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Canadian Rail 246 1972

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Canadian Rail 246 1972

lQae lQ7B

Dncl UpOD
a
Coastar~
John E. Hoffmeister
Photos by the Author.
CP Rail Vancouver Island subsidiary,
the 196.5-mile Esquimault & Nanaimo
Railway, is very well-kr.o~m for a
variety of reasons to a variety of
people. To most persons resident on the
Province of British Columbias Vancouver
Island, this railway shuttles an endless
procession of freight cars back and forth,
up and down, over its seldom-level pro­
file.
For those whose interest is passenger trains –
either through necessity or inclir.ation -CP
RAIL operates over the E&N the only remain­
ing local passenger service in British Col­
umbia -Trains 1 & 2, currently (1971) com­
posed of RDC-2 DAYLINER Number 9199 -daily
except Sunday on the 140-mile Victoria Sub­
division between south-island Victoria and
northeast coast Courtenay. This run is re­
no~med for its scenery and has become a fa­
vourite jaunt for tourists and railfans,over
the years,
Curiously enough, perhaps the most remarkable feature of the
Esquimault & Nanaimo in 1971 is its motive pm.,rer, unique in Canada.
Driving along the Islands famous Island Highway, the well-main­
tained railway right-of-Hay plays hide-ar.d-seek 1;1ith the highway.
The casual observer would conclude that GP7s,M-636s or some equally
common kir.d of diesel-electric ur.it lJould be used, but a closer in­
spection will reveal ,-That the casual observer will surely miss!
~
A NOON-HOUR IN MAY,197o, AT DUNCAN, VANCOUVER ISLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA,
graces this months cover, with CP RAIL units Numbers 8001 and 8004,
waiting for switching orders for their Train 51. Compare No. 80049
face with the way it looked at Nanaimo in 1954 -seventeen yeers
before! Engineman: Bruce Palak
… A FABULOUS MoNSTER= the first Nitinat logger, headed by Numbers B005 and B012
on the crossing of the old Cowichan Leke road at Sahtlem,B.C.
shortly after the retainers hed been set on the 40 trailing cars-.
Engineman:
Cecil Darby.
CANADIAN
208
R A I L
Until 1948, the E&N Division, in common with most other rural
divisions of the Canadian Pacific Railvlay Company rostered typical
CPR small motive pOVier. In the latter years of steam -just prior
to dieselization -the ubiquitous D-IO class 4-6-0s patrolled the
Island system, wrking in all classes of service. Before their time,
ancient, squat D-4 class ten-wheelers of the 400-series held do~m
the numerous passenger runs, Ihile equally ancient Belpaire-firebox,
wooden-cabbed 3100 and 3200-series 2-(5-0s majestically handled the
freight services.
The majority of these truly-remarkable grass-cutters Iere scr­
apped sh.ortly before ilorld v.Jar II. One former E&N class D-IO steam
locomotive, Number 926, fortunately is preserved under cover at the
1-1useum of Science and Technology, OttaVla, villere -last summer -mem­
bers of the Ottavla Branch of our ASSOCiation have installed a brand­
neVi front buffer beam. A picture of this engine, taken at Nanaimo in
1947, appeared on page 199 of the September,1971 issue of CANADIAN
RAIL.
Back in 1947, the Mechanical Department of the Canadian Pacific
Raihtay lias very interested in the feasibility of total dieselization
on the E&N Division and a decision VJas taken to convert two subdivis­
ions entirely to this relatively new type of motive pONer, using the
diesel-electric road SVJi tcher. Selected for conversion Jere the Lyn­
donville Subdivision in southeastern Quebec (and the neighbouring
State of Vermont, U.S.A.) and the Esquimault & Nanaimo Division on
Vancouver Island ,British Columbia. Five ALeO (Schenectady) -GE 1,500
hp. units, Numbers 8400-8404 inclusive, were purchased for th.e east­
ern operation, while 13 BALDvlJJlr-HESTINGHOUSE 1,000 hp. units, Numbers
8000-8012 inclusive, were bought for the E&N in the :lest.
The BALDVIINS were the only units of their kind manufactured for
a Canadian raih~ay. They vlere of the Ds-4-4-10 model, which design
was even rarer in the United States. The 8000s ~ere built lith the
famous Delavergne diesel motor, similar in appearance and operation
to a marine diesel engine. The actual motor, generators, blower and
most
of the electrical circuitry are housed in the long hood, direct­
ly in front of the cab, with the radiator compartment fitted in the
nose.
A traction motor is geared to each axle of the four-wheeled Sy­
mington trucks. The short hood on the rear end of the units once
housed a steam generator on Numbers 8000-8004 for the period 1949 to
1956, vlhen they were in passenger service prior to the advent of the
Budd RDC DAYLlNERS. On units Numbers 8005-8012, the short hood now
houses the fuel tank, which rides between the trucks on the former
passenger units. This one difference is the only readily-visible str­
uctural distinction.
At the same time that the 8000s were acquired for use on the
Island, the class DS-IOg s1}litchers, Numbers 7065-7075 inclusive, also
BALDV1IN-HESTDWHOUSE products, 1:[ere acquired for use in the Vancouver
B.C .area. The only real difference between the tm designs is that
the 7000s are true switchers, lacking the short hood behind th.e cab,
From time to time, one to half-a-dozen of the 7000-series have been
transferred to Vancouver Island as auxiliary units to the 8000s. For
CANADIAN
209
R A I L
example, Number 7068 served from 19L~8 to 1958 as the regular yard
engine at Victoria, necessitated primarily by the industrial spurs
along Stole Street, vlhere the curves are too tigl1t for the longer
8000s to negotiate lIithout actually stripping their speedometer
cables. More recently, ALCO S-3, 660 hp. Number 6573 has been assign­
ed to tl1is service.
For rough.ly the first ten years of their service up and dovm
Vancouver Island, the BALDlnNs handled the average train of 10 to
15 cars lith very few problems. Gradually, an increase in the lumber
traffic resulted in longer log trains and increased export traffic
from on-line pulp and paper mills at Crofton and Port Alberni, for
example. Sometbing had to be done about the eXisting motive power
arrangements on the E&N!
Apart from getting rid of these units altogether, tl1e only other
alternative seemed to be multiple-unit operation. By the end of the
year 1965, all of the BALD1HNs had been M-U equipped, albeit with
GM-EHD jumper cables! Not only did M-U operation enable longer
trains to be hauled, but it actually reduced the number of runs, pr­
incipally out of Victoria at the southern end of the system. In case
you come looking for tl1em, 10 of the 13 units assigned to the E & N
can generally be found on the Island, tlitb 2 of the remaining three
:.fOrking ir. the lmler mainland B.C. area. The remaining unit is most
often at Ogden Shops in Calgary, undergoing heavy repairs. At the
time thiS article,vlas Hritter: in November, 1971, Number 8005 was at
Ogden Hi th a broken crankshaft.
NOIJadays, the BALDHINs are running in three colour schemes. Num­
bers 8001-8005, 8008, 8010-8011 are handsomely decked out in the new
CP RAIL colours, vIi tIl the multimark. Numbers 8000, 800-( and 8012
appear lith the Hide-band Canadian Pacific script, leaving Numbers
8006 and 8009 in the old narrovl-band Canadian Pacific colours. Un­
fortunately, the lettering on Number 8009 is completely faded out,
making tb.e 9 the least attractive in appearance, alth.ough the unit
has the best-souding tri-tone horn of the lot. Nwaber 8004 is pre­
sently altogether unusual, having been painted in all three Canadian
Pacific colour schen~s,in addition to the CP RAIL colours -from the
short-lived tuscan red and yellml of 19
L
fB to the current glarrour of
red and Ilhi te and l1ULTH1ARK. Number 8003 was the first BALDlUN
unit to sport the CP RAIL colour scheme, being redecorated just in
time to shml it off by participating in the retirement ceremonies
of MacMillan-Bloedel I s steam-povlered Nanaimo River Raihlay at Lady­
smith Diamond on December 1, 1969 (See CANADIAN RAIL,Number 228,Jan­
uary,1971) •
During the last 23 years, the BALDlTINs have run up an average of
600,000 miles in revenue service and today are shmTing signs of their
age. Ground relay and associated electrical equipment problems are
becoming increasingly more frequent.
Present operations on the E&N vary ITitll the day of the ,,,eek.
Yard sllitchers llorl~ at Port Alberni, Hellcox Yard on the Nanaimo wa­
terfront and Victoria at th.e south end. Most trains originate and
termir:ate at Hellcox Yard, the only exceptions being the Victoria-

CANADIAN
211
R A I L
based freight runs, Trains 51 & 53. Train 53 seldom runs except on
holidays Hhen Train 51 is annulled. Train 51 generally departs Vic­
torias Russells Yard midmorning daily except Saturday and returns
as Train 52 daily except Sunday from 1fellcox -from ~Ihich point it
usually leaves around midnight. These trains handle all normal work
bet,leen Victoria and Nanaimo, including the immense British Columbia
Forest Products pulp and paper mill, located at the far end of the
Crofton spur.
A maximum of four units may be multipledbecause of weight re­
strictions on bridges over the Niagara and Arbutus Canyons, along
the highly scenic Malahat section, above Saanich Inlet. Hellcox Yard
rosters both a day and a night road-s1-litcher most days of the week.
Usually only one of Trains 63 or 67 run from Hellcox to Port Alberni
daily except Sunday, ith Train 63 being the early-morning departure
and Train 67 a suppertime departure. These trains run over the Vic­
toria Subdivision north to Parksville, Mile 95.2, from vlhence they
take the 38.8-mile Port Alberni Subdivision, cresting the 1,215-foot
backbone of the Island at Arro,smith. These trains return as extras
east, so designated by the road number of the leading unit.
Because of the unusually heavy volume of traffic on the steeply­
graded Port (Port Alberni) Subdivision during the last two summers,
CP RAIL GP9s have been used on Trains 63 & 67. In the summer of 1971,
units Numbers 8643, 8649 and 8688 were working these trains. These
uni ts ,Iere rostered primarily because their dynamic -braking equipment
eliminated the necessity for setting the retainers on the cars for the
return journey. One or two log trains of roughly 40 cars each run
Ieelcdays on the Lake Covlichan Subdivision, hauling CrOim-Zellerbach
logs from the loader at Lake COHichan, east to the boom-grounds at
Ladysmith. Generally, two multipled BALDHINs -along tlith a 1-later
car and a caboose -depart .vellcox, picking up the empty string of
log flats from the storage tracll:.S at Ladysmith, at the beginning of
the run ImOim as the nitinat. On the return journey dOi/D the branch
retainers are set full on all the loads at Sahtlam, mile 9.2 on the
18-mile Covlichan Lake Subdivision. The trip from the Lake to the jun­
ction lith the Victoria Subdivision at Hayward takes a little under
an hour.
A cultural highlight of this trip is the hippie Commune located
on a farm adjacent to the right-of-way at mile 2.1 • This unusual
establisllment is knmm locally as Dogpatch, for obvious reasons.
Researching sociologists are not encouraged!
After setting out the logs at Ladysmith, the units return to Wel­
lcox, either to tie up for the night or to go out again t/ith a fresh
crew. On Wednesdays and Saturdays, the Mill Cre1-l·depart 1,Tellcox early
in the morning, with high cars for loading at the shingle mill at
~ THE AFTERMATH OF A SNOWSTORM IN THE qUIET WOODLANDS AT MUD BAY, VANCOU­
ver Island, December 1,1970. By degrees, 8 distant throb b~ome~ audi­
ble.and five-car Train 65, heatJed by unit No. 8003, crunches northward
to Courtenay. Engineman: RrJ.Scott.
j IN THE GOOD OLD SUMMERTIME OF 1954. SOUTHBOUND TRAIN 2 STOOD AT NANAIMO
l with unit No. 8004 on the head-end. Less than two years later, the an­
cient, comfortable, gas-lit coaches would be gone and No. 8004 would be
hauling freight, while RDC DAYLINERS took over the run.
Photo courtesy J. Cowie, Cowies Machine Shop,Nanaimo,V.I.,B.C.
Lake Covrichan for later delivery to the Western Forest Industries
private-haul industrial railway interchange at the Lake.
Western Forest Industries operate an 0-6-0 Cummins industrial
diesel over their 7-mile line, connecting their mill at Honeymoon Bay
with the E&N. Generally the Mill Crew runs about a dozen cars and
seldom requires the services of a second unit, unless -as sometimes
happens -there are a fel surplus logs to go down to Ladysmith.
Probably the most scenic rural run is the Courtenay Turn -Train
65 -1lhich is carded as a daily train, but seldom runs more frequently
than Tuesdays and Fridays. It originates ar.d terminates at Vlellcox and
runs to the end of the division at Courtenay. Especially scenic are
the 44 miles between Parksville and Courtenay, there the train passe s
through quaint fishing villages and resort communities, lith such
extraordinary names as Qualicum Beach, BmlSer, )ylud Bay, Fanny Bay,
Buckley Bay, Union Bay and Royston. Train 65 is strictly a local
freight, having very little lOrk to do except at Courtenay. Its
consist is mostly bulk chemicals for trans-shipment to highvlay trans­
port for Campbell River, Gold River and Port Hardy on the Islands
east and north coasts. Cattle feed, propane, gravel and general mer­
chandise are also carried. Southbound traffic from Courtenay is most-
ly empties, mineral concentrates from Hestern 111ines Limited and
CANADIAN
213
R A I L
poles. The Courtenay Turn comes south as ar. extra, so designated
by the diesel unit road r.umber.
It is r.ot possible to say hovr much longer these remarkable BALD­
~lIN ur.its Hill remain in service. The fact that most of them have
ur.dergor;e major overhaLJ.ls and repainting is a hopeful sigr. that they
Hill be in service for a fel more years. It is likely tilat -sooner
or later -the GP9s or some other diesel pOTtIer, made redundant on
tlle mainlar.d, T:Till find their day to Vancouver ISlar.d. To the Island
resj.dents Uvir.g along the E&N right-of-vlaY, the characteristic bur­
blir:g and faint drummir.g of ti,e BALD1HNs have become familiar sour.d s.
But i.n spite of the fact that their life-span may root be lor:g, in ti,e
mear:time, ur:der the guidar:ce of tbeir ger.ial, capable crews, the
8000s of Var:couver Island contir.ue to do their job very 1,Jell!
T
he Autcor, ir; a post-scriptum, sir:cerely hopes tllat ,·rhen some
of the BALDiH:r:r uni.ts are retired, one of them may fir:d Ec place of
honor able re tL,ement at tile Canadiar. Il.ai hJay Hl1se um, Saint -Constar.t,
Quebec, ihere so rnan~l Cltile:, notel.JOrtlly steam and diesel-electric
locorrlotives are preserved.
if AT 1158 HOURS ON A VERY WET JANUARY 8, 1971, EXTRA SOUTH 8008 WAITS
at Courtenay, B.C. with eight cars and CP RAIL caboose 436733. Then,
highball! Engineman: Harley Aeichelle.
~ THUNDERING THROUGH MALAHAT, V.I., B.C. ON A RAINY ST. VALENTINEIS DAY,
1971, units Nos. 8010 & 8009 head Train 51 with 14 cars.Note the 3rd.
car in the consist -the road carl Engineman: Gena Grogan.
THE BALDHIN-HESTINGHOUSE-CLC UNITS
OF THE
ESQUIMAULT AND NANAlltrO DIVISION
OF
CP RAIL.
Bui Ider: Baldvlin-Hestingbouse; Canad ian Locomoti ve Company,
Kingston, Ontario.
Builder IS Model:
Builder 1 S Date: December, 1948
Railway Class: DRS-lOa
Road
Tractive Unit BUT Paint scheme
number
effort weight serial Jan.
15z1272
8000 L~2, 000 Ibs. 239,000 Ibs. 73967
CP RAIL lIDLTlMARK
8001 L~2, 000 239,000 73968 CP HAIL MULTlMARK
8002 L~2, 000 239,000 73969
CP RAIL HULTIMARK
8003 l~2, 000 239,000 73970 CP RAIL MULTIMARK
8004 L~2, 000 239,000 73971
CP RAIL l-fULTIMARK
8005 l~2, 000 223,000 73972 CP RAIL tIDLTIMARK
8006 42,000 223,000 73973 Canadian Pacific Old 154
8007
L~2, 000 223,000 73974 Canadian Pacific Script
8008
8009 8010
8011
8012
Notes:
l~2, 000 223,000
73975
CP RAIL ]vfULTlMARK
L~2, 000 223,000 73976 Canadian Pacific Old 154
l~2, 000 223,000
73977
CP RAIL MULTlMARK
L~2, 000 223,000 73978 CP RAIL MULTH1ARK
42,000 223,000
73979 Canadian Pacific Script
These units ride on Symington B-B trucks •
Each unit is powered oy a Delavergne 1,000hp. 4-cycle,
6-cylinder, in-line, 606-cubic inch, turbocharged diesel
engine.
Units Numbers 8005 through 8012 were orlginally intended
to be numbered 8200 through 8207, but this fortunately
never came about.
N
DIESELS
EAST
SECOND SECTION
S
Photos -Pierre Patenaude .



• • •


• • • •





~ ONE OF THE CHESAPEAKE & OHIO UNITS -NO. 6183 -WHICH TOGETHER WITH
, 39 others are on lease to Canadian National Railways, is shown here
at Montreal Yard on 22 April, 1972.
PRIDE OF THE LINE, CANADIAN NATIONALS TRAIN 1, THE SUPER CONTINEN­
tal, leaves Dorval, Que. on May 9,1972 with FP9 No. 6540 and F9Bs
No. 6630 & 6616.
CNS TORONTO-HALIFAX FREIGHT TRAIN 306 at Dorval, Que. on May 9,1972,
with SD40s Numbers 5075 & 5036 on the point.
ONE OF CANADIAN NATIONALS UBIQUITOUS CONTAINER TRAINS, 207, ROLLS
through Dorval, Que. on May 9,1972. Pbwer was SD40s Numbers 5041 &
5031.
CANADIAN NATIONALS MLW-I M-636s NUMBERS 2312 AND 2303 ON FREIGHT B/313
at Dorval. Que., 29 April 1972. CN Operated fourty M-636s,No~. 2300-
2339.
CANADIAN NATIONAL FREIGHT 390, HEADED BY THRE~ GP9S, NUMBERS 4484-4488-
4490, rurr.bles off Victoria Bridge through St. Lambert Stat ion on 7 May,
1972.
.

I :rT X> I ..A.
S • S • Tor til er. •
SurelY one of the most handsome
panoramas of the many Wllic:o
particularly embellish the
eastern seacoast of the United
States is that to be obtair.ed
in the City of Portlar.d ir. the
State of f.iaine.
From the cool, shady heights around Observatory Hill or. a
sunny, summer day, the er.tire roadstead of Casco Bay extends as far
as the eye car. see, the island-studded waters beir.g bounded on the
north by Tukeys Bridge across Back Cove ar.d to the south by tlle
more moderr. South Portland Bridge across the Fore River.
Casco Bay was and is one of those splendid r.atural deep harbours
that could, as the saying goes, safely ar.d secUlely [,arbour the er.­
tire lIr.ited States Navy. It 1!aS very likely for this reasor. -but r.ot
in anticipation of the ever.t -tllat Charles I..evett of York, Er.glar.d,
built a :fort in 1623 on ar. islar.d ir. Casco Bay. FolloVlir.g the hos-
tilities of that period betueer. Englar.d ar.d Frar.ce, ths first Er.­
glish settlers -George Vleeves ar.d Ricllard Tucker -arrived or. t~)is
penir.sula, !mowr. ir. 1632 as Casco Neck and today the site of tile City
of Portlar.d.
Casco Neck VIaS renamed Falmouth ir. 1658 ar.d, fol101lir.g a ra.id
and cor.currer.t massacre by the local Indiar.s in 1676, a fort named
Loyal 1!aS built ir. 1680 r.ear the foot of pleser.t-clay Portlar.d s Ir.dia
Street.
Fort Loyal was soor. to justify its constructior., for it shelter­
ed the citlzer.s during the Fler.ch ar.d Indian 10.1 of 1689-90. In Hay,
1690, a force of several hundred Frer.ch ar.d Ir.dians attacl(ed Fal-
mouth and besieged Fort Loyal. Captair. Sylvar.Ls Davis, the dougllty
comrilander of the fort, las forced to sur.rer.der after trle fort had
beer. mined ar.d threatened by fire. The Captair. ar.d a fell mer.-at-arms
vlere taker. captive to Quebec. The civilians Here summarily massacred
by the Ir.dj_ans, vlho took th.e scalps of their victims for Jar-trophies
and the anticipated bounty-mor.ey. The village of Falmouth was utterly
destroyed.
The ruins of Falmouth gradually became part of tile r.atural lar.d­
scape, but ir. 1692, Sir HilHam Pilipps anchored his ship ir. Casco Bay
and a shore-party buried the relll8.ir.s of the victims. Finally, ir. 1699
a peace treaty was concluded uith the Ir.dians.
By 1775 and the dawr. of tile struggle for independer.ce i)y tIle
Er.glish colonies in easterr. North America, a ne.! tovm had ariser. or.
the ruins of the old. Falmouth das agair. of sufficient importance to
be selected for bombardment by the Er.glish fleet from Nova Scotia.
The damage ViaS rapidly repaired and the town IJaS subsequently leir.­
corporated in 1736 as the Tovm of Portland, receiving its charter as
CANADIAN
222
R A I L
a city in 1832. From 1820 to 1832, it was the Capital of the
of 111aine.
State
The year 1866 TaS remarkable in the City of Portland. Perhaps
as a result of the general public rejoicing at the end of tile Har
Between the States, the Independence Day celebrations on July 4 llere
so vigorous and so universal that the city HaS set on fire and many
of its principal buildings were burned to the ground. It is for this
reason that many of the older buildings in Portland today date from
that period.
It is nOvl time to consider the further development of the City
of Portland, Iith respect to the Grand Trunk Raihlay Company.
The first truly interna.tional railway in North America VIas the
St. Lawrence and Atlantic-Atlantic and St. Lawrence Railroad Company.
The
tHO parts to its corporate title were interchangeable and the
one taking precedence depended on whether the speaker las from Maine
or from Canada.
In any event, the Atlantic & St. La …. lrence RaiJIoad Company 1as
chartered in the State of Baine in 1845 and the first train arrived
in Portland on March 10, 1851, from a point intermediate bettleen
Portland and Island Pond, Vermont, about IG miles south of the Inter­
national Boundary.
According to a footnote ir. the February, 1937 issue of tile
Canadian National Raihlays Magazine, Fort Loyal -or its remains –
is said to have been demolished for the erection of the first
Grand Trunk Raihray station in 1848, the year the line was opened to
North Yarmouth, across Back Bay. This station VIas at the foot of
India Street.
The City of Portland das soon to be bound inextricably to the
fortunes and misfortunes of the City of Montreal, the northern ter-·
minus of the siamese-twin raihray. The first train crossed the In­
ternational Boundary between the Province of Canada and the State of
r1laine on July 18,1853. The Grand Trunk Raihlay Company of Canada, in­
corporated for the specific purpose of building a trunk line of
railway from the Atlantic seaboard to the GreaJc Lakes, lost no time
in leaSing the Atlantic & St. Lalrence-St. Lawrence & Atlantic, con­
cluding the lease on July 1,185) for the usual term of 999 years.
The foot of India Street on the southeast side of Portland IS
lovely peninsula 1;-laS the centre of activity for the Grand Trunk.
Its passenger station las t11ere erected, facing the roundhouse 1:hich
had been removed from its original vlaterfront location. \111ile a pas­
senger station may have been built in the first years by the Atlantic
& St. Lalrence adjacent to the docks, there is no record of its con­
struction or demolition.
In 1901, the Grand Trunk Railway COr.1pany commer.ced construction
of the India Street Station, :Ihich llas to be a landmark for travel­
lers for nearly 60 years. The stati.or. vras opened to passengers on
November 2,190). It vras erected at or near th.e site of Fort Loyal ar.d
according to Canadian National Railways lvlagazine of February, 1937,
the Sir lilliam Phipps Chapter of the Daughters of American Colon-
I
I ~
I

CANADIAN
225
R A I L
ists of Haine dedicated a tablet fixed to the station wall early in
1937, to commemorate the history of Fort Loyal, 1Ilhi.ch stood on the
site of tile statiO), grounds
ll

Hith its tall, classic tower, this handsome station vIas a wel­
come and familiar sight to thousands of travellers -many of them
vacationing Canadians -arriving i_!1 the City of Portland. In the
period before 1lorld l1ar I, hLU1dreds of Grand Trunk employees from the
POinte-St-Charles Shops boarded three or more special holiday trains
in the raihlay yards adjacent to the shops, for the fast overnight
journey to the Maine coast resorts south of Portland. Their return
a fortnigll.t later at tile end of their annual vacation caused a fur­
ther multiplication of problems for the Operating Department.
The summertime traffic to the resorts on the Maine coast was not
er:tirely cor:fined to Company employees. The Grand TrLU1k enjoyed a
very healtlJy tourist traffiC, bringing vacationers east from pOints
as distant as Chicago, Durand and Grand Rapids at very attractive
rates.
In tlle I!ir:ter, the advar:tages of Portlands ice -free harbour
,;ere exploited to the full. For roost of the year, irlll1ugrants arrivir:g
by ship from Europe were talten to Montreal, T010r:to, CJlicago and the
nud,lest by train after train.
Although trade tllrough this remarkable eastcoast port declined
after /orld Har I -as indeed it did in most eastcoast ports -the
Grand Trur:ks international raihray VIas to achieve even greater im­
portance during 1-1orld ~Iar II, when Portland became a most desirable
llarbour and trans-shipment point.
But lith the advent of the motor car, the h1gl1way bus and the
aeroplane, passenger train traffic betv/een Mor:treal and Portland be­
gan its sl01;l dec11ne. Hi th the natural beauty of the Hhi te Mountains
of New Hampshire midI-lay in the journey from the St. Lawrence River
to the Maine coast, travel by private automobile became the prefer­
red mode.
And so, in 1962 -fifty-nine years after the first passenger had
Talked along the brick platform to the station concourse -passenger
service on the Grand TrLU1k Raihlay into Portland VIas terminated. And
tr.e station at the foot of India Street no longer vlelcomed the travel­
ler.
Empty it VIas, except for certain Company offices. To all intents
ar.d purposes, it VTaS unused. But the City of Portland continued to
levy municipal taxes on the property at an apparently ever-increasing
rate. Before long, Grand TrLU1k cost accountants became acutely av.,rare
of these increasing charges and one day at the end of lI1arch, 1964 ,a
hurried decision was taken to demolish the India Street station be­
fore it cOlJ.ld be reassessed for tax purposes on April l.
And that was just vlhat happened 1
;nl.en the tax assessor arrived on April 1,1964, there was nothing
left of the station at the foot of India Street but a pile of rubble.
The pen-and-ink sketches of the Grand TrLU1k Railways India St­
reet Station,Portland,l1atne,U.S.A., ,Ihich accompany this article -and
CANADIAN
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llhich II/ere in fact the primary stimulus for the article -were ex­
ecuted by Mr. Donald C. Pattersor. and illustrate tile stations ap­
pearance from India Street ar.d from the platform side (rear), after
the imposing tower had been demolished.
These sketches are reproduced. through the lund permissior. of Mr.
Patterson and The 470 Railroad Club of Portland, llaine.
The Author is very much indebted to Mr. J-G. Cote, Research An­
alyst,Headquarters Library,Canadian National RailVlays,Hontreal, Que­
bec, for information basic to the articles composition.
Wllll1L8
Editorial Staff CANADIAN RAIL
MR. RAYMOND J. HARROD SENT THE SUGGESTION OF THE YEAR -SO FAR -TO
the Editor of the Chicago Tribune recently. Commenting on AMTRAKs
cancellation of passenger train service over the Buffalo-Cleveland­
Toledo-South Bend-Chicago ex-Penn Central ex-New York Central Road
of the Centurys ,Mr. Harrod suggested that a self-propelled vehicle
was the answer to the low average patronage, normal for passenger
trains on this run. He also expressed the opinion that instead of
winning passenger bUSiness for the railroads of the U.S., AMTRAKs
managers seemed to be making a real effort to lose money by com­
peting with the airlines for a very limited (about 12%) percentage
of the market, while making little or no effort to carve off a slice
of the automobile-bus segment, amounting to about 86%.
Most observers of the railway scene in both the United States and
Canada
will reply that this observation is not a new one.This is
quite true. But the observation has never yet been logically rebut-
ted,even by the pre-AMTRAK railroad managements. S.S.Worthen.
CP RAIL NEWS -THE NEW TABLOID-TYPE COMMUNICATIONS ME­
dium published by CP RAIL under the guidance of Supervis­
ing Editor Ron Grant -announced in a recent issue that
Burlington-Northern had failed in its ongoing attempt to
secure a portion of the coal traffic from the Kootenay­
Crows Nest region of British Columbia to the superport at Roberts Bank. For more than tvw years, BIN
has been promoting permission to construct -or rather
reconstruct – a railway to be called the Kootenay and Elk
from the International Boundary to (probably) Morrisey,B.
C.,on the abandoned roadbed of the one-time Crows Nest
Southern Raihtay. Trackage rights from CP RAIL would have
enabled BIN trains to reach Sparwood,Fernie and perhaps
the upper reaches of Elk Creek. BIN planned to route coal
unit-trains south over this line to a connection at the
International Boundary with a BIN branch at Gateway,Mon­
tana and the main line at Great Falls,Mont. The trains
would run west and cut back north into Canada at Surnas,
B.C.,proceeding thence to Roberts Bank superport.
The Canadian Transport Commission denied the B/Ns ap-
CANADIAN
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R A I L
plication on the grounds that the Railway Act prohibits
the connection of a common carrier -such as the BIN
with annindustrial,railway -such as the Kootenay & Elk.
The CTC also questioned the right of the BIN to cross
the International Boundary and operate in Canada without
(federal) statutory authority -the K&E being incorpor­
ated only in the Province of British Columbia.
Needless to state, the BIN and K&E appealed this decision
to the Supreme Court of Canada.
OTTAHA MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGYS
ex-STELCO 0-6-0 steam locomotive Number 40, which last year per­
formed so nobly at the Museum, was referred to Canadian National
Railways Point St. Charles Shops (Montreal) for a very thorough
inspection which hopefully would have paved the way for repairs
to the boiler and firebox, enabling extended operation in 1972.
Hmlever, the inspection revealed that the firebox and crown sh­
eet were irreperable and subsequently, Number 40 was returned
to Ottaltla for exhibition as a static display.
SUNDAY EXCURSIONS OVER CP RAIL TRACKAGE
from Otta~a to ~{akefield shortly thereafter raised the hopes of
the railway enthusiasts in and around Otta~a. Mr. Douglas FUl­
lerton, Chairman of the National Capital Commission -which is
a power
to be reckoned with in our Nations Capital City -made
minor headlines in most of CanadaS Canadian Press newspapers,
when on April 11 he announced that steam-hauled Sunday excur­
sions via CP RAIL up the Gatineau Valley were imminent. This
trip has long been a favourite of Ottawa area railway enthus­
iasts and berry-pickers alike.
At a meeting held as early as April 6 -which Mr. Fullerton did
not attend -NCC spokesmen said Dr. David Baird of the Museum
of Science and Technology at Ottawa would supply the essential
moti ve power from among the locomotives displayed at the Museum.
However,
Dr. Baird declined this privilege, but this in no. way
deterred l~. Fullerton, who held his press conference just the
same. According to 11r. Fullerton, there will be leisurely ex­
cursions up to vakefield and back, on sunny, summer afternoons,
this year. Only the details remain to be arranged .CP RAIL of-
fiCials, vrhen they recovered from their surprise, said that
it was a little more complex than that!
EX-CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILHAY ROYAL HUDSON
4-6-4 Number 2839, longtime tenant of CP RAILs John Street,
Toronto, roundhouse, recently left for the Niagara Falls gate­
vlay en route to the Atlantic Central Steam Company of Allen­
tovm,Pennsylvania. CP RAIL are much relieved for a variety of
reasons, the most important of V1hich is that it reduces the
steam locomotive population at John Street by one and secondar­
ily that there is now no possibility that this engine will be
a candidate for operation or~ CP RAIL lines, a proposal that has
beer. frequently stated as fact in one of the [ell-known monthly
railroad enthusiast publications. S.S.Worthen.
CA NADIAN
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FROM CORNTJALL, ONCE THE HOME OF
The Cornwall Street Railway, I1r. E.H .Heattl Jrites that the lo­
comotives and cars of tIle CSR are being disposed of rapidly.
Locomotive Number lL~ Has loaded on a flat car at the end of May
for shipment to the Illinois RailHay Museum, Union, Illinois.
Snolplo~1 Number 8 was purchased by the Branford Electric Rail­
.lay of East Haven, Connecticut, ·[hile Sweeper Number 10 has
been acquired by the Seashore Trolley Museum of Kennebunkport,
Maine. As previously reported, streetcar Number 17 and Line-car
Number 4 will be preserved at Cornwall, near the Ontario Hydro
Power Dam. Locomotive Number 16, Slleeper Number 1 and TOHer-car
Number 5 have been donated by Canadian National Railways to
the Museum of SCience and Technology,Ottawa. ltlaiting dispos­
ition at Cornwall are locomotives Numbers 6, 7, 11 and 15.
ONTARIOS MINISTER
OF TRANSPORTATION
and Cooonunications, Mr. Gordon Carton, announced recently that
GO TRANSIT, Ontarios conunuter rail service, llad ordered thirty
conunuter coaches from Ha,lker Siddeley Canada Limited. TIle cost
will be a cool $ 6 million and the cars llill be built at I-lSs
car division at Thunder Bay, Ontario. Mr. Ca.rton made the voters
of Thl,mder Bay happy by pointing out that the order would mean
continuing work for 225 citizens through a slack period which
could have resulted in a shut-down and lay-off at the HS plant.
T,venty of the ne1 cars will be used for a new GO TRANSIT ser­
vice running northwest from Toronto via CN to Malton,Bramalea,
Brampton and Georgeto>Yl, scheduled for operation by mid-1973 .
The other 10 Iill be integrated into the present Pickering-Oak­
ville GO operation. Mr. Carton eschev.led gallery cars or a sim­
ilar deSign, sayi.ng that cost studies had Sh01Jn such a design to
be too expensive. Too expensive? It didnt take a cost study to
reach that conclusion! S.S.Worthen.
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILiJAYS ORDER FOR
twenty SD40s from Diesel Division, General Motors of Canada, road
numbers 52L!·1-5260, has been deferred to November, 1972. These
units are six-motor jobs and Hill ride on DD-GfilCs High Adhesion
trucks.
~ CORNWALL STREET RAILWAV,LIGHT & POWERS Motor Number 12 and double­
truck snowplow en route to the Branford Electric Railways museum
at East Haven, Conn •• photographed at Mohawk Varcf, Schenectady, N. V.
on July 4,1972 by Jim ShaughnesfrY.
~
The sixteen GP38s recently acquired were assigned to Toronto,with
road numbers 5500-5515. They have four D-87 traction motors, ex-
erting Lf8,000 Ibs. tractive effort. They do not have dynamic
brakes. Pierre Patenaude.
A QUESTION HAS BEEN RAISED •••.••…..•..•
regarding the accuracy of some of the news items which appeared
in the Waybills section of the June, 1972 issue, Number 245, of
CANADIAN RAIL. The year 1971 in the first paragraph should be 1972.
This is a typing error and happens occasionally even in the best pr­
oofed copy.
Of more importance are the statements made regarding the results
of lateral-force tests conducted by Canadian National Railways,early
in 1972. A spokesman for Canadian National has reminded the Editor of
CANADIAN RAIL that 6-axle diesel-electric units do produce greater
lateral forces on rail than do 4-axle units and several technical pa­
pers to this effect have been published in engineering journals.Fur­
ther, it is not correct to say that the DOFASCO truck, used on MLW
Industries units, produces a greater lateral force on the rail than
does the truck used by Diesel Division, General Motors of Canada, on
their SD40s.
The
restriction of 6-axle units from the Garneau-Chicoutimi ser­
vice of CN preceded the lateral-force tests referred to, and, in fact,
special permission had to be obtained to operate the 6-axle units on
this subdivision to conduct the tests.
It is also quite wrong to say that the DOFASCO Hi-Ad truck is
in any way inferior or suspect, based on the results of these tests.
CA NADIAN
230
R A I L
Contributors to Waybills are urged to check their information
before submitting it, The Editor of CANADIAN RAIL will, in future,
require verification of information, submitted as factual, before
publication,
TORONTO TRANSIT COMMISSION CHAIRMAN
and Honorary Vice-President of the C,R,H,A Mr, Ralph Day,
announced recently that the 1967 decision to terminate street­
car service in Toronto by 1980 had been recinded, New cars will
be purchased to maintain the roster of 394 streetcars presently
in service, Toronto motorists, today the most disenchanted seg­
ment of Toronto travellers and once the most vocal in the battle
to scrap the streetcars, have lost much face vTith the Toronto
public and are also notorious contributors to pollution and tra­
ffic congestion, A total re-evaluation of urban transportation
in and around Toronto will doubtlessly be necessary, S.S,Worthen,
SOUTHERN PACIFIC TRANSPORTATION COMPANY
of sunny California recently took the cal can be drawn from a quick estimate of mileages involved, It
appears that this railroad has rumbled off vTith the record for
long distance unit-train operation. On April 11, 1972, the
first of a series of unit-trains of rolled steel coils left
Kaiser Steel Corporations Fontana,California plant for the
Chicago area, the steel coils destined for reproceSSing there
for reshipment to General Motors automobile manufacturing pl­
ants throughout the eastern United States, The first train car­
ried 5,000 tons of coils in 50 special 100-ton capacity cars
and represented the first shipment of an estimated :;iOO,OOO-ton
per annum order.
1#0 unit-trains are used, operating eastward from Fontana every
six days. Southern Pacific has ordered 125 of the totally new
coil freight cars from Thrall Freight Car at Chicago, The last
of these special cars were delivered in late April. They can
handle steel rolls ranging in size from 34 to 86 inches, nested
in an open cradle mounted on a flat car. The cars are engineer­
ed to handle any combination of steel coils within the 100-ton
weight capacity. In current shipments, coils range from 6.5
tons to 15 tons each, so a single car can handle a maximum of
7 of the heaviest coils, The coils are loaded by a gantry cra­
ne adjacent to Kaisers rolling mill. A unit-train can be
loaded in 24 hours, Trains move by Southern Pacific from Fon­
tana to Tucwncari,NeVT Mexico and thence via Hock Island and
Milwaukee lines to destination. Each train makes a round trip
in 12 days.
THE ROBERVAL AND SAGUENAY RAIU1AY COl4PANY
and the Alma and Jonquieres Railway Company have applied to the
National Assembly of Quebec ror the adoption of an act to amal­
gamate the two companies. New entity will be the Transportation
Division of ALCAN and the new M_L~20TRs from ML11 Industries were
so lettered VThen they left for Arvida.
r
CANADIAN R A I L
PRAIRIE DOG CENTRAL S NUMBER 3
has a few new accessories for the 1972 seasor.. Or. l~y 1), 1972,
Number 3 left Car.adlar. National RailwaY2
1
Trer.scona Shops with
a square, oil-type headlight and a diamr.d stacK, ublch f1 t­
meets are said to be reminiscent of her original cor.dltlon,so~
90 years ago. On loiay 28, Prair-ie Dog Cer:tral 110St€d the Thou­
sand Lakes Region Rally of the national Model Railroad Assocla­
tior:. Several special trains /111 be operated for the Boy Scouts
of Canada. Prairie Dog Centlal has also acquired a 1912 caboose
from CP RAIL and ~dll restore it thts sUQmer. The complete opera­
ting schedule tor 1972 haa not beer. received, The photo 1s here
reproduced through the k1ndr.ess of Mr. Jack. Ablett ot the Hlr.­
nlpeg FREE PRESS.
CORNWALL STREET RAIL~AY.LIGHT & POkER COMPANV
electric a~aper Number 106, ex-Hull Electric
Railway, Hull, Qu~. -just purchasedJ
Octeber 19,1947 CHRA E.A.Teohey Collection.
CANADIAN R.AIL
pubHehed by t.h.e
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