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Canadian Rail 250 1972

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Canadian Rail 250 1972

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J:..V OVEDJ:EI EFI.. 1. 9 7 2

jeRO~~ THE DIiI[)E B l ~ CPRail
H.Il.Elson
W
heth.er it be on the head -end of CP
RAILs crack transcontinental pas­
senger train,the Canadian,or be­
hind the throttle of a fast freight
from Vancouver,British Columbia to
Calgary,Alberta, railroading through
Canadas Rocky Mountains is always
a challenging and ever-changing ex­
perience.
The heart of this mountainous country is the 136-mile run over
the Laggan Subdivision of CP RAIL,east from Field, Bri tish Columbia,
up and over the main chain of the Rockies and the Continental Divide
to the valley of the Bow River and onward to Calgary,Alberta, where
th·e vast flatness of the prairies begins.
IJaiting with the Laggan Sub. crew at the station at Field, the
sound of the eastbound trains air-horn,corning up the valley of the
Kicking Horse,ricochets echoing from side to side in the valley be­
low and from mountain to r:J.ountain above. The nel! crew for the east­
bound train makes a final check of their atches and orders, just as
the lead units of the twenty-two car,stainless steel Canadian rum­
bles up to the end of the platform,exactly on time.
Lets ride the lead unit -Number 1400 -of a three-unit lash­
up,which includes Number 1902,a powerful B unit,with A unit No.
lLa6, trailing. Even before the whee ls have stopped turning, the en­
gineer for the eastbound trip calls up to th~ cab,asking if all of
the units are running all right and whether or not there are any
oroblems.
-All okay,is the reassuring answer,as the Revelstoke-based cr-
ew climbs dONn from the cab.
There is still time to look back along the 164-foot length of
tuscan red,chrome yellow and grey and to listen to the rhythmiC throb
of the prime-movers, recalling that these giants cost about $ 100 per
horsepower-unit and that there are 4,500 such units combined in the
WINDING DOWN THE wBIG HILL BETWEEN PARTRIDGE AND YoHo, B.C., CP RAIL
westbound freight with a couple of DRF-30a units on the point, was
caught for this months cover on 18 August 1971 by Ro~ald C. Hill.
FROM THREE-QUARTERS OF THE WAY UP MOUNT OGDEN, YOU CAN LOOK WEST DOWN
the valley of the Kicking Horsff River to Field, B.C. in the distance.
When the artist made this sketch, the tunnel under Cathedral Crags
had not been daylighted and no one had heard of the Trans~Canada
Highway. But the Lower and Upper Spiral Tunnels were there, as were
the two crossings of the Kicking Horse River. Sketch courtesy CP Ltd.
CANADIAN
32,.
R A I L
three engines. Although popularly called diesels or diesel units
these engines are basically electric locomotives which carry their
O;/n generating plants.
The prime-mover in each of the three power sections is a 16-cyl­
inder,two-cycle,V-type diesel engine,rated at 1.500 horsepower. This
prime-mover turns a generator which,in turn,feeds electrical energy
to the traction motors on the trucks. These motors are geared to the
axles and thus provide power for the train.
Lets reach for the grab-iron and follow the engineer and fire­
man up the steel side of the unit to the vantage point of the cab,
while the airbrake test is being made for the car inspectors along
the train. Safety is of prime importance on CP RAIL and the Company
does everything possible to guarantee it. Brake tests at Field are
obligatory. Moreover, in addition to th.e engineer, the fireman is
on board to check the diesel engines,pick up orders,check signals
and act as engineer in an emergency.
In front of the fireman I s seat is a control panel, on ~lhich a
bell rings or a light flashes whenever part of the equipment malfun­
ctions. Th.e engineer explains that the safety devices on the unit in­
clude a dead-man pedal,which must be depressed by his foot at all
times Ihen the diesel unit is operating. iVhenever the pedal is re­
leased,power is cut off and the airbrakes are applied to stop the
ANOTHER DAY -ANOTHER CP RAIL TRAIN 902:-CLIMBS LABORIOUSLY UP THE SIDE
of Cathedral Mountain, past Morantt, B.C., through the avalanche shel-
ter. Units Numbers 5529, 5520, 5554 and 5523 were on the point. W.R.
Linley, Secretary of the Ottawa Branch of the Association, took the
picture on 11 September 1968.
t
FOUR UNITS WITH PIGGYBACKS GROWL UP THE BIG HILL EAST OF CATHEDRAL,
B.C. -Canadian Pacific Railways Train 902 -on the way to the top of
Kicking Horse Pass, Lake Louise, Banff and Calgary. Photo courtesy CPR.
train. Thus,if the engineer were to become ill, the train Iould still
be brought to a stop safely,or slowed down until the fireman could
take over the operation of the train.
The cab of the unit is clean, roomy, quiet (as compared to the en­
gine room behind the bulkhead) and weatherproof. A control panel is
installed in front of the engineer,with half-a-dozen or so gauges and
swi tches, the latter operating the headlight, marker lights and other
accessories on the unit. At the engineers left is the throttle st­
and,airbrake controls and track-sanding valve,1Ihile on his right is
th~ engine-bell lever. Overhead,within reach,is the air-horn cord.
Soon, the air-,.-histle sounds twice. The engineer releases the
braJ<;es and gradually notches up the throttle. The prime-movers begin
their powerful roar and the train starts slowly out of the station,
through the yard,on its eastbound run to Calgary. Ahead,ttJe bril­
liant green light on the CTC signal announceS a clear block ahead.
In the distance,the track Iinds up the 101ler slope of Cathedral Moun­
tain.
To cross the Continental Divide,th.e Canadiar. must overcome a
difference in altitude of 1,265 feet, from the town of Field to the
top of the hill at Stephen. The Big Hill is ll~ miles of curvir.1}: )
tllisting raihlay and includes some of the most extraordir.ury mour.tain
scer.ery ir. Canada,alonl}: ,hat is p.lobably the most r.otable part of
CP RAILs trar.scontinental lir.a.
With the diesel er.gines roaring just behind the bulkhead, the
CANADIAN
326
R A I L
shiny stainless steel train winds up the hill,in the shadow of Cath­
edral Mountain,through the avalanche shelters, past the long siding
at Cathedral, finally turning towards the lower portal of Spiral Tun-
nel Number 1 • Just before entering the tunnel, the train rumbles
across the bridge over the foaming, rushing Kicking Horse River.
Entering Spiral Number 1, the engineer flips on the headlight
switch and explains that in the 2,922-foot long circular bore, the
train will turn through 226 degrees and emerge 50.4 feet higher on
the side of Mount Ogden, travelling in a vlesterly direction upgrade
towards the lower portal of Spiral Number 2. In the cab, the exhaust
fumes from the diesel engines are hardly noticeable, but as the train
emerges from the tunnel, the pale blue haze of diesel exhaust hangs
over th.e cars. As the long, silvery train curves around the side of
the valley,it passes over the lower portal of the tunnel it has just
left and crosses the raging, foaming Kicking Horse River for the sec­
ond time. Just ahead is the operating point of Yoho, 6.8 miles from
Field. About a mile-and -a-half further on, be 1011 the parking area and
overlook on the Trans-Canada Highway, is the long siding at Partridge,
l<1here a vlestbound freight is often 1-Taiting for the eastbound Canad­
ian •
As the train slowly climbs the 2% grade, the 10lTer portal of
Spiral Tunnel Number 2 comes into Viell. In this 3,255-foot bore under
Cathedral Crags and Vanguard Peal~ -both portions of Cathedral Moun­
tain,lO,L!·64 feet high -the Canadian will turn through 288 degrees,
emerging 55.7 feet higher on the side of Vanguard Peak and on a level
VJith the rushing Kicking Horse River, as it emerges from Hapta Lal~e,
its source.
Coming out of the tunnel, there is a magnificent view of tlw Kick­
ing Horse and Yoho Valleys beloVi. In less than a rrU.le, as the crol is
supposed to fly, the Canadian has climbed 105.7 feet. But this
11.5-mile stretch of track is true mountain railroading, requiring
constant vigilance on the part of the engine cre,. CTC signals are
invariably checl~ed, as are the warning flags, protecting the main­
tenance-of-way creVis and track inspectors, who are constantly patrol­
ling and working on this section.
The names of the operating points on the Big Hill are of
interest. Partridge is named for the railway employee who gave the
alarm wllen,in 1925,a huge rockslide came roaring dOVin the bare slope
of Cathedral Mountain. His timely warning cleared the immediate area
in time to prevent any loss of life.
THE LAUNDRY ON THE STATION CLOTHES-LINE AT PARTRIDGE, B.C., WASNT THE
same after a Canadian Pacific eastbound freight pounded up the hill
to the Upper Spiral Tunnel above Field with engines Numbers 5352 and
5443 on
11 July 1951. The photo is from the E.A.Toohey Collection.
HIGH ON THE MOUNTAINSIDE ABOVE THE KICKING HORSE RIVER, SECOND NUMBER
2, do~bleheaded with a 5800-class and Number 5924. passes over the
lower portal of Spiral Tunnel Number 1 near Yoho, B.C., on 11 July,
1951. The photo is from the E.A.Toohey Collection of the Association.
THE SECOND SECTION DF CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAYS TRAIN 2, ENGINES NUM­
bers 5811 and 5927, works up the grade to the Upper Spiral Tunnel near
Yoho, B.C., on 10 July 1951. The photo is from the E.A.Toohey Collection.

CANADIAN 110 R A I L
Sudde~ly,the engineer interrupts the conversatio~ to point out
several ~Japiti elk at t,he edge of the loads. lIe can tell you about
the time Iihe~ a train Ifas forced to come to a stop to avoid killing
several of these beautiful animals. Because this area is in Yoho Na­
tional Pa:(II:, the elk are protected from llunters aDd they seem to MOV!
it!
Soon, the train rumbles SlO,fly past the site of the old station
and Ilye at Hector,wflich used to be the Iitop of the hill in the days
before the Spi.ral Tunnels. As first cODstructed in 1882-83, the line
betl:een Field and Hector climbed steeply up a 4%-plus grade, traiDs
requiring up to six steam locomotives to mall:e the climb. The line
was
relocated in 1907-0B,the Spiral Tunnels were driven and today,
the TraDs-Canada Highway occupies parts of the original line.
The station at Stephen, now demolished, used to stand 219 feet
west of the Continental Divide,whicll is also the boundary of Banff
and Yollo National Parks,at an altitude of 5,)99 feet,the highest el­
evation on CP RAIL. To the right, through the trees, it is sometimes
possible to catch a glimpse of the massive wooden arch over the old
highvfay, -ihich marks the Great Divide II and the boundary between Br­
itish Columbia and Alberta. Through (or under) tllis lOoden arch runs
a little brook, which divides some distance further on into two tiny
streamlets. One of tllese turns Hestward to flovf into llapta Lal,-e and
the Kicll:ing Horse River, finally reaching the Pacific Ocean through
the mighty Columbia River. The other rivulet turns east to join the
Bow River and reaches the Atlantic Ocean through the South Saskatch­
ellan River and Hud SOD I S Bay.
From an altitude of 5,3)2 feet at Stephen, the Canadian begins
to descend the 1.8% grade tOHards Lall:e Louise and Banff. UsiDg the
dynamic braking system, the engineer controls tIle speed of the train
to the permitted maximum. At the top of the grade, the dynamic bral.e
system is selected on the throttle stand and the traction motors be­
come generators, the energy required to turn them holding back the
train. The power produced is dissipated through resistance grids,lo­
cated in th£ roof of each unit.
Minutes later, the station at Lake Louise appears in the dis-
tance. The train has descended only some 280 feet from Stephen.
IJ-Red board! calls the fireman and crosses to the engineerls
Side to lean out th.e cab door to picl. up th.e order hoop, held aloft
by the operator on the station platform. There are no extraordinary
instructions to the crew of the Canadian and after tile station
stop, the train will proceed onward to Calgary.
~ IT TAKES A FEW UNITS TO BOOST FREIGHT TRAINS OF EMPTIES AND LOADS OF
British Columbia forest products up the hill at Field, B.C. and over
the summit of Kicking Horse Pass, through the Spiral Tunnels. Here
is an eastbound CP RAIL freight on the middle level -with an MLW
M-630 on the point -about to cross the Kicking Horse River -for the
second tim~-on 15 August 1971. Photo was taken by Ronald C. Hill.

t
BY 196B, PARTRIDGE, B.C. WAS JUST A MILE-BOARD :jJ:IEN SECOND 901 WESTBOUND
came down the hill, headed by u~it5 8652, 4447, 4445 and 8631. W.R.l~nley
l~a5 there to take the picture on 11 September 1968.
There is a brief stop at Lake Louise station to entrain and de­
train passenge,ts for the C11ateau Lake Louise, before continuing the
lUl~ dmm the Bo:: River valley to Banff, through Bar.ff National Park.
iTo.J and again, trac;~side signs potnt to the high ;,lour.tain peaks, tel­
lir.g tl1e passer.ger thetr names. It is a comfortable ride througb
beauttful 8our.tair. sceneqr, yet r.o matter ho;! scenic the country may
be,the cre; is constantly or. the alert, but r.ot so pleoccupied as not
to be able to ~iave a greeting to the sectionmer. po,trolling the right­
of-vIay or to hikers or. the mountai.n trails.
Castle Mountain, nm, named Mount Eisenhowel, is a ;iell-knovm land­
marl~. In its s[1ado1.-1,:;e can see the westbound Canadian viaiting 1n
the siding at Hassive for us to pass on the maie line. Our train sl­
oCiS, to pass Train 1 and members of the cre\ Ilave a greetir.g from th.e
open vestibules. As the rear of our tratn clears tJ:le east switch, the
speed begins to ir.crease on the descending grade to Bar.ff. Banff is
a well-kr.o,n~ and important stop for Ghe ICanadiaD east and westbound
and,while passengers are alighting and boarding,the craw has the op­
portunity to check around the diesel units,before starting OD the
last non-stop lap of the long descent to Calgary.
In the afternooD sunlight,the long stlvery train winds along
the banks of the Bow River,in the shadow of the Fairholme Range,past
several osprey Dests built on specially-constructed crossbars on the
telegrapll poles. The famous Three Sisters Peaks and Grotto Nountatn
appear and are left bebind. Then the train 1.01).s through the BO.
River Gap,described as the eastern entrance to the rlockies. Leavir.g
tlle Gap behind, the clicl~-clack of -:he 1:lhee1s on the l.ai1 jotr.ts in-
.
CANADIAN R A I L
creases in tempo. DOIIn the spacious, green valley the speed climbs to
50 and then to 60 miles per hour, the green CTC signals pass -lith in­
creasing rapidity and the scenery changes from majestic mour.tains to
bare, high hills and then to ever-broader.ing plains. Suddenly, the
train rumbles across the bridge over the Eov, Ri.ver. and the mileage
board on th.e telegraph pole shmTS 25 miles to Calgary, the end of
the Laggan Subdivision. Road crossings become more frequent. The
engineer sounds the air-horn for everyone of them; r.evertheless, a
battered automobile barely beats the train across a crossing ahead.
fnenever I see a crossing-beater, exclaims the engineer, I
w
ish that he could be up here in the cab himself,to see how stupid
motorists can be. Then hed !mON v-That it really feels like to be
in my place!
Around a bend in the track, the skyline of Calgary appears, glOlil­
ing larger,taller,higher with each passing minute. The speed of the
train begins to decrease,as the engineer makes a brake application •
Now the train slows almost to a 1!Talking pace, as tile first of the in­
numerable sl:1i tches in the yard slide by. Then, under the towering sp­
ire of Husky Tower and beneath the Palliser Hotel,to slow to a stop
in the station, some 1900 feet below the Continental Divide.
On this particular t:cip of the eastbound Canadian over the
Laggan Subdivision, everything IJaS pleasant and ,Ti thout incident. But
t.here are days and nights when this run is a nightmare, in a blinding
blizzard,in a terrible thunderstorm or in the spring, when dangerous
rockslides threaten. Late in January,1972, the Canadian was stuck
fast in the mountain sr.o,,, for over LI·e hours.
In 1972,with diesel-electric engines for pONer,centralized traf­
fic cod,.rol and dynamic braking, railroading ir. tile Rockies could per­
haps be said to be less hazardous and less exciting than it HaS fifty
years a,go. On +;he cont.rary. The never-ending battle iith the forces
of nat ure cor.tinues and, to vlin tlli s battle, the cre:iS of the Can-
adian i;USt be ever watchful -true railroaders -possessir.g that
esser.tial quality, derived from years of experier.ce, which er.ables th.em
to take the Car.adian from division point to diviSion poir.t promptly
ar.d safely.
And after all,to the occaSional traveller, these men are long-
time erit;.0loyees of CP RAIL,Ilho are dOir.g the job that is expected of
them ..
TRAIN 13 WESTBOUND DITH ENGINE NUMBER 5930 ROUNDS LAKE WAPTA,NEAR HECTOR,
B.C. on the Canadian Pacific Railway on 13 July 1951. The photo was taken
by the late Allan Toohey and is from the Associations archives.
CANADIAN PACIFICS TRAIN FIRST NUMBER 3, ENGINE NUMBER 5444, PASSES THE
station at Partridge, B.C. on the downgrade to the lower Spiral Tunnel
and Field. The photo l~as taken on 10 July 1951. E.A.Toohey Collection.

CANADIAN R A I L
POST SCRIPI
Mr. J.A.Beatty, Director of Membership Services of the
Association, has kindly provided the folloNing historical background
for Mr. Elson1s story of the Field-Calgary main line of CP RAIL, with
particular reference to the Spiral Tunnels:
v[hen the main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway VIas opened
in 1885 and for many years thereafter, the stretch of track
between Hector and Field, British Columbia, bore unchallenged
the reputation of being the most difficult piece of standard­
gauge railNay to operate in North America.
It Nas well-built, well-ballasted and kept in perfect
condition, but the descent westbound and the climb eastbound
over the IIBig Hillll las so steep (4.5%) that the operation of
trains was both dangerous and expensive.
It required the use of 4 steam engines weighing 154
tons each to haul a train in the eastward direction (consisting
of from 14 to 28 freight cars, or 11 coaches) over the summit,
taking, under favourable conditions, about an hour to make the
trip.
Every westbound train Nas required to stop on reaching
Hector, at the top of the IIBig Hillll, while the air bral<;.es
and sanders •• ere tested. Eight miles an hour was the enforced
speed limit for passenger trains descending the hill, while
freight trains were restricted to a maximum of 17 loaded cars
by day or 9 by night.
If a descending train got out of control, there were
three safety switches, about 0.9 miles apart, with spurs lead­
ing a~Jay up the mountain side on a steep incline. These three
switches were manned twenty-four hours a day. The Switchmen
were notified by telephone whenever a train started do,m the
hill. The switches v[ere set for the safety spurs in the nor­
mal pOSition. As the dovm-bound train approached the safety­
SNitch, the switchman consulted the automatic speed indicator
and, if the descending train .vas exceeding the speed limit,
he kept the sy,i tch lined for the safety spur. If the speed
of the train was normal, he threw the s1i tch to allow the
train to continue on to the next safety point. After the tr­
ain had passed, he returned the safety switch to IInormalll ,
set for the spur.
Trains were operated over the IIBig Hillll on the
staff system. Staff machines at Hector or Field allowed the
removal from the machine of a small steel wand, vlhich allowed
the train conductor to proceed. The replacement of this metal
staff in the interlocking machine at Hector or Field allowed
another staff to be removed, whereupon the train conductor
of the next train on the line was allowed to proceed.
In 1907, the Company decided to reduce this remarkable
gradient and, in 1909, after twenty months of rapid work, the
two Spiral Tunnels, the first in North America, were opened.
The approximate cost of this vast project was $ 1.5 million,
CANADIAN R A I L
and the IIBig Hillll became a thing of the past. The Lf.5% gr­
ade was reduced to 2.2%, all danger was eliminated and, in­
stead of being able to make only 4 or 5 miles per hour ,/i th
four engines, two engines could now haul a train at 20 miles
per hour.
The project involved an increase in distance of 4.5
miles, two bridges over the Kicking Horse River and the
removal of 650,000 cubic yards of rock from the two spiral
tunnels. There were 75 carloads of dynamite (1.5 million
pounds of explosive) costing $ 250,000 used in the excavation.
In spite of the special complications introduced by
the spiral curves, the sections of the tunnels, which were
constructed from both ends, met exactly and the work is no­
table for having been completed from start to finish vlithout
a hitch in spite of its magnitude.
THE DOME TRAIN OF THE 70s -CP RAILS CANADIAI~ EASTBOUND REACHES
the summit of the Canadian Rockies at Sink Lake, B.C. at the top of
Kicking HorsE Pass. Ronald C. Hill took the picture in August,1971.

1I11LS
Editorial Staff CANADIAN HAIL
AMTRAK -AMERICAS NATIONHIDE RAIL PASSENGER SYSTEM –
finally made it to Montreal, Canada, on 30 September, 1972.
Designated in Canadian National Railways advance inform­
ation sheets as CN Trains 26 & 27, this first AMTRAK train was OSed
Central Station as Extra Lf036 at IljO hours EST, somewhat after the
advertised arrival time of 0845 hours.
The conSist of AMTRAK Train 60 -Montrealer -was:
AMTRAK equipment Train 60
Number
can no.
4036 A unit -nose forward
4316 A unit -nose forward
4038 A unit -nose backward
7002 coach none
7003
coach none
3952 coach none
5611 coach none
5613 coach front 8:557 -rear 8.J58
7000 coach 6031
8300
diner none
2633
sleeper PACIFIC SKIES none
2619
sleeper PACIFIC riJEADOW none
2616 sleeper PACIFIC HOME none
8301 diner none
2608
sleeper PACIFIC CREST ED-l
2606 sleeper PACIFIC COMMAND ED-2
3212
sleeper PINE TREE STATE ED-3
The
first four coaches had stencil marks on air reservoirs
and water tanks indicating that they had been inspected by the Wash­
ington Terminal Railroad on 09/23/72.
Apparently, everyone of thB six New England States -with
the possible exceptions of Maine and Rhode Island was anxious
to get a piece of the action. There was an emotion-charged message
distributed by the New Hampshire Association of Railroad Passengers,
brochures from STEAMTOWN U.S.A. and cocktail napkins from the Yankee
Silversmith Inn, Wallingford, Connecticut -all equally irrelevant
to this particular AMrRAK operation. There was a cute blonde in one
of the windows of the PINE TREE STATE. She was relevant!
Applicants for space reservations in Connecticut were ad­
vised about 15 September that the first four northbound trips were
sold out.
AMTRAKs second Montrealer on 1 October showed a definite
improvement in schedule-keeping, being OSed Central Station,Montreal
at 0925 EST with 2 units and Q cars.
And then -or,at least, soon -AMTRAK had to
the mundane task of reducing the estimated $ 400,000
predicted by the sceptics.
settle down to
annual deficit
S.S.Worthen.
;·lont>.ea1 STAR
AMTRAK
Thursday,. September
2(;,1972.
INAUGURATES
OVERNIGHT SERVICE TO
NEW YORK AND
WASHINGTON, D.C.
ALLEZ!
Starting September 29th, northbound; September 30th, southbound.
Amtrak. puts its best foot forward with this new international
service. So you enjoy restful, reclining coach seats. A choice of
private accommodations. A spacious lounge for socializing.
And, in the diner, Amtraks inviting new menus at attractively
low prices. Come aboard soon.
WASHINGTONIAN MONTREAlER
(Southbound·read down)
Lv. 7:10 p.m.
An; 9:10 p.m.
An; 10:10 p.m.
An; 10:40 p.m.
An; 10:55 p.m.
An; 12:13 a.m.
An; 1:30 a.m.
An; 2:10 a.m.
An; 4:25 a.m.
An; 5:03 a.m.
An; 5:50 a.m.
An; 7:33 am.
An; 8:15 a.m.
An; 9:00 a.m.
An; 9:40 am.
An; 10:07 a.m.
An; 11:19 a.m.
An; 12:00N
Montreal (CcntraJSLltlnn)
Sr. Albans
EssexJer.
Waterbury
Montpelier Jer.
White River Jet
Bellows Falls
Brattleboro
Springfield, Mass.
Hartford
New Haven
New York {Penn Station}
Newark
Trenton
Philadelphia
Wilmington
Baltimore
Washington, D.C.
(Northbound· read up)
An; 9:40 a.m.
An; 7:20 a.m.
An; 6:50 a.m.
An; 6:20 am.
An; 6:05 a.m.
An; 4:40 a.m.
An; 3:31 a.m.
An; 2:50 a.m.
An; 12:13 a.m.
An; 11:42 p.m.
An; 10:45 p.m.
An; 8:55 p.m.
An; 8:40 p.m.
An: 7:57 p.m.
An; 7:18 p.m.
An; 6:50 p.m.
An; 5:50 p.m.
Lv. 5 :05 p.m:
Low. Money·saving One·Way Coach Fares: Montreal to New York US$19.50.
To Washington US$28.00.
One·Way Roomette Fares {includes First Class charge}: Montreal to New York US$47.00.
To Washington US$63.00 .

Daylight saving time.
For train reservations and infannatian,call (514) 877-6550, or see adjoining Amtrak ad (ar listo( rrnvel agents.
CANADIAN R A I L
.. FIFTY YEARS AND MORE HAVE PASSED
since the Government of Canada was in the railway business
and cars bearing the inscription Canadian Government Rail­
ways could be seen. But in July, 1972, the Government of Canada,
in the person of the Honorable Otto Lang, Minister responsible for
the Hheat Board of Canada, announced the awarding of three contracts
for 2,000 covered grain hopper cars.800 will be built by the Nation­
al Steel Car Company of Hamilton, Ontario, 500 by ~4arine Industries
of Sorel, Quebec and 700 by Hawker Siddeley of Canada at Trenton,
Nova Scotia. Deliveries will begin early in the autumn of 1972 and
will be completed by mid-March, 1973.
The new cars will be 59 feet long and will have a cubic
capacity of 4,550 cubic feet. Tare weight will be 61,000 pounds and
load limit will be 202,000 pounds. Carrying capacity will be ),000
bushels of wh.eat weighing 100 tons. The car design allows top-load­
ing and bottom unloading and it has been calculated that they can
bring to Canadas ocean ports about 150 million bushels of grain a
year.
Canadian National Railways and CP RAIL car designers, in
consultation with the Canadian Hheat Board and Information Canada
have produced a distinctive colour design for the new cars. The
right-hand third of the car is a bright canary yellow with two sty­
lized heads of wheat -the full height of the car -one in solid
salmon brown and the other in brown outline. The same brown covers
the remainder of the car. At the opposite end above the centre-line,
running from the car end towards the centre is the bar and leafof
the Government of Canada logo, followed by the words Government of
Canada in the English and French languages, in two-line groupings,
all in yellow.
Hanting to make the announcement in mid-July, the Wheat
Board was
unable to secure a prototype car from the contractors on
such short notice. Accordingly, Canadian National Railways loaned
the Government of Canada one of their new covered hopper cars and
it was painted above. However, it still retained Canadian National
reporting marks and was, in fact CN 379024, temporarily altered to
CX 379024 for July 14, 1972, the day the announaement was made at
Ottawas CN-CP RAIL station.
The first loaded movement of the prototype car in its new
colours was from Rowatt, Saskatchewan to Thunder Bay, Ontario, on
24 August 1972. L.C.Perry and CN News Bureau.
MR. JOHN HOFFIclEISTER S EXCELLENT ARTICLE
on CP RAILs Baldwin diesel-electric units on Vancouver
Island prompted a reader to iTrite to point out that Bald­
win-built units are operated by bTO other companies in Canada, both
located in British Columbia. At Delta, B.C., a Baldl1in swi tcher
loads and unloads B.C,-Alaska train ferries at Delta Alaska Ter­
minals. Currently, this unit is painted a total sky-blue ( even
the trucl~s) except for small white letters under the cab 11indow say­
ing DAT 1. Even the builders plates h.ave been removed. This unit
is believed to have been used previously in the Crowsnest coal re­
gion.

CANADIAN
342
R A I L
The remalnlng Baldwin unit lives at Ladysmith, B.C., on
Vancouver Island and inllabits a small Vlooden engine house belonging
to Crown Zellerbach Corporation, about 100 feet from the crossing at
grade with CP RAILs Esquimault & Nanaimo Subdivision. The crossing
at grade is remarl~ble in that it is still protected by upper and
lovler quadrant semaphore signals, worked by pipe-throlls from an
ancient signal tower.
TIle CroVln Zellerbach Baldwin is powered by an in-line, 8-
cylinder Delavergne diesel engine and the roof of the unit is stud­
ded /i th eight exhaust stacl:s, one per cylinaer.
This arrangement is advantageous for the motive povler super­
intendent, as it is easy for 11im to tell which cylinders are lor I:­
ing efficiently and which not. On one day, cylinder 1 smoked grey­
ish-wllite; numoer 2 emitted blacl: smoke; numbers 3 and Ii-showed no
smoke at all, :lllile 5 blew intermittent smokerings. 6 & 7 emitted
very little smoke and 8 s exhaust was inVisible, due pell1aps to an
apparent serious internal maladjustment which caused the engine to
produce an odd, gargling nOise, as though sometlling VJere gravely
wrong internally.
This remarkable unit operates weekdays, starting its da­
ily tour at about 0600, heading off 22 miles to the Nanaimo Lakes
region. Heturning to Ladysmith mid-worning, it dumps the logs on
the racks into Stuart Channel, an inlet of ths Straits of Georgia,
and dashes bacl: into tile forest for more. Two trips daily are made
and the C-Z Baldviin is usually bacl: in the enginellOuse by 1300.
K.H.Goslett.
THE ROSTER OF IHE BRIlISH COLUMBIA RAILI-lAY
included in Mr. C .11 .Creighton s exce llent artic le North
to the Yukon in the September, 1972 issue ::Jf our maga­
zine CANADIAN RAIL, No. 248, is clarified by Mr. R.F.Corley, one
of the contributors. Mr. Corley points out that:
(1) there are three B-B S-13 switchers: Nos. 1001-1005;
(2) t:lO RS3s ITere purchased from the Lake Superior and Ishpeming
Railroad in February, 1972.,Numbers 1605 & 1606. These be-
came Numbers 559-560 ::Jf the Pacific Great Eastern Railway;
(3) Tio
C-h20s Vlere purchased from the Lehigh & Bud son River
Railroad, their Numbers 2,) & 26, renumbered 631-6)2 by the
Pacific Great Eastern.
CP RAILS nft C-LlNERS, THE SUBJECTS OF MUCH INTEREST TO
diesel-electric enthusiasts recently, early in September
,,ere in storage at Nelson, B.C. Numbers L~053, lW57, 4065
and 4105 were stored outSide witll their stacks capped. Number 4104
ias in the diesel shop lith pistons and connecting-rods removed .
Also stored outside with stacks capped were 12 H-line FMs.
Meanwhile, two H-16-4l~s, Numbers 8715 & 8716, ~ere work­
ing lith the SPENO rail-grinding car between Megantic, Quebec and
GreenVille, I.iaine, on CP RAILs Short Line to Saint John, New
Brunsl-lick.
CANADIAN R A I L
THE (ill-lITE PASS AND YUKON ROUTE
during the past year Vias just as busy renevling some old
structures and building one important nell one as it Vias
hauling containers to Skagway and passengers to Lake Bennett.
Scheduled for completion late in 1971 vias a replac8ment steel
bridge for the old lOoden A-frame trestle at mile lit -Glacier,
Alaska. The new structure, 76 feet long and about 4·0 feet high,
was built outside and around the trestle vrhich it replaced. De­
signed by Kinlen Engineering Limited of Vancouve.r, B.C., it was
built by Manson-Osberg Construction Company of Seattle,Hashington.
Follmiing the disasterous fire which destroyed the round­
house and shops at Skagway, Alaska, the site was c18ared and new
car and locomotive repair shops were constructed. These facilities
are housed in a new 200 x 200-foot building. The heavy-duty repair
tracl, 180 feet long, is equipped ,i th platforms at different levels
for efficient fOrk. Alongside it is the running repair track of the
same length, with a pit for changing out traction motors on di88el
units. Th.is track is serviced by a 20-ton overhead crane.
In the centre of the building is a machine Sh0P, woodwork
shop, stores room, offices and a lunchroom area.
On the other side 0f thie centre core are the Car Repair
and Maintenance Shops, IVith two 200-foot tracks.
The new service and repair facilities have been designed
and constructed .lith great attention to fire-retardant details. The
deSign and construction were by Manson-OSberg C0nstruction Company
of Seattle, Hashington. Hhite Pass Container Route News.
CANADIAN R A I L
THE AUSTRIAN FEDERAL RAln{ AYS (OBB) PURCHASED
from the Swedish firm AESA in the winter of 1971-72, four
thyristor-controlled electric locomotives (B-B) similar to
the Rc2 series, used on the Swedish State Railways and tested on the
Norwegian State Railways by CP RAIL. These locomotives, road numbers
1043.01 through 1043.04, were assigned to the depot at Villach and
have been in use principally on heavy freight trains on the Tauern
Line from Villach to Salzburg.,
Naturally, with the international interest shown in this
type of electric locomotive, the new units were subjected to impor­
tant technical studies and many tests. The main problem encountered
in the use of thyristor-controlled electric locomotives is the po­
tential problem of interference with signal and telecommunication
circuits. In addition, their power demand is exceptionally high. To
study this latter condition, two of the units were double-headed on
the Tauern Route, hauling freights of about 1,600 tons. Of major
interest is the effect of the heavy current demand on the catenary
voltage and measures were examined to maintain and support line
voltage in substations and transmission lines supplying sections of
the line where the use of thyristor-controlled units may eVentually
be increased.
The importance of these experiments to the proposed Cal­
gary-Vancouver electrification of CP RAIL is evident and at least
one observer has been to Villach to investigate the operation.
Editorial Staff & La Vie du Rail.
IN MID-1972, CANADIAN NAlIONAL RAILV1AYS HAD ON LEASE
a number of Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad units, which were
assigned to Symington Yard, Prairie Region. In addition,
there were Quebec, North Shore & Labrador Railway units Nos. 138,
171, 177, 170 (GP9s) and 120 (GP7); Bangor & Aroostook Railroads
GP7s, Nos. 62 & 63. By July, there was a QNS&L GP9 No. 132 added,
while Precision National Corporation had contributed GP8s, Nos.
969 & 971 (ex-Detroit, Toledo & Ironton Railroad) and GPIOs Nos.
31t19,
3L~45 & 3634. This information from Pierre Patenaude.
mE MOMENTUM CREATED BY THE OPENING OF THE EXTENSION
of the British Columbia Railway to Fort Nelson, B.C is
not by any means being lost. A new coal deposit, discover­
ed in the Chetwy-nd, B.C. area, dll hopefully bring some quarter-of­
a-million dollars annually over a 20-year period and will convert
Chehlynd to a thriving mining-railway community. A 37-mile branch
line from the town to the mine location will be undertaken by the
BCR, regardless of whether or not Brascan Limited of Toronto decides
to exercise its option to develop Brameda Resources Limited ( Van­
couver) Sukunka coal deposit.
If development is undertaken, BCR will invest $ 9 million
on construction and $ 15 million to buy 300 coal cars and 17 diesel
locomotives. Mn{-I is said to be very interested in this order, as
nearly all of the present units on the BCR are products of this
Montreal firm. Editorial Staff.
CANADIAN
lh5
R A I L
_I~ SIX YEARS AFlER THE OFFICIAL END OF STEAM
on the Societe National des Chemins de fer Belges -other-
wise the Belgian National Railways -which occurred at
Denderleeuw, near Bruxelles on 20 December 1966, steam locomotive
Number 29.013 of the SNCB was brought out of storage to assist in
commemorating another event.
On 2 September 1972, SNCB engine Number 29.013 hauled a
special train on a circular tour around Bruxelles to commemorate
the Tenth Anniversary of the Association pour Ie Musee du Tramway at
Val de lAisne. The trip started at Schaerbeek and ran through Hal,
Denderleeuw, Zottegem, Bruxelles Midi, Bruxelles Nord and termina­
ted at Schaerbeek locomotive dep6t.
No 29.013 …. IaS one of 300 2-8-0s built by the Montreal Lo­
comotive Horks, Montreal, Canada in 1945 for the SNCB. These consol­
idation-types were designated as Type 29 by th.e SNCB and were
frequently used on passenger and freight trair.s in the Meuse River
valley,vlhich was the native region of our member, Mr. A.E.G.Arnold,
who sends this information.
The accompanying photograph, taken by Mr. Arnolds friend
Mr. G. Gauthier on 2 September 1972, shows the AMUTRA Tenth An­
niversary Special at Hal, where the consist of antique compartment­
type coaches was exchanged for an all-steel coach train, for the
remainder of the excursion to Denderleeuw-Bruxelles-Schaerbeek.
CANADIAN R A I L
.. THE ORDEH FOR THIRTY t.1L~20 fofLU INDUSTRIES DIESEL UNITS
placed in mid-July 1972 by Canadian National Railways, is
silSnificant because these units will have entirely new
cabs, the product of SNs structural and visual redesign groups.
The new desigr. Y·,ill provide better visibility, improved heating and
ventilation systems, more comfortable seating and an improved dis­
play of gauges and instruments.
Amenities for the engine creH will include a refrigerator,
a hotplate, lockers for clothes and an enclosed, heated toilet. The
four lindols in the cab front are of double-thiclmess glass, with
a fine iiire mesh lami.nated between the to layers, <,hich enables
rapid defogging and defrosting.
Instruments and gauges /ill be larger and more legible.Th.e
speedometer is mounted above the I·dr.dows at the midpoint of tile cab
so tilat it is visible from almost any position in the cab. On tile
control stand, dials and gauges are arranged in a pattern which will
be standard in all future CN units. Controls and levers have also
been redesigned to a standard patte~n. The noise level in the new
cabs will be lower th.an the 90-decebel limit specified by the na­
tional standards for diesel-unit cabs. Heavier cornerposts for the
cab Till strengtllen the structure and provide extra protection for
the cre/ in case of accident.
In the full-width nose, there will be a clothes locker ,
an cnclosed toilet room Iith full-height access door and the sand­
boxes, one on each side, will act as force-absorbers and cushioners
in case of collision.
Crew comfort in the cab is assured by two doors at the rear
of the cab lith overlapping door-jambs, sinilar to tile door leading
to the nose of the unit. 1hese doors are essentially draft-free and
easily opened in emergencies. Interior Ivalls of molded fibreglass
can be easily cleaned and have no sharp edges. Half-inch-thick st­
eel plate is used in the overall construction. To reduce drafts
even further, number boxes and classification liglt.-receptacles are
accessible only from the outside!
The nevi cabs for these units represent a great improvement
in diesel cab design and this is the first time tllat this essential
part of a diesel unit has been constructed incorporating recommend­
ations from many design and operating groups. CN NeTs Bureau.
THE NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD OF THE UNIrED STATES
is being urged to take steps which JQuld considerably
change the appearance of the conventional boxcar nov
running on North Americas railways. Because of the increasing
frequency of accidents involving trespassers on railroads and
unauthorized climbing on and over cars and structures, the
Board has been urged to consider the expeditious removal of
side-ladders, grab-irons and sTitching ladders and steps from
boxcars, a safety requirement scheduled for implementation by
April 1, 197L~. John D. .Ielsh.

CANADIAN R A I L
CP RAIL IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
had more than its usual share of difficulties resulting
from the h.eavy snow melt in the spring and early summer
of 1972. In mid-June, the Okanagan Subdivision from Sicamous to Ver­
non, British Columbia, was under 18 inches of water in places and
traffic was rerouted over Canadian National RailNays Oakanagan Sub­
division. On Tuesday, 13 June 1972, 75 feet of track was washed out
about 3 miles east of Albert Canyon on CP RAILs main line, in the
Illecillelaet River gorge, with the track left dangling over a hole
that varied in depth from 35 to 7~ feet. The roadbed was washed out
just after Train 91~11. had passed. Fortunately, trackmen patrolling
this section alerted the dispatcher so that another freight train
was stopped before it reached the wash-out.
Repair of the wash -out las begun immediately and service
was restored rapidly, expeditiously and completely on 16 June,three
days later.
Attempts were made to reroute westbound tonnage from Gol­
den via the Hindermere, Cranbrook, Nelson, Boundary, Carmi and Pr-
inceton Subdivisions -the southern British Columbia line of CP
RAIL -but without much success, as the right-of-vTay on the Winder­
mere Sub near Lake Hindermere (Invermere) was some inches under wa­
ter. Replacement ties, lying beside the track in this area, floated
off down the Columbia River in the direction of the tie yard at
Golden.
Railway enthusiasts travelling by the Canadian this
winter need not be alarmed if they see a stretch of catenary over­
head, west of Glacier, in the Tinter of 1972-73. It is said that CP
RAIL will install a short stretch of wire to determine the effect of
snowslides on overhead catenary. Editorial Staff.
LONGTIME ilESTCOAST RAILWAY ENTHUSIAST MR. TERRENCE FERGUSSON,
President of Pacific Tours Limited of Vancouver, B.
C., this year accomplished the impossible 1-Then op­
eration began on the Victoria Pacific RaihTay of vhich he is
also President and majority stockh.older. The operation of pas­
senger trains on the VPR, vThich began on 24 June 1972, repres­
ented the realization of a four-year battle to overcome gov­
ernmental, technical and financial obstacles, according to the
Toronto GLOBE AND MAIL.
The Victoria Pacific Railway uses that part of Can­
adian National Railways former Victoria-Sool .. e line, la::;t used
in 1965, betvmen two trestles presently in poor condition and
not train-Nor thy • Mr. Fergusson has leased 5 m.i.les of the old
line, but presently can use only 2.5 miles of it. As a conse­
quence, the passengers miss out on a spectacularly excellent
view of Portage Inlet, just north of Victoria.
Canadian National has leased the 5 miles of tracl .. age
to the Victoria Pacific for $ 7,500 a year, plus 30% of the
profits above $ 30,000 per annum. VPR is responsible for all
necessary track maintenance and must terminate operation should
CN decide to resume service itself. This lease arrangement, as
reported in the Toronto GLOBE AND }1AIL, contrasts rather sharply
CANADIAN R A I L
with other, less restrictive arrangements concluded by CN with
other enthusiast organizations in Canada.
Moreover, l.fr. Fergussons Victoria Pacific Railway has
been placed under the regulatory jurisdiction of the Canadian
Transport Commission and must adhere tp all of the operating re­
gulations established by that government body.
If operation of the project is successful, the opera­
ting base Till be moved from theVictoria area to the junction
of the Trans-Canada and Patricia Bay High>1aYs, a poj _1t passed
by an estimated 2 million tourists each summer.
Pa
ssenger service in the initial period of operation
,ms provid ed by ex-Comox Logging and Railroad Companys 2-8-2-
built in 1929 -and two 1932 CPR sommuter coaches, purchased in
Montreal.
The VPR operated trains IIdaily except Tuesdayll this
summer from its southern terminus at Millstream Junction in the
outskirts of Victoria. The fare was $ 1.50 per adult and 75i per
lIyoung person
ll

OUR HEA.l~TY CONGRATULATIONS AHE EXTENDED
to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania of the United States,
the Secretary of Transportation of the Commonwealth and
the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, on the occasion
of the ground-breaking ceremony for a new $ 1.8 million Pennsylvania
Railroad Museum at Strasburg, Pennsylvania, just across the high~ay
from the Strasburg Rail Road station.
Conceived in 196j, the plans and proposals for th~s Museum
Ilere
forwarded by Mr. Sylvester K. Stevens, ther:-Director of the
Pennsylvar:ia, Historical ar:d Museum Commission. At this time, ~1r.
Stevens visited the Canadian Railway Museum several times ar:d dis­
cusses the proposed Pennsylvania museum with Directors of the As­
sociatior:. Finally, a 15-acre tract of land was selected, just a­
cross the iligh,my from tlle Vie 1 1-kr.o:iT! Strasburg Rail Roael, Strasburg,
Pa.
The simiarity of ttle Per.nsylvania musum, as planned, to
the Canadian Railway Museum at St-Cor:stant, is striking. There will
be a rectan3ular four-track rolling stock exhibit building, adjacent
to an already-cxistir.g lOO-foot turntable, which can hold more than
25 railroad cars. The preserved cars and locomotives, some dating
back to before the War Between the States (1851-65), are in various
stages of renovation.
The
entrance or headquarters building will house the
library and will include an orientatior. room, offices ar.d lavatory
faCilities.
Recent ly J the Hoh lsen Constr uct ion Company of Lancas ter ,
Pa., was awarded a $ 1.47 million contract to erect the museum. The
overall cost of the new facility is estimated at $ 1. 80~ mi llion.
Lancaster, PaU.S.A. LANCASTER NEW ERA.
THE DELAHARE & HUDSON RAILROAD
has repatriated PA-ls Numbers 16 & 18 from the Greenbrier
Railroad and has also repatriated a ne<1 President -Mr.
Bruce Sterzing -who has a warm spot in his heart, so tis said
CANADIAN
350
R A I L
for these units. Ivith the Hashington-Montreal AMTRAK passenger ser-
vice :cunning via the PC-NH-B&H-CV) one wonders Hhat in the world
the PAs ,iill be doing on the D&H.
Ar:!other annoying situation for the D&H is Penn Centrals
move to abandon freight interchange with the D&H at Hilkesbarre)
whose rail facilities v,rere severely damaged by Hurricane Agnes.
Penn Central thereafter routed northbour.d He,,! England-Canada traf­
fic through IJilliamsport) Po.. to Newark) N.Y.) near Rochester ,N.Y.,
thus interch.anging with the D&H at ~Jjohalk Yard, nea:r Schenectady.
D&H thereby lost the haul from lVilkesbarre to Schenectady.
Sterzing said this large revenue loss VJould be enough to
nudge (push, shove) th.e D&H into bar.kruptcy. Not so said PC, since
the agreec. divisior. of revenue netted D&H as much as before, while
saving PC $ 1.5 million annually at Wilkesbarre.
In August 1972, D&H got a little more business. The roof
of Boston & Maines ancient Hoosac Tunnel (1877) caved in in one
short spot, forcing B&M to detour freights north and west t::) St.
Albans and Cantic, Quebec to Rouses Point) Ne,1 York and thence to
1I1echanicville Yard via the D&H. The roof laS repaired shortly and
service Has normal by mid-August. ~10hawk & Hudson THE CALL BOARD.
TRAFFIC ON CP RAIL lJEST OF CALGARY, ALBERTA
began to pick up in September) after a slump in August,due
primarily to tile protractec dockers strike at Vancouver ,
:Ihich ,as settled by government legislation. Grain and sulphur unit­
trains were the first to start rolling. S::>me ;Iestbound grain extras
Here filled out to 11,)00 tons at Chase, B.C., Hest of the heavy gl-
a
de up N::>tch Hill, ,,est of Revelstoke. S ,S .Horthen.
THE PHOTOGRAPH ON THE BACK COVER
of the September 1972 issue of our magazine (NO. 2L~8)
lias identified by Hr. Glenn Ivallis of Hantsport, Nova Sco­
tia. Mr. Iallis writes:
The location ::>f the photograph is on the bridge at La Salle, Que­
bec, which spand Route )7 or La Salle Boulevard. This bridge is
part of the r.orthern approach to CP RAILs Lachine Bridge over
the St. Lawrence River.
Thus, the ::>bvious answer to the question is that this is a CP
RAIL train, headed by a leased unit from the BAR. The Canadian
National boxcar has notlling whatever to do with it,
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILV!AYS CANCELLED THEIR ORDER
for hlenty SD40-2s (road Nos. 5241 through 5260) for un­
known reasons, vlri tes Pierre Patenaude, and instead order­
ed sixty-one GP38-2s) .vhich include the 16 units previously report­
ed on in CANADIAN RAIL Numbers 240 & 247.
The order number for these units ;las C-350, the raihlays
class is GR-20b and the serial and road r.umbers are:
A2673 through A2708 5500 through 5535
A2819 through A2843 5536 through 5560
These units are expected to be delivered by Diesel Divis­
ion, General Motors of Canada Lillll ted, London, Ontario) in October
and N::>vember, 1972,
t
EX-DELAWA…~ &: HUDSON NID-lEER 4097
Has prettied up for lease to the Pacific Great Eastern in
British Columbia. Alas, the inspector said Number 4097 ~1 a no_r:o ar:d so the unit still sits at Car:adian Nattor:als :wntreal
Yard, .;altir.g for something to happen. The photo was taken by ill.
Bar ry Blgeloli.
EDl·IONTON T::tANSrr -LATE IN JUNE, 1972 –
to110-red the lead of three ::>ther western Canadlar. cities
ar.d introduced ar. exact cash-fare system on all its :rou­
tes. NOli, Ilher. a passenger boards a bus in EdlOOr.ton, as well as 1r:
Calgary, Vancouver and Victoria, he must pay an exact cash-fare ~f
251 • Trar.sfers are still issued as before, but tickets no lor.gel
exist ar.d drivers roo l:H:.ger make char.ge. The reas:m for the lr:tro­
duct1or. of thgse practices lias the ir.creasing r.umber of robberies
aboard Edmor.tor. Trar.sit vehicles.
Surprisingly, the exact-fare system seems to have caused
few difficulties, as patrons quickly became accwnstoned t::> havir.g
the1~ exact fare ready_ For those without change, a dollar bill
nay be depos1te~ ir. the fare-box, a receipt for the 75i overpaymect
obtained fror.l the orivcr ar.d the refur.d collected at Cit;, !;all.
Glenn F. Garturigt:t.
FOR THOSE l/HO A.~ INTERESTED
ir. the whereabouts of ex-CPR bus1r::ess car HUI:lber s,it ,;as
spotted parked or. a s1d1r.g at the foot of Gar!al1 Street
or.e block north of Alexar::der ir. Var.couvero famous Gasto trict, at the en! of Jur.e, 1972.
Although located r.ot far from CP RAllos Var.cOuVer statior.,
all signs of former Canadiar. Pacific ownership have b(er. pair.te<
out, presumably because the car is r.ow 1r. the possessior:: of T01<1-:
Group Realty Co~any, which hopes to rent the car to ar. 1~gir.ative
shopkeeper. The Por Rent II sign, displayed promir.er.t1y on ~~e car,
suggested that it laS cons1dered as aT! ideal locatlor. for a ha1r_
stylir:g. toy, jewellery or similar establishment.
Gler:r.
F. Garhlrlc;,;lt.
~ A S[lJTH91lJIO CP RAIL FREIGHT, IIJITH AN INTER[5TlNG AND V!lRIED CQr;SIST.
I~ pa~~es the belancinQ yard et Fort Steele, B.C. en route to Colval11
and the Crows Nest dl~trlct. Ronald C. Hill t~ the picture on 08/14/7.
CANADIAN RAIL.
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A •• Co,a …. Mernoerehlp In01UC:l1ng 11, …….. or
-Can.chan :RaIl
VISIT THE
t:u .. ndiau Hllil>.-ay !U>i(UIU
OP:EN MAY SEPT.
e 00 annually
PRODOCTION P. J4,1rphy
VI8ITEZ LlI:
M~ FCITQ;ain: C,matl;n
QUVERT WAI· SEPT,
OIRJEOTOR or MBlMEllt:R.l9HIP SERVICES J.A .• JIlATTY

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