to Saint John,NelJ Blunslifick,Has one of the first BIG raihiays
in the Maritir,lcs. Opened to Shediac,N.B. from Sair.t John on August
1,1860,0. distance of 107.97 miles,H Has slightly antedatEd by thE
Nova Scotia RailwaY,opened from Ric~nond (Halifax) to Truro,N,Son
December 1~,1:)58,a distance of Gl.19 r,1iles. The L.& N,A, 1lhicll had
fallen on (.i.l tiJ~es,l/aG quict, to SUCCU1~J)) to the olaJ~dishmentsl of
the Federal GovernJilent of Canada after the Act of Cor:fu1eration of
11:;67 anel pasGcc1 into the control of the Departmect of Public ;;ork,
A e;entleman by the name of I .. lr. Leliis Carvell ,;(1 Genl.ral Hanaur of
tcle line· ane;,in In6(,llls jlEiGdiction :Ias cXGcnclcd to inclu(1e [;:H.
Nova Scotia Hatl.my. [·.jr. Carvell lias desperatel:. unpopular and i.l.c
Nova Scotia n( :;spapers, in the traditional Josepll jbuc nanncr, raised
so muci1 he 11 about hiLl tllat,a1tllou[):1 he ,Ias <11101,:0 to ,c;tain 1:1.3
tHle,hls jurtscliction Ilas confined to the Nell BlUnSliic, portion of
the opr.ration and popular 1·11. GC01,zC; Taylol,T).Qffic Ean:;lC;c.., lookecl
after loced. N.S ,n, alrll~s·;mcnts.
Carvell seemed to have earned his reputation. At one time,
he vIaS sent to Nova Scotia to mal,e a report on the state of the
Nova Scotia RailNay. The report he made Nas so devastatingly un-
favourable that the N ,S ,R.General Manager ~aS sUlTunarily fired and
Carvell installed in his stead. Some years later, C.J ,Brydges, then
General 1I1anager of the Grand Trunk Railiqay was also chief commission~
lJlINDSOR & ANNAfJOLIS RAILWAYS Nur~BER 2 GA8RIEL,IJUILT BY FiJX-WALKER
in 1868. She was standard-guaqed in 1876 and, after being convertBd
to an 0-6-0 by Canadian Pacific in 1902, was scrapped in 1906.
Photo courtesy Harold A. Jenkins.
CA NAD IAN
362
R A I L
er for the building of the new Intercolonial Railway. He Has appoint­
ed by the Federal Government to make a report on Carvells handling
of the first section of the Intercolonial -Halifax to Saint John,
N.B.,lG72-T6. He, in turn, gave Carvell such a going-over that the
Government retired Carvell and appointed Brydges as General Manager
of the t,hole operation from Halifax to Riviere du Loup and Levis,
from 1076 on.
Sir Charles Tupper,reigning politico and one of the Fathers
of Confederation thoroughly dislil{ed both Brydges and Carvell and
Then he became Minister of Railllays and Canals in 1879, tIle first
thing he did ViaS to summarily fire Brydges and bring in David Pot­
tinger from Nova Scotia. The first act might have been a minor er­
ror but the second Has a miracle of good fortune for the Intercol-
6nial. Even as late as 1906-l2,there Nere still some men around on
the I.C.R. Hho had run engines on both the N .S.R. and the E. & N .A.
and both Carvell and Brydges, but especially Brydges, Nere st ill re­
membered Hith cordial detestation. They remembered Brydges as an
arrogant Upper Canadian of the Granel TrunK, which raihray they con­
sidered to be the meanest railroad in North America. The diction­
ary definition of meanest does not do justice to their use of the
adjectivel
In conversation,these men used to refer to having ,Iorked for
the Intercolonial before 1872 and this was a little puzzling and
seemed to be historically incorrect, because the I.C .R. did not
come into existence until the Order in Council of November 9, 1872.
Recently,on reading throu~l the Federal Sessional Papers from 1867
to about 19)4,1rhen they ~Iere discontinued, it las discoJered that,
although the N .S.R. and the E. & N .A. were taken over by the Fed-
eral Government on July 1,1867, the t1IO roads operated as separate
units under the Federal Minister of Public Horks, Sir Hector Lan-
gevin,because there was no rail connection behleen Truro,N.S. and
Painsec Junction,N.B. George Taylor in Halifax ran the N.S.R. and
Carvell looked after the E. & N .A. from Saint John,N .B although
Carvell apparently had jurisdiction over matters of general policy,
such as granting running rights to neighbouring lines like the Hin­
dsor and Annapolis RailHay.
Anothcr element which ploducecl confusion ir: steam locomotive
history in this part of Canada vias the circumstance There the con­
tractors on the I.C.R. hired both N.S.R. and E. & N.A. engines for
construct ion 1lork betwecn Truro and Painsec Junct ion, as VIe 11 as
north from Honcton tOl/lards the Miramichi River valley. These engines
operated Hith the ir old names and numbers, not only (luring the con-,
NU~GER 16,TIT/~NIA, OF THE JJINDSOR AriJ A~!JAPOLIS RAILWAY. GUILT BY
galdwin in 1893 (BIN 13615~ Number 16 became Number 20 of the Dom-
inion Atlantic Railway. Collection of Major C.W.Anderson.

CANADIAN
365
R A I L
struction period,but also during the first years of the I.C.R. op­
eration, until that line got around to repainting and renumbering
them.
Elsewhere in Canada, the Canadian Pacific Raih~ay may have
pursued its construction with vigor and independence, but such was
not the case in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. In New Brunswick, it
purchased existing railways instead of building and came to Saint
John over the rails of the Hestern Extension of the E. & N .A.Before
the purchase of the consolidated Dominion Atlantic Railway, with
access running rights to Halifax,the C.P.R. secured its own running
rights for its Montreal-Halifax passenger trains from Saint John,via
Moncton and Truro,over the Intercolonial. The C.P.R.Express,trains
25 and 26,ancestor of todays Atlantic Limited,was a regular fix-
ture or. this portion of the I.C.R. until F.P.Gutelius ended the
Saint John-Halifax portion of it about 1914. However, through ser-
vice was continued from Saint John to Moncton,where the cars were
added to the eastbound Ocean Limited for the onward journey to
Halifax.
The lease of the Dominion Atlantic and the establishment of
the Saint John-Halifax service via the D.A.R. might have seemed to
be the solution to the problem of competition with the I.C.R., but
so much time was usually lost in crossing the Bay of Fundy to Digby
and on the run from Digby to Halifax that the arrival times at the
terminus for the two journeys was about the same. The actual rail
distance,via Moncton and the I.C.R. Vias 275 miles,1Ilhile it was 204
miles via Digby and the D.A.R.
When this new route to Halifax was opened,C.p.R. passengers
intending to make the journey were invited to participate in a pas­
sage across the Bay of Fundy,which is renovmed as being the most
turbulent piece of water in the world, with the possible exception
of the Bay of Biscay. Service on the 47-mile vlater passage from
Saint John,N.B. to Digby,N.S. began as early as 1784,with the sail-
ing packet SALLY.The first steamship service started in 1827 with
the 87 -ton SAINT JOHN and in 1881, the Bay of Fundy Steamship Com-
pany instituted regular service. The sidewheeler MONTICELLO was
making the trip in 1889. The Canadian Pacific had through passenger
service to Saint John from Montreal in 1889 and was soon consider­
ing ways of transporting their passengers to Halifax faster than by
taking them around by Moncton.
By 1892, when the Canadian Pacific failed to secure running
rights over the I.C.R.,the Dominion Atlantic had ordered a steel
paddle-steamer,the PRINCE RUPERT,from J.M.& A.Denny of Dumbarton,
Scotland and at the time, it vias rumored -not without foundation
.. LATER rJU~lBER 19 OF THE DOMH,IOIj ATLArHIC flAILl:JfY, W&A rJU~WER 15,
Oberon was built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1893, 3/N
13538. Collection of Major C.W.Anderson.
CANADIAN
Public timetable of the Windsor
and Annapolis Railway,effective
Monday, June 26, 1893 and -as
it says -until further notice I
Collection of Maj. C.W.Anderson.
,66 R A
lnAtm~··
G.tJUSU ;A~T.
L
that the C.P.R. ViaS behind the order for this ship. Operat ing two
trips daily, the new ship was so attractive that in 1896 the compet­
ing Bay of Fundy Steamship Company withdrew the l>10NTICELLO from the
run.
The PRINCE RUPERT did not pass to C.P.R. ownership when the
Dominion Atlantic was leased for that marvellous term of 999 years
from January 1,1912, -the lease hav ing been consummated on Novem­
ber 13,1911. She (he)(it) was purchased by Canadian Pacific on Sep­
tember 15,1913 and together with the YARMOUTH was replaced in that
same year by the br. GEDRGE and the EMPRESS. The PRINCESS HELENE
well-known to so many Canadians,las built by Canadian Pacific spec­
ifically· for the Bay of Fundy se rv ice. She could carry a thousand
passengers and 45 automobiles and was the Digby Boat from 1930
to 1963. The present PRINCESS OF ACADIA las formerly the PRINCESS
OF NANAIMO of the C.P.R. s British Columbia Coastal Fleet.
t
THE S.S.
one time
wick and
PRINCESS HELENE OF THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY, AT
the preferred way to travel between Saint John, New Gruns­
Halifax, Nova Scotia, via Jigby and the Dominion Atlantic.
Photo C.R.H.A.Archives.
The PRINCESS HELENE ,,,as a steady ship on which to travel
On one trip during World War II,her passengers got an unexpected
fright. On the passage from Digby to Saint John,the Digby Boat was
in that period escorted by a Royal Canadian Air Force bomber from
the R.C.A.F.station at either Greenwood or Yarmouth, because enemy
submarines ,,[ere knovln to be in the coastal waters. The view from
the PRINCESS HELENEs dining room ~as superb, commanding a clear and
unobstructed view of the sea to both port and starboard. One pas­
senger who was idly reading a neVlspaper, raised his eyes to the awe­
some sight of a submarine breaking water about half a mile north of
the ship. Much consternation and a paniC among the passengers en­
sued until they took a second look and discerned the number 15 Ion
the conning tOVler. It Vlas then realized with relief that this was
a
Dutch practice sub from Cornwallis Naval Base,not far away. Of
course, the ships personnel had been previously informed.
THE DOMINION ATLANTIC FREIGHT STAGGERS OUT OF TRURO, N.S. ON THE MORN­
ing of May 26,1949, with D-10 Number 1089 on the head-end. In 1972,the
0-10 is gone and only a portion of the old IeR station at Truro remains.
Photo E.A.Toohey Collection, C.R.H.A.
AN INFREQUENTLY PHOTOGRAPHED LOCATIUN IS GRAND NARROWS, WHERE THE CAN­
adian Nationals main line to Cape Breton crosses the Bras dOr Lakes.
Here is CN Train 5, Sydney-Moncton, at Iona N.S. on May 26, 1949.
Photo E.A.Toohey Collection, C.R.H.A.

(-
I-
~ . -.-:: . ::
..
SYDNEY AND LOUISBURG RAILWAY ENGINE
Number 55 had headlights and pilots
at both ends, to per~it operatinn in
either rlirection on branches where
no WyBS were available.
Photo W.G.Cole Collection,C.~.H.A •
..
THE FlJRfV,ER HITERC[]LDr:IAL RAIL!llAY STA­
tion at Pictou, Nova Scotia, as it
looked when the gas-car was loading
on
I~ay 28, 1949.
P
hoto E.A.Toohey Co11ection,CRHA.
Both the IIPrincesses
ll
fere relatively free from incentives
to seasickness. It 11as the earlier ships like the PRINCE RUPERT and
the EMPRESS that seemed to induce the malady,vrith their nauseating
cookery,coal smoke and hot oil odours, all of which earned these ves­
sels a Singularly unenviable reputation.
The naming of steam locomotives on the raihmys of Nova Sco­
tia vras perfected to a remarkable degree. The Nova Scotia Railway
had one named (quite elegantly) SIR GASPARD LE MARCHANT, after Sir
Gaspard Le Marchant,one-time governor of the Province. Sir Gaspard
was a close friend of the Great Tribune,Joseph Howe and in the mid-·
dle of the nineteenth century, Sir Gaspard got Joseph into a peck
of trouble by sending the latter to the United states to recruit a
IIfore ign legion, sponsored by the British Government in London, to
fight the Russians in the Crimea.
Parenthetically, it is noted that the N.S.R. sold both the
SIR GASPARD LE MARCHANT and the JOSEPH HOWE to the Windsor and An­
napolis Railvray, ,hich changed the ir names to MICMAC and MALISEET and
usacl them on construction work only. These stalwarts never saw reg,
ular service after the W. & A. was completed.
The SIR GASPARD LE MARCHANT and the JOSEPH HOWE are reputed
to have been IIbicycle engines,or of a 2-2-0 wheel arrangement. Al­
though there were photographers in Nova Scotia at that time, -and
good ones, too -either they were just not interested in railway sub­
jects or their works have not survived. Neither are there any sur­
viving artists sketches of these early locomotives,as there are
for many other first locomotives of Canadas pioneer raihlays .The
late Robert R. Brmln made a dravring of one of them, based on infor­
mation supplied by one of the Youlds of Truro,N .S.,who had driven
them during the construction of the line. The resulting pictorial
representation mayor may not be anything like Vlhat they really were.
Among the first pictures of raihTay locomotives are those of the Fox­
Valker engines of the Windsor and Annapolis. These locomotives 11ere
built in Bristol, England and many of them vrere given Acadian or Mic­
mac Indian names.
The accurate recording of history, particularly railvray his­
tory, is a very d iff icult and exact ing occupat ion, but it is nowhe re
near as difficult as the later research which is almost inevitably
required to separate out the impression from the fact.

DECLINING RAIL SERVICE IN
SOUTHERN OUEBEC.
1961·1971
J.D.Booth
T
he past decade has seen an acceler­
ation in the long established pat­
tern of rail passenger service re­
duction throughout Canada. Not only
have entire operations been abandoned ,
but there has also occurred a progres­
sive dilution of skeletal proportions of
service on many of the remaining lines
(see accompanying maps).
A comparison of the volume of passenger train service in the
southern part of Quebec in 1961 and 1971 illustrates a number of im­
portant points. The first is the 38.9% overall decline in total
passenger train miles from 16,003 in 1961 to only 9,766 in 1971.The
second is the reflection of the ongoing rationalization of passenger
service and the resultant concentration of operations in the areas
of highest population density, notably the Quebec City-Montreal-Tor­
onto corridor, as seen in the continuing relatively large number of
trains operating on Canadian National Railways St-Hyacinthe and
Drummondville Subdivisions. In 1971, 63.5% of total passenger train
miles were on this route, as opposed to only 37.5% in 1961.
The two major areas of decline are in branch line and inter­
national passenger services, although the resumption of New York
City-Montreal international service may have changed this latter
aspect somewhat. Among the operations in the former category, which
either disappeared or were curtailed between 1961 and 1971, are CNs
Montreal-Granby-Waterloo passenger service and the mixed train from
Granby to Farnham, Quebec; CNs Richmond to Quebec line and Quebec
Central Railways service between Sherbrooke and Quebec.
Among the name international trains of a decade ago, which
included Canadian Pacific Railways Alouette and Atlantic Limited,
Canadian Nationals Washingtonian and Montreal Limited,only the
Atlantic Limited remained -until a few weeks ago -passing throu­
gh the northern part of the State of Maine in the dead of night, en
route to Saint John, New Brunswick.
+ CMJil.DIAN ~JATIor;,AL RAIL.iJAYS BRANCH-LINE TRAHJ 138/140, f~ontrr.al to Des
Ormeaux,~uebec, via Sorel, takes the east switch at St. Lambert,Que.,
on September 3, 1955. Photo courtesy John A. Swift.
.




0
CANADIAN
PASSENGER TRAIN SERVICE
1961
No service
1-24 trains per week
25-49 trains per week
50-74 trains per week
Over 74 trains
miles
10 15 20
,
PASSENGER TRAIN SERVICE
1971
No service
1-24 trains per week
_ 25-49 trains per week
_ 50 -74 trains per week
_ Over 74 trains per week
miles
o 5 10 15 2,0
R A I L
————-~—
THE LAST VESTIGE OF THE RUTLAND RAILROADS MONTREAL CONNECTION,
Train 64 to St. Johns, ~u~bec, with pacific Number 5063 for pow­
er, swings south towards Edison Avenue, St. Lambert,qu8bec, on
September 2, 1955. Photo courtesy John A. Swift.
t
CANADIAN
376
R A I L
One of the first international railways in the world was the
Grand Trunk Railways Montreal to Portland, Maine, line, opened in
1853. By 1961, passenger service on this line had been cut back to
Island Pond, Vermont and today, all that remains of the service on
this historic route is the daily RDC Railiner between Montreal and
Sherbrooke, with a folorn Friday evening only round-trip from Sher­
brooke to Coati cook, 21.4 miles further south towards Portland.
An indicator of the shrinking passenger operations has been
the decline in the number of communities where rail passenger ser­
vice is still available. In 1961, 111 localities in southern Quebec
were served by passenger trains, but this number dropped to only 44
by 1971 and much of this service is on a less-than-daily frequency.
In all probability, there will be further reductions from
even the modest scale of operations in 1971. While CP RAILs At-
lantic Limited and CNs corridor service between Montreal and
Quebec City will likely remain stable for the near future, the
prospects for CNs Montreal-Sherbrooke-Coaticook and Richmond-Que­
bec City services are considerably less promising. Volume of pas­
sengers on both of these lines is light, in particular between
Richmond and Quebec City, and CN has requested permission to aban­
don both operations.
Editors Note~ Professor Booth composed this article in June, 197~,
when the AMTRAK service between New York City and
Montreal had not been initiated. However, the re­
sumption of this service does not change the con­
clusions in Professor Booths article significantly,
since the only southeastern Quebec community to be­
nefit even marginally from this service is St. Johns,
Quebec.
JUST 9EFORE THE STATION WAS FIN­
ally demolished, this is Canad­
ian Wationals station stop at
Lennoxville, ~u~bec. The date
of Pror8ssor J.D.Booths photo
uJas April, 1970.
_1_ THE COUNTRY STATION UF CAN.LDIA~J
~ National Railways at Hemmingford,
• qu~bec, was quite unique. This is
the way it looked in June, 1969,
when Professor Booth took the
picture.
WlllI11S
Edit,orial Staff CANADIAN nAIL
Der;mber ]q72
WHAT SHOULD TURN UP THE OTHER DAY AT UNITED RAILWAY SUPPLYS
Montreal facilities but two Fairbanks-Morse H-16-44s from the
Ferrocarril Chihuahua al Pacifico (Mexico), Numbers 502 & 620.
Number 502 is a high-nose with a steam generator (passenger unit,may­
be?), while Number 602 is a rebuilt low-nose. The two units are to
be repaired -no renewal of the larger components -and returned to
the FCalP by the end of November, 1972. Other units are expected to
come to Montreal for the same procedures. C. & K. De Jean.
SPEAKING OF UNITED RAILHAY SUPPLY, it is rumored that this company
has been purchased by Precision National Corporation. Hhile
this would seem to be quite a logical occurrence, it is as
yet unconfirmed by the two companies involved.
LOOKING S01JlHVJESI FROM L ENFANT PLAZA IN WASHINGTON, D.C.,
National Railroad Passenger Corporations AMTRAK is planning
yet another international railroad passenger service, this
time with the Republic of Mexico. The proposed service will run via
Little Rock, Arkansas and Dallas, Texas, probably using the former
route of the Aztec Eagle through Nuevo Laredo, Mexico.
AMTRAK also wants to get something going between Oakland and Ba-
kersfield, California, in the San Joaquin Valley. AMTRAKs plans al­
so include the purchase of eight turbotrains or other high-speed
trains, as well as some fairly fast conventional trains. Wonder what
all that means? S.S.Worthen.
MR. ALLAN GRAHAM, CHAIRMAN OF THE RAILHAY HISTORY COMMITTEE
of the Prince Edward Island Heritage Foundation reports that
the Committee acquired the former Canadian National Railways
station at Elmira, P.E.I., during the week of 16 October 1972. Un­
daunted by the fact that it may be five years before funds are ava­
ilable for restoration of the station -and by that time, it may be
a complete ruin -the Committee is hard at work on the project to
photograph all of the Islands railway stations. Only five remain to
be done. A history of the Prince Edward Island Railway from 1870 to
1900 is being /ri tten by a member of the Committee.
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS HAS FINALLY DECIDED TO RENEW
twelve troublesome wooden bridges between Chilliwack and Van­
couver, British Columbia on the 14-mile stretch of its main
line through the upper delta of the Fraser River. The llO to 150-
foot long bridges that were replaced were all timber structures and
the new ones are made /ith prestressed concrete beams. In some cases
land-fill and culverts were used. The preliminary work of pile-dri­
ving and dock assembly werd done first. The components of the new
bridges .Tere stockpiled at each site to allow quick and efficient
change-out. CN trains were detoured over CP RAILs main line for 60
hours, while the work was being done. CP RAIL, which uses a portion
of CNs main line to get its coal trains to Roberts Bank, stockpiled
enough coal to maintain normal ship operations Then CN s line was
CA NAD IAN R A I L
CN trains were detoured over CP RAILs main line for 60 hours
while the work was being done. CP RAIL, ihich uses a portion of CN s
main line to get its coal trains to Roberts Bank, stockpiled enough
coal to maintain normal ship operations when CNs line was closed.
Hitherto, bridge replacement operations were conducted be­
tween train movements, resulting in severe delays and subsequent
slow orders. In this operation, CN allowed a period of 60 hours to
get the work done. After that, almost normal schedules for main-line
trains were resumed. CN NEWS.
AT THE BEGINNING OF OCTOBER, 1972, IT WAS RUMORED THAT
MLW Industries had completed the necessar.y modifications to
the trucks and engines and had shipped 12 of the 64 units for
the Nigerian Railways.
The Portuguese National Railways had placed a large order for
spare parts for their RS3s, purchased some years ago.
As reported elsewhere, MLW-Industries has joined the Budd Com­
pany and Morrison-Knudsen Construction Company to modernize and ex­
pand Burlington Northerns commuter service into Chicago. MK and MLW­
I have cornered a $ 6 million + contract to rebuild and upgrade 21
EMD E-type passenger units for this service. Work will be done in a
new
MK shop at Boise, Idaho.
Meanwhile, MLW-I in Montreal was reported to have a back-log
of 167 units of various models, some for export to Greece.
Editorial Staff.
AFTER BEING RETURNED TO THE C&O BY CANADIAN NATIONAL,
Pierre Patenaude reports that the following GP9s were again
leased by Cn in September and October, 1972:
6026 6027+ 6030 6033+ 6037 6045 6050+ 6140+ 6150+ 6158+
6166+ 6189+ 6192 6194 6197
(+
= leased in September; remainder leased in October)
FURTHER TO THE QUESTION REGARDING THE LAST
regularly-scheduled, steam-hauled passenger train in the
United States, there seems to be general agreement in com­
munications from our readers that it occurred on the Grand Trunk
Western Railroad. The following dates and runs have been placed in
competition:
Date
27 Mar. 1960
7 Aug. 1960
20 Sept. 1961
NOTES:
Between
Detroit-Durand, Mich.
Chicago-South Bend, Ind.
Detroit-Durand, Mich.
Engine
Train No.
1-21 6319
2-21 6322
(spec. )6322
21 6323 Not
es
A & B
C
D
-A—-C.R.H.A.NEWS REPORT No. 111, ~lliy, 1960, Page S-19: R.F.Corley
B Mr. W.A.Kirkpatrick, Evanston, Ill.: perconal participation
C RAILWAY AGE, August, 1960
D Mr. Donald W. Etter, Willis, Mich.: personal participation.
CANADIAN
179 R A I L
CANADIAN PACIFIC LIMITED I S DIVISION CP HOTELS
will put the Company back in Halifax, Nova Scotia, when the
Chateau Halifax is completed in 1973. The new hotel is under
construction in the downtown shopping area of Halifax, on Scotia
Square. Bob Tennant.
THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION LOST
a second Honorary Officer this year, when Mr. Ralph Day re­
tired as Chairman of the Toronto Transit Commission in June.
Mr. Karl Mallette of Scarborough was named by the Council of Met­
ropolitan Toronto as a TTC Commissioner, to succeed to the seat pre­
viously held by Mr. Day. Mr. Franklin I. Young, also a Commissioner,
was elected as the new Chairman of the TTC on 5 July 1972. Mr. Young
is a former northern airline pilot and was an AIR CANADA executive
more recently. His career has been in the transportation field, al­
beit not in the surface sector. W.J.Bedbrook.
ABour MID-YEAR, 1972, HAWKER SIDDELEY (CANADA) LIMITED
of Thunder Bay, OntariO, began to outshop the first of 46
PA-3 rapid transit cars for the Port of New York Authority
(PATH). Some of these cars travelled east to Toronto on their own
wheels
J
via CP RAIL. W.J.Bedbrook.
JOHN R. EICKER, EDITOR OF THE INTERCHANGE
of the Baltimore, Maryland, Chapter of the National Railway
Historical SOCiety, pointed out in a recent issue that AMTRAK
lost $ 935 on each and every passenger it carried during its first
year of operation. Penn Central
J
over whose lines the majority of
AMTRAK services are operated, lost the most money for the corpora­
tion -$ 43,600,578. That is qUite a lot of money!
CANADIAN VICKERS LIMITED OF MONTREAL BEGAN SHIPMENT
to the General Electric Company, Erie, Pa., about mid-year of
the first of 144 cars being built jointly by the two companies
for the New York Metropolitan Transit Authority and the Connecticut
Transportation Authority (NYMTA and eastern CTA). Vickers are buil~
ing the bodies and GE Erie is installing the electrical gear and
trucks. W .J .Bed brook.
CANADIAN
380
R A I L
THE TRURO, NOVA SCOTIA, PASSENGER STATION OF CANADIAN NATIONAL
Railways is in the midst of being replaced. The eastern and
western extremities of the former classic Intercolonial Rai~
way station have been demolished, leaving the main central portion,
with its imposing tow~r (picture, page 271,No. 205, CANADIAN RAIL,
December, 1968). A group of Save the Station citizens of Truro
tried -alas, unsuccessfully -to have the imposing ICR structure
preserved as an historic landmark. Bob Tennant.
PLANS FOR REFURBISHING CAPE BRETON ISLANDS
Sydney and Louisburg Railway for steam-powered passenger tr­
ain operation between Victoria Junction – 4 miles from Sydney
Nova Scotia -and Louisburg, mile 39, during the summer tourist
season, have been prepared by PROJECT RAILLINE. This organization is
a joint venture of the Cape Breton Development Corporation (DEVCO)
and Nova Scotia Eastern Institute of Technology. PROJECT RAILLINEs
report was to be submitted to DEVCO, the major sponsor, in September.
A decision on whether or not this exciting plan would be implemented
was expected shortly thereafter. (This item is from THE MARITIME EX­
PRESS,
from an exclusive interview with Mr. Del Amiro, Director,
PROJECT RAILLINE.)
ONCE KNOWN AS WESTERN FLYER COACH (1964) LIMITED,
modernized, Manitoba-owned Flyer Industries Limited had an
international happening early in October, 1972, when the
first of what is hoped will be a new series of trolleybuses rolled
out of its shops, en route to San FranciSCO, California. This west­
coast city operates one of the largest fleets of trolleybuses in
North America and Flyer Industries hopes that this prototype will be
the first of an order for 210 vehicles for the California system.
Flyer Industries is the only remaining builder of trolley­
coach bodies, having entered the rebuildinifield in 1967.The Com­
pany has specialized in the rebuilding of trolleybuses, using the
propulsion systems of units ClaSSified as non-operable by the
transit company requesting the rebuild. It has received rebuild or­
ders for 151 units from the Toronto Transit Commission and for an­
other 40 units from Hamilton, Ontario.
Other potential customers include the U.S. cities of Boston,
Philadelphia, Dayton and Seattle. Canadian cities who may be in­
terested include Vancouver, Edmonton and Calgary, the transit de­
partment of the latter said to be much impressed by a demonstrator
bus which was used in the city a couple of years ago.
Western Flyer Coach was founded in Winnipeg in 1930 by Mr.
John Coval. Mr. A.J .Thiesen assumed control in 1963 and reorganiz­
ed the Company in 1964. The Government of Manitoba purchased a con­
trolling interest in the Company in 1970.
With entry into the United States market thought to be as­
sured, Flyer Industries are pressing forward with plans for a $ 2.5
million plant in neighbouring Transcona, scheduled for completion
in December 1972 and increasing the Companys potential annual out­
put between its two plants to 1,300 units.
With mounting pressure from the antipollutionists in Canadas
cities, as well as from similar organizations in the United States,
CANADIAN J81 R A I L
the future of the trolleybus as an urban transportation mode seems
assured. Toronto thinks so. So does Hamilton! Winnipeg ought to.
Calgary and Edmonton are still undecided. But the real winner in
this contest will be the first trolleybus builder ltlho hits the mar­
ket with a new, simple, modular control and propulsion system.
~ …..
-~~
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS AND THE CITY OF MONTREAL
8.S.Worthen.
let the people know on 13 October 1972 that some of the land
adjacent to the historic first railway entrance into the City
of Montreal -via the Montreal and Lachine Rail Road -would change
hands soon for between $ 9 and $ 10 million. A few days before this
announcement, CNs President N.J.Macmillan noted during an interview
that the Company had a considerable amount of property in the cities
of Quebec and Winnipeg, which presently supports only tracks and the
occasional boxcar and which represents an extremely desirable area
for development purposes. The same -by extension -was probably
true for Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver.
Proceeding in line with the Presidents statement, CN set
about consummating the sale to Montreal, under discussion since 1968
of about 20 acres of land between Guy and Atwater Streets in the
Little Burgundy district. Mr. Yvon Lamarre, a spokesman for and
member of the Citys Executive Committee, said that the land was to
be used for construction of between 1,600 and 2,000 new dwelling
units.
CANADIAN R A I L
Railway historians will recognize this general 2rea as ad­
joining on the original right-of-way of the Montreal and Lachine Ra­
il Road, opened in November 1847, the first raihTay to enter Mon­
treal. After the completion of the Grand Trunk Railway from Montreal
to Toronto in 1856, the downtown terminus of the Montreal & Lachine
at St-Bonsecours Street on Chaboillez Square became a very desirable
piece of property to the Grand Trunk, since its station was in dis­
tant Pointe-St-Charles.
In due time, the Grand Trunk leased the Montreal and Cham­
plain Railroad Company (30 June 1864) and finally purchased it on
14 June 1872, getting in the process the Montreal & Lachine and an
entry into downtown Montreal. The Grand Trunks first action in 1864
was to lay a third rail from St-Henri Station to Bonaventure Station
to accommodate its 5-foot 6-inch-gauge cars over the 4-foot 8!-inch­
gauge line of the Montreal & Lachine. The second action of the GTR
was to acquire the real estate adjoining on both sides of its new
line. This it did and this CN has today. Part of this, Montreal will
purchase.
CN will retain title to that parcel of land on which the pr~
sent Bonaventure Express Terminal, fruit and piggyback tracks are
located, from Peel to Guy Streets.
Mr. Lamarre noted that the sale agreement had yet to be ra­
tified by Quebecs Ministry of Municipal Affairs. A CN spokesman
said that removal of the tracks from the property contemplated in
the purchase agreement could begin by January 1973 if the sale was
approved rapidly by Quebec and that CN had plans to deve10p the
Bonaventure express, fruit and piggyback terminal as a mini-Place­
Ville-Marie complex, just down Peel Street from the projected
Place St-Georges development of Marathon Realties, on the present
site of CP RAILs Windsor Station. S.S.Worthen.
EIDIN J LA REGION DE QUEBEC A AUSSI SA LOCOMOTIVE A VAPEUR!
Lundi matin, le 31 juillet dernier, les automQbilistes de Que··
bec maugreaient a bon droit contre la lenteur de la circula­
tion. La raison de cet embouteil1age etait la presence incongrue d­
une locomotive a vapeur de 165,000 livres qui, bien sar, ne pouvait
se mouvoir de ses propres moyens. Il saggisait de la locomotive
0-6-0, numero 38 de la Gulf Pulp & Paper Company de Clarke City,
Quebec. Ce mastodonte dacier termina son periple par Ie boulevard
Masson, jusque dans Ie boulevard lOrmiere.
De fait, cest sur Ie terrain de M. Yvon Bordeleau, encanteur,
que cette vieille locomotive toute roui11ee, datant de 1930, tr6ne
depuls cette fin de semaine la. MonSieur Bordeleau qui vient de se
porter acqu6reur du ranch appartenant l Monsieur Martin ONeill, a
decide de faire cette locomotive sa reclame otficielle.
C
est a Clarke City que M. Bordeleau a deniche cette machine qu
!l acheta il y a deja trois ans. Profit ant de son demenagement
sur le boulevard de lOrmlere, M. Bordeleau a fait venir la loco­
motive a Quebec. Chargee dur une remorque de Clarke City a. Sept­
l
Ies, elle rut acheminee dans la semaine du 23 juillet de Sept-lIes
~ Quebec, par bateau, et demenagee jusque dans Ie quartier Neuf­
c
hatel sur une autre remorque geante.
M. Bordeleau qui a egalement achete plusieurs milliers de
pieds de rail, caresse Ie projet de remettre en etat cette locomotive
assez extraordinalre, afin de pouvoir la faire circuler autour de sa
nouvelle propr16te. Sur
la plaque de construction apposee sur Ie cylindre gauche
on peut y lire Ie numero de serie 2187 -Davenport Locomotive Works,
fuvenport, Iowa.
A ma connaissance. ce seralt la premiere fois quun canadien de la
langue fran~aise sinteressc a la preservation dune loco~o­
tive a vapeur au point dinvestir plusieurs milliers de dollars a
cette finl Esperons que dautres imiteront son louable geste!
Communique de M. Roger Boisvert, Quebec.
AT LAST! THE QUEBEC AREA, TOO, HAS A STEAM LOCOMOTIVEl
On Monday morning, 31 July 1972, the traffic in one part of
the City of Quebec was severely impeded by a 16S.ooo-pound
steam locomotive, moving down Masson Boulevard to the Boulevard de
lOrmie
re. This was an 0-6-0, formerly Number 38 of the Gulf Pulp &
Paper Company at Clarke City, Quebec.
Mr. Yvon Bordeleau of Quebec recently purchased a ranch
Mr. Martin ONeill and thereafter decided to bring the steamer
C
larke City, where she had been Since Mr. Bordeleau purchased
three years ago. from
fr
om
her
On the builders plate, affixed to the lett-hand cylinder, you c
an read the builders number 2187 and the name wDavenport Locomotive
lorKs, Davenport. Iowa • As
fa:! as the riter knows, this is the firzt time a Canadian
of the French language has interested himself in the preservation of a
steam locomotive. Lets hope othern will follow his good example! R
eport from Mr. Roger Boisvert, Quebec.
PHLIP ;0. I.ass (r:l2) poses with leased L u25C ,,umber 2301, at Thund!!r Bey, Ontario, on I-ay 23, 1972.
OANADIAN RAIL
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